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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 008
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 008. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3675.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3675

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 008, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3675.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript sexuality is just associated with the very effeminate young man or the man who wants to pick up young boys. Well, I think these people would be shocked to realize there are an estimated 50,000 homosexuals in the Dallas area. I grant that only about 600 of them have actually declared themselves, but it any of these people ever wandered into any of the gay circles in town they would be surprised at who might turn up-- everyone from some of your better known athletes to school teachers to truck drivers. "A good many of my homosexual patients tell me they particularly seek out jobs which are known to be he-man jobs. They feel this will give them a good cover." But the doctor said he didn't feel the question should be if a person is obvious or unobvious or declared or undeclared. "The simple truth is," he said, "that homosexuality exists--and when it exists to the tune of 50,000 people in Dallas alone, it might be well to understand how it exists and what the gay world consists of. It might solve a lot of problems on both sides.'' "WHAT BOTHERS mo t people," said one psychiatrist, "is what happens if a homosexual has the job of, say, teaching young boys. What kind of influence will he have on those boys? "I can only say it depends on the person. You get as many heterosexual men w .io like to fondle girl students as y*" io homosexual men who like to ' die young boys. But I can sav . ,. -many of the homosexuals rr „.iave very deep emotional prob!-..is resulting from reactioi: scause they are homo sexual or from problems which caused them to be homosexual. , "In some instances, they could inflict these feelings on the students they might be teaching-- not in a physical way butin a mental attitude. I'm not saying a heterosexual might not do the same thing ' but in a predominantly heterosexual world, there is going to be a lot more upset if it is a homosexual attitude." "I am becoming firmly convinced homosexuality is something that is inside a person and can't really be taught too easily," said the minister of a prominent North Dallas congregation. "I THINK we worry too much about corrupting others. I was rather unsuspectingly thrown into this problem when one of the most respected members of my congregation came to me and said - he just had to talk to someone. He said he was a practicing homosexual and was terrified his children would find out. "The man's wife died when the youngest girl was five years old. His two girls and one boy are now grown and are all happily married. I couldn't see that their father's homosexuality had any effect on the way he raised his children. He was a good father and that is what mattered." But other ministers say some of their most frustrating counseling is from young people who have learned of their parent's homosexuality. "Perhaps when they are older they will understand," said one Methodist minister, "but I had one girl who ran away when she found out her mother had a woman lover. It's been two years and "I MARK TWAIN 4015 Lemmon Ave ^fefi^>^*'° .ws COCKTAIL HOUR 4 - 7 <*•<<■' **•») SUNDAYS 6 - 9 PM. $1.50 STEAK SANDWICH NIGHT, along with FREE draft beer . . . all you can eat and drink at this price ..... . MONDAYS 6 - 9 P-M. ITALIAN DINNER PLATE NIGHT . -IJ yo. PIANO BAR - (UPSTAIRS) - OPEN Tuesday through Sunday . p.m. 'til 2 a.m. PATIO BAR SOON TO BE OPEN SPECIAL EVENTS - Planned for Texas - O.U. week end and Halloween • watch for these announcements in the next issue of The Nuntius. Dallas, Texas 528-3480 CHRISTGAIJ/ In Love With theNY Dolls; Ail-American Boys Into Ultra-Decadence y Robert Cfarbtgau "People have the wrong ides about is," says Arthur Kaye, burnt ol the New York Dolls. I strain to hear what will come next, for although Arthur is a big guy, standing over six his platform heels, he speaks in a barely audible lisping murmur. "They think we're'a bunch of transsexual junkies or something.'* Of course, Arthur, that's a ridiculous notion. Although you are weatr- ng red lipstick and a New York Hangers jersey/minidress over white lights. And David Johansen will tie ip his arm and inject !-_i mself with Ml imaginary hypodermic while singing 'Lookingfora Kiss"at Kenney'a Castaways tonight. And Sjd Sylvain will ook like the strutting image of Lira Minelli in "Cabaret'' at the Mercer tomorrow. And Billy Murcia, your tint drummer, did die in what is sailed a drug-related death in London set fall. Transsexual junkies? What calumny. Johnny Thunder has his own theory, which he offers in the band's nore typical sensitive, tough-guy voice: "I think we're just a bunch of kids looking for a good time." Thie turns merry agreement among others, merry partly because hey've all been drinking up their hare of forthcoming proceeds at a eetaurant near Kenny's. That*! Syl says. "Apple pie and ice ' And as if to prove that ma i are just healthy American wya, New York division, the new Jerry Nolan, orders some It's true. Nolan himself m I* Army brat with a heavy Brooklyn accent who has been into rock and nl since his big sister took him to jm Alan Freeo. in the '50a. Thunder, ylvain are bombed-out background on Staten Island. They may be fibbing a little, but all claim to be somewhere between 18 and 22. Just a good old-fashioned punk rock and roll bond. The original members—Kaye, TTiunder and Murcia—got together a year and a half ago, shortly after Kaye and Thunder first met on Mao- Dougal Street "I hear you play guitar," Thunder said. "I play bass." 