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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 001. 1973-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3668.

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(1973-09). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3668

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973 - File 001, 1973-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3693/show/3668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 9, September 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date September 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript _-s NUNTIUS APOLOGIZES FOR REFERRALS TO VO CLINICS Billy Buckman, chief of detect­ives in houston, picked up the phone to call Alice Coyne at the public health service. He was working on a lead regarding the queer murders, and he wanted to look at the records of gay cases on file at the VD clinic. The information was supposed to be confidential, but then so were FBI and IRS files. After Watergate even the very naive had shed their illus­ions concerning such things. Buck­man could have called Paul Nathan, the head of the communicable di­sease section, but the doctor was sometimes fussy about matters of confidentiality - - forgetting that he was not a private physician but a public servant sworn to make those disclosures "as may be necessary for the preservation of the public welfare." The Dean Corll murders were serious. Any­way, Buckman knew Alice. On Monday, August 13, Buckman and Sgt. Trinidad Garcia examin­ed the records, identifying contacts having been coded as homosexual. Less than a week later a partial list of the names appeared in the LA TIMES as a tie-in with a dirty picture and call boy service. It was a simple process. Across the country in the larger cities extensive dossiers on the private sex lives of persons who engage in homosexual activities are being methodically compiled. Cases of venereal disease must be report­ed. It is the law in effect in every state in the nation. At the same time our legal codes impose severe penalties against all forms of homosexual acts. In California, for example, oral sex is a felony with a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. Anal intercourse can result in life imprisonment. Since homosexuals lack the legal protection afforded most hetero­sexuals, viz., since the sex act that brings about the venereal disease is a crime, a homosexual who acquires a venereal infection automatically incriminates him­self and his partners when he supplies information concerning his sex practices to public health officials or their agents. In the early 1960s, believing that homosexuals were responsible for a marked increase in the venereal disease rate, but without statistical data to support their belief, the government poured some $500,000 in federal funds into LA County's fight against VD and into a campaign to convince organizations working in the gay community with the absolute con­fidentiality of venereal disease information. Reassuring articles appeared in one of the two gay journals then in existence. VD investigators became adept to gett-ing homosexuals to list their con­tacts. TIME magazine, in 1967 reported one Negro who volun1:3~­ily went to a New York chmc and named "14 of his contacts (12 whites and two Negr9es) who all tested positive." But it remain­ed for the once anti-establishment gay lib organizations to be per­suaded either by motives of profit or by fast-talking public officials to set up communicable disease control programs within their own groups. There is now one in Hous - ton (which made Buckman'sjob that much easier), there was one in San Francisco last we knew, there is one in Boston, one in Chicago, and at least one in LA. The LA clinic was started by the Gay Community Services Center as one of their programs, but it now is partially supported by public funds. In other words, the GCSC VD clinic is Sheriff Pitchess and Police Chief Davis' dossier on every participant in this county financed program. In California there is complete acceptance of a statewide program for compulsory notification of positive laboratory tests to the local health depart­ment. In the case of GCSC, the laboratory work is not done at the center so the reporting and its source is automatic. It is a dead give-away. The HOUSTON leak only em­phasizes what we have been saying for years: As long as homosexual acts remain a crime, venereal infections resulting from the acts should not be reported to public health clinics. Public records are public. A man who wants to keep his sex life confidential should go to a private physician not to public ones. Furthermore, a homosexual has a moral obligation not to dis - close the names of his sex partners. It should be no surprise to any­one to learn that it is perfectly possible for every federal agency and every state agency as well as several committees of Congress and certain individuals to examine confidential records of practically every other public or private agency. After the activities of the so - called "White House Plumb­ers," after Judge Sirica listens to tapes bugged by the president himself, a man would have to be a fool to believe that LA Police Chief Davis, Police Chief Herman Short, their flunnkies, or Jaw en­forcement officers of all com­munities can't by one means or another examine public health re­cords. The NUNTIUS wishes to make apologizies to persons calling requesting help who have been sent to our "understanding and friendly PUBLIC HEAL TH SERV­ICES" for treatment. -- -------------~= SEPTEMBER 19731 MC CLUSKEY'S MURDERER