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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
File 012
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 012. 1981-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/45.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-03). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/45

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 012, 1981-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/45.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date March 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript CONNECTIONS: !n Jo Burt This is such a family. We've been together a year and a few months, and still there's in-jokes building up and a lot of little laughs. A year into the TRB, we were already fighting and there were problems developing I noticed how much TRB changed between the first and second albums. Yeah. There's a session drummer on the second album, already. That was one thing. It sounded like a piano album to me. fMeaMmasmsmmamasa^^aMm^ammaammammmmmmmammmmasa^m,ma. Right. The guitar was mixed right out. A real shame. Where do you live? I live in Hammersmith, West London. Is that the gay neighborhood? Unhappily, no. Is there a gay neighborhood? There's a small ghetto called Earl's Court, but it's nothing like an American gay ghetto, where you get Wot like Greenwich Village or San Francisco? Not like Westheimer. Please! Actually out of all of those, the one I like most was Westheimer. I don't really like Castro that much. And Polk. It's not so very nice. I've always felt that gays per se don't really like rock and roll that much. If you were to make a mass generalization. . . . This one does. Oh sure, so does this one. Obviously. If you made a generalization, gays tend to like ballet, opera, Judy Garland, Bette Midler, and disco. In the same terms, they tend not to like rock and roll. The people who would get most out of Sector 27 would be rock and roll fans who happen to be gay, as opposed to large swathes of gays who suddenly saw the light and got into rock and roll. I don't think they would and I don't blame them, you know. I wouldn't go to see an opera simply because the leading tenor was gay. That wouldn't make me enjoy it one jot more. I don't expect any kind of quote-unquote "loyalty" from the gay community, simply because I'm an out musician. The only reason people should come to see Sector is because they like the music. That's healthy. So you consider yourself a performer who is gay rather than a gay performer? That's what I mean. I don't think there's any reason, simply because you share someone's sexuality, that you have to automatically enjoy their work. Their work should be the thing that they're judged on, not their sexuality. If through that, you're able to reach young gay people, young lesbians, who might find themselves out in the middle of Nebraska or something, then that is great. Of course, we're delighted that you're out. If you can help other people have the'strength to come out, that's the main thing. Everybody should be out. If everybody came out overnight, we'd have a Congress and Senate that is on our side. A lot of people would not go for things like fag-beating, which is on the increase and doesn't need to be. If it wasn't an unknown quantity, if people had some idea who gay people are, like their best buddy is one, and maybe their father is bisexual, then maybe they'd ease off a bit. In Jim's GAY AUSTIN review of your appearance at the Armadillo in 1979, he contrasted Rod Stewart, who is straight, but a campy, drag-queen-type performer, with you, who are real, and a good actor 'and a good performer. He said it was so refreshing to see the difference. There's a lot of gay overtones in rock, but a lot of it is a gimmick, too. Yeah, but that can be liberating. That can even be a little bit of help. A lot of people who like Rod Stewart don't like Sector 27. If, in the corner of the Rod Stewart show, there's some kid who finds a sympathetic chord, even if Rod's only putting it on, it's going to be liberating. Then it's good that that happens. It's symptomatic for any kind of radical movement to have infighting and pick holes in people who are broadly on your side of the fence, rather than people on the other side. I would much rather have Rod Stewart being camp than one of these really macho heavy-metal rock and roll bands talking about fags and queers. Rod Stewart always does have The Killing of Georgie to his credit. Certainly. I think there's too much infighting. Continued on page 15 Darlington Station at a quarter to four Down in the tearoom, watching the wall Waiting forever, a boy next door Daylight fading and In hating it all Can't keep away, can't keep away from the other door Can't Keep Away Stevie B '«.'."//.'..
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