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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1972
File 008
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1972 - File 008. 1972-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3749/show/3731.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1972-06). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1972 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3749/show/3731

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1972 - File 008, 1972-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3749/show/3731.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date June 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript GAY LIB IN GREAT BRITAIN I EDITOR'S NOTE - Anthony Collins> an Associated Press Writer, submitted the following article to the news service and it was reprinted in the Houston Post, May 24; The release received from CHE in London was not as complete as a result the NUNTIUS is reprinting the AP release. LONDON - In a Piccadilly Circus doorway a couple embraces. The lovers are breaking the law --they're both men. They have just come from a demonstration by militant homosexuals who feel that Britian's already-liberal laws still aren't liberal enough. Among otherthings, they demand the right to be just as amorous in public as boy and girl couples. "If I want to kiss my boy friend and hold hands in public, I don't see why that should be illegal," says Malcolm Bissett, a 20-year- old Scottish homosexual. He is a member of a protest movement called the Gay Liberation Front --GLF. The GLF wants Britan to give homosexuals the same legal rights as everyone else. While many people in other countries consider Britain's 1967 law on homosexuality extremely liberal, the militants don't see it that way. The landmark 1967 Act of Parliament, preceded by a lively nationwide debate,legalizedhomo- sexual acts in private by consenting adults. It was intended not to condone homosexuality but to free adult homosexuals from police harassment and blackmail. Four U.S. states -- Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois and Idaho -- have similar laws. With the 1967 Act, Britain came a long way from the 16th century law of Henry VIII grouping homosexuality with heresy and witchcraft -- all punished by death -- and an 1861 law changing the maximum sentence to life imprisonment. But British GLF militants complain that even when there is mutual consent and privacy, the 1967 law still provides for imprisonment of up to five years for a homosexual 21 or older if hehas relations with a young man 16 to 20. For sexual relations with a boy under 16 the maximum penalty is life imprisonment. The militants want the age limit dropped from 21 to 16 -- the same "age of consent" as for heterosexuals. And they want freedom from alleged police harassment of homosexuals who show affection in public. "The 1967 law didn't go far enough, although it was a start," contends Tony Smythe, general secretary of the National Council for Civil Liberties, a liberal group. "There are still many homosexuals suffering from guilt and loneliness because their relationships are illegal or socially frown- . ed upon." Says the Rev. Michael Butler, an Anglican clergyman who counsels homosexuals: "The 1967 law helped make society more sympathetic, especially when people saw that the bill was supported by the churches. But people forget that there have been centuries of society being conditioned against homosexuals." The Rev. Mr. Butler works for the Samaritans, a charity that tries to talk people out of suicide. A growing number of the depressed people who come to the Samaritans are homosexuals, he says. They call themselves "gay", but he finds they're often sad -- suffering from loneliness, shame and self-hatred. There are no precise figures on their numbers. Michael De-la- Noy, former press officer for the archbishop of Canterbury and now active in helping homosexuals, estimates there are more than one milling homosexuals out of CALL 643-7976 FOR YOUR PRIVATE APPOINTMENT . . . for your entire needs — Cosmetics, jewelry, panty-hose, wigs, bras, etc. - lingerie, clothing and understanding. 9 - 5 JVlon. - Sat AFTER HOURS 944-7402 NOW OPEN SALOON SERVING YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGES. PRE-GAME WARM UP: GREYHOUNDS, BLOODY AND SCREWS FIFTY CENTS. SATURDAY AND SUNDAY AFTERNOONS 1 'TIL 4 P.M. Britian's total population of 55 million. The GLF now claims a membership of 1,000 throughout the country, with branches in 13 cities. Its weekly London meetings and demonstrations called "gayins" draw some 300, it says. The first public dance in Britain for homosexual men and women was organized in London in 1970 by the GLF and 750 attended. About one-fifth of GLF's members are lesbians, and they are considered its most radical influence. In contrast, their American "sisters" have broken away from male homosexual protest groups. Although Britain is more tolerant than many other countries, the GLF claims that homosexuals get turned down for many jobs purely because of their homosexuality. But the Rev. Mr. Butler of the Samaritans suspects that homosexuals often use this as an excuse when they're rejected for other reasons. "Leading a double life, hiding their secret from their parents, makes them almost paranoid in many cases, and they read too much # into a situation," he says. "It makes for a ghetto mentality. They get more obsessed with their homosexuality until gradually their personalities deteriorate," he adds. "I try to get them to go out more into 'straight' society." London's "gay ghetto" includes a notorious movie house near Victoria train station, public toilets, parks and a group of pubs in the low rent Earls Court district where homosexuals have furtive encounters. "A sexual meat market," the London Times calls these places. The GLF and another group called Campaign for Homosexual Equality have tried to organize social clubs that would offer better places to meet. But in some cases, such as the English town of Burnley, offended local citizens have pressured landlords not to let them in, the National Civil Liberties Council says. The militants say it's wrong to call homosexuality a sickness. They've demonstrated against British psychiatric clinics that use electric shocks and nausea-producing chemicals as an "aversion therapy" to treat homosexuals. The GLF uses street theater, Hyde Park pinics and other activities to drive home the slogan: "Gay is Good." The group has had several setbacks, but feels its activities are starting to achieve a main purpose: to "liberate" the ashamed homosexuals known as "closet queens" and help them shake off their guilt. GAY GETS SECURITY BACK Reprinted from the Houston Chronicle May 28, 1972. Washington - A federal judge has ordered the Defense Department to restore the security status is had revoked from an avowed homosexual. U.S. Dist. Judge John H. Pratt issues an order and an accompanying memorandum stating that a person who admits to practicing homosexuality carnot be barred from handling secret defense information. Benning Wentworth, an employe of an electronics firm under a defense contract, had his clearance lifted under a guideline blocking clearance of people who have engaged in "any criminal, infamous dishonest or notoriously disgraceful conduct or sexual pro- version." Pratt ruled that Wentworth "did not receive a fair and impartial adjudication" of his Defense Department security status. Wentworth had been cleared for defense work for 13 years.
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