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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 001. 1978-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-07). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/541

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978 - File 001, 1978-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/566/show/541.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 9, July 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date July 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript auslin a austin fills the streets! vol. 2, no. 9 _2_ __ ---8ay auslin STAFF EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS Steve Akin Stan Bear Kelly K:iy Enrique Lopez Art Morris Arnie Fleischmann Billy Frazier R.H. D~vid Morr is Harvey Neville Will van Overbeek Amme Hogan Alan Pogue ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Art Morris THE COVER finds Gay Austinites filling the streets in celebration of Jay Freedom Week . The Gay Pride March began ~t n~on , June 24 and proceeded no!"th up Congress Aven1e and around the Gover nor ' s Mansion to Wooldridge Park for a r ally . Photo by Harvey Neville: stor y and more photos on page 12. NEWSBRIEFS are taken in part from The Advo­cat e , Gay Community News (Bost on) and The Body Poli tic (canada) . TEE O?INIO~'S exoressed herein are those of the writer or editor, and not necessarily those of Gay Community Services nor tne advertisers. GAY AUSTIN is published by Gay Community Services of the University Y, 23)0 Guadalupe, Austin, Tx . , 78?05. The coordinetors of Gay Corr.munity Services ares Art ?.iorris Troy Stokes Ste\'e '.:'horr-as (vacant) 3ruce> Alekcander Kelly K::iy General Coordinator Fin~ncP Coordinator Office Coordin~tor (and peer ccunselir.~) Sneakers Bureau :oordin?.tor ~edia ~oordinator Publicqtior:s '.::ooruin~tcr ,·,~ I GAY AUSTIN is the monthly publication of s~y Community Services. Tr.e advertiserr.ents signi ­fy that the following businesses.suoport th~ work of the organiMtior.. Patron11.e tr.~SP <>s ­tablishments and , above all.Pls ... , . 1:t the people know that you appreciate tne1r equ~l , open- hearted support . ADULT BOOKSTORES All American News Stallion Bookstore BARS Austin Country New Apartmer.t Private Cellar BAT~S Club Austin BODY Ai'/AREHESS 2532 '.;uad::i:upP. ?06 East r:tn 705 R~d River 2132: ~ ! " ::r::or1d~ 7{)G ::2.st i:,tl. Joo 1.est :6!h 4?3-0?22 1..77_r,1LJ.8 472-0418 '..7°-0224 4?"-'))i:I? Safari Growth Studio 20044 Gua~a:uDe ~"2-~q2c COI~~ SHOP Cat:ital Cob Como<.iny J01~ 'Ju-:t':!a:...1p .. 4";-:r .... ~ HAIR CUT~ERS Comb Free LA'NYERS Legal c:inic FAINT.::RS Dave ' s P:ti~ti::g PHYSICAL F:TNESS Seyf orth Labor~ t o~iPs, Inc . R:!:S~AURAr>TS Tr.e 01 j :; ... ~an Stre~ t :3.fe 501 .. <?nt !2th P . 0, 2ox ! ()l.12? San An~o:--.i n ?8210 ;i4 E~st 6th ( 5 ~ 2' 5"2-~7?q Dead1in" ::c:- s•..1bmissions to GA': ;,US'!'i"\ • :.· A ... ;,, . .;-1; issu~ i~ J~:y l~th . Co~t:-ibu~i n~ chcu 1 ~ ~e mai!e~ ~r de:ivercd :o th. ~ay :om~vr.i:y S@r­vicP: o~fi~es at : ?J)n Gu~·~·u~et #7 Aust~n. Texas 78705 L~tters should also be sent to this address. Upfront Ginny Apuaao • hould be proud of gay Texan• . When the openly gay c andi date for Nev York's Stat e Ass embly dellvered the keynote address a t Texas Cay Conference V last month In Dallas, she s ald tha t the gay movement today reminds her of the French during WWI. Aa Apuzzo e~pl a ined, the Fr ench we1 e totally con­vlnced tha t they wrlUld defeat the Germans s imply bece uc:e French soldiers were overflowing wlth "elan". "Etan" ha 11 no Engllah cognate, but it can be tran1- l a ted roughly as " ardent courage''• Anywa y, tha French ma rched off to the battlefield a rmed with heavy shi eld1 of " a rdent courage". The Cer .. n1 took machine guns, We know what happened t • the French in WWI. We al10 know wha t happened in Miami . St . Pa ul , Wichita and ~ugene. To Apuzzo , every nev gay rights referendum is another blast of the homophobic machine gun . She sees that the gay movement rises courageously --bri .. ing to the soul with elan--trying to ahield itself frOll every bla1t, only to fall in defeat. She worries that each time we rally in desperation that we do so st the expense of forming ALTERNATIVE STRATEGI ES . Apuzzo says i t '• time that we start channeling our photo by Will van Overbeek What does Anita have to sing about? See page 14. JULY 1978 GAY AUSTIN 3 anergia• i nto nev anlpoa itive directions , She should be pr oud of gay Texans becau•e here in Tex• • we a re beginning to do just that. Read on page 7 about t he Texa• Cay Task Forc e ' a pl an for the up• coming legi•l a tive 1es1ion (mor e det ai l• on TCTF' a •trategy next 1110nth~ See pages 18·19 for more neva of Texas Cay Conference V in which gay Texan• from al l acro•s the sta t e came together to learn from and i nspire one another. It ls just tha t •ort of tightly knit organi zation be i ng developed by 'fCTF which 111 one of the keys to the alternative stra t egies advocated by Apuz70. Houston ce l ebr a t ed Gay FreedOCll Week ~n grand • tyle with ToV1'\ Meeting I (•ee page 7). Other Texas cities t ake note: Here in Auatin v e had the bigge•t Cay Pride Week ever -- with eve rything froa a Gay Pride March and Rally to poetry readings and a daace. Host of the f e•tivitiea were arranged by the Austin Coalition for Hu.an Right•, the new and very active group whicb gave us tbe l reak­f ast Festival for Huaan iighta in Hay (•ee inside for photos and stories from both events). Cay Texan• have really t aken the initiative in the l ast two months, Let's keep going strong. ··Kelly lay contents VIEWPOINT Gay political strategy at the crossroads by Arnie Fleischmann ................. ............. 4 Courting human rights by Art rt.orris ......................................... 5 Corning out at TGC v by R • H ..................................................... 6 NEWS State briefs ................................................. ? National briefs ......................................... .... 8 International bricfs ................................... 21 Calendar 24 FEATURE ARTICLES Gay a~d ProJd: Julio Coreno , ~ farmworker by David Morris with Enrique Loper.. ...... 1 O Gay Pride Weeks gay austin in celebration by Art Morris ........................................ 12 Bac~s tage with Anita by Harvey Neville .... ............................. 14 Breakfast Festival for Human Rights photos by Alan Pogue .............. .... .. ......... 16 TGC V by Kelly Kay ............................ ............. 18 Play ballt gay athletic clubs form across the state by Billy Fraz.ier ................................... 2) 4 GAX AUSTIN JULY 1978 viewgoint Goy political strategy at the crossroads l y AUii PLllSCllHAD Anita Bryant'~ vi•it to Austin is behind us. So are the party pri•aries and the county conventiona 1 aa vell a1 a aeries of referenda accross the country. The11 events suggest several courses vhlch the gay rights imov .. ent might follow in Texas and Travis Co•nty. In a a1n1e. ve have reached a fork in the road and nave tvo strategies to chose from , The first would have u1 play &)'llbolic politics, a sure vay to raise iaaues and consciousness. Tne other adopts a imore lov-key atratagy. What can be said for each? Tbo1e vho pr090te a)'llbolic politics favor auch actions a1 attempting to repeal the state's sodo•y law1. Re­pealing 1ection 21.06 vould undoubtedly be a great moral and 1ymbolic victory. Those vho favor thia 1t4'ategy, bovever, 1hould be prepared to demonstrate that attempting to repeal these lavs during the next Legislature will actually yield positive result• than The situation is a011evhat like .. rijuana lava. If few people are convicted for violating them, will trying to repeal them bring the self •righteous out of their closets? Will these people p~esaure for enforcment of lavs which are currently ignored? W1ll theypressure for even more restrictive legisla• tion like that advocated by the Travis County Rep­ublican c~nventlon's resolution on hiring gay teach­ers ? These are question• which the proponents of aymbolic politics mu~t grapple w1th before embark­ln& on their campa tgn, Many would c all the second strategy accomodat1on1st. Its supporters would like to avoid symbolic issues and concentrate in1tead on building alliance• with office holders, bureaucrats, and interest groups. Thi1 1trategy von't make the evening nev•casta and .. y prove incapable of maintaining the support of tho1e vho c an't be full-time gay activi•ta, Tho1e who favor thia approach villhave to respond to thoae who charge that they are taking a go-slov, conser­vative atanc1 that compromises gay rights. Which shall it be? Personally, I tend to favor the aecond strategy for aeveral reasons. First of all, ve cannot count on the Supreme Court to overturn the atat• aodotmy lava. A series of cases from Texas, Virginia, and North Carolina all 1ugge1t thia. We .. y be able to count on the court to guarantee the rlght1 of free speech ind aaaociation guaronteed by the Fir1t A .. end.ent, But that leaves the question• nf individual rights to be decided through the legi­sl ative proceaa . Second , ve can't win the 1ywbolic i1sues yet. Ask• lng the Legi1lature to repeal the aodo•y lav1 next 1e11ion is like asking the Railroad Coe1111i11ion to favor consumers instead of oil and gas producers. Why won't they do it? Because few. if any, legiala­tora have anything to gain by supporting repeal. Politicians avoid risk, and our t a skl.