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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 005
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 005. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3672

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 005, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript questions about hypothetical situations. Some questions are promptly reversed and tossed back to the audience. "If someone asks what causes homosexuality, we ask them what causes heterosexuality." Perhaps the most successful gambit is the role reversal. Besides switching roles in the foursome - at - dinner routine, and audience volunteer might be asked to play a token gay activist at a cocktail party, surrounded by "liberal" mental health professionals. Other panelists are absorbed in overturing traditional psychiatric views of homosexuality, and in providing the therapy they feel gay people are not receiving from most professionals. In fact, Mark Freedman, a San Francisco psychologist, believes there are advantages to being gay. -He has surveyed 81 lesbians and 67 heterosexual women with similar educational backgrounds. After collecting personal data and testing for "self-actualization" with the Personal Orientation Inventory, he found no differences in psychological adjustment between the gay and straight women. And the homosexuals scored higher on work satisfaction, inner direction, spontaneity and the ability to create meaningful relationships. "When people go through the crisis of 'coming out' (recognizing their homosexual orientation), and they have all the social flak coming at them, they tend to be able to cope better with future crises," Freedman told the convention audience. "They're more in touch with themselves and what they want to do." Gay men are often freer to show tenderness and other "feminine" emotions than heterosexual men, S --„ DALLAS MCC Affirmation more comfortable with their ag*^ gressive sides. And, ironically *%«ta social prejudice can free up homosexuals to create their own lifestyles, he believes. "Since you're 'sick' no matter what you do, you learn to live without social reinforcement and tune into your own needs." In other words, monogamous homosexuals who remain faithful to each other and live quiet surburan lives are considered just a "sick" as gay people who relate to many sex partners—thus removing the necessity to shape one's living habits to win social approval. In recent months, Freedman has served as staffpsychologistforthe San FranciscoGay Counseling Service, which dispenses advice to 15 to 20 callers a day. Calls include routine requests for housing information -- where landlords don't discriminate - - or physician referrals - for medical help without value judgements. Other more urgent problems like "marital" and general emotional difficulties are treated in person. Another psychologist, John New- meyer, provides the San Francisco gay community with its own branch of the human potential movement. His Gay Raps, which appeal mostly to middle-class men from their late teens to early 40's meet weekly for consciousness- raising, sensitivity and encounter groups. In progress for two years, the program offers a healthier setting for forming friendships than gay bars, Newmeyer believes. And perhaps most important to gay activitists, the raps cope with the loneliness and emotional conflicts that affect all human beings --re gardless of sexual identity. 'NOW OPEN' 'IN THE VILLAGE' t AMP 6PO»i * 2417 TIMES JUST OFF KIRBY Mixed Drinks Dancing Look for your personal invitation in the mail Norma & Jerry HOUSTON, TEXAS Page 4 Ml of position on Human Sexuality We, the members of the Metro- politian Community Church of Dallas, because of the need for a better understanding of our Church's purpose and position on human sexual expression, do hereby affirm the following: 1. The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches (by which our Church is chartered) was founded in response to a need of individuals who, for one reason or another, had been rejected or felt rejected by their previous church and that need evidenced itself, in some of these individuals expressed their sexuality in a homosexual manner, our Church has been and is still sometimes referred to as a homosexual (or gay) church. We are not a homosexual (or gay) church! We are, have always been, and intend to always be a Christ - centered Church open to ALL people in Christian love and understanding. 2. Our position on the personal and private expressions of an individual's sexuality has always been one of non-judgemental acceptance. We do not, as a Church, promote or advocate any particular expression of sexuality. We do feel that any expression of an individual's sexuality, which is sincerely guided by a deep love and true concern for anotherindividual, is a valid and worthwhile expression of their relationship. We do feel that sexual acts should be reserved to private expression. We are opposed to any sexual expression that is forced upon another individual and advise againstpublic sexual acts of any expression. 3. As part of its regular ministry to all, our Church will continue its special ministry to individuals who express their sexuality in homosexual relationships. Our justification in this stand are manifold: Primarily, the Gospels tell us to go and preach the good news of Christ to ALL the world. This instruction makes no exception! Many churches (or their congregations) consider certain individuals to be unworthy to attend or hold a position in their church members of their congregation. Many of these outcasts are people who naturally express their sexuality in a homosexual manner and several of this number have a strictly private expression with only one other individual for whom they have a deep love and true concern. The Scriptures also tell us that we are not to judge (Matthew 7:1-2; John 5:22-23; John 8:4-11; John 12:44-50). If Jesus, the Christ, Himself did not come to judge (John 8:15; John 12:47), then how could we presume to act as judges? The Commandments of the New Law are to love God and to love our neighbor (Matthew 22:37-40; John 13:34). We do not show love by rejection and condemnation. Jesus warned us of false prophets but assured us that we would know them by their works (Matthew 7:17-20). We ask those who do not now understand ourpurpose to not judge our Church or its congregation but to come and see and know whether what we say and do is of Christ. See if those who were lost are now being shown the Way. See the difference in the lives of those who attend. . . the difference that the love of God makes in their lives. And, when you come, look not only with your, eyes but also with your hearts that you may understand. For we also have those in our congregation who hear the Word but do not understand, who see and yet are blind . . . but we are working together to try applying Christian principles in our lives. We may all serve God just where we are. Our Church does not seek to change anyone from one type person to another but only to direct their individual consciousness to God. If any individual will open thftr heart to God, He will transform and regenerate them from within so that, regardless of their race, color, sex, sexual orientation, or other condition or position in which they find themselves, He will show the way of expressing their human nature in the right manner . . . the way of Love. ■^or to associate socially with When our human nature is guided fUTCfiO- 69 times The Problem OF HOMOSEXUAL QQVSZ DAUGHTERS OF BILITIS Dallas Chapter The Nation's Oldest Lesbian Organization Consciousness Raising - Educational Projects - BY AND FOR WOMEN JOIN US - First and Third Fridays Each Month Be a part of the Scene Call (214) 824-0770 or BOX 5944 DALLAS, TEX 75222
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