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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
File 008
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 008. 1981-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-03). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/41

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981 - File 008, 1981-03, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/51/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 3, March 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date March 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript ^CONNECTIONS' called The Secret Policeman's Ball, part 1 and 2. You can get those on import here on Island Records. There's an unreleased track of mine called 1967 on that, and an acoustic version of Glad to Be Gay. It's a hysterically funny movie, if they ever release it over here. It's a full feature-length film of the stage show that we did for a week at a theatre. It's already made well in excess of 100,000 pounds for Amnesty International. (Current value of the British pound is $2.35 American. Ed.) It's broken box-office records in Britain. The film is very funny, very good entertainment. Everybody donated their services, including the filmmakers. One of the great things about it, it's a bit parochial, because it's England, is that there's a prominent politician, Jeremy Thorpe, the leader of the Liberal Party, who was implicated in a blackmail about his alleged homosexuality. He was alleged to have tried to suppress the guy who was alleged to have been trying to blackmail him. Peter Cook did this fantastic spoof of the summing-up by the judge, who was totally biased in favor of this politician, and against this gay guy who he tried to have killed. The performance happened the week that the real trial had taken place. It's still really funny, even now. It was the most outrageous miscarriage of justice you've ever heard of. Peter ends his summing up by saying, "I trust you'll now all retire to consider your verdict of not guilty." I thought it was important to do Glad to Be Gay for that particular show because Amnesty International doesn't recognize being imprisoned for being gay as a political offense. Strictly speaking, it isn't, but they don't regard it as part of their job to campaign for people who have been imprisoned for that. Since that has to do with the hierarchy at Amnesty, I felt it was important to get that in there. So, it's perhaps an angrier performance of Glad to Be Gay than the tone of the film generally merited. Have you heard Sector 27 at all? Yes. I got the record as soon as I saw it in the store. How many times have you been able to listen? That's quite important, too. Probably about five. Oh, good. I'm just starting to . . , . Oddly enough, I made a couple of notes about the songs . . . Oddly enough! I take it it is oddly enough. A lot of the straight journalists who come along from the local papers might have listened to it half a time, or something like that, so they don't know anything about the subject matter. Probably about half of the songs have started to sink in. I'm beginning to decipher lyrics and things. Three of them seem to be about resistance to authority: Invitation, Total Recall, and Take or Leave It. 'otal Recall is. It's a cliche now to talk about the data banks and how easy it is for them to survey you, but the myth that's being propagated is the 1984 myth, which is that Big Brother is actually watching you. The idea that Jo had, and that I was working on with this song, writing it with Jo, who's my best buddy, and the bass player in the band, was that they don't actively survey you; they merely record facts, which is a very different thing. So, the data bank is amassing facts about you, as you live your life, but nobody's necessarily looking at that record. It's just that when they do want to find out about you, and they call in on the ' walkie-talkie or whatever, they then have access. The punch line of the song is "Checking the records is as far as they go." If you ain't on the record, they can't check ■shit! They haven't been watching. It's things like your credit card, driver's license, and medical records that are recorded. The last verse is dealing with possible ways of circumventing that - "Slip into the city like a Vanishing man, Midnight arriving at the station. Casual labor paying cash in the hand, Short-let cheap accommodation. Apply for a license at a fresh address. Get another bike, take another test. What you never tell, they can never guess. Better not forget to send off the registration." It. was;,rreant to be quite light-hearted, rather than pounding away at it. I like it a lot better than 1984 stuff. Take or Leave It is a nice hopeful song, too. Do you have you. own record company, like the song says? We did actually put our first two singles out with Sector on an independent label in Britain. The finance was the thing that meant we had to finally go with a larger label there. We're with a small label in the States, I.R.S. (International Record Syndicate), which is nice. That leaves us a lot of flexibility. I have to say, there are less than ten employees in that company and they've already done far more for us than Capitol Records did for TRB in two years. I'm not sure if the record company is directly Continued on page 10 Sector 27 (from left): stevie B, Tom Robinson, Burt, and Derek Quinton
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