& to convince tbem not only tha t gay people are not a riak, but alao we may be an important political aaaat to them. Whit gay Tex1n1 need to do la cultivate friends in a Legisl ature which appears as if it vi l l be more progressive than the l ast. Having cultivaled such friends. ve need to get them in a position where they rely on us for campaign workers. cont1ibulions, and votes. Onlv then will we be able to counl on them when the golag gets tough. Such a strategy seems reasonable in light of what l\ippened in the U. s. House of representatives when 1 was working there Last year. When an oral vote on a gay rights question was called, we, von. When a roll call vas called for on the same question, we lost We must give politicians something to stick their necks out for Opposing our enemies will not gain political victor­ies. It's simply not enough to oppose Mayor McClellan for her conduct in last year's fight over a fair housing ordinance for Austin. Our task de• mands more than confronting del~s•tes to the Travis County Democratic Convention with resolutions on gay rights. While such efforts are a necessary part of an overall strategy, they should get sec­ond bill1ng to coalition building and public ed­ucation efforts. We must influence the recruitment, funding and campaignin~ of candidates. Among the activities we might protDOte are forums at vhlch candidates or thelr representatives can speak wlth gav voters Endorsements and accompanying press relea~es are valuable ln building alllances . So is the moni toring of votes and statemen t s by loc­al office holders. Congresspeople and their staffs continJed on ~•~e 6 JULY 1978 GAY A UST...,I. ,,N_ _S. ... Courting human rights By ART P«>RIUS the gay men and lesbians of Eugene, Oregon are the latest to suffer the blow of the referendUG1. Ques­tion 51 on the ballot asked if the ordinance which protected the rights of gay men and l esbians should be repealed. The law gave protection in the areas of employment, public accomodations, and housing. It said that one's sexual orientation alone was not a reaaonable cause for exclusion or discrimination, The ordinaGce was repealed by a 2-to-l vote. Eugene is the fourth area in l eas than a year to subject gay men and lesbians and their rights to a popularity contest. Dade Cnunty, Florida was the first of the municipalities to allow the civil rights of a minority group to be decided by the ma j­ority ln a popular election. As you may remember. Anita 8ryent Green lent her name and energy to this event. Aft er s four month campaign of fear and hate by the organization ca lled "Save Our Children," that ordin­ance was repealed. The Dade County Coalition and the Hl ami Victory Pa rty both ran tremendous cam­paigns aimed at educating the public. But their campaigns didn ' t prove strong enough to combat tha t moat unholy alliance of Southern Bap tista and con­servative Roman Ca tholics. the referendum passed by a 2- to•l margin on June 7, 1977. The call for referenda was spearheaded last sU1Der by various conservative. charismatic and fundamental r aligioua and r lght-vl ng gr oups. St. Paul ia tha city tha t vaa forced to ho l d the first referend11111 after Dade County. The St, Paul Citi z ~ns for Hw:aan Rtghta was formed to educate the people of t he city about the referendum and about gay people. The St. Paul referendum passed by a 2-to-l margin in the Ap• r i l 25, 1978 e lec t ion . Tbe referendum in Wichita , Kanaaa marked the greateat defeat that we have bad to f ac e . The Homophile Al- 11..tnce of Sedgwick County worked hard and long to ed­ucate the public; overall the ran an e ffective cam­paign, Unfortunately, they were dealing with one of th• moat conservative areas of the country. Liquor­by- the-drink is still a major area of controveray in K.anaaa. On May 9, 1978 the voter1 of Wichita voted 5-to-l to repeal the ordinance that protected the gay p•ople of that city. But it was the Eugene defeat that was the greatest 1urpri1e of all of the referenda. Oregon is tradi· ttonally liberal, and Eugene ia an urban area vith atrong overall support for the rights of lesbian• and gay men. Jerry Weller, co-chairperson of the finance committee of the Eugene Citlzen1 for Huaan Rights, said "Civil righta have never been a matter of popularity. No minority ever received civil right1 from a vote. " Weller said that we have only the courts to look to, The E.C.H.R. will be in court to contest some of the tactics of VOICE, the conaerv­etive faction oppoalng the civil rights ordinance, Although their appears to be no imaiediate relief, groupa from each of the cities are fighting in the courta on grounda tha t the righta of a •inority group cannot be put to a popular vote--and that to do 10 ia a violation of the conatitutional rigbta of all people. At the queation of the constitutionality of th• var­ioua referenda, one ia reminded of Martin Nie1tOeller, a Proteatant clergyman. He waa imprisoned for apeak• ing out againat Hitler and survived a concentration camp where 76,000 Jews and 15,000 children were slau­ghtered. He described how it happened: " ... the Mada . .. came for the Coaaunista, but I didn't speak up because I waan't a COtlllluniat; then they caae for th• Jews, but I didn't apeak up because I wasn't a JflV. The they came for the trade unionista , but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the CatholicsJ but I didn't apeak out because I vas a Protestant . Then they ca•e for •e, but there was no one left to speak for me ." What Pastor Niemoellor a.itted is that firat the Nazis came for the homosexuala and other "undesirables." But before that, they created a climat e in which the escalating peraecu-t iona -- the rounding up of the "undesir­ables" -- would be poaaible, while ateadily widening the devouring definition of that word. (from Gay Sunahine, with per8leaion) In all, what the courts decide for Dade County . St. Paul, Wichita and Eugene they will decide for tba whol e country. The deciaion will initially affect the gay men and lesbians of this country, but it will ultimatel1 affect everyone. The courts have the power: will the work of Hartin Luther Xi ng and Su~an B. Anthony go the way of the Dade County Coa l­ition, the Eugene Citi zens for Huaian Rights, the St. Paul Citizens for Human Rights, and the KOlll>phila Alliance of Sedgwick County? WEIGHT REDUCTION & CONTROL MUSCLE DfVELOPMfNT fNUGY SOURCES SICIN & FACIAL FITNESS It can hap pen to you! P.O BCIX 10422 SAN ANfONIO, TX 71210 Sl2·S32· 1771 SPENCE JANUA•'I', do•ributor \ . ... ~ 6 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 Coming out at TGC V Bv R. H. The TeYas Gay Conference Five in Dallas in m·d­Junc was an lncrcdible awakening for me. It was the first gay activ{st meetllljl had ever part[• cipated in, and I was evtre~ely apprehensive a· bout attending. My reasons for attending were threefold: I) t~ hopefully meet a "higher class" of gay people than I had been meeting at Austin ba rs and patties; 2) lo see wh' the activ ist lea­ders wetc; and 3) to benefit and learn form the various workshops offered. The first of my expectations was realized a t the kick-off cocktail party Friday night when I spot• ted someone standing alone in the shadows looking as forlorn and out of place as I felt at that mo­m~ nt. His opening coawent was to compliment the graphics on the cover of the official program we were all dutifully clutching. The cover design of a vortex with a superimposed number "S" proved to be an apt symbol for the conference, a heady barrage of dizzying stimuli and sensations which affected each of us at different levels of con ­sciousness during the course of the weekend. Beginning Saturday morning with the presentation of keynote speeches, I began to fulfill my second expectat ion concerning what type of leadership we have at the forefront of Texas gay activism. The speakers repre~ented all colors, shades and textures you could possibly imagine. They were witty, tou­ching, eloquent knowledgeable , informed, caustic, and inspiring- -but most of all they were committed: committed to giving each one of us a sense of pride ln belng gay. They challenged us to stand up for our civil rights--if not as activists. then by boy· cotting products and e~tablish~ents whose endorsers or policies seek to dlscri~inate against us. -----04VE Will IE ON VACATION UNTIL A,llT 23 ---- Do you need the services cf. a ~of ess1 ono.\ painter but a.re ~t off tt"f thrught of a. sweet-taJKinq con­t a.ltor a.nd a_ crew of homopn~k akoholics sP,raying. \JOur furniture? Th en ca:ll us. vle''ve been \n t -ne business four ~ears daT\d srecia\ize in commercia.\ remo elin9 dnd f\ne interiors_ Gay owned and operated. ;oo_v e,SPojn\.\n.t1 1t'+~-12-90~ Hy th L rd ~ .. pee tat4v, .,ar realized ... t.cn the w..Hkshops began on Satr1day afLernoon. The workshops vAried in G atlty, but the nnes I-attended, gay physical heal th cue: the law as it affects hon1osex11sls, and ~AY 1 teralure and movies, were lnformatLve and practical. I was most impressed by the profe •• sion­al ism of some of these presentations. As coincidence would have it , the person I meL at the cocktail party Friday n1ght was from Austin a l eo. We spent the entire weekend together, shar­ing both the conference experiences and each other's company. We shared our innermost thoughts, desires, fears and self-doubts. In many ways he was the most intellectual and stimulating person I have met in tne gay lifestyle. Toward the end of the conference I remember fervently wishing that the weekend would never end; that my consciousness and sensitivities ;,ro~ld never stop eYpanding. The theme of the conference was "Setting S tes on Human R ghts" and I believe I left Dallas having set my sights on new values,beliefs, pri­orities and goals that I had not been forced to confront before. I have never felt so much pride in bein8 gay a~ l experienced that weekend Ln Dal­las. TGC V was everything I had hoped for, and more. I made a special friend whose self-revela-t ions significantly altered the way I perceive gay relationships. I am grateful to him and to the sponsors and leaders of TGC V for restoring pride I had lost, raising my consciousness and providing me with memories of a weekend during which all those who attended walked a bit taller in the sun. CAY STRATEG~ • , • continued from p~gc 4 can be very heavily influenced by surveys and letter writing campaigns Equally important is the develop­ment of cont acts within government agencies a t all levels. Re111ember, it waa one of those often-maligned f ederal bureaucrats who wrote regulations las t year which made gay couples eligible for federal housing, We need to build on the positive spirit cha r ac ter­ized by the Breakfast Fes tival for Human Right~ an4 the Gay Freedom Week Celebrations_ To do so means putting off the ~ymbolic issues until we are more ce rta in of winn ing without at irring up opponents who can win ;m the short run bec ause fea r is on their side. It 's too late in 1978 to develope a full­acale 1trategy for the November elections. There 11 plenty of time, though, to begin recruiting candi· datea, funds, and worker1 for next spring ' s city council election1. news texas ... FAR::N'!'Hc .. _. :JEC!CES 'TYRANNY C? .r..