CONFESSES William David Hovila, 26 year old former Witchita Falls resident, has confessed to the slaying of Dallas civil attorney Henry J. McDluskey Jr. The 30 year old attorney was last seen by meigh­bors entering his Jaw office in the Skillman Shopping Center and then followed about 15 minutes later by two men who pulled up in a small car. The attorney and the two men left shortly after, as meighbors said they saw two cars drive away. McCluskey's parents, with whom he lived, went to their son's office the next day and found the tele­phones ripped from the w~II _and a small portable tv set missing. They called police. Police found McCluskey's car abandoned at a city park about a mile from his office, and launched an intensive hunt for him. Two weeks later, two fishermen spotted the body in a ditch south of the intersection of Nance Road and East Fork Road, near the Rock­wall- Forney Dam of Lake Ray Hubbard. The county medical examiner ruled the attorney had died of multiple gunshot wounds to the back under the right shoulder. Mc­Cluskey's arms were tied behind his back with hemp rope similar to a length of rope found in his abandoned car by police. Hovila emerged as the principal suspect the same day as the search for McCluskey was started with the discovery that a person by that name had cashed a $500 check drawn on the lawyer's downtown bank account. The check was dated the day McCluskey vanished. Hovila was arrested in Ruther­ford, N.J., by police acting on an anonymous tip. Hovila said he met McCluskey tn a bar six months earlier, and as their acquaintance grew, reports came to him that McCluskey w;is spreading stories about ~im. Hovila, high on drugs, conceived a plan to drug the lawyer and leave him on a street to be found by police to humilate McCluskey, for damaging Hovila's reputation. Hovila feared meeting Mc­Cluskey alone and arranged for two men whose names Hovila told poli~e he could not remember, to go with him. These two men left Hovila alone in the office with McCluskey and took Hovila's car. Hovila showed McCluskey a pistol to convince him that he meant to drug him. McCluskey pleaded wi~h him and, in an effort to bargain for his life, wrote a $500 check. After taking the check, Hovila crushed a pill, dissolved and in­jected it into the attorney's body. The drug took effect immediately and McCluskey was led drowsily to the lawyer's car and placed on the back seat. After driving for several hours, they eventually came upon the lake, where Hovila fired two pistol shots in the law­yer's back. 'Church has failed,' says priesJedhim H,w,s,'ta<~,di,g~, (HOUSTON POST 8 September '73) meeting, but came in by mistake. The assistant pastor ofthe Hous- He knows . that wt; are there." ton ·Catholic church that allows The pnest said he knows 200 homosexuals to meet there "several priests who are homo-each week calls himself the chap- sexuals." lain of the group. "I am sure many of us priests " I sit in on all the meetings," have homosexual tendencies, but he explained. " I maintain a_n in_- ~e _seem to be sc~red o~ anyone terest in them - - and I thmk it finding out, especially smce we does count. It gives them moral work with altar boys. support." "The impressio_n is tha_t every The church has failed to minister last homosexual is a child mo-to homosexuals in the past, the Jester, but this is not tr~e. We priest said. have had no problems with the "The church has adopted a kind people who have met here." of ostrich head-in-the-sand at- The priest said the church group titude hoping they will go away, "seems to be the only organized but they don't. The individual gay group here in Houston." parish has some sort of boligation "The Gay Lib at the University to the community, so the pastor of Houston folded - - and now here has given them the use of Montrose Gaze no longer has a the hall." place to meet. These people need The bishop of the Galveston- something there_to maintain them. Houston diocese, John L. Markov- I thought they might wantt sky is aware that the group meets I thought they might want to meet at the church, the assistant pastor only once a month, but they come said. week after week. It serves a pur- "He walked in on one of our pose." meetings one time -- and several The number of homosexuals_ in of the Catholic members recog- the Houston area has greatly in- - - - .. creased since the opening of NA­SA, the priest maintained. "Not that NASA has a lot of them, but it has brought tremend­ous growth to the city he explain­ed. The homosexuals who meet at the church do not have religious services there - - and are minist­ered to only by the presence of the priest who attends their meet­ings. "They must concentrate upon themselves -- and develop their own personalities," the priest said. "Gays shouldn't undersell them­selves, as they so often do. There is a lot of talk about Gay Lib, but it has to be the person himself who liberates himself. It is this that I find greatly lacking among gays: A sense of personal re­sponsibility." GAY PRIDE? For several weeks now, since shortly after fire swept through the Upstairs bar in New Orleans killing 29 men, gay groups, their publications and their leaders have been exploiting the catastrophe for all it is worth. That men should die without purpose under such painful circumstances is tragic enough, but that their fate should be used to the advantage of certain gay leaders and made into a con­sciousness - and fund-raising gay event is even more tragic. The l'pstairs bar, at 604 Iber­ville St.. was a fire-trap. While not found by investigators to be in actual violation of New Orleans' fire