Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
File 015
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 015. 1981-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/48.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-03). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 015. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/48

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 015, 1981-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/48.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date March 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14! ^CONNECTIONS: Reviewed by William French There is historical evidence that the phenomenon of sexual-affectional relations between men and boys is not unique to any culture or geography. Indeed, one is hard- pressed to identify any major civilization in history's montage that did not experience it to some degree of commonplace occurrence. Socrates and his contemporaries lived in a society notorious for flagrant pederasty. So did Caesar, Mu- hammed, T.E. Lawrence (of Arabia), and King Arthur. A number of Popes were infamous for their indulgences with young boys. Such relationships between age and youth have been of interest to a great many writers and provided ample frames for strong and enduring characters in both classical and modern literature. It's risky for an author to deal with this most volatile and forbidden of sexual-affectional relation ships (except, of course, incest). If not superior in tact and taste, an author may find himself on a blacklist, not a book jacket. Wallace Hamilton is superior. His current novel, KEVIN, proves it. This is the story of Kevin, the boy, and Bruce, the man. They meet in a sex-for-money encounter and twice more cross paths before realizing and accepting the mutual emotional fulfillment they enjoy. Starry-eyed adolescents and idolized father-figures have no place in this straightforward account of two people whose generation gap is bridged by the far-reaching needs of each for the other. At all times believable and honest, Hamilton's prose is unobscured. The reader's eye absorbs the narrative with the ease of a listener's ear harkening to the spoken word. This remarkably competent style facilitates the reader's understanding not only of storyline but of the emotional and psychological makeup of the persons that story is about. Hamilton, however, mercifully spares us the tedium of libido analysis, social implications, and sexual moralizing; he sticks to telling his story and tells it eloquently. My enthusiasm for the book is shared by Tom Reeves, founder of the North American Man/Boy Love Association (NAMBLA): "Kevin is the first novel I know of to treat man-boy love honestly and positively from both vantage points." Praise of that magnitude from a practicing pederast bespeaks the book's literary merit and its objective integrity. By way of a personal reflective observation, the most significant statement is not the book's venture into the specific issue of man-boy love. The most important statement Hamilton makes (and, it's an indirect one)is that alternative love relationships can succeed despite odds, omens, and objections to the.contrary. We in the wilderness of sexual defiance badly needed the heartening cry this book sounds. KEVIN, St. Martin's Press fjct CRKcrdi SPRING TEX'S COLORADO STREET BAR 404 COLORADO, AUSTIN EtfH ^ffifc
File Name uhlib_5962584_v003_n003_014_ac.jpg