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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
File 002
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 002. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 002. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3669

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 002, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript _T_e < VOLUME 4 NO. 9 UIMTIUS & OUR COMMUNITY Houston, texas SEPTEMBER 1973 NUNTIUS APOLOGIZES FOR REFERRALS TO VD CLINICS Billy Buckman, chief of detectives in houston, picked up the phone to call Alice Coyne at the public health service. He was working on a lead regarding the queer murders, and he wanted to look at the records of gay cases on file at the VD clinic. The information was supposed to be confidential, but then so were FBI and IRS files. After Watergate even the very naive had shed their illusions concerning such things. Buck- man could have called Paul Nathan, the head of the communicable disease section, but the doctor was sometimes fussy about matters of confidentiality -- forgetting that he was not a private physician but a public servant sworn to make those disclosures "as may be necessary for the preservation of the public welfare." The Dean Corll murders were serious. Anyway, Buckman knew Alice. On Monday, August 13, Buckman and Sgt. Trinidad Garcia examined the records, identifying contacts having been coded as homosexual. Less than a week later a partial list of the names appeared in the LA TIMES as a tie-in with a dirty picture and call boy service. It was a simple process. Across the country in the larger cities extensive dossiers on the private sex lives of persons who engage in homosexual activities are being methodically compiled. Cases of venereal disease must be reported. It is the law in effect in every state in the nation. At the same time our legal codes impose severe penalties against all forms of homosexual acts. In California, for example, oral sex is a felony with a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. Anal intercourse can result in life imprisonment. Since homosexuals lack the legal protection afforded most heterosexuals, viz., since the sex act that brings about the venereal disease is a crime, a homosexual who acquires a venereal infection automatically incriminates himself and his partners when he supplies information concerning his sex practices to public health officials or their agents. In the early 1960s, believing that homosexuals were responsible for a marked increase in the venereal disease rate, but without statistical data to support their belief, the government poured some $500,000 in federal funds into LA County's fight against VD and into a campaign to convince organizations working in the gay community with the absolute confidentiality of venereal disease information. Reassuring articles appeared in one of the two gay journals then in existence. VD investigators became adept to gett ing homosexuals to list their contacts. TIME magazine, in 1967 reported one Negro who voluntarily went to a New York clinic and named "14 of his contacts (12 whites and two Negroes) who all tested positive." Butit'remain- ed for the once anti-establishment gay lib organizations to be persuaded either by motives of profit or by fast-talking public officials to set up communicable disease control programs within their own groups. There is now one in Houston (which made Buckman's job that much easier), there was one in San Francisco last we knew, there is one in Boston, one in Chicago, and at least one in LA. The LA clinic was started by the Gay Community Services Center as one of their programs, but it now is partially supported by public funds. In other words, the GCSC VD clinic is Sheriff Pitchess and Police Chief Davis' dossier on every participant in this county financed program. In California there is complete acceptance of a statewide program for compulsory notification of positive laboratory tests to the local health department. In the case of GCSC, the laboratory work is not done at the center so the reporting and its source is automatic. It is a dead give-away. The HOUSTON leak only emphasizes what we have been saying for years: As long as homosexual acts remain a crime, venereal infections resulting from the acts should not be reported to public health clinics. Public records are public. A man who wants, to keep his sex life confidential should go to a private physician not to public ones. Furthermore, a homosexual has a moral obligation not to disclose the names of his sex partners. It should be no surprise to anyone to learn that it is perfectly possible for every federal agency and every state agency as well as several committees of Congress and certain individuals to examine confidential records of practically every other public or private agency. After the activities of the so - called "White House Plumbers," after Judge Sirica listens to tapes bugged by the president himself, a man would have to be a fool to believe that LA Police Chief Davis, Police Chief Herman Short, their flunnkies, or law enforcement officers of all communities can't by one means or another examine public health records. The NUNTIUS wishes to make apologizies to persons calling requesting help who have been sent to our "understanding and friendly PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES" for treatment. MC CLUSKEY'S MURDERER CONFESSES William David Hovila, 26 year old former Witchita Falls resident, has confessed to the slaying of Dallas civil attorney Henry J. McDluskey Jr. The 30 year old attorney was last seen by meigh- bors entering his law office in the Skillman Shopping Center and then followed about 15 minutes later by two men who pulled up in a small car. The attorney and the two men left shortly after, as meighbors said they saw two cars drive away. McCluskey's parents, with whom he lived, went to their son's office the next day and found the telephones ripped from the wall and a small portable tv set missing. They called police. Police found McCluskey's car abandoned at a city park about a mile from his office, and launched an intensive hunt for him. Two weeks later, two fishermen spotted the body in a ditch south of the intersection of Nance Road and East Fork Road, near the Rockwall-Forney Dam of Lake Ray Hubbard. The county medical examiner ruled the attorney had died of multiple gunshot wounds to the back under the right shoulder. McCluskey's arms were tied behind his back with hemp rope similar to a length of rope found in his abandoned car by police. Hovila emerged as the principal suspect the same day as the search for McCluskey was started with the discovery that a person by that name had cashed a $500 check drawn on the lawyer's downtown bank account. The check was dated the day McCluskey vanished. Hovila was arrested in Rutherford, N.J., by police acting on an anonymous tip. Hovila said he met McCluskey Tn a bar six months earlier, and as their acquaintance grew, reports came to him that McCluskey was spreading stories about him. Hovila, high on drugs, conceived a plan to drug the lawyer and leave him on a street to be found by police to humilate McCluskey, for damaging Hovila's reputation. Hovila feared meeting Mc - Cluskey alone and arranged for two men, whose names Hovila told police he could not remember, to go with him. These two men left Hovila alone in the office with McCluskey and took Hovila's car. Hovila showed McCluskey a pistol to convince him that he meant to drug him. McCluskey pleaded with him and, in an effort to bargain for his life, wrote a $500 check. After taking the check, Hovila crushed a pill, dissolved and injected it into the attorney's body. The drug took effect immediately and McCluskey was led drowsily to the lawyer's car and placed on the back seat. After driving for several hours, they eventually came upon the lake, where Hovila fired two pistol shots in the lawyer's back. 'Church has failed,' savs priest (HOUSTON POST 8 September '73) The assistantpastoroftheHouston Catholic church that allows 200 homosexuals to meet there each week calls himself the chaplain of the group. "I sit in on all the meetings," he explained. "I maintain an interest in them -- and I think it does count. It gives them moral support." The church has failed to minister to homosexuals in the past, the priest said. "The church has adopted a kind of ostrich head-in-the-sand attitude, hoping they will go away, but they don't. The individual parish has some sort of boligation to the community, so the pastor here has given them the use of the hall." The bishop of the Galveston- Houston diocese, John L. Morkov- sky, is aware that the group meets at the church, the assistant pastor said. "He walked in on one of our meetings one time -- and several of the Catholic members recog nized him. He wasn't attending the meeting, but came in by mistake. He knows that we are there.'' The priest said he knows "several priests who are homosexuals." "I am sure many of us priests have homosexual tendencies, but we seem to be scared of anyone finding out, especially since we work with altar boys. "The impression is that every last homosexual is a child molester, but this is not true. We have had no problems with the people who have met here." The priest said the church group "seems to be the only organized gay group here in Houston." "The Gay Lib at the University of Houston folded - - and now Montrose Gaze no longer has a place to meet. These people need something there to maintain them. I thought they might wantt I thought they might want to meet only once a month, but they come week after week. It serves a purpose." The number of homosexuals in the Houston area has greatly in-
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