regulations the bar was locat­ed in an old part of the city where fire codes were not adequate nor strictly enforced. According to Fire Dept. Supt. William McCros­sen, many of the buildings and establishments in the French Quarter of New Orleans are simi­lar fire hazards. Conditions of the sort exist in every major city in the country. But specifically, the Upstairs bar was decorated with highly flammable materials. The windows were closed over by paneling, and they were barred. There was a blocked-off fire escape with no stairs leading to the ground. There was one exit through a passage­way, but apparently only about 20 patrons in the bar at the time of the fire were aware of it. The fire was first discovered in the main stairwell. It was al­most immediately drawn up into the bar by a draft of scorching air. Everyone panicked and in the in­stinct for self-preservation ran for the windows where they either fell or were pushed to the floor and trampled by their brothers. A few of the more agile and slend­er patrons managed to slip through the bars, but were either killed or injured when they tried to jump to safety. Coroner, Carl H. Rabin described the scene after the fire'. One pile of bodies was found in the corner by the fire escape where in "mass hysteria one man fell, then another, and another .. . . " The fire broke out at 7:56 p.m., and was under control 16 minutes later at 8:15. The fire­men did all they could. Fire depart­ment investigators sifted the ashes for clues to the origin of the blaze. Some witnesses claimed it was the work of a disgruntled customer who had been ejected from the premises earlier. But there was no real evidence to indicate arson. The injured needed and received blood. Charity Hos­pital blood bank director, David de Jongh, said "he was pleased with community response to the call for doners." Families of four victims were reported to be too poor to make funeral arrange­ments. Residents of New Orleans were generally unmindful that the Up­stairs was a "gay bar." It was not a matter for consideration. The bar and its patrons for the WANT TO DO SOMETHING PCl',Je 2 TO BETTERYOUR LIFE AND HELP YOUR GAY BROTHERS AND SISTERS AT THE SAME TIME? DO SOMETHING! DON'T JUST COMPLAIN ABOUT DISCRIMINATION, JOIN THE Circle of Friends TEXAS' OLDEST HOMOPHILE ORGANIZATION AND SPONSORS OF DALLAS' ANNUAL GAY PRIDE PARADE ALL MEN & WOMEN (OVER 18) WELCOME. TO MEET NEW FRIENDS AND ENJOY GAY ACTIVITY, MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY: ----------------------------------- I am interested in learning more about the CIRCLE OF FRIENDS and how I can expand my social life while helping others, Please send me a brochure, Enclosed is $1, 00 to help pay for postage, printing, and a s mall contribution to social justice. Name Age _ _ Addre_s_s---~---------...: CZiipty _ ____________ _;SPhtaotne_ e_ ____ 1000 EMBOSSED BUSINESS CARDS $8.9 4615 Mt. Vernon 524-5612 QUALITY PRINTING most part had no commitment to gay rights. Homosexuals in New Orleans are not organized. The local papers with one or two early exceptions reported the fire with­out emphazising the homosexual aspect - - contrary to accusations made against the press in its coverage of the Houston murders. Indeed, the fact that the Upstairs bar catered to a homosexual clien­tele was irrelevant to events. The individual sexual proclivities of the patrons was not an issue in their fiery end. Nor was it considered to be by the families and friends and local community that quickly responded with sympathy and help. It remained for thoughtless in­terests within the homosexual movement itself to direct attention from the tragedy and make a sexual issue of it. With a lack of sen­sitivity equal to that of a funeral parlour using a similar moment of personal loss to benefit its business, representatives of the gay interests moved in on the scene and took over from grief­stricken and bewildered friends and families. They organized and directed as specific homosexual movement functions a gay memorial service for the dead, they proclaimed a national day of mourning for their "gay broth­ers," they called for gay blood donations, they created a national memorial relief fund from gay resources, and, they seized every ianppropriate opportunity to be interviewed by the news media on the plight and oppression of "Gays" in general. Quite rightly, the reaction of those in New Orleans who had to endure this was one of horror that their local ordeal was being man­ipulated by unsolicited and un­welcome intruders for the purpose of promoting gay liberation and of displaying a phony gay solidarity. Most of them were unable to resist. Some, not knowing what else todo cooperated - - as did the rest of the homosexual movement. Although what happened in the aftermath of the Upstairs bar fire is .an isolated incident, there is a distressing trend among some seg­ments of the homosexual move­ment -- particularly among those who mindlessly refer to them­selves as "Gays" - - to divert the movement from its primary goals to their own selfish ends by using every tragedy no matter what its origin or association as a cause to rally around. In their haste to use these situations these gr.oups and persons do not stop to think whether their actions are beneficial -- or possibly harmful and embarrassing to the movement and to innocent persons. The be­havior may be symptomatic of a lack of concrete and worthwhile programs within these groups. (Homosexual Information Center) FOLLIES coming to Houston! The Thespian Players of the Dallas Metropolitan Community Church will present THE TEDDY BEAR FOLLIES in one of Houston's