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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972
File 007
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 007. 1972-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1972-08). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3710

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972 - File 007, 1972-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3723/show/3710.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 8, August 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date August 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).; This newspaper issue is missing pages 10-11.
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript NOW SERVING YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGES - tftf *** «0«* MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 5 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. RONSUES REWARD REWARD: Something that we expect to receive for services rendered, whether tangible such as money, a thing, a person's body... or intangible such as a person's presence, a smile, public recognition, respect, love...? Is this all? Reward: a sense of satisfaction, a feeling of Tightness, a knowing that some action or thought is good or perhaps God. In the latter sense the highest reward is not ireceived...that is, it is not gotten or expected from outside our - selves. Rather it comes from within. We have made a trite cliche of the truism "Virture is it's own reward." Yet it is so in health. People do "exist in this world, all of them doingtheir own thing, without hope of some type of reward ...with no expectations" from outside themselves, but with the sure knowledge of inner reward. There are hundreds of thousands of them. Their numbers are capped by the great men of high consiciousness -- Jesue, Lao-Tze, Shankara, Krishna, Gautama the Buddah, Moses, among others. Theirnumbers are undergirded by the guy who picks up a cup carelessly discarded on the lawn by someone else and throws it in the trash can, by the driver who lets the other driver go first, the dedicated teacher, by the conscientious cop, by the myriad men and women who use their abilities above and beyond the requirements of their jobs...and for good. In our gay world they are those who, while expecting that a "type of friendship should (indeed) exist after an evening of rather intimate rapport," are not bitter, are not rendered hopeless, or otherwise impaired when the light of another day brings rejection and disdain. They are those whose inner confidence, whose inner wholeness is complete enough so that no rejections, no blunting of expectations, no lack of outside reward can shake it or threaten their emotional integrity. Their reaction is compassion for the limited horizons and the distorted emotions of the rejecter...not condescension but unexpressed compassion, concern, perhaps surprise, with not pain. What is the source of their strength? The spirit within, that's the source. How can they be hurt if their thoughts are stayed on the Lord in other words, if they recognize their Spiritual origin and existence? What reward do we need from "This world?" If we are not reaching out to get the THINGS pi this world...includingbodies and their owners...as your life goal, but instead are accepting these THINGS as your rightful but incidental due as you search for the Spirit within...after all, where IS THE Kingdom of Heaven? If this is your effort, and as a Christian it should be, then the arrows of disdain and rejection bounce off easily. Public recognition is not J needed because deep within you i KNOW and are sure of your worth _„ —to you, your God and to His other manifestations: your fellow | creatures and creation. Remember the Golden Rule: | "Do unto others as you would have j them do unto you," and a very commonly applied psychological rule: "I am not in this world to live up to your expectations and you are not in this world to live up to my expectations." So, says this contrast, if you trick with someone seemingly in the spirit of love, or if you work for an organization in that same spirit and are then disdained, ignored or rejected ... it follows that the human psychological rule is applicable while the Golden Rule is only self-defeating. For human finite beings the above counclusion is inevitable. For spiritual man who knows that he does not live by bread alone, there is no contrast and no conflict. I am, in truth, not in this world to do what YOU expect of me but rather what I, the Spirit, expects of me. At the same time you are not here to do what I expect of you, but what you, the Spirit, expects of you. In other words the demand is placed upon you, by you, to live up to your own expectations. That demand comes from the Father within, your Spiritual Awareness, your your Spiritual Awareness, your Spirithood, your Goodness... and in the fulfillment of that demand you could hardly help doing to others as you would like them to do to you. Therefore, trick with love, work with zeal, expecting nothing from the outside and Everything from the inside and the things that you would have done to you will be done. --Charles David (The Prodigal - July 9, 1972) The NUNTIUS DISPLAY ADVERTISING RATES 1/8 Page $ 20.00 1/4 Page 40.00 l/2Page 80.00 3/4Page 120.00 Full Page U0.00 1/2 Tone (Pictures) each 2.00 Color (Red, Blue, Greet etc.) 30.00 Calender Listing (on back) 5.00 Calendar Listing FREE if you sell TheNUNTlUS •- FREE Coupons (In Ad) FREE Business Card Size Ad 5.00 Your same size art, trademark, etc., reproduced in ad Free. Artwork: Normal lettering No Charge Special Art Available Nominal Charge THE NUNTIUS Published by CITY ART STUDIO 4615 Mt. Vernon (713)524-5612 Houston, Texas 77006 far Out! - GENE LEGGETT '•-'<■' Members of Dignity/Houston were privileged on Sunday, July 16, to hear Gene Leggett speak to them on gayness, gay civil rights, and on relious faity. Dignity/Houston meets at 3512 Travis on Sundays, 10:30 a.m. - 12 noon. Gene is a leader of the Purple Star Tribe in Dallas. As such, he has been the "father" speritually of many more children than the 3 of whom he is the physical father. He was suspended from the United Methodist ministry in San Antonio, Texas, in May, 1971, because he Texas, in May, 1971, because he is gay and proud. He grew up inEdinburg, Texas, and graduated from Perkins School of Tehology, SMU, Dallas, in 1959. He was featured in the Dec, 31, 1971 issue of Life Magazine on page 68, on a 2-page spread entitled "A gallery of men and - women important to the (gay) movement." He was also pictured in The Texas Methodist newspaper in May, 1972. The captian under the picture told of how the General Conference in Atlanta in April had said it does notwantgaypreachers in Methodist pulpits. As a Methodist gay preacher, Gene Leggett is an outcast- -a prophet, a crusader, and a lover of his fellow men. He is 37 years old. Here are some of the ideas Gene advocated to the audience at Dignity/Houston: "We gays can say we are content to be persecuted, because this brings great beauty into our lives. We gay brothers have to stand together and help one another share our suffering." "One thing we gays have to offer the world is our sensitivity. We need however, to avoid becoming self-righteous. We have no right to act in self-reghteous rage. We have no right to inflict suffering on straights, out of revenge.'' "Gay people in this world have a mission to reach out to the people around us, to see the God in them, and to see the beauty in our unattractive, "stupid" neighbor." "A gay person sees life as something to celebrate! The gay person is in life to share and to be on the same level with all. A straight person sees life as an acquisitive force. The straight person wants to control life and to be on top of the heap." "The church is a terribly gay institution. It talks about paradoxes, visions, and dreams. The church lost its gayness when the men preachers walked in to take it over from the women who made up the church." "God, life, and religion are awesome, mysterious, irrational, obserd, and uncontrollable. Out of the whimsy, mystical, and obserd, flows the truth. In the theater, the . masks and makeup we wear, and the games we play, point us to ithe truth. The same thing applies in everyday life." To continue to fight the church, may be a way to help destroy the r^age 6
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