~.;c:c:-~ · A:" ::c:...·sTc:~ · s rct:N r-:EE':'IJ\'; C!\E The Houston Gay Political Caucus sponsored Town Meet­ing I in Houston on Sunday, June 25. The Gay Chicano Organisation, the Lesberadas, a lesbian alliance, as well as a society for gay civil engineers and The Executive and Professional Association of Houston par­tlcipaled. Former Texas gubernatorial candidate Frances "Susy" Farenthold was treated to a two-minute-long standing ovation by more thAn 3,000 gays who attended Town Meeting I after she condemned religious fanaticism against homoaexuals and urged gays to demand their "full human rights ." Fa renthold . formerly of Corpus Christi and now the president of Well• College in Aurora, N.Y. was the keynote speaker , "Racism \5 not a state issue , just like parenthood 11nd childbearing a re not state h "ues." she said. "Human rights is a human issue." Reca lling a ~peech l ast week by Carter, Farenthold said the president had vowed to continue calling for human r1ghls ln such countries as South Africa . Yet , she said, "lneq ua l lty and basic human Lnjustice" run• rampant 1n this ce untry," Farenthold said human rights in America are subjected to the '' t yranny of t he majority" and t he"tyranny of the state," Speaking to the gay community meeting in Houston, Farenthold said "The rights of this large minority can no longer be tramp led upon. " She stopped several times on her way out a rear door of the arena te wave to the crowd which cheered for more than two ainutes. Once the 1veech waa over, Town Meeting I turned into what one l eader described as a "strictly business " meeting of th• gay coo.unity. Al l manner of issues were debated, from the rights of transsexua ls to al­l eged police brutality leve l ed against gays. Several leaders of Houeton's l esbian co .. unlty stood to decl are that the Houston co11111unity of gay men had l argel y ignored women ln the pl anning of the meeting, which CPC leaders hope will be an annual event and in gay i asues in &ener al. ' TGTF PLANS TO FIGHT DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION DURING 66TH SESSION A five-point plan waa introduced a t the Texaa Gay Conf erence Five , J une 10, i n Dallas. The plan out­l i ne• how the pre1ent Texas law , which criminali zea ho010s exwal conduct, will be r epealed and how Texae Gaya v ll l pr event discriminatory l egi alat ion f rom pass i ng in the upc oming 66th l egis l a tive s ession. JULY 1978 GAY AUS1'IN 7 The plan calla for: 1) continual identification of human rights suppor­ters in all regions of Texas, 2) building coalitions with groups of traditionally underrepresented persons and with persons who sup· port our push for equality . 3) a comprehensive co111111unications network aimed at grass roots involvement with local lawmakers, 4) establtsh~ent of an Austin office and a lobbying team 5) $25.000 price t ag to implement the plan. According lo Kathy Deilcch, moderato'r of the Texas Gay Task Fnrce , which sponsored Texas Gay Conference Five and d1afted the plan for the upcoming legisla­tive session gays will be visible and active in Austin during the session. TCTF issued a statement at the conference which further explains the ir po1ition: We will be visible and active in Austin during the next l egisl ative aeasion . The 1977, 65th s ession was a forevarnin& to us . Be reminded tha t tha t sea ­aion 1aw the firet diacriminatory legi1lation aimed a t Texas gays, a measure to prohibit gay groups f roa being recognized and fro• aaing state college and university ca.pus facilities. Certainly such legis­lation waa uncon1titutiooal and improper; however, ther e are legia l ators vhe feel tha t ''the perverts must be kept in the closet." The Ta1k Force ls preparing to prevent additional legi1lat i on of this type . An example thi1 next ses• 1ion, commencing January, 1979, may very well be a imed at prohibiting gay teachers and their suppor­ters from teaching and to allow local school dis­trict1 to engage in "witchhunts" to determine who ia and i an 't gay. Similar legi1lation has been intro­duced and /or passed in s everal other states. In April . about 30 Task Poree members met in Nev Braunf ela Texas to l ay the gro1.mdvork for this leg­i1la tive push . At present, we are ga thering da ta r e­l a t ed to the legisla ture . tha t is, learning more about the process of legisla tion . t alking with key suppor t er1 and more importantly . t esting the vat era vith l egi1lators to l earn hov they view our concern for the .. actment of new l egial a tioa vbich will single out Texas gays for ha r assment and discrimin­a tion . The active fundr a iaing campaign to ra i se $25 .000 wi l l begin l a t er thia auaeer. we believe we mu1t begin our work ear l y, so aa to deter aod/or prevent action aimed a t pus hing ua back i nto the cloaeta . We wil l not sit back and wait to ••• wha t certain interest groups and their l awcmaker1 have pl anned for u1 . Texas lesbians and gay men are on the move. 8 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 national. .. DEPUTY SHERIFFS FOUND GUILTY OF VIOLATING GAY'S CIVIL RIGHTS After deliberating seven hours, a federal jury found all four defendants guilty Ln the trial of present and former county law enforcement officials of conapiracy to violate the civil rights of an admitted gay man and transvestite. Special Justice Department prosecutor Ralph Martin. in his closing arguments, accused the detJuty sheriffs of causing "an orgy of terror" for Lee Roy Watson, 24. who prefers to be known as Linda Sue Jackson Watson is seeking more than $2 million in damages from the three men and one weman on trial. A fifth defend­ant will be tried separately. Watson was arrested twice in February and Hay 1977 on 1everal miadeaeanor charges, including criminal imper­sonation while working as an Avon salesperson. At the -~~e of the eecond arrest, he testified that he was forced to appear nAked before several woaaen in Malvern City Jail as he vas being teased by one of the defend­ants . Later ha vas beaten vith a nightatick, according to testimony by eyewitnesses. On June 25, Wataon testified that one of the defendant• took him to a remote part of Hot Springs. beat him with nightsticks and a flaahlight, pouring turpentine in his anu1, and cut his hair, injuring his ear in the pro­cess. They than set tvo Doberman pinschera to attack hiM, reaulting in bites to his wrists and inner thigha: one of the defendants subs~uently poured alcohol on the vounds. Watson alao said that one of the defendants asked to be fallated by him, but later dropped t he re­quest. Watson was hospitalized for ten days for treatment of wounds following the incident, causing his attending physician to call the injuries the most severely beaten patient he had treated in 25 yeara. U.S. Dlst1ict Court Judge Oren Harris co111111ented "It would have been very difficult to arrive at any other verdict. It must be made clear that the Constitution of the United States is for all citizens." Harris re­leased all four defendants on bond pending sentencing later thi• month, 'QUEER AND LESBIAN' TEACHERS TARGETED IN OKLAHOMA Me.ber1 of Oklahoaia's lover house voted 88-2 to permit school boards to fire or refuse to hire persons who have engaged in "public homosexual conduct." lep. John M.iftks (D-Huskogee) vho authored the bill maintained that with his bill, districts could dilmiss "people af­flicted with this degenerate problem, .. people who are mentally deranged in this way," When asked whether hie bill vould anly to both aexes, Monka replied: "It vil 1 cover both queers and lesbians." The bill nov goea before the Oklahoma s enate for action. The Senate ver­sion is sponaored by sen. Mary Helm, a member of the John Birch Society. The measure defines "p11blic homosexual conduct" as " advocating, citing. imposing, encouraging, or prompt· ing public or private homosexial activity in a manner that creates a substantial risk that such conduct vill come to the attention of school children or school em­ployees." By such definition, even heterosexual teach­ers who speak out in behalf of gay rights could be li· able for their jobs. NATIONAL LESBIAN FEMINIST ORGANIZATION FOUNDED IN LOS ANGELES Los Angeles, March 17-19: the Pounding Convention of the National Lesbian Feainist Organization. Lesbians from all reaches of the country g~thered that weekend to form an organization coa:mitted to dealing, from a feminist platform, with the oppression of lesbians in all of its manifestations. These manifestations were seen as including. but not being limited to, discrim­ination based on sexual preference, sex, race. class. age and physical disability, The organization also committed itself to education and the development of lesbian culture. On of the more significant affirmative votes, from the south's viewpoint, was a motion amending the conven­tion rules to allot an equal number of votes to each of the five regions present. Another important resolu­tion opened membership to all lesbians and wo~en iden­tified women, reflecting consideration £or lesbians who remaln closeted. Race and class were strongly addressed in a resolution which calls for 50 percent representation by ~-omen of color and a balance of class backgrounds on state and national level planning and decision-making coanittees. Delegates to the meeting voted lo hold • nat tonal r at­ifying aonvention of the organization in Spring, 1979 ln St. Paul-Minneapolis. Slate conventions of all NLFO members are to be held in the interim t o encou1age stronger grass mots pa rtlcipation and Lo provide a forum for discussion of iss~es. Delegates to the na­Lional conference will be elected at the stale confer­ences on the basis of one delegate for each ten qual i · fied participants. Delegates to the founding conference and all other in­terested women who