most popular bars on October 6th. The purpose of the performance is to raise money for the newly organized Houston MCC. This show is unique for gay entertainment in the Southwest in that few numbers are "record-m~ ed." Those performing use their own talents. This cast of 17 lively singers and dancers , plus five technical staff members have just returned from a smash engagement in Okla­homa City where they played to a turnaway house. Anyone wishing to audition for the company (which is semi-pro­fessional) is welcomed. a The Air Force and the Primitive "H" (Human Behavior, Aug. '73) As high and mighty defenders of "red blooded manhood," air force officials look benignly upon heterosexual love. But the man­to- man variety snaps the jail doors shut. Dr. John A. Chiles, a Uni­versity of Wisconsin psychiatry resident, argues that outmoded, harsh punishments for homosexual men are hurting both the air force and the people involved. Emphasis is on "administrative segregrat­ion" (the stockage) and purging all deviants from the hup-two­ranks regardless of emotional stability, loyalty, degree of sexual control or work competence. Since no exact definition of homosexuality appears in air force rules, intoxicated men who go so far as to buss a buddy have been thrown into prison while the bu­reaucracy cranks up in an effort to discharge them. Men may be detained for months in solitary as their case is "investigated." Meanwhile, a captive's moral plummets. A code H can even be placed on an inspection record attached to the prisoner's door, spurring other prisoners to taunt and ridicule the man. UNEVEN JUSTICE. In air force eyes, there are two classes of homosexuals. Officers branded with the scarlet H can resign "for the good of the service." If they want to fight the charge, they may present expert medical and psychiatric testimony. Medi­cal authorities, in fact, can take over entire disposition of the off­icers' cases. But for enlisted per- IN DALLAS sonnet, regulations do not permit medical opinion to take prece­dence over administrative rulings. It seems that for the bigwigs, sexual preference is a medical matter, but for ordinary air force men, it's nothing but a discipli­nary issue. '·Puntitive attitudes are need­lessly expressed, and useful personnel are excluded from the service they may wish to render." Dr. Chiles maintains. He recom­mends that homosexual prisoners be accorded minimum custody status. The distinction between officers and enlisted men should be removed, so psychiatrists retain the power of medical in­tervention in all cases. Further, homosexuals should be carefully defined as those who "exclusively and preferentially seek same sex gratification.'' Current air force policy pontificates that homosex­ual behavior is "a debasement of high moral standards." Instead of dishing out rhetoric, air force officials should consider the men involved as individuals, and ap­proach their futures accordingly. "The contention that all persons with homosexual behavior should be excluded from the Air Force is at least a debatable one. Such a group includes many who are emotionally stable, loyal and cap­able of rendering good service," Dr. Chiles insists. Gay Activists and Mental Health (Human Behavior, Aug. '73) Martin Rogers and Barbara Bry­ant, gay activists, have an effec­tive technique for giving the general public a taste of what it's like to be homosexual in our soc-iety. They chose two female vol­unteers from their lecture aud­ience and ask them to play the part of a gay couple. Then Rogers and Bryant, tongue firmly in cheek, play Mr. and Mrs. Straight. Rogers sets the scene for the volunteers with a certain amount of relish. "A married couple you're friendly with has invited you to dinner," he told a young woman recently at the Western Psycho­logical Association Convention. "They tell you to bring a date, and you show up with her." As the well-meaning hosts, Ro­gers and Bryant serve up cock­tails with a goodly share of put­downs. "You might have warned us so we'd have known," Bryant ad­monished the "guests." "After all, the children might have been up . . . . Have you been this way long?" Rogers beamed in the spirit of liberal benevolence. " I'm ready and interested in learning and I'm open to this , but you've got to realize- -this is the first time this has happened in our home." The scene illustrates what Ro­gers dubs "homophobia, the ir­rational anxiety reaction many het­erosexuals experience when in the presence of a homosexual." The term, and the attitude that it's time for heterosexuals to start dealing with their own fears about sexual orientation, characterizes the growing gay activist movement in the field of psychology. Rogers, an associate professor of psy­chology at California State Uni­versity, Sacramento, and Bryant, a psychology graduate student at the same school, have founded the Association of Gay Psychologists, a national organization with some 60 members. This is your ticket They and other gay therapists, who appeared on a panel at the recent convention, are running a speakers' bureau, encounter groups and counseling services- - all of which operate off the fun­damental assumption that homo­sexuality is a valid alternative for all human beings, not an ill­ness that must be masked from society. The activists most in the public eye are the trained speakers, like Rogers and Bryant, who discuss the gay movement before local groups. Last year, the Sacramento Gay Speakers' Bureau filled 200 speak­ing engagements, leaving Rogers and Bryant rather experienced in handling a potentially sticky sit­uation. Audiences are so unwilling