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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
File 011
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 011. 1981-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/44.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-03). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 011. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/44

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 011, 1981-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/44.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date March 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10! ^CONNECTIONS^ TOM ROBINSON CONTINUED related, but the coverage that you're getting this time can't be compared with when TRB played Austin. This time, you're getting radio spots about every half hour from Club Foot and Spotlite Productions. That's wild. Really great. So we might have more than eighty people tonight. Here's hoping, anyway. I mean, by the time this comes out (in CONNECTIONS), we'll find out. (There were 300 at Club Foot to hear Tom Robinson and his group that night. Ed.) I sure hope so. You made CONNECTIONS, too. We estimated there were 200 at the Armadillo when you were here in 1979. Yeah, I think 200 would be about right. It's really depressing when you're in a place that holds 2,000 and there are only 200 in the audience. There was no publicity to the gay community in Austin before your appearance at the Armadillo. The gay part of Sector is altogether more satisfactory than TRB was. TRB was this kind of more or less conventional mid-70's rock band, with songs like Glad to Be Gay grafted on top of that, from my sensibility as a writer. You know, it's 1981 now, and with Sector songs like Can't Keep Away, "down in the tearoom, watching the walls," it all fits in much more integrally. The band has more friendship - dare I say it - love on stage between the members, and has more style in terms of how the men look and feel and approach the music. It feels much more coherent, and I'm very happy with it. It doesn't make money, it isn't successful like the TRB was, but, I feel so much more whole. I'm hoping the Sector 27 album will do pretty good. It seems a lot stronger than T. B 2. I'm much more proud of it, but then, it represents a much larger chunk of my life. It's sort of a culmination of the last year and a half of work to finally release the thing. Even then, it's only like a calling card for Sector 27. It's not, "this is the future of rock and roll as we know it," or "this is all we're capable of," or anything like that. It's like our credentials, musically. "If you like this, stick around, because we got plenty more." At the same time, that Invitation song is our statement of intent, our manifesto: '".one of them bastards notice when we're gone." People can Take or Leave It. They like us or they don't. ;;re you going to sing Sing if You're Glad to Be Gay ht? not going to sing any of the old songs, barring possibly Bully for You. (Co-written with Peter Gabriel) We had the choice when we formed the band. There was a reputation still extant, various tours that had been done, and hit records that had been achieved. We could have made a "Tom Robinson Band Mark Three" or just called it "TRB" and gone out, although we were a completely different group, except for me. We would have got plenty of bookings because of the name and kept the EMI recording contract, instead of being dropped. When we played concerts, we would get an instant reaction, because people would hear songs they knew. You can always please an audience by singing something they've heard and they'll sing along, and you know you'll get an encore, and win them over and everything. We could have made quite a lot of money, in short, by doing that. But . . . Stevie B is twentyish, ten years younger than me. Stevie is a young kid, but he's a really talented guitar player. He's just like a prodigy, but, he can't play like Danny Kustow could, in the old band. Danny has a very distinct guitar style, and if Stevie tries to imitate that, he comes off very badly. So, if he had to learn the old songs, and play those licks and everything, he would always be a second-rate Danny. This band would always be regarded as a substitute, and all of us, well, all the others, would feel themselves to be substitutes. And the audience would feel it, too. They would all way, "Why did the original lineup break up?" We said no to the easy option and started trying to win a reputation in our own right. Sector had to begin from scratch. We figured we'd go ahead, write our own songs between the four of us and win our own reputation, bit by bit. Now, we're playing to audiences that never heard of Tom Robinson. And couldn't give a shit. They see Sector 27 and go, "Wow! That's a hot band! What a great guitar player! What's his name? Stevie B, huh? Right." And he's the first Stevie B, now, not the second Danny Kustow. I think if we'd been playing the old songs, then it would have been necessarily inviting comparison and cashing in on what went before. We didn't feel that was very honest, especially with what we had to offer. I think if we manage to succeed, if we do'start to break even financially instead of losing money and running into debt, then it won't be any skin off our backs to play the old songs.
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