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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 010
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 010. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3677.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 010. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3677

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 010, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3677.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript she hasn't spoken to her yet." Ministers and doctors who are not trained in psychology or psychiatry say the subject of homosexuality is still most impossibly difficult for them to deal with. Bob Lewis is a young artist who is active in the gay liberation movement. He and many other homosexuals released statements and wrote letters to The News deploring the mass murders which were unearthed last week in Houston. "I am also offended by the mail-order homosexual ring which was broken up in Dallas," said Lewis. "The gay people here look at it just as the straights would at a prostitution ring. There are those who deal in prostitutes and those who don't." The most common meeting ground for homosexuals in Dallas is in about 30 bars, mostly located in the Oak Lawn area. THE BARS ar as varied in style and atmosphere as the groups who drift into them. Some are what regulars call "campy queer", complete wihhomosexual comedians and female impersonators and others are simple quiet places where people gather to do some serious talking and beer drinking. Some are open only to women, some only to men. But most accept both sexes but get a predominance of one. For many who consider themselves "closet homosexuals," these bars are a safe place to meet friends and not fear discovery. Many of the customers are married and say they married for social reasons.Otherssaytheyare frankly bisexual. Others are single and consider this to be a part of their gay community. Other homosexuals find the idea of socializing at bars distasteful and limit their socializing to private homes. All are disgusted by and fearful of "the straight who wander in tolookattheshow." Many of the places have back entrances and are good about keeping out the people who just come in to gape. For many, the formation of the Metropolitan Community Church has been a good solution. "IT IS A CHURCH notforhomosexuals, but one which offers the homosexual a safe and comfortable place to come and worship. All churches are not so Christian in their attitudes," said the Rev. Mr. Vincent, the minister. He explained he performs weddings in the church. If the couple is of the same sex, it is called a union. But is is the same cere mony that is used for a straight marriage. Mr. Vincent says, however, he requires gay couples to go through extensive counseling to make sure they know whattheyare doing. He said the unions have no legal ties. "Any popular misconception," said a Dallas school teacher who calls himself Steve Johnson when giving interviews about his homosexuality, "is that mostgaypeople are concentrated in the world of show business or hair dressing. This is not true. A lot of them drift there because they are two areas where homosexuality is openly accepted. But believe me, there are as many gay school teachers in Dallas as there are hair dressers. We just don't dare admit it." MANY UNDECLARED HOMOSEXUALS are leading what their gay friends call a double life. g»g»wwtwww«r 1U W&§m we&o«myM to the fcteti fan, at Da&u, "7cxoa FEATURING: Mixed drinks Dancing Live entertainment %f$MU^4 1-7fUK. Draught Beer- Name Beer— Bar Drinks— Call Drinks— (ALSO VISIT THE BON SOIR) ** 4516 TMKauwt (214)526-9328 § ' MM_M_Mltt_K-MZ_ttMM*€S_i BOABIIf 60*$ COT rOOl • DANCING • MIXED DRINKS Open Tuesday through Sunday 5pm (Closed Holidays) 2305 S. SHEPHERD A. 52* 9430 "There are plenty of very sought after yount men in this city," said Bob Lewis, "who make it a point to date the prettiest girls they can find. Many a girl would like to marry them, but their object is to be seen. In order to keep an embarrassing situation from occurring, they have to keep switching girls. The pressure is intense," said Bob Lewis. "I did this for a long time and finally gave up. It wasn't fair to me and wasn't fair to the girls I was dating. But survival is the main thing and we all have our own ways of doing it." Homosexual Procuring Ring Uncovered That was the headline screaming from the top of page one of the Dallas Morning News, August 15, 1973. According to the News, this was a nationwide operation and was uncovered by police in a raid at 3716 Cole Avenue. John Paul Norman, 45, the alleged leader, three adult men and two teen-agers were arrested. A mailing list of 50,000 to 100,000 listings was seized along with booklets containing the pictures and names of teen-agers and young adult males. Captain Bennie Newman, commander of the youth division said there was no evidence to link the Oddyssey Foundation to the brutal murders of the young men in Houston. Detectives, led by Lt. Harold Hancock of the intelligence division raided the second floor apartment which was described as a ■"crash pad" and seized a pickup truck full of files, pornographic literature, a camera, photo-engraving equipment, stationery, an electric typewriter and hundreds of booklets with names and addresses. A quantity of marijuana was also seized. Those arrested were booked for conspiracy to commit sodomy, possession of commit sodomy, possession of narcotics, and contributing to the delinquency of a juvenile. The Odyssey Foundation had a San Diego, California post office box, and the Cole apartment was listed as ''Epic International.'' HOW IT WORKED - Thousands of unsolicited letters were mailed inviting readers to become members of the Odyssey Foundation for a yearly membership of $15.00. For an additional $3.00, one could buy a booklet containing pictures of young men, their names, physical descriptions, ages and interests. According to Officer Newman, the youths were procured from bus stations and from solicitations by mail. But the booklet gave the impression that these were bright young men eager to learn from travel. If you wanted to be a "sponsor," you financed the youth's (called "fellow") flight to your town where he would be a guest in your home for a few days before flying to the next "sponsor." According to Newman, the boys received expenses and some pocket money and usually stayed from one to three days. Dallas was the "dispersal point." John Paul Norman, freed on $7,000 bond, was arrested in 1954 and 1956 for committing sexual assaults in Houston. Disposition of these cases is unknown. In California, Mr. Norman was convicted in 1963 for sex pervision and in 1965 was committed by the state Page 9
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