to listen with open minds, said Rogers, that a speaker who makes one wrong move will be written off by his listeners. Therefore, they discourage introductions that play upon stereotypes or pay trib­ute to "these extremely brave and courageous people." A speak - ing team is al ways composed of one male and one female, who make a point of telling anecodotes from their childhood, schooling and car­eers. "We tell them we're some­body's son or daughter, or some ­body's father," said Rogers. Most important, they try to answer even insulting questions without a trace of hostility. ''When we first started speaking," said Rogers, "our anger flowed out in a way that flattened our audience. We've since learned to rein in our anger, because we're more inter­ested in reaching people than in feeling good about ourselves." Frequently they resort to role ­playing techniques to answer for FUN.& EXCITEMENT l DALLAS e BEST MUSIC & SOUND at your DALLAS SPIIIIIST 5462 DENTON DR. CUT OFF DALLAS e BEST DRINKS DALLAS •BEST ATMOSPHERE (LIQUOR & BEER) DALLAS e MOST FRIENDLY PEOPLE LARGE ENOUGH TO PROVIDE FUN & EXCITEMENT FOR YOU AND TO ACCOMODATE LARGE CROWDS. SMALL ENOUGH TO APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE AND TO WELCOME YOU PERSONALLY ' DOWNTOWN DALLAS Page 3 'I ; . -, questions about hypothetical sit­uations. Some questions are promptly reversed and tossed back to the audience. " lf someone asks what causes homosexuality, we ask them what causes heterosex­uality." P erhaps the most successful gambit is the role reversal. Be­sides switching roles in the four­some - at - dinner routine, and audience volunteer might be asked to play a token gay activist at a cocktail par ty, surrounded by "lib­eral" mental healthprofessionals. Other panelists are absorbed in overturing traditional psychiatric views of homosexuality, and in pro­viding the therapy they feel gay people are not receiving from most professionals. In fact, Mark Freedman, a San Francisco psy­chologist, believes there are ad­vantages to being gay. ·He has sur­veyed 81 lesbians and 67 heterosexual women with similar educational backgrounds. After collecting personal data and testing for "self-actua lization" with the Personal Orientation Inventory, he found no differences in psycholog ­ical adjustment between the gay and straight women. And the homo­sexua ls scored higher on work satisfaction, inner direction, spon­taneity and the ability to create meaningful relationships . "When people go through the crisis of ' coming out' (r ecogniz­ing their homosexual orientation), and they have all the social flak coming at them, they tend to be able to cope better with future cri­ses," Freedman told the convent­ion audience. " They're more in touch with themselves and what they want to do." Gay men are often freer to show tenderness and other " feminine" emotions than heterosexual men, said Freedman, and lesbians are more comfortable with their ag gressive sides. And, ironically, social prejudice can free up homo­sexuals to create their own life­styles, he believes. "Since you're 'sick' no matter what you do, you learn to live without social reinforcement and tune into your own needs." In other words, mono­gamous homosexuals who remain faithful to each other and live quiet surburan lives are considered just a "sick" as gay people who relate to many sex partners--thus removing the necessity to shape one's living habits to win social approval. In recent months, Freedman has served as staff psychologist for the San Francisco Gay Counseling Ser­vice, which dispenses advice to 15 to 20 callers a day. Calls include routine requests for hous­ing information -- where land­lords don't discriminate -- or physician referrals - for medical help without value judgements. Other more urgent problems like "marital" and general emotional difficulties are treated in person. Another psychologist, John New­meyer, provides the San Fran­cisco gay community with its own branch of the human potential movement. His Gay Raps, which appeal mostly to middle-class men from their late teens to early 40's meet weekly for consciousness­raising, sensitivity and encounter groups. In progress for two years, the program offers a healthier set­ting for forming friendships than gay bars, Newmeyer believes. And perhaps most important to gay activitists, the raps cope with the loneliness and emotional conflicts that affect all human beings - - re gardless of sexual identity. ''NOW OPEN" ''IN THE VILLAGE,, DALLAS MCC Affirmation of position on Human Sexuality We, the members or the Metro­politian Community ChurchofDal­las, because of the need for a better understanding of our Church's purpose and position on human sexual expression, do here­by affirm the following: 1. The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches (by which our Church is chartered) was founded in response to a need of individuals who, for one reason or another, had been rejected or felt rejected by their previous church and that need evidenced itself, in some of these individ­uals expressed their sexuality in a homosexual manner, our Church has been and is still sometimes referred to as a homosexual (or gay) church. We are not a homo­sexual (or gay) church! We are, have always been, and intend to al ways be a Christ - centered Church open to ALL people in Christian love and understanding. 