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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972
File 010
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 010. 1972-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3713.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1972-08). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 010. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3713

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 010, 1972-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3713.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date August 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).; This newspaper issue is missing pages 10-11.
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript EDITORIAL A gay (or straight) parade, any time of the year and in any place will be very much like a Mardi Gras celebration. Last year's Christopher Street Liberation Day Parade in Hollywood had colorful floats, clowns, drag queens in lavish costumes, and even a baton twiler. There was a float carrying ten beautifully built young studs, briefly costumed, and with a sign saying GROOVY GUYS MAKE GROOVY STARS! There was a platoon of motorcycle guys in black leather jackets, heavy chains and--high heels. There was c well- built young man (again briefly costumed) carrying an enormous boa but some of the spectators and watchers were "turned off" by what they considered to be vulgar displays: A sign bearing the words, SUCKING IS BETTER THAN WAR, and a 35 foot long red, white, pink, and blue "surrealistic cock." (Others felt that if beauty exists j in the eye of the beholder, then obscenity must exist there also) All this led one writer to complain to THE ADVOCATE (the gay national newspaper) that these parades defeat their purpose: instead of presenting freaks, we should march a thousand average, well-adjusted homosexuals in business suits and ties. To which one of the parade organizers replied: "Find us a thousand average, well- adjusted homosexuals in business suits and ties willing to march in the parade, and we'll be glad to march them. Until then, we will use what we've got." This year's parades will be no different: we will have our critics. There are many gay people who have NEVER made a contribution to the gay movement in any way-- time, money, or effort; but who are very eager to criticize those who do. Very much like the Little Red Hen who could find no help when planting the corn, harvesting the corn, grinding the corn, or cooking the corn; but found her table crowded when the dinner bell rang. But none-the-less we must go on. If Walt Whitman saw "all America singing'' and Isadora Duncan longed to see "all America dancing," this writer would rather see "all America marching." Marching for the rights of all Americans. There approximately 975,966 gay men and women in Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and New Mexico. Most are in their damn closets, and because of jobs, families, and social positions can't afford to come out. And who would blame them? But they could contribute in some way to the GAY PRIDE PARADE. They might drive a float unseen, dance down the street disguised as a clown, make posters, lick stamps, make posters, and seal envelopes, contribute a few dollars, or provide food and shelter for out of town marchers. The rest of us WILL MARCH. (Photo by Woody Keys) GAY FREEDOM IS We expected obscenities. Perhaps even violence, from both the police and the 14,000 spectators who came downtown June 24th to see Dallas's First Gay Pride Parade. But the police were friendly. As a matter of fact, they seemed to be having a ball. And if there were catcalls and half-ass cute remarks hurled at us from the sidewalks, we didn't hear them. We were too busy singing and shouting Gay slogans. Many in the crowd applauded and cheered us. Some even left the walks to join our ranks. But most stood in stunned silence. Could this be real? Men and Women proudly marching down the street, arms around each other's shoulders, openly proclaiming to the world that they were human too? Where was the shame? The guilt? And that theme song gaily blair- ing from the sound truck: "United we stand: divided we fall. And if our backs should ever be against the wall, We'll be together. Together, you and I." And so it was. The early summer air seemed filled with our strength, love, and warmth. We gave it and received it from each other. We cared! Oh, why can't it be that way every day? How often have we opened our hearts and homes to those in need, only to be robbed, sometimes beaten by our own people? How often have we, who have enemies enough, heavens known- cruelly put down one of our own? Or the many times we've thoughtlessly hurt our lonely ones by simply ignoring them. Couldn't we have invited them into our lives? Why is it those who need "Just A Minute' , V£XX^_ 24 Hour Service —*-.-— jUjXrfiUt phone L-UXU^h' LJl—l 526-4406 528-1000'' 2319 So. Shepherd Houston, Tex il li V 1r your hostesses Ricci & Rita B0ABIH6 €0*S CLUB POOL • DANCING - MIXED DRINKS Open Tuesday through Sunday 5pm - 2am (Closed Holidays) 2305 S. SHffHERD _1_ 52S 9430 Page 9
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