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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 004
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 004. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3671

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 004, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript The Air Force and the Primitive "H" (Human Behavior, Aug. '73) As high and mighty defenders of "red blooded manhood," air force officials look benignly upon heterosexual love. But the man- to-man variety snaps the jail doors shut. Dr. John A. Chiles, a University of Wisconsin psychiatry resident, argues that outmoded, harsh punishments for homosexual men are hurting both the air force and the people involved. Emphasis is on "administrative segregation" (the stockage) and purging all deviants from the hup-two- ranks regardless of emotional stability, loyalty, degree of sexual control or work competence. Since no exact definition of homosexuality appears in air force rules, intoxicated men who go so far as to buss a buddy have been thrown into prison while the bureaucracy cranks up in an effort to discharge them. Men may be detained for months in solitary as their case is "investigated." Meanwhile, a captive' s moral plummets. A code H can even be placed on an inspection record attached to the prisoner's door, spurring other prisoners to taunt and ridicule the man. UNEVEN JUSTICE. In air force eyes, there are two classes of homosexuals. Officers branded with the scarlet H can resign "for the good of the service." If they want to fight the charge, they may present expert medical and psychiatric testimony. Medical authorities, in fact, can take over entire disposition of the officers' cases. But for enlistedper- sonnel, regulations do not permit medical opinion to take precedence over administrative rulings. It seems that for the bigwigs, sexual preference is a medical matter, but for ordinary air force men, it's nothing but a disciplinary issue. "Puntitive attitudes are needle s sly expres sed, and useful personnel are excluded from the service they may wish to render." Dr. Chiles maintains. He recommends that homosexual prisoners be accorded minimum custody status. The distinction between officers and enlisted men should be removed, so psychiatrists retain the power of medical intervention in all cases. Further, homosexuals should be carefully defined as those who "exclusively and preferentially seek same sex gratification." Current air force policy pontificates that homosexual behavior is ' 'a debasement of high moral standards." Instead of dishing out rhetoric, air force officials should consider the men involved as individuals, and approach their futures accordingly. "The contention that all persons with homosexual behavior should be excluded from the Air Force is at least a debatable one. Such a group includes many who are emotionally stable, loyal and capable of rendering good service," Dr. Chiles insists. Gay Activists and Mental Health (Human Behavior, Aug. '73) Martin Rogers and Barbara Bryant, gay activists, have an effective technique for giving the general public a taste of what it's like to be homosexual in our soc iety. They chose two female volunteers from their lecture audience and ask them to play the part of a gay couple. Then Rogers and Bryant, tongue firmly in cheek, play Mr. and Mrs. Straight. Rogers sets the scene for the volunteers with a certain amount of relish. "A married couple you're friendly with has invited you to dinner," he told a young woman recently at the Western Psychological Association Convention. "They tell you to bring a date, and you show up with her." As the well-meaning hosts, Rogers and Bryant serve up cocktails with a goodly share of put- downs. "You might have warned us so we'd have known," Bryant admonished the ' 'guests." ' 'After all, the children might have been up ... . Have you been this way long?" Rogers beamed in the spirit of liberal benevolence. "I'm ready and interested in learning and I'm open to this, but you've got to realize--this is the first time this has happened in our home." The scene illustrates what Rogers dubs "homophobia, the irrational anxiety reaction many heterosexuals experience when in the presence of a homosexual." The term, and the attitude that it's time for heterosexuals to start dealing with their own fears about sexual orientation, characterizes the growing gay activist movement in the field of psychology. Rogers, an associate professor of psychology at California State University, Sacramento, and Bryant, a psychology graduate student at the same school, have founded the Association of Gay Psychologists, a national organization with some 60 members. They and other gay therapists, who appeared on a panel at the recent convention, are running a speakers' bureau, encounter groups and counseling services -- all of which operate off the fundamental assumption that homosexuality is a valid alternative for all human beings, not an illness that must be masked from society. The activists most in the public eye are the trained speakers, like Rogers andBryant, whodiscussthe gay movement before local groups. Last year, the Sacramento Gay Speakers' Bureau filled 200 speaking engagements, leaving Rogers and Bryant rather experienced in handling a potentially sticky situation. Audiences are so unwilling to listen with open minds, said Rogers, that a speaker who makes one wrong move will be written off by his listeners. Therefore, they discourage introductions that play upon stereotypes or pay tribute to ' 'these extremely brave and courageous people." A speaking team is always composed of one male and one female, who make a point of telling anecodotes from their childhood, schooling and careers. "We tell them we're somebody's son or daughter, or somebody's father," said Rogers. Most important, they try to answer even insulting questions without a trace of hostility. "When we first started speaking," said Rogers, "our anger flowed outina way that flattened our audience. We've since learned to rein in our anger, because we're more interested in reaching people than in feeling good about ourselves." Frequently they resort to role- playing techniques to answer IN DALLAS This is your ticket for f UN & EXCITEMENT ! dt your S462 DENTON DR. CUT OFF DALLAS. TEXAS DALLAS- SPEAKEASY 5462 DB. DALLAS BEST DANCE FLOOR - LIGHT SHOW DALLAS BEST MUSIC & SOUND . DALLAS BEST ATMOSPHERE DALLAS BEST DRINKS (LIQUOR 6, BEER) - DALLAS 9 MOST FRIENDLY PEOPLE LARGE ENOUGH TO provide fun & EXCITEMENT for you and to accomodate LARGE CROWDS. SMALL ENOUGH TO APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE AND TO WELCOME YOU PERSONALLY ! DOWNTOWN DALLAS Page 3
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