meet the membershlp requirements may also form local groups. Membership dues are determined on a 1liding scale basis of $1.00 per $1,000 of gross 477-8280 4n-4978 COMB FREE 1512 West 5th Handmade Haircuts at People's Prices yearly inco•e and can be sent to the interim headquar• ters in Housten. Tx A 12-memher interim steering committee was elected to serve between the f~unding and the ratifying conven• tions rhe member' are of various colors and class background and are located in all regions of the coun­try, The organization will publish a bimonthly newsletter. All lnca! 1state/1egionAl news of national interest will be included F'nancial donations are also encour­aged . For more information about the organisation or news• letter contributions write to: NLFO, P.O. Box 14643 , Hnu~ton, rexas 77021. •J: ·: .... :,'· • :£33! a\:. c-__ -\_ ~r SUPPCR~ EX-:ov~R San Diego (California) Superior Court Judge Bvron F Li ndsley June 6 ordered Oenease Conley to pay $100-a­month support to Sherry 0. Richardson. Before the two women participated in a Holy Union ceremony a t the Metropolitan Community Church in Feb ruary, they had si~ned an agreement that Richardson would perform the dutLes of a ''v i Ce," while Conley vould provide finan· c isl support. Afte r the rela tionship termlnated r ecently, Richa re• son, vho said she had given up her job in Nev York to be with Con ley. fil ed suit for support and the divi­sion of property acouired by the couple during their relationship Conley, who wa~ not represented by counsel1 agreed in court lo the support agreement, wh ich will continue indefinitely uni•~~ it ia niod­lfl ed bv the court or ano ther judic1al procedure . Jud~e L ndsley accepted the couple s a ~reem ent on the basis of the Ma 1vln•Triola decision in which the Cali f ­ornia Supreme Cnurt ruled that there can be property and support agreementl and obliga tions between urunar­ried people . That ca~e involved actor Lee Marvin and his common law wife. The Conley-Richa rdson case ap­pears to be the first gay couple test case of that precedent. French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 8 a.m. until 2 at night. 31 ~ East 6rh Sr. J ULY 1978 ENTERTAINERS JONATE ':AI;;: N~ ~c ?IG~T ER I G~S IN:7iAT:v~ 9 Singers Joan Baez , Harry Chapin , Peter Yarrow and Holly Near drev a near-capacity crowd of 5,800 to the Santa Monica (California) Civic Auditorium on June 7 to raise funds to fight the Briggs I nitiative battle looming in the Golden State, The event, sponsored by the New Alliance for Cay Equality (New AG£) of Los An· geles, raised an estimated $70,000. At two performances marking the first anniversary of the defeat of gay rights in DAde County (florida), the cr~wds, moved to tears , offered standing ovations. Nearly half the audience consisted of women , a first for any gay rights fundraiaing event, All four perform­e rs donated their talents to the successful concert . The even ing's only jarring moment came ,betveee shows when a bomb threat was announced, and the second shov had to be delayed for 45 minute&. Two l aw suits a re underway challenging the so-called Bri~g~ inlrlatlve, which vnuld require the flring of gay educators and those vho " advocate" the gay life­style, Filing its au t t soon a ft e r the Ca liforllia secre t a ry of st ate announced tha t the Briggs initi ative had enough val id signatures to qaalLfy for the November ballot, Gay Rights Advocates challenged the initiative on be­half of t he Cal ifornia Federation of Teachers. Cay Rights Advocates charges that the initiative un­con1titutionally violates protections of due proce11 , equal protection, privacy and free expression . The 1uit alao charges that if the initiative is allowed on the ballot, it would have a chilling effect ou teachers ' first ... ndeent right• to apeak aaainst it because, under the initiative'• advocacy provisions, they might be subject to teraination from employ• •ent should the initiative pass . The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan C01111U11ity Churches (M:C), represented by attorney John B Wall, also filed 1uit in an attempt to have the Briggs initiative removed from the ballot. The M:C suit claims tha t the initiative, should it become l av , vio· lates sepa r a t i on of church and ,tate ptinciples. Theo­retically, gay teachers who wanted to keep their jobs would be forced to avoid attending HCC 1ervices because they ~ight be identified as gay and therefore fired from their jobs. Thia, contends MCC violates thetr right of religious fre edo•. PR:::;::·:·:-ER.u.:;s ·:c:-!:: :'(' REFl'SE OR!:C»H:cr. :'C PRACTICING HOl'f.C.SEXUALS SAN DIECO ·- After extensive co .. itted debate , the full 1e1sion of the General Asaambly of the United Presby· terisn Church voted not to ordain practicing homosex· uals as ministers in their church. Delegates from the assembly c l•i• this action folloved years of study concerning social . psychological, aa well as religious aspects of homosexu4lity, and p re~· ious to the vote. found themselves sha r ply divided as to the matter of ordination. A church co111111lttee ia~ued tvo r eports that disagreed on the ordination question but concu~fed in several key 10 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 Gay and proud Julio coreno: a farmworker By DAVID l«lRRIS Aa you drive 1out h from Aus t in to t he valley in Ap­ril, the f ields and brssh along t he sides of the highway change by s ubtle steps from nearly green to gr een and t he mesquite becemes thicker. The houses change , too, from plain 1ynmetry and neatness in the north to richer florid schemes and leas modest color in the aouth. And poverty, from the highway , reveals itself in poorer sides of towns~ unadorned h11111an prevalence over neatness of lawns and rigid architectural geomet ry. But the valley , by one measure, is not poor . Hidalgo County, whose southern border is the Mexican Border, it t he richest agricultural county in Texas , the 1e­cond richest in the na tion , In its fertile ao i l grow orruge t rees . grapefruit and eoentless t ypes of veg­etables , enough to feed millions and enough to make rich men richer. For it is by the mea1ure of rich men that Hidalgo is rich. Like corporate feudal lords, they gather fortunes while seated in plush chairs a t polished desks , breathing cool, filtered air; but fortunes in carrot• and onions need more than clever business deals, a warm 1un, and great holdings of f ertile land. Wbat ' s needed. too . are abundant human hands t ' cultivate a~d pick and to do so cheaply. By the measure of the 70,000 agricultural workers who live there , Hidalgo is one of the poorest coun­ties in the nation . There are efforts to build a union. With few resources beyond their own deter­~ ination, a group of far111WOrkera led by Antoaio Oren­dain hat been trying to change what by now seems an almost perm.anent situation by organizing strikes, protests and marches . The Texas Farmworkers Union , La Union de Campesinos de Texas, bas organized and helped orgaaize many local strikes, the latest being in the onion fields, where moat workers previou1ly earned less than a doller an hour at the rate of 35c per sack of onions. Last year, they marched 1, 500 ailes from their headquarters in San J uan to Washing­ton, O.C., to speak to Jimmy c~ rter . Carter ' s refusal to listen was no aajor blow to people who had been run over , 1hot at and j ai led for t heir efforts. An openly gay man i s in the thick of the union ' s s t ruggle . S•all and dark , with indian f eat ures and a recent permanent. Jul io Coreii'o's eff eminacy i s one with his s t rength and determination. Being a campes­ino , a farmwerker , is more his life than hia occupa­tion , as i t was the life of his parents and his grandparent1 . Boru in the Mexican state of Guanaj uato, he has never been to school and speaks no Engli1h . Re is sensitive and articulate on the 1ubject of his life a1 a campe1ino and bis union, and tha t , as it turn• out, was the 1ubject of the interview Enrique LOpez and I held with him at his home in Mercede1, Texas , on the eastern edge of Hidalgo County. Although deeply political, Jul io'• community has not yet politicized the subj ect of homosexua lity , and be wa1 reluctant to discuss it in a political interview . All the more important , then . is the obvious re1pect his determination and energy have vOll him ati0ng hi• colleagues. a respect that in itself ls hardly un ­usual in practical situations in worki ng-class Mexi­can a•d Chicano communities . DAVID H:>RRIS: How much money do farmworkers make here in the valley? JULIO CORENO: You can't make money here, the sala r­ies are very low, We never work forty hours a week, much l ess overtime because they don't want to pay lime-and-a-half. O.M.: In other jobs it's onl y the f ather tha t works. but here in the ha rvests i sn't it true tha t the whole f amily usual ly works? J.C.: Everyone always works, the f a ther , the mother, the chi l dren , everyone. They have to t ake t hem to work because you can 't earn enough pay to be able to say, well , "I' ll be the onl y one to work ." D.H. : So the childr en don't go t o school , or t hey go only when they can? J.C. : The way we were raised, our parents didn' t send us to school because there weren' t any schools on t he ranches ; t here was not hing, and even when the governaent 1tart ed putt ing schools on the ranches, parents didn't send their ehildren. Who c ould send photo by Enrique LO'pez Camuesino Julio Cor eno their kids to school? It was better to have them driving the oxen, or with the teaa; working the soil; bringing firewood; bringing bay for the don­keys; taking care of the goats or the pige~ or this or that. They would eay that the schools were a thing of the devil. Now, when there are classes, when the schools are open, the children don't go to work. But when they get out of school, their parents are there to pick them up and take them to work. Mothers take their bable~ to work with them, too, because they don t have enough money to have ~omeone else take care of them. So there they are with their bottles, in the sun1 in the wind, exposed to poisons from the t4rk, to insecticides All