'Tin not too good." Kaye replied. "Well, neither am I," said Thunder. After switching instruments, the two joined with Murcia to form the Dolls. Thunder named the group and sang. Soon Sylvain added a second guitar. Then Johansen, who had been performing as a solo singer- songwriter, joined on. The group played for anyone who would listen— at political rallies, a steambath in Brooklyn Heights, and the like. The Mercer Arts Center, where they made their reputation, was one more such opportunity. By the time the Dolls got there, about a year ago, the Mercer was already a haven of what is called glitter-rock, which on scant experience I would define as deliberately dumb rock and roll played by bands of ambivalent gender allegiance. In contrast, the Dolls may be the beat hard rock band since the Rolling Stonea. The comparison Is unavoidable, but the Dolls resist it, and for good reason—it limits and dates them. Unfortunately, there is really no other way to understand a new band. Like David Johansen, Jim Morrison waa described aa Jagger-like when his fame began, and the image had to suffice until the Doors' specific identity began to sink in. As he himself points out, Johansen has mon in common facially with Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits, but ha moves like Jagger. especially in his hair and hip gestures, and generates the same wild unisex eroticism. But while suffering seemed to make Jagger tough and distant, Johansen remains vulnerable and close to the surface. He is attractive and dangerous as only someone who always means well and always follows his well-meaning impulses can be attractive and dangerous, the kind of person you forgive in advance for hurting you. That kind of appeal is called star quality. The rest of the band also shares more with the Stones, especially the early Stones, than with more recent hard rock bands. They convey the same desperate, droogy decadence in J973 that the Stones did in 1964, and their music is the same elementary metal blues cacophony, only more anarchic. The Dolls do not possess a classy blues soloist like Mick Taylor, and they wouldn't know what to do with turn if they did. They are quite content to careen around the stage Disking noise, with Nolan, who has apparently served to firm up the group's commitment to the rock and roll myth keeping a frantic beat "We're a lot faster than the Stones." Johansen says. And somebody else adds: "And younger." Some rock snobs put such music down because it seems so elementary, even impoverished. That"s exactly what it's supposed to be, of course, and in any case the Dolls are not another minima] band in the manner of critical faves like the Stooges and the MC-5, or popular successes tike Grand Punk and Black Sabbath. The crucial difference is that the Dolls have good material. Working with the band for bis melodies, Johansen writes hard rock songs in the tradition of Peter TWnshend and Jagger- Bichard, and conceivably in their class ae well He aaya his favorite composers are the old Brill Building I hitmakers, Jeff Barry and Fllie Greenwich, and like them he shows that magic knack for the memorable phrase. I've heard "Rock and Roll Nurse" only twice, the second time about a month ago, and I can still rernember how the refrain goes. The songs wouldn't be so memorable if they weren't as well-arranged as they are well-composed. The Dolls may not be virtuoso musicians, but they know how to structure a sang. They create and intermesh within the bounds of their technical competence, which is exactly what rock and roll bands have always done. They think up introductions and closes and .segues and fades, they add harmonies for variety, they end a song before you want it to be over or extend it after you thought it was done. Tltey do dozens of little things that require not training, but immersion in rock and roll and street-type savvy. Immersed and savvy they undeniably are. The Dolls are managed by Marty Thau, who used to be a promo man at Cameo-Parkway and at Buddah. A promo man is someone who gets radio stations to play singles, and Marty Thau was very good at his work. Some trendy music industry types whisper that Thau is too square for this band, but it's more likely that they're too hip—they don't know the Barry/ Greenwich handshake. Thau loves this band, but he can't get them a record contract. Buddah told him that the band was great but Johansen didn't make it; MCA told him that Johansen was a star but the band was lousy. A&M's entire New York staff was informed by President Jerry Moss that the Dolh were wrong for the label's image. Paul Nelson, head of New York a*r for Mercury, loves the Dolts so much that lie's seen them 30 times. Atlantic aaya they're too crude, Columbia saya they're too hard. Paramount says they're too loud, Capitol says they're too wierd. RCA and Polydor express interest but don't even come to see them. Give or take a few subsidiaries, that leaves Warner Bros- for the time bemg, but others may come back in. Of course, Thau admits that the Dolls were drunk at their first major audition and ui hearsed at their second and that couldn't have helped. Nor was Thau's $250,000 asking price for a recording deal an inducement And it's true that teenagers aren't into the Dolls' kind of hard rock any more—they seem to like heavier, more melodramatic-stuff. It's also true, however, that the Dolls are the first new band with major talent to play such music in several years, and if anybody can get them recorded and promoted right, it's someone like Marty Thau. Ever since the beginning, the rich, classy men who own record "Tap"1* have hated rock and roll. They'll jump on any other bandwagon to get rid of it for a while. But it keeps on back; haunting them with its unreasonable demands. This time it's wearing make-up and platforms and suggesting possibilities cf love that decent people don't want to think about. And eventually, some brave, greedy capitalist will try to make it go. I wouldn't offer a personal guarantee. The Dolls are so much to my taste that I have to n trust my taste just a little. And I do think the Dolls have reached too many trendies and not enough kids—rather than woodshedding on the New York club circuit they really should invade high school gymnasiums, as they have suggested. The kida might not like them quite aa much aa they expect, but they would learn from that, and if a certain the kids would like them a lot more than the average record executive. Transsexual junkies or no, they do have a lot of punkitude, arid punkitude h gone out of style quite yet /a Page 7
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