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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 013
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 013. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3680.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 013. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3680

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 013, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3680.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript for "multiple contusions" and was listed last night in fair condition. "Medical examiner George Curtis said Lynch had inhaled a mixture of mud and water and suffocated after being thrown unconscious into a sewer. "According to police, Lynch and Tuscher had met casually near closing time in a Bay Village bar and were invited to a party by six fellow patrons. Tuscher told detectives that, lured by promises of booze, some pot and a lot of fun,' he and Lynch left the bar and got into a vehicle with the six men. "After driving around sections of Forest Hills and Jamaica Plain, Tuscher said, the vehicle stopped near a rear entrance of the Arnold Arboretum at South and Bussey " streets. Police said the eight men got out of the car and conversed until someone yelled: 'Now!' "Lynch and Tuscher were repeatedly struck with 'clubs, knives and other weapons,' according to police, and 'several sticks covered with blood' were later discovered at the scene. Tuscher told police that both men were also robbed of cash, wallets, jewelry and watches. "Police quoted Tuscher as saying the six men dragged Lynch and him to a sewer main at the edge of the Arnold Arboretum grounds. "Lynch reportedly was dropped first through the 27-inch opening into the deepest part of the sewer with Tuscher thrown on topofhim. Police said the cover of the main was replaced and the six assailants drove away. "Truscher told police he waited until he knew his assailants had gone before calling for help. He was eventually heard by an unidentified passing motorist. "Det. Sgt. John Daley of the homicide division and Det. Sgt. Arnold White of Station 13 are conducting the investigation of the attack. Robbery has been described as the motive." After I'd finished only the first paragraph of the preceding article, I knew that Jeremiah Lynch and Stephen Tuscher were victims of faggot haters. By the time I was finished with the article, Iguessed that the bar referred to was The Other Side -- Boston's most famous gay dancing bar -- and I pretty much could imagine the whole situation. My emotional response was complex. One element was fear, but I'm almost immune to fear. Cruising can be a dangerous business, and while unlike some people, I am not turned on to the danger, I am always aware of it. Will I give up cruising because of its potential danger? Probably not. (Perhaps I should give it up for other reasons -- because it has so little to do with the sense of community which we want to build and which Jim Kepner has written about so eloquently in these pages -- but that is another story.) Another element of my response to the Lynch-Tuscher story was . sadness, on many levels, for dead Jeremiah andhospitalizedStephen. And there was curiosity about how their families were dealing with the situation. (Had the cops told them theie sons were faggots? Maybe they had known previously, maybe not.) But my strongest emotional response was anger, directed at the Boston Globe for not telling its readers the true story of what happened to Jeremiah Lynch and Stephen Tuscher, for neatly ex cising homosexual oppression out of the story. I remembered the class I took in libel law at the Columbia Journalism School; it's libelous to say that someone is a homosexual, and even if the person is dead, his or her descendants can sue and collect! Is that why the Boston Globe hid the facts, I wondered. Well, it turns out that Thomas Dotton, the Globe reporter is a Black gay brother, and of course he knew the gay aspects of the story, but the police told him the gay facts "off the record," and besides, the Globe "is a family newspaper." So the story appeared in its truncated form, which, Dotton says, "was unacceptable to me and still is." I sympathized with Dotton having to put up with his 3ditors' dishonesty -- on what is supposedly one of the nation's most liberal dailies -- and beyond that I was happy with this new affirmation of how right I was to have quit the establishment press five years ago. I almost sat down to write a letter to the editor of the Globe to complain about their dishonest journalism, but I decided instead to direct my energy into an article for the Advocate and the Nuntius. The editors of the publications, following standard journalistic procedures, would want certain facts for their article, and I, as a "trained professional Journalist," knew how to obtain them. I found out that Stephen Tuscher was still in only "fair" condition and could receive no visitors. I balked at the idea of talking to his family; what would I ask them? I called the police officers mentioned in the Globe article, but they were not in. I called Charley Shively, a friend of mine involved with Boston's "Fag Rag," whose lover happens to be a bartender at The Other Side. Charley confirmed all of my intuitions. In fact, the police had already been to The Other Side asking questions. Charley said that he had also heard that Jeremiah Lynch's family had refused to take his body, though this could not be confirmed, and later it was learned that his family did indeed take care of the burial. (The gay- vine reflects our cruel reality.) By the time the next day dawned, I felt I could no longer proceed with this routine reporting project. Was I just being lazy? I felt uncomfortable with the standard journalism expected of my by the Advocate and Nuntius. What did the specific details matter anyway? Could I say something about this incident that would be helpful to othr gay people? 1 decided to call Thomas Dotton to tell him how I felt about his article, but also to garner some more information. Dotton told me that the police were less than vigorous in their investigation. He said that one of the bartenders at The Other Side could definitely identify at least one of the assailants, yet the police seemed uninterested. 