that'i; veiy dangerous. D.H.: So if the kids don t learn anything else, they are &olng lo spend their lives working in the field11? J.C.: Well. at most, they finish high school; but most etay to work la the fields. If all of the food ie p'oduced by the campesinos, everything the lower classes eat and the upper classes, and all the communitie1, educated and not educated, then it can't end, So campesiooe have to exist anyway; if we're all going to be educated and the government wants ua all to go to 1chool, then what are all those edu­cated people going to do? O.H. : What about technology? It is said that all of that work is going to be done by aacbinee in the future . So what's going to happen to campesinos? J.C.: Yes, exactly. Host are going to be unemployed. One machine does what hundreds of workers can do. But many people have told ua that we should go to school since the government has so many education programs, and stop &ofn9 around like trouble-makers and agitators. So why are we struggling? I tell them that if education were enough to end all the exploitation, if there wouldn't be any more ex­plolted campeaino• 1 I 'd go to school. But if I go to school and, nevertheless, there is still ea­ploltatlon for hundreds and hundreds who are out in the fields, then what good does it do for me to go to achoot? THEY still won't respect our opinions, Only what THEY aay goes I can't say I don't like thls work, or that'• not the right vay you're dolng i t 1 can I? Just the way THEY say, that ' a the wav it la. For example, in many states they've done a~a y wlth the short hoe. ENRIQUE LOPEZ: And in Texas? C~n they use the short hoe? J .C.: They've got us bowed down, and really bowed down . If the boss comes to the field and we're not bent over we ' re fired . E.L.: Why do they use the short-handled hoe? J.C. Welt, ideas that the bosses have. They think the work is done bettec . Long hoes have always worked well, but the bosses don't think so. If I tell the boss or contractor I'm not going to work with a short hoe and bring my own long-handled bee from home, then they have a saw in the fields and they cut it off. And up in the northern states people say the bosses don't give them short hoes. But I tell them, don't think lt's becauae the boss loves you so much. The boss has never loved us, all he loves ls his big sack of money, that's all he wan ts. People don't matter to him They want to have people in stock, to have a lot of people of every type, of every age, of every si~e, every kind of people, Llke a basketful of apples, and from it the buyer'\ the boas 1 whoever ia go in' to buy that mer - chandlae, he's picking out and picking out, all JULY 1978 GAY AUSTIN II nu~ber one~ all number one, and all the number twos and nUJ11ber threea he leaves there or he throw~ awav. They 'r e nn good, according to h i ~, because he s gning to choose the best• That ' s the wav he want~ us, the people, the ca~pes i nos. No, he doesn't want tn have us that way, he has us that way, dn you see? Because they pick the best and the strongest, the ones th•t can do a lot of w~rk, not the weake. ones. They want to have a lot of people so when a bunch die, or one dies) they put in ten more. One dies, they put in ten more. They want to have extra people like extra machines . They don't want to loee the•, They're not going to lose, for example, ten trailers of cantaloupes, ten trailers of whatever is waiting there without ice and without being crated, so it moves, it has to be moved. D.M.: Is there a law protecting the workers from insecticides, from poisone used in the fielde? J.C.: The workers have none. That's why we make ~ese marches, and make these protests, and make strikes . because the campesinos aren't protected, O.H.: So for example if a group of workera is in a field and a plane passes by spraying insecticides, what happens? J.C.: No-not " for example" ! They do pass and they do 1pray ua. D.H.: They don't pay any attention to the workers? J .C.: No, they don't pay any attention to ua, be­cause ve don ' t have any laws to back us up. People have even been killed in the fields by the planes because they fly so lov that even if the people lie on the ground they have been hit, D.M.: How many years have you been doing this? J.C . : Well, a~ for belng a cainpesinn, ay whole ltfe because I don't know how to do anything else, JU St fa l'lllW'Hk • D.H.: From what age? J,C , From the age of eight 1 wh ich is a child's age, isn't Lt? I worked because we have always been very poor, my pa renta have always been vecy poor. I neve~ went to school. I ' ve never aeen a school from the inside, juat from the outside> from the sldewalk. D.H.: Some people say you worked harder than anyone elee during the march to Waahington. J.C.: Well, I can't say I was the hardest worker, be­cause who knowe? For me it was~ 't work at all . Al­though I would work here and there and then I'd cook for all the strikers and I'd distribute the newspape; I'd distribute leaflets and I'd go around to the houses and talk to the people. E.L.: Some would be 111&rching and there would go Julio nnd ao•e othera distributing papers 1 or they'd have run forward, the marchers would paas by and they'd run again, And the rest would be just marching and 1D&rching It's hard. J.C.: For me it wasn't work since I'• used to it. I'd even go ~arefoot And I never got a blister, I'm used to walking around like that. Look, I think I have ehough callouses . E.L .: And a lot of people in the union would ~eke fun of you because you're gay wouldn't they? J .C.: Oh, yes. Well, no, They just ••• they likad t~ tn plav with me. !.L.: And you loved it J.C.: Oh, I did, yes . E. L.: But they accepted you anyway. J.C . : Oh, ye~, they had no reason not to accept me, It's not against the law. EL.: Do vou think the march lo Wa~hlngton was a Kood idea even if you didn't get co talk to Carter? J.C.: Well, I think it 1o·a1 a good idea even if lie 12 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 ~sth~r's ?olll~n showed us whqt hApp<Pns when (oh , •YI) AnitA finds h~r sons in bed together. ~as Dolph looking when we marched by hie mansion? Ga Freedom Weel UD ... The parade's front banner 1a C&rrled wit~ pride down to ~ooldridr.e P~rk Gav Austin in celebration ... 9y ART HORRIS Traditlonelly celebrated during t..h• hat veek of June, C•y rreed09 Week vat ob•arved thh year June 19·26 The "**k c~ratea the ninth anruvareary of the birth of the .odera C.y Liberation eov•e.nt in Merica. Oil JUE1e 24, 1969 gay •n and l41bl1n1 fought back la tbe face of pollce haraaAent at the Stonewall Iruti on Cbrhto,har Street in Nev York Clty Por three coo ... afleuttve day1 there v•t beavy atre1t -.ctivlty vitb bonfire• and rioting, At an lmMdlate reault the gay people of the area felt me.atonal relief. But there were long ter• re1ult1 which are 1till being tel• Ault ln ha• ob1erved Cay Prlde Week regularly ainca 1971. That year there was a picnic a t Wooldridge Patlt followed by a Mrch to the C.tp1tol and a rally and vorkehop1 on tbe ground1. lach year •lnc:e then bat te:en 1oee observanc.a of the occa.ton. Wltb a•Y prlde being tf'lcraalinsly ln evidence c::hrouab· out the co111ntry vbUe gay fretdoa ii continually threatened vlth referenda by Anita Bryant, Clay Smoth· er1. H.trold 0 'Che1ter • .tnd Cal Ue»tnia' • Sen John lrtss•, lt lt eaey to undautand vhy C1y Praado• Week h cahbuced throughout. \lhtn our freedom h in J•o · patdv, ve ftel the need to proclal• lt all the •r• vah.,.tntty. Thh year 11 Cav Preedoe weak Celabntlon began vlth Gay Praec:to- Nlg.ht at the Private Cellar on Sunhy. There vas free beer and &uitar playlng. Wednesday, J1.1na 21 .. , the Au1tln pr•lar of \lord 11 Out tha neve1t doc\.l.IMnta ry of 11,ay people ln AM'f1U. The 1hovlng ••• • ba.naf ll for the Au1tin """'' " 1\iRht• Coalltion '"t on by the Doble ScrHnt. A vorlt1hop conducted by Crag Calvert of the Austin e~n. ligb.ta Coa lition dealt wlth gay •en end cruil· inA He u.aed .. thod1 of encC)unt:t:r and dilcu11ion la racognhlng fa.ellng1 htld by Noy MD Tbe traditloo1l .. rch •nd rally took. place oa Sat· urday. At uoon about tvo lu.andt"ed pe.ople .. rchad from rtnt Street up Congre11 to 1neventh Street over to Cuad•lupe and down to Wooldridge Park. Several block• long. the lively pa••d• pro3re11ed without •hh1p. the only for. of lliar•••••nt caae on the ,art of one APO police officer who inthted on. crowding the .. rcheo together and ru1hin& the pace of the parade. A. 1treet d..tnce took place Saturday night on 2lrd Street at c_be People' 1 len• t11anca tc.rk.etplace vlth •u1lc by Little l•• 200 to lOO people a ttended the dence, lncludln• aeveral avo•ed hetero1e1ruala lut pot tee forced lh• band to 1top ,taytng a t 1L40 , ••.• ctttna a clty ordinance forbidding at1:plltlad •ullc tn 'ublla places after 8:00 p. •· Cey Preedoe Wttek concluded on Monday, June 2& "tth a P'Ottrv uadlng by Texa1·ba1ed le1t;bian1 and gay ••n a t l•ther' s Pool, Aeong tt'lo1e ,resent "'' Hou•toa poet Joaeph Loeax. All in all. Cay Preedoe Waek, 1978- "as a a ... cce11, vtth ..,,,, p1rtlclpation by aore gey people. than ever before. "• ve coee •long vay it.nee 1969-·e.ve.n lf together ve l:ri ave tha t •UCh fatther to ao . Jl,;L'!" 1978 CAY AL'STIN 13 KPr@'8 R picture to 9en0 home to Ko~. 