2. Our position on the personal and private expressions of an in­dividual's sexuality has always been one of non-judgemental ac - ceptance. We do not, as a Church, promote or advocate any particular expression of sexuality. We do feel that any expression of an individ­ual' s sexuality, which is sincerely guided by a deep love and true concern for another individual, is a valid and worthwhile expression of their relationship. We do feel that sexual acts should be re­served to private expression. We are opposed to any sexual express­ion that is forced upon another individual and advise against public sexual acts of any expression. 3. As part of its regular minis - try to all, our Church will con­tinue its special ministry to in­dividuals who express their sex­uality in homosexual relationships. Our justification in this stand are manifold: Primarily, the Gospels tell us to go and preach the good news of Christ to ALL the world. This instruction makes no except­ion! Many churches (or their con­gregations) consider certain in­dividuals to be unworthy to attend or hold a position in their church to associate socially with TE.RO-members of their congregation. Many of these outcasts are people who naturally express their sex­uality in a homosexual manner and several of this number have a strictly private expression with only one other individual for whom they have a deep love and true concern. The Scriptures also tell us that we are not to judge (Mat­thew 7:1-2; John 5:22-23; John 8:4-11; John 12:44-50). If Jesus, the Christ, Himself did not come to judge (John 8:15; John 12:47), then how could we presume to act as judges? The Commandments of the New Law are to love God and to love our neighbor (Matthew 22:37-40; John 13:34). We do not show love by rejection and con­demnation. Jesus warned us of false pro­phets but assured us that we would know them by their works (Mat­thew 7:17-20). We ask those who do not now understand our purpose to not judge our Church or its congregation but to come and see and know whether what we say and do is of Christ. See if those who were lost are now being shown the Way. See the difference in the lives of those who attend. . . the difference that the love of God makes in their lives. And, when you come, look not only with your . eyes but also with your hearts that you may understand. For we also have those in our congregat­ion who hear the Word but do not understand, who see and yet are blind . . . but we are working together to try applying Christ­ian principles in our lives. We may all serve God just where we are. Our Church does not seek to change anyone from one type per­son to another but only to direct their individual consciousness to God. If any individual will open thrir heart to God, He will trans­form and regenerat£ them from witlrin so that, regardless of their race, color, sex, sexual orien­tation, or other condition or posit­ion in which they find themselves, He will show the way of express­ing their human nature in the right manner . . . the way of Love. WIien our human nature is guided e 0• Page 4 2417 TIMES JUST OFF KIRBY Dancing Look for your personal invitation in the mail _ _ Norma & Jerry HOUSTON, TEXAS Is 69 times The Problem OF HOMOSEXUAL A8\ISE. DAUGHTERS OF BILITrs Dall as Chapter Tlia Nation's Oldest Lasloian O,vanizatlon Consciousness Raising - Educational Projects - BY AND FOR WOMEN JOIN US - First and Tliird Fridays Each Mc.nth Ba • part of the Scana -- Cal I (214) 82.~0n0 or BOX 59.U DALLAS, TEX 75222 by God's love, then any expression of that nature is acceptable in His sig:it! It is when we allov. our human nature to rontrol us that these expressions build barriers betwc,•n us and God and between us and 011r nl'ighbor. ) The MCC Started in Texas with its study group in Dallas in July 1970. [ The group became a mission in the Call of 1970 and was charted as a Church on May 23, 1971. ;ij Recently, great interest has grown 1 - 1 ~1 , all over Texas . . . . Other , And Anna's Ice Cream Parlor - In the Heart of Town churches are now in Fort Worth\ and Austin, and now we have a / ..:'.-1.: . - Phone 501-253-8630 study group in Houston. Other 1 ,.._ _ _;.. ____ __, areas have expressed interest and,~-- _..,_ __ --- - ---'·--------------- f.~~y~/t~~:~~i PSYCHOLOGISTS Gods graces .. .. So ------- . Are you interested in uniting with people. Let us teach them a thing the MCC study gro!IP in Houston? NEED HELP U so, please advise or two! You can aid in this valu- the MCC able work by calling Mary Wilson, at the Montrose Gaze Community Monday through Friday at 692- Center - 504 Fairview - Houston, 2266 or 369-9135 after 5 o'clock. Texas 77006 - Phone 528-9769. No one was ever born a psych- (You will not be asked to disclose P ologist. Perhaps their development your identity. So please do not 0 rno was "arrested" when they were reveal theirs.) first exposed to alternate life fl styles. But these unfortunate R I■ people CAN be helped, if they U Ing sincerely WANT to be helped. The. gay_ community can not provide motivation for them. Criticed By flooding the market with explicit films and publications, pornographers triggered a back­lash and spurred the U.S. Supreme Court towards its recent decision on obscenity, according to the director of the Indiana University I Institute for Sex Research. Dr. Paul Gebhard, director of the institute made famous by Dr. Scientests are not sure what exactly causes a psychologist or even if they can be "cured." But if treatment is started early, it is believed they can be made useful and responsible citizens to society, and eventually even lead purposeful and happy lives. It is the duty of gay citizens everywhere to help those less fortunate than we. Our work will be difficult, but we MUST NOT turn our backs on our brothers - - even though they are "different." The Southwestern Medical School and Southern Methodist Uni­versity is conducting an indepth study of the sexual preferences of homosexuals. These are sincere 69 TIMES as BAD II 63 Spring Street Eureka Springs, Arkansas 72632 .. - __ ., ~----· . ..