'Queer entanglements," one of the cops said to Dotton and other reporters, as if to dismiss the murder. Later, I got through to Det. Sgt. White, who informed me that two arrests had been made and more were expected. He said that routine investigation had led to the arrests, and he assured me, when I asked him whether police were less than vigorous in solving the murder of a queer, that the police would go ''as far as possible'' in finding the culprits. My anger at Dotton's article subsided after talking with him. He said he was willing to let me identify him as "gay" in the pages of the Advocate and Nuntius (though he told me he doesn't like the Advocate). He told me that he was a founder of the Student Homophile Leage at Columbia University in 1966, but has not been involved in the gay movement recently. As a result of the Arbortum incident -- plus a new wave of assaults on gay people in Boston cruising spots -- Dotton has received the OK from his editors to work on a long piece discussing the escalation in anti-gay violence. In addition, he decided to attend a meeting of the Gay Media Watch, a new Boston gay community group specializing in monitoring and correcting media Pfcverage. The obvious response to all this violence, as gay community leaders have already stated, is organized self-defense, and some Bonstonians are attempting such a group. Who could disagree? We are vulnerable, and the police, who hardly protect ordinary citizens, are not going to protect us faggots. (Protect us so we can commit felonies in the municipal bushes?) But I would be the last one to preach about the need for self-defense. On this, I feel I am a very typical faggot. I have neither the skill nor the will to fight. I have almost no experience fighting. I have managed to avoid every opportunity I have had to fight, and that includes everything from childhood squabbles to recent gay classes in karate held during the prime of New York Gay Liberation Front. In the hey-day of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), when the slogan was "pick up a gun," I bought a .22 rifle, which I still own, but I have no idea what I would use it for. Two faggot friends I know bought rifles under similar circumstances, and they too no longer have any use for their firearms. (Did we ever really have any use for them, other than to impress upon ourselves and others how tough we were?) In theory, I believe in self- defense, including armed self-defense, but I feel incapable of it. I abhor violence, and it al so frightens me. I would like to stop it. There is, of course, violence running through the gay community, and some gay people seem to get off on it. That goes for the fascistic neo-Nazi sector of the leather crowd as well as for the effeminists gleefully predicting a sex war. But I think such people are a minority. It is no coincidence thatgay people have always had a! leading role in the pacifist movement (David McReynolds, Bayard Rustin, Allen Ginsberg, etc.). In practice, I suppose I am a pacifistic if I were personally assaulted, and I am not convinced of the effectiveness or the validity of the doctrine of pacifism (as in "love thy enemy" and "turn the other cheek"). (Readers can make their own puns as far as the "Other cheek" epigram is concerned.) I do think we need to find a way to take destructive power out of the hands of those who are using it -- whether it is Richard Nixon or the people who killed Jeremiah Lynch. But I am very confused. I do not know for certain how to take this power away. Perhaps we are accomplishing this over the long run, by a gradual process, as people learn to overcome the fears that drive them to violence. Perhaps violence won't end until there is an end to the domination of women by men, until there's an end to the domination of the poor by the rich. Perhaps it is true that as each of us strives against the destructive values of our society -- competition, greed, racism, sexism -- we are effectively combatting this destructive violence. Footnotes to all of this: 1.) Stephen Tuscher, in an interview in the Boston Phoenix, asserts he is not gay, but"AC/DC", and he said he desperately wants shock treatments to help him erase the memory of that awful night. 2.) The two men arrested in the case were released on their own recognizance, that is, with nocash bond required. 3.) Thomas Dotton's proposed long article on gay people as victims of violence was scuttled by the Boston Globe. The above is not fiction and it COULD HAPPEN TO YOU -- YES! - HERE IN HOUSTON - - DALLAS BARS UNITED-! DALLAS - Saturday, August 18, 1973 the Gay Bar Owners Met and decided to raise the prices of the drinks in the local gay bars. The prices will go up effective August 20 when the bar opens and will remain from now on ... . Beer, 15-25 cents per can; Bar drinks, 25 cents per drink and call drinks 50 cents per drink according to what it is. Also no more Happy Hours and no 1/2 price drinks. There has been some comment on these prices and these are just a few made during personal interviews in the different bars Saturday before the raise was effective: "Why should we Homosexuals have to pay for the price of drinking with fellow Homo's, when we can go to straight bars and get drinks for 80 or 90 cents per bar drink, 50 per can of beer, and 1.15 per call drink." "I guess the bartenders will have to suffer because, I will not be able to afford to leave a good tip paying these new prices." "It looks like I will limit myself to one drink per evening because I cannot afford to drink at these prices." "I carry just so much money with me and then I go home. At this rate it looks like I will be going home at 11 p.m. instead of 2 a.m., my usual time . . ." "I do not have to go to Gay Bars to find tricks and it looks like I will not go because I cannot and will not pay these prices." '' I think that we should get together and boycott the bars over these outrageous prices." The question is will the gay people of Dallas go for the new prices or will they rebell? There is rumour that there will be a boycott on the bars and marches are being organized. These are things that should be answered but will not be answered for a while. We, like you will have to just wait and see what happens. GOOD LUCK BAR OWNERS, GOOD LUCK PATRONS! (The above received from one of the many interested parties in Dallas) Page 12
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