14 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 Backstage with Anita ly llilVI! lfEVILLI "And, r••b•r llavarand, tell all of your good peo• pl• to pray for the victory of repeal in Wichita and !ugene " With tho•e words Anita Bryant ended bar "testimony" at Au1tin'1 Municipal Auditorium on May 7. Sha then valked out of a vell-protectad rear exit of the building arm-in-arm with Harold O'Chaster of Allandale Baptist Church, A waiting car took Bryant and her entourage to the airport; they vere escorted by two city motorcycle policemen and one 1quad car, I had bean waiting backstage at Muni three hoars for an opportunity to talk with the Florida orange juice queen (it 1a .. ad like years while watching the "Church service" and her performance). Her tightly acheduled, three hour visit had prohi~ited a person­al interview vhich I tried arranging months in ad­yanca through bar office (The Fi1her1 of Men) in tu.mi. Part of ae didn't vant to be anywhere near or have anything to do with Bryant, her ahov or O'Cheater'a peculiar for• oe worship. It was a1 if to vitne11 (uaed in the non-religious 1en1e) their spectacle would 1ive 1ot1e validity to it. The Breakfast Festival for Buman Rights was being held aimultaneou1ly down by Town Lake near the Aud­itorium. The one tbou1and happy end gay people were there sharing in something which 1, too, wanted to be a part of: a celebration of solidarity in oppos· ing Bryant'• great eagerneas to deny gay1 and women ~ual ri&ht• in living their lives a1 they want to a1 they must. But indeed there I was in the wings of the stage at Municipal Auditorium shaking the hand of one of the vorld'a most famous homophobes, Anita Bryant Green, before she aade her first entrance. I had been per- 1uadad by the voyeur in •e to observe Anita in ac• tion. I was e1king her if we could talk for a few minutes after the "service" was over, and 1he had agreed to a short meeting with the pres•. Bryant had made a point of telling me that her appearance va1 strictly a religious one, and in no way polit· ical, although I hadn't asked any question that pro-.ted the comment. The one•tiae first runner•Uf in a Hiss America con• test had arrived at about 10:00 a.m. -- 45 minutes before her portion of the "service" began. One city policeman had been guarding the rear entrance to the auditorium for an hour before Bryant's arrival. But the low-key and easy-going backstage mood set by so.e rather disinterested lighting, sound and television technicians bad altered radically vhen a beefy contingent of eight additional policemen came on the scene at 9:45 a .m. They checked the creditentials of anyone who (like myself) wa1 straggling around on the stage or who did not look particularly enthralled with Reverend O'Chester 11 haranguing of the audience for donations. THE ARRIVAL The police received a radio •essage when the Bryant party was a five •inute drive away from the audi­torium (having arrived at the airport) , The good vor4 vas given to an expectant O'Cheater vho had been pacing to and fro b1ckstage whenever he left his rostrum on stage, hands tightly clasped like a nervous new father. While on stage he had managed to present a different persona -- that of the cool. collected preacher. A local television news camera team caught the scene as Anita Bryant walked in, O'Chester at her side Profe11ional all the way (from the experience of countless orange juice co11111ercials, no deubt), Bryant looked directly into the caJDera, smiling and photo by Alen Pogue lllOUthing "hell o." The show sorry I did mean " service11 -- went on building t o a climax while Anita prepared herself. She finally appeared in an all-white lace and cot ton gown, looking like an old-time country girl on the way to the town Sunday picnic, She walked around backstage humming to herself and checking her of t­repeated Bible reference• on the lit tle notecards sbe carr i ed. 4. •• I'YA - AN E?{'!'ER!'AI!'IER At the designated time (the audience hav ing been properly primed), Reverend O'Chester introduced Anita1 then walked to the side of the stage to escort the star of the service on . The opening number was "Give me an Old-fashioned • " which made her gown take on the significance of a costume. And as soon as she &ta r ted singing with tha t orange-selling voice . the purpose of her participation was uncover­ed for all to see. Bryant ls an en t ertainer who sings about Cod and throw ~ in some occas s ional political co111111entary be­tween numbers, just as some other show-person might deliver jokes between songs . But she never once made a direct ref e r ence to gays. homosexuals, or femin ists during the show, Ra th ~r, she would repeat­edly chant about "mil itant radica l groups" which thr eaten "the chil dr en," "the r-ily" and the righteous order of society. Ani t a manuf actured some genuine- l ooking tears but was subt l y able to turn them on and off a t will, and the audienc e c r ied righ t along wi th her. She was aood. She was so good that s he was ecary . Bryant and her homphobic clones (such as O'Chester) have memorised a string of formulaic phrases u1ed to describe the danger of those "militant radical group groups." Anita 's "testimony" would have r ead like exc er pts from the choicest coaaents in her Playboy interview (May, 1978) . There wer e a few dissenters am0ng the true-believers i n the audi enc e . But whenever t hose i ndividuals shouted out a retort to Anita's prenouac .. ents, those c r ies for reason or tolerance were dr owned out in a sea of applause for whatever quip an ampl ified Anita would answer back . nHAT ' S BEHI ND I T ALL? In an i nt erview one week prior to Bryant' s visit, Harold O'Chester said that he had i nvited her to participat e in the special Allandale Baptist "aer ­vice" a t Hunfci pa l Auditorium "fer no part i cular rea s ~n . We invited Anita Bryant basically because tthe ' s ver y prominent ." He went on to l ist the ot her celebrat ed na tional " religious" figures who had ap­peared in t he past . i nc l uding Ji1111y Carter (vhile governor of Georgia), Charles Colson and Pat Boone, among others , Reverend O' chester has a clear view of wha t the rol e of hh church i n the co-unity should be: "Our job is to permeat e the commu•i t y, Jesus said ve oagbt to be salt. Salt fl avors a co .. unity -- salt keeps the rot tenness out . If my church can' t .. ke an ethica l and moral impact on t he C08111uai ty, t hen we ought to quit being wha t ve are." Although sbe was invited to appear in Au1tin "for no particular reason ," other than being pr0tainent, Bryant reiterated tha t ahe bad co•• onl y to ahare JULY 197Q GAY AUSTIN 15 her religious " testi mony f or a cburch service ," during tbe ahort press conf erence aft erwarde . When t old about t he Br eakf ast Festival being held outs i de , Anita s aid " Well, I doo 't know wha t they're upaet about • • • They have their opinion and I have a ine; but I '• not here on any one particul ar isaue per se, but to shar e the hope for •ftJ'Oae who' s wi lling to look at an l1m1e>ral life atyla aa s i n , and that'• true for any kind of sin . I'm noc j us t against the ain of homosexuality." In the world of 0 1Chester and Bryetrt. there a re , ob ­viously, no clear demar ca tiona between the realms of r e ligion , politics and ente rta inment , Crusades throughout history have always fus ed those first two el ements , and the third i s an addi t ion of our dis­traction- fi l l ed age of t el evi sion. To get a ttention. an event must have some enterta i nment value . And Bryant and her spoa sors know hov to succ eed on that count . Al l endale Baptist Church had a specific reason for inviting Ani t a Bryant - - r ega rdl ess of vhat O'Chester sa id . She i s a nationa l. political f igurehead for t ha t element of American society which is f ed up with "liberalizing" soci al changes. It's no revelation t ha t a strong r eactionary movement i s well undervay ~hese days , and tha t t act ics employed by l iber al c auses of the a ixties are being miaicked with success. But there's a vital difference between the polit :c al role rel igious l eaders pl ayed a decade ago and the role of Br yant and O'Cbest er today. HUMA :~ RIGHTS IS THE ISSUE The former ac tively cont ributed a 110ra l and ethical underpinni ng of aulti -deooaioatioaal aupport to the politic s of equal rights for blaclta , cbicano1 and VOS1en , and in oppos i t ion to t he war in Vietn&11 . Today, t he politics of rel igion is the deaial of rights for gays; the denial of a ..,...n •e right to continued on page 22 16 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 MAY 7th Breakfast Festival ---- forHUJDan Rights JULY 1 78 GAY AUSTIN 17 PHOTO~ BV ALAN POGUE: 18 GAY AUSTIN HArvey Milk JULY 1978 I photos by Harvey Neville TEXAS GAV CONFERENCE FIVE ROVAL COAClt INN DALLAS JUNE 10 and 11 By KELLY KAY Cav women and men from across the state met together ln Dallas June 9-ll for TeYas Gay Conference V1 held ln Dallas' R~yal Coach Inn, After a welcnm!ng cocktail partv Fr iday evenlng, t he Q" nfe rence be~an with a po~errut addre~a f 1orn 8 1onk­lyn prof es ao1 nf urban politics G nny Apu7 P ~ who ls cu1tenllv running for the New York Staie Assembly. In her speech Apuzzo called for• new aelf-unde r ­atand1ng wlthin the gay movement. "I'm not convinced we ' ve gotten over i;elf-hate," the former co•chair of the Cay Rights National Lobby said. ' "No one ever clel .. ates power ... because It's •orally right" - Ginny Apuzzo JULY 1978 GAY AUSTIN ~ilK , A~a~or , Apuzzo , Lee Knapp (con~erenc~ cochairoersor~ Deitsch , Steve Wilkins {cor.~erence cochairperson) Apuzzo al•o c al l ed for gay activist's acknowledge­ment of our clear l y self- int e re•ted motive for fighting the homophobia which would deprive us of our human rights. "We' re not in this for altruistic rea1on1," •he • • id . Apuzzo explained that the movement must operate from the principal "where there h oppression, I am op­pressed ." She expressed a personal fear that gay men will forget about iesbian1 once the males have won their rights. Apuzzo also expressed her concern tha t the gay move­ment rallies around every new referendum at the ex­pense of forming alternattve1 more positive strat­egies . Kathy Deitsch, moderato r of the Texas Gay Task Force, sponsor of the conference, outlined the task force 's flve point plan for the next legislat ive session (see a rticle, page 7). Task force coordinator for the central region Woody Egger expl ained the pl an ' a strategy to restrict the 1urlsdiction of Section 21,06 (the ~odomy l aw) to ac t s committed in public, The pl an' s succ ess wi l l legalize homosexual acts commit red in priva t e between consenting adults. Ca rn! Phe l en, an eight year vete ran of the Sta t e Legisl a ture1 instructed the conf erence on the subt let ies of t he legislative process. Aft er a dts .. 