-./"' ... -.--• - MCC CONFERENCE The Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches held its fourth annual General Conference in Atlanta , Georgia August 30 - September 2. Texas was represented by several dele­gates and lay persons from Hous­ton, Dallas and Fort Worth. Also attending the conference were delegations from churches of the Fellowship in Hawaii, Canada, England and France. The conference adopted new by­laws and installed new officers. Rev. Richard Vincent, Pastor of the Metropolitan Community Church of Dallas was elected to the Board of Elders of the Fellowship, giving Texas new strength in the admin­istrative functions of the Fellow­ship. The next general conference will be held in San Francisco. Jim Jaynes I Alfred Kinsey, called the court decision to let censorship rules mirror community standards "dangerous and unfortunate." "The ruling is an infringement t-r===========================================----_- _- _- _- _- _- _- - _- _- _- _- _- _- _- _- - _- _-_- _- _- _- _- _- _- - _- _-_- _- _- _-_- _- _- - -~--_-_:-_-_ _ on individual freedom and an at-tempt to legislate taste," Gebhard said in a news release. "It is another example of the govern­ment claiming that the individual must be protected from himself as though he were an incompe­tent minor." 0 Aso,rr ~ heterosexua1A~ ~ A60SE SOCIAL EVENTS AT MCC - • Friday and Saturday6 September 21st and 22nd - WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? with Bette David. 8:00 p.m. Saturday, September 22nd - THE TEDDY BEAR FOLLIES PLAYS HOUSTON! 10:00 p.m. Sunday, October 7th - COVERED DISH DINNER. Good food, good company. 5:30 p .m. Friday and Saturday, October 19th and 20th - A ST AR IS BORN with Judy Garland. 8:00 p.m. Lon WITH YOUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS DALLAS: 3834 Ross Avenue Sunday Services: 11 am & 7:30 pm, Richard Vincent, df{opolitA11 FT WORTH: 2800 Purington Sunday Services: 7:30 pm David Carden, Interim Pastor HOUSTON: MCC Study Group 504 Fainiew -Call 528-9069 Page 5 ,.I ,I, 1 MCC full-fledged in houston Incidents Focus by Jim Jaynes ordinator of the West Central Everyone remembers when a District of the Fellowship, has A tt t • persol!, calling himself _a repre- au~orized an intensive program to en ion on sentatlve of the Metropohtan Com- bnng Houston gays a place to munity Church ame to Houston and worship in freedom and security. · started a church study group here. Robert E. Miller, on the Min- a. l ' After holding a few Bible Raps istrial Staff of the Church in Dal- omosexua s ~nd collec~ing a little money_ the las as an Exhorter, and qualified imposter disappeared. Ever since to administer the Sacraments when been understandably wary when first full-fledged religious service that time, gays in Houston have he is in Houston, will conduct the w◄ ld they heard of church-related act- on September 23. All interested ivities. Con~eq1;1ently, Houston _is persons, gays and straights alike Or the largest city rn th_e ~ountry with are welcome to participate in these no MCC for gay Christians. services. For information please But the Metropolitan Community call Mr. Arnold Lawson at 781- Church is coming to Houston. An 1940. MCC Study Group, with Mr. Arnold Lawson assigned as Worship Co­ordinator, has operated in Houston for the last several months; and has been recognized by the General Conference of the Universal Fel­lowship of Metropolitan Com­munity Churches, held August 30 - September 2 in Atlanta, Georgia. Rev. Richard Vincent, Pastor of the Dallas MCC and District Co- THE BRAZOS BAR - IN HOUSTON - FUN SHOWS - PATIO (A MUST) (Dallas Morning News - by Maryln Schwartz) Revelations of mass murders in Houston and a "gay" procurement ring in Dallas have thrust the con­troversial subject of homosex­uality into the public eye. "What is most disturbing," said the Rev. Richard Vincent, minister of a church whose congregation is predominantly homosexual, "is there are people who think that the mere fact that a person is a homo­sexual is reason enough for him WONDERING WHAJ TO 0 0 ? ID Dallas REY' HE All 60116 TO .,,._ ,.. to have turned into a perverted murderer. This is not only grossly unfair, it is grossly untrue." "They keep trying to tell us homosexuality is a victimless thing and not a crime," said one man in a downtown office. "Well, just look at those murders. Is that victimless? You ought to string them all up." "And when some man goes out and rapes a young girl, do we go out and string up all the hetero­sexuals?" someone answered. A LOCAL psychologist feels the main problem is misunder­standing. "People like to.think thathomo- ,,,,\ \\\\ '" \ \ / "''\\ Studi * ..... .,,,... , , _,,, 4117 IRYU AT fllZHUN 114 123 1441 Page 6 if; ./ ,. .,,- ,. .. ,, .. erted ossly ill us thing man I, just I that string Is the llder-omo- \ sexuality is just associated with the very effeminate young man or · the man who wants to pick up young boys. Well, I think these people would be shocked to realize there are an estimated 50,000 homosex­uals in the Dallas area. I grant that only about 600 of them have actually declared themselves, but it any of these people ever wand­ered into any of the gay circles in town they would be surprised at who might turn up-- every­one from some of your bett£r known athletes to school teachers to truck drivers. "A good many ofmyhomosexual patients tell me they particularly seek out jobs which are known !O be he-man jobs. They feel this will give them a good cover." But the doctor said he didn't feel the qu2stion should be if a person is obvious or unobvious or declared or undeclared. sexual or from problems which caused them to be homosexual. "In some instances, they could inflict these feelings on the students they might be teaching- - not in a physical way but in a mental attitude. I'm not saying a hetero­sexual might not do the same thing · but in a predominantly heterosex­ual world, there is going to be a lot more upset if it is a homo­sexual attitude." "I am becoming firmly convinc­ed homosexuality is something that is inside a person and can't really be taught too easily," said the minister of a prominent North Dallas congregation. 