1 l unch provided by the Royal Coach Inn, the conferencees went i nto va r ious workahop sess iona f ro11 "Teachers and Homosexuality" to " Long-term Relationahipa" . Sat urday evening, openly gay San Franciaco City/ County Superviaor Harvey Hi lk d i •cus sed hi1 caapaign i nd hi1 t enure to date in off i ce , Hilk also i ntroduced the f ilm "Gay USA," which doc - Don Amador UJ11ent1 the 1977 Cay Pride Day Pa rade held in San Fr ancilco . Sunday Don Amador, who teach•• gay 1tudies at 1ev­eral achool1 in Loi Angele• , delivered a talk en• titled "Cay Sociological and Cul t ural Roota." Amador is the r ecent ly appo i nted gay lia i son on L.A. Mayo r TOCI &radley' s ataff . 19 20 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 ~'EWS BRIEFS continued from oage 9 areas . A •ajorlty of the committee members supported a set of proposals that call homosexual acts "sinful ." One such proposal counsels Presbyterlans that ''our pre• sent underatandlng of God'• Wlll precludes the ~rdina­tion of persons vbo do not repent of ho1DOsexaal prac­tice." Yet another stat .. ent urged those in char~e of reviev­ing candidates for the •inistry not to make• specific inquiry into the "sexual orientation or prac t ica '' of a candi'8te vho has not declared hia or her sexual pre­ference. The report also contained a condeainetion of the "vide­spread contempt fo~ homosexual persons thet prevails in our eociety1' and voiced strong support for lawe up­holding civil rights for homosexuals. However, while not ordaining declared homosexuals, the church vill welcome "such parsons 11 as 111embers. NYC 'S FIRST GAY COrt;.¥.UNITY CENTER OPENS The first gay c01111Unity center in New York City, to be called the Triangle Gay Community Center, wa1 formally dedicated at ceremonies on June 24. Created by the Het­ropol itan Community Church of Nev York at its offices on the third floor of 26 Ninth Avenue, the epace vill house not only church activities but programa of tha West Side Di1cus1ion Group, the Christopher Street Lib­eration Day Committee, units of Gay Over-eaters and Al­cbbolic1 Anonymous. therapy groups and rap groups of all kinds. GAY TF.ACHER REINSTATED IN NYC NE'W YORK -- Sallie Herson has been officially rein1ta• ted to a teaching position for the Nev York City School Board of Education. She had been released f roai ~er job as peer-group counselor at Walton High School in the Bronx in Nov .. ber of 1976, just days after sharing vith 1tudent1 in a rap group discu•aion that •he va1 a lesbian. Officials of the United Federation of Teachers and the Board of Education have issued statement& in support of the employment rights of hOCDOsexual teachers, The i ssue in thia case vas whether it is permissible for teachers to openly •cknovledge, in the classroom , a ho1110sexual l i festyle. With this decision, the Board has clarified it• position, The init i al incident toek place in late October of 1976. The student initiated topic of homosexuality led to a frank conve rsation in which Hs. Herson shared vith t he students t hat she lived with another woman and their sh children. With support from the G•y Teache · s Association and the legal counsel of the Nev York Civil Libertie ~ Union , H~ Her,on f l ied suit in federal court last August 1 charging abridgement of her constitutional rights by the NYC Board of Education. In i eaponfie to this sui t , the Board initiated an informal hearing procedure i n October, 1977 . As a result, it was determined tha t Ms . Herson should be returned to a teaching position. Ar ­rangements were recently completed and she is pre1encly teaching in a junior high school. SEATTLE IN TURl·:OlL CV;<R A :~~lD IS:RIM INA TION ORDINA NCE Both ~ve Our Heral Ethics (SOME) , led by hOC110phobic Seattle policeman David Eates , and gay r ights support­ers ' Citizens to Retain Fair Employment (CRFE) are f iring off volleys in the battle to repeal t he city' s anti-di1criaination ordinance . SOME i s attempting to collect 17,626 valid signatures by August 1 ~ ~put In­itiative 13 on the November ballot. SOHE's Hay 24 advertisement in an area newspaper hea~­lined "Ten Reasons for Repealing Seattle's Homosexual uw," lilts statements such as: "Homo1exuals account for half the murders and suicides in large cities." "Half of the nation's syphillis comes fr m homosexuals. " "A great 111&ny homosexuals are classified as suicidal unemployables and therefore qualify for welfare, and are thus living off the American people ." Protect America ' s Children, Anita Bryant's organiza­tlon, has contributed $3,000 to SOME, while the Play- THE TUBS boy Foundation gave $2,000 to CRFE. Cay activiats charge tha t the police are in c ahoots with the pro -Ini ti ative l ) forces after Liquor Board enforc ement officers i a­isued citations for violations of the lav to opera tors of the Honaa try, where a fundr a ise r to fight the anti · gav init1 at1ve wa< t aking pl ace. Heanwh le CRFE l • prepar ing a poll design.ed en measure voter a w~ renes< of the i ssues at stake and to find out just h~w Seattle c1ttiens f eel ab• ut gay people The proposed lni a tive differs from those in the four cities where repeals nave passed. I t would, lf passe4 , also remove from Seattle's Off1ce of Women's R1ghts al l enforcement powers for discr1mination cla1ms baaed on sex, ma tital st atus and sexual prefe rence. Jur11 - diction wou l d pass to the city's over l oaded Human Rights Depa rtment. In addit ion , the passage of the E t es ordinanc e woul d not a ff ec t the c i ty' s t eacher s aince Seattle public schoo l s are not governed by city ordlrianc es, An appeal brief before the 5th Circuit Cour t of Appeals has been filed in behalf of three Texas A6.M students, members of the Gay Student Service Organi zation. Tne brief filed by J, Patrick Wiseman, a Houston Attorney , a ske the court to agree with three other circuit court decisions -- the 1st 4th. and 8th -- and allow gay o r ­ganu: at lons on ca:np,us The o.rig1nal suit, filed three years ago had beeP dismissed by a Houston Federa l )Udp.t The facultv of Ynle Law School in New Haven (Connect!· cut) has voted to pralect gav students from discrimin ­ation bv law firms and other recruiters Yale ls the second law choo l in the counrrv to adort such a mea ­sure rhe words 'seYua l o rten t a ti,., n" wi 11 he added to the exlstin~ pol icv tha t s afeg ua rds a11 a 1n<>t dtscrim1n ­a t t >n ~>n •he ha !>iS of s e ~, race, n" ti,1nal .,r i g1n, and re l ~to s bel e f~. Law tirm~ found in v1ol at1•n of the st a Lement mav nlt use the s e rvic es of the l aw scnnol. Lamoda Leaa l D ~ f ens e and Educ ation Fund I nc. of New York recenLly represent ed a non • tenured profe <>sor a t Pennsylvania Sta t e Un1ver aity in a hearing before a f aculty committee with 1e spect to his di smissa l on charges inc l udi ng one tha t ne was " an admitted homo­sexual." The dismissal was in violation of a pos i tion && 2532 Guadalupe "9'01. /lie acli11e m an'' the best selectlon In aclult material ••• Anywhere! ..."ULY 197: GAY At:Sr!N 21 in defenae of gay people t aken by t he Pennayl vania Chap t e r of the Aaerican As aoc i a t ion of Un iveraity Pro­f easora . Ac ting upon t he recOG1111endat i on of the co ... ittee, t he president of Penn State has dec 1ded t o reinst ate the professor and award appropria t e damages . The University of H11sou r i has paid Cay People's Union $10,385 in court coats as a r esult of the decision in the 8th Circuit Cour t of Appeals tha t gave the group campus recognition. The U. S. Supreme Court refused to r ev iew the c ase, thus allowing the lover court ru­l i ng to stand . Officials of the university have asked the Supreme Court for a rehearing on its refusa l 1 but auch rebea rlngs a re 1arely grant ed. international. .. · AIX·EN-PROVENCE, FRANCE -- A criminal court sentenced three men tc prison terms for raping two avowed Les­bians four yeara a~o in a landmark decision which their lavyers said established for the first time "tha t rape is a crime" in France. Although r ape ls llsted as a felony in French legal st a tu tes the trial ma rked the first time a rape case was heard by a crimina l court before a jury without ad­d l t lonal criminal charges. such as armed robbery, ac­companyins the indictment, ln the past, rape cases in France were tried as simple misdemeanors by a Judge without a jury in c losed door aeirnions . RODY POLITIC ro co ro CASADIAS SUP~EME corr.r Tc cd t•1 t The B dy P'l•Lic &\e annP need t Al t C\ will bo t~ tne Supre~~ C urt of Canada lr. a btd to q as. t'le !:earch arrant u ed to ald the o rnal s ,ffice last December JG. Clavton R .. b~ t e paper s le6 al c • .msel has been instructed to seek leave t<> appeal tne d1smisi;al by the Ontario C,urt of Appeal of an earlier TBP move to quash the ~arrant on April 14 . At Lnat time, a three· man panel of Ontario's high­est court 1cfused to interfere with the March l5 ru l in~ of Mr Justice Garrett to the effect that the warrant used in the ra id was legal The move ls described as 11 "stand against growing police powers" in the ~ay issue of t he gay libera tio1 newsmaga7ine pub l ished Mav 5, "The rccert r ev alat ions of growing pol ice crime·­w11rrant less br e11k1·1!} theft and 8"<:on a!llOng other actlvitie~--arc frighte rdng to 8 lot nf pe.,ple ,, .;11'cl TSP c,llective 'Ile-:iber Ed J;ick!i'"· "If our f >ht ng thi 11ct'nn can hel p f~cus Attention on the evtent of p ~'icc power i n thi s country, t~ en our Rp­peal t' the Su p re~e CnJrt will have been 3us tlftcd.• :iews br ief s cont inued on page 22 I 22 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 NEWS BRIEFS continued from page 21 Pink Triangle Preel!> publisher of TB~ ls claiming tha t the warrant vis ill•aal because lt vas 10 1 vaguely worded as to allow the police to take any­thing they v i abed. In fact., the P"' lice seized twelve cartons of aatariab inclu•ing 1ub1cription lists and .. nuacript&. Tb• raid prot1ptad expressions of concern fr .. a wide variety of groups and individuals includ­ing Book• in Canada editor Douglaa Marshal!, broed· caater June Callvood. the Canadian Civil Liberties Aaaociation, and eight Toronto city aldermen . ?be ANITA • • • continued from page 15 cbooae abortion or to be coaati tutioaally guaranteed of .. aal riabta. D\aria1 tbe pre11 coaference after ber perforuaca, lryaat apoka to this 1'int quite clearly: "I jaat know that we cannot leghlata morality, but I think it 11 tille •• atopped legialat• i•a i-rality." Anita daacribed bar initial 80tivation to oppo1e gay righta beginning with that ill·f .. ed Dade County or­dinance aa a fight to "repeal apecial privilege laws which would take away the conatitutional rights of a aajority of Americans That iasue (in Dade County) would have made it .. ndato1y that private , religioua school• hire flaunting homosexuals. That's a very religious . bigoted (lie) law." "And," she continued. "what they (gays) want to do on a national bait.a ii to uae theae lava to push 9o9osexuality a1 an alter­native lifHtyle." Anita al8o1t bit the truth in that last stat .. ent , but ahe errs in her usage of the verb "to puah ." Gays are not trying to push anything on anyone . Yat we do want to bave our way of life accepted as an al t erna­tive lifestyle, and not be diacriminated against or left outside the protection of (or persecuted by) the lav for being what we are. JULIO CORENO ••• continued from page 11 di dn ' t t alk to us1 because for us~ for me, for the u ion, we weren't goi ng because we were so anxious to see ht., because after 111 we weren't going to kiss him, What mattered wa1 t a lking to the people, to the poor people, to every class of people, poor and not poor. to anyone who would support us. That wa1 our i dea . THE 10.:7. I' .;~»--" .. - - AU/Tin/ CRUl/IE/T BAR Open noon - 2 n.m. rla 1l y HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY HAPPY HOUR 4 8 Monda~ thru S~turday HAPPY HOUH 1} 8Sunday 'I) • \ ~. .- ; .: • ': •~ • •• ' • . •. - "'"' ) 1• .. action vaa 1110 protested by members of the gay co .. unity in places as far eway •• London, San Fr1nciaco and Melbourne, Auatralia. aa well •• all across Canada, In a recent devalo,.ent, ?BP bas learned that the police have obtained a judge'• authorization to retain the .. terials 1eized for a further 12-.onth period. The paper vae not permitted even to argue against the court application for thia authorization. Anita spoke about her concern over homosexuality a1 a mother . Sha h11 felt ce111pelled to take a political atand against gay right• in order to protect her children (and everybody elae'a} . When asked if she really recognized the degree of difference and the not totally logical connection between her political atance (and note, it'• not• reli9ious one nov) and her concern 1s a mother, Bryant loat aome of the compoaure 1he had maintained until then and said "they (gays) are under the constitution. IP THEY DON'T FLAU?n' THEIR BO'C>SEXUALITY, THEY II.Wit THE SAME RIGHTS AS ANYONE EL.5E," As long as gays are "in the closet," they ire not offending Anita and thus en­dangering her children. The hundrPda of people standing out by Town Lake on that muggy Sunday morning had ceraainly been focusing their celebration and peaceful protest on the right issue -- h6-an rights. For Anita Bryant i1 asking UA to hide our1elves 10 that we don't offend her ind threat en her rights by asserting our own. Of course, those people didn't have to be inside to hear that message -· it has been heard before and will be beard again, Reprinted with pet'lQission from The Daily Texan, copyright 1978 . TIE STIJJ.101 BOOIST8BE 706L6th Street AUSTJK. TEKAS Play ball! gay athletic clubs form across the state By BILLY FRAZIER Have you heard the talk about a Pan-Texas Gay Att lellc Championship? It i11 mote than just talk. Already the Montrose Sports Association of Hou­ston, the Turtle Creek Athletic Club 1f Dallas. and the newly developing Capitol City Athletic Club o[ AuRtln have been engaging in rousing and intense athletic competltlon involving volleyball in each of the three cities. Dallas held the first tennis tourney in June. Gay People of West Texas (GPWT) from the Lubbock area also participated last year . San Antonio, Galveston, Corpus Christi and other cities will aoon get the message about how much fun is to be had on (and off) the playing fields and will want to organize their ovn tea111S . Tournament• are u1ually played during the day on weekends with the 1ponaoring city also hosting vi1itor1 to all 1orts of social soirees, poolside parties, and dining excursions, and in addition to the "thrill of victory and the agony of defeat," these pan-Texas get-togethers foster excellence a­mong accomplished as well as aspiring gay athletes. Especially noticeable i1 a camaraderie among the participant~ which is truly heart-warming. After all. any time the two legendary Texas rivals, Dall•• and Houston , cAn npend the mejority of two days to• gether vlthout coming away with bleedy fangs and fingernails, you have to admit that a marvelous feat of inter-city diplomacy has occurred, This rather recent development (starting last spring) of sports interest in the gay conmunity has been so encouragin;that plans are nov being made to expand into other popula1 types of competition; for evample . organizing team1 for baseball. swimming, and diving , ~a rathon 1aces, f i eld spo i t s , g~lf and other area~ wh er e the1e i r e n o ~,;h · nl eres t and pa1tic i p1llion to ~ake Lt excl t !rcg and challeng ln3, How do YOU join the fun and games? Simply contact the o •ganizers in your city for more information, If Lhere is no present organization, start talking It up with athlete~ you know and then approach a local gay service organization, or local bar, for support : or s imply organh.e yourselv'es. For help­ful hints and guidelines visit a city that already has it together and ask them for useful information. In Dallas , go by Revershon Park (off Turtle Creek Blvd . ) on Sunday afternoon around Spm. In Houston, try Cherryhurst Park (off Ridgewood and Cherryhurst St.) on Sunday afternoon around 5pm. In Austin, come by Ramsey Park (off 44th and Burnet) on Sunday from 5 to 7pm. ... All of us who are already involved invite all of you to join us. We need more athletic representa­tion for all major Texas cities, and also more side­line supporters (where we've been told there is more "1'ction" than on the field). And, after all, what would American sports events be without a cheering section of beer guzzlers on hand? The ne~ t Aust l n-Dsltas-Houston Tournament will be held the flrst Saturday and Sunday in August in the Capitol City, Details will be publl~hed later. Come on out--brlng your friends--and enjoy the ga'lle. In Austin, Geo rge (owne r and ope rator of the Pri­vate Cellar) Is generously donatin0 (in the name of good sportsmanship , of course) a free keg of beer lo lighten spirit~ every second and fourth Sunday at Ramsey Park. This kind of support (team T-shirts , fiee beer , political donations and who knows what else) furtheri ng gay community activities ls to be highly commended and deeply appreciated. We thank you, George. CAPITAL COIN COMPANY nJ4 GUADALUPE 472-1676 AN EXTENSIVE COU.ECT I ON OF (] rns AND CURf{NCY OOLD JE\£LRY FIU1 JU OVER TI£ hGRLD ALSO BUYING ANTIQUES AND ALL GOLD 2az DI SCO!.M" ON roLD JEWELRY AND COIN SUPPLIES WITH THIS AfJ, 22 GAY AUSTIN JULY 1978 calendar NEWS BRIEFS continued from page ? ' special events 7 9 14 1e 19 21 28 Wo~e nsoace orograma "Women ' s Health: Abcr­tion," Ginny Cleaver from A, stin Women ' s Health Collective; Jane Hertel from Re ­productive Services . National ERA March for extension and rat ification . Washington , D.C. C~ll (202) 737-2295 for more information, Society for the Advancement of Freed om and Equ::tlity special meeting. Ca.11 Woody Egger for details, Womenspace program1 "Considerin~ ~ erv icPs for Battered Women , " Lois Ahrens ::inr.I Joy Ruth, Deadline f or contributions to GA "' il!:S:';:J , GAY COfl:rtUNITY SERVICES rr on t h l.Y meet ing . 2330 Guadalune, 8 om. V~ ~linic snonsored by the Stat e DPnart­ment of Health, Private Celhr, ~ lub 31 ths and GCS. Free for men and ~ omen , ~ 1ub Austin, Joe w. 16th, 10 pm to midnight . \',l')mencoace orogr;;im: "The New Viet N::im." Chris Cunningham , director of the Uni ver­si ty Y, will report on her recent trio to Viet N-.im . Womenspace program1 "Women 's Music , " Gail Lewis and Ruth Huber will play original music (guitar and piano). LEGAL SERVICES at reasonable fees The Legal Clinic charges $15 for your 1n1tial consultation ses aion with en attorney There is no time 1tm1t If you want or n~ •dd1toona1 services we will supply you with a written tee quota tlon If you don't wlah to go on With a case alter c onsulta t i on )'Ou are under no lurtner obugauon t UNCONTESTl!O DIVORCE (NO PROPERTY OR CHILDREN) S SI() • UNCONTESTED OIVORCE {WITH PROPERTY OR CHILDREN I 150 • UNCONTESTED DIVOl!CE fWlfH Pl!OPEllTY & CHILDREN 17.S • NAME CHANGE 4S t MfllKRUPTCY, INDIVIDUAL 225 •BANKRUPTCY. HUSBAND ANO WIFE 275 t SIMPl.E WILL, INDIVIDUAL 40 •SIMPLE WILLS, HUSBAND ANO WIFE eo The leg•l f ... quoted above do not Include court costs. These ,_ •re tor caae• ffled In Travis County between .June 1, 1978 and Soptombe<l,1978. Feea for legal work OU1Sk:le of Travl• County wlll be higher. The Leg•I Clinic also accepts crlmln•I caae • •nd clvll c•••• not llated above Pl••- call for an appo1ni,,_,t No l• g•I advice wlll be given over the telephone. Hour•· 0 00 5:00 weekday• \l\!8el<ends and evenltig8 by ap PQlntment . Vlvl•n Mehl•b Legal Clinic at 501 W.12th St. Austin, Texas 78701 ..,.___ _ 512-478-9332 _ _ ~ I weekly MONDAY-SATURDAY H:ippy Hour at the New ApA r t ­ment, 4-8nm MONDAY Lambda AA, 209 West 27t h , 8om TUESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY sm:DAY Free beer, the New Apar tment Lesbian r ::ip group (open) , Womens pace, ?: JOnm Showtiffie , Aust in 8ountry , l C: JOnm .;,.,menso"lce pr o~ r·-rn:s with dlc­c ~ s s ion : ~offer at ?n~ , ~oc~~ ­~ r ::i ~ ~o~ : ~~e ~~r~:~ t?r~c~ be:c·1: R::i-:> gr O·?• :;;iy :;l')'Tlm~r.::·· .::.rr ­v ic2~ (ncen) , ~nm ;.,_. !10.Y t:•)Vr "'\:: th•• I~· "' A tJ'.tr~ - zr:e:it , : lOCl!": - ~~"""i 'lo llnyb~ ll sron Ho r ~d h~ ~;~ , R::im~ey P:i!"J.: , ·.1<>::n .'.!.tt. :it R':>Cf~i~!e , 5- ?r;m. /rcr~ ~·- r bePr e very Gec,.,nd ~n! f o~ r 'h S1mriay (cJ on~t~<l by th~· F rit<i~e Ce::. h r). Come nn ?u'; I .Ht ~ r iii opy Ho:!. l 0"·1 Hour, frNl bePr 3nd hot doe~ , 7rm , Priv2t° CPllar , ~e tr ~oolitan Commu~ i ty Church s er vices , noon and 7 t JC p~ , 614 East 6th. 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