4015 Lemmon Ave "The simple truth is," he said, "that homosexuality exists--and when it exists to the tune of 50,000 people in Dallas alone, it might be well to understand how it exists and what the gay world consists of. It might solve a lot of problems on both sides." "I THINK we worry too much about corrupting others. I was rather unsuspectingly thrown into this problem when one of the most respected members of my co~­gregation came to me and said he just had to talk to someone. He said he was a practicing homo­sexual and was terrified his child­ren would find out. COCKTAIL HOUR 4 • 7 (Special Prices) SUNDAYS 6 - 9 P.M. "The man's wife died when the youngest girl was five years old. His two girls and one boy are now grown and are all happily mar­ried. I couldn't see that their father's homosexuality had any effect on the way he raised his children. He was a good father and that is what mattered." $1.50 STEAK SANDWICH HIGHT, along with FREE draft beer ••• all you can eat and drink at this price ••• : •• "WHAT BOTHERS me . peo­MONDAYS 6 - 9 P.M. ple," said one psychiatri~t, "is what happens if a homosexual has the job of, say, teaching young boys. What kind of influence will he have on those boys? ITALIAH DIHHER PLATE HIGHT •• • alJ yau want ••• $1.25 PIANO BAR - "I can only say it depends on the person. You get as many heterosexual men v. ,10 like to fondle girl students as Y'" lo homosexual men who like to ' Jle young boys. But I can sa -many of the homosexu:\ls rr .aaveverydeep emotiona prob! -·••~ resulting from reactio1 .;Cuuse they are homo- But other ministers say some of their most frustrating counseling is from young people who have learned of their parent's homo­sexuality. (UPSTAIRS) • OPEN Tuesday through Sunday 9 p.m. 't;I 2 a.m. "Perhaps when they are older they will understand," said one Methodist minister, "but I had one girl who ran away when she found out her mother had a woman lover. It's been two years and PATIO BAR SOON TO BE OPEN SPECIAL EVENTS - Planned for Texas . O.U. week end and Halloween • watch for these announcements in the next issue of The Huntius. Dallas, Texas 528-3480 CHBISTGAU/ In Love With the NY Dolls; All-American Boys Into Ultra-Decadence that he'a _, U- 30 t:itta. Atlmtic aya 11,oy're too crude, Columbia &aYB they're too hard, Para­mour, t •YB they're too loud, Capitol aeya they're too -.rierd. RCA and Palydor - in1ereot but don't even come to aee them. Give or tab a few subsidiaries. that leavea Warner BNJL for the time being, but others may come back in. Of course, 'Thau admill that Iha Dolla - drunk at their tint imjor audition and ,._ l>Nraed at their ll00001d and thot couldn't be" helped. Nor wu 'Thau'• $250,000 aoldnr price for a n,cording deal an indUCOID«lt. And i~a true that teene,ers aren't into the Dolla' kind ol hard roclt any ~ - to lilr.e heavier, mon melo­dramatic- stuff. By RalNri Cltrlltpu "People lave tho """'I Ida -t ..,. •ya Arthur Kay,e, boooiol al Ibo New York Dolla. I strain to bar what will come nert, lo, allhouch Ar· thur is a bis guy, •landinl over • feet in his platform heels, he ~ in a barely audible lispin1 mUl'DIW. 'They think we'n, a bwu:n al tra.­.5SUAI junkiN or somethin1.'' Of courae, Arthur, that'• a ridica­notion. Although you an, - ina Nld lipstick and a New Yan 1ers jel'lty/minidrea over WW. tichto. And David J-will tie up his ann and inject kimoeU with • imaginary hypodenruc while sintlar 'Looking for• Kies'' at Kenney'a C,ut. >aya toni,ht. And Syt Sylvain will looll: Ille the a1ruttinr imore o1 u.. Wlaelli in "Cabaret" at the Men:ior _,__ And Billy Mun:ia, ,­flllt clnunmer, did die in wbat lo lllllod a c1ru,-fflatec1 death In Londim 1a.i.t,u fmalrl\Y T, ran-.ual junkiM? WW lohnny Thundff hu hia _,, -,,, which he offers in the baaora _.. typical IIOnSitive, touch._ ....,_, '1 think we'n, juot a bund, af ldda looltin1 for a ,ood time.• 11lil ,_...,. mony _t _ -... merry partly ._ an been drinlinc up their ol lorthcomlnc .,.-ia at a t _, Kenny'a. "'IW'a -• Syl u:,a. "Aj,plo pio and loo -· And .. u lo - that .. ..... - juol beollhy,...... New Yan dnioian. tho­• Je,ry Nalan, ..... - • - rra true. N-..._. 11 .. Almy brat with • ._.,. Braall,,, who haa - - rod: .. ...... hla bis - loak ..... Alla ~ In the .... ,,__, .. a,. ~...... .-......_. .,q,....,____ _____ ......,.,. background on Staten lsland. They may be fibbinr a litlle, but all claim to be aomewh<re between 18 and 22. Just a good old-fashioned punk rock and roll band. The original membtr&-Kaye., Thunder and Murcia-got together a )"NI' and • half ago, ahortly al1er Kaye and Thunder first met on Mao­Doupl Saeet. "I hear you play guitar," Thunder aid. "I play bas." ••rm not too good." Kaye replied. .. Well, neither am I,'' &aid Thun• der. After mtchinr instrumenta, the two joined -.iith Murcia to form the Dolla. Thunder named the group and IIU'II. Soon Sylvain added a aecxind (Wlar. Then Johans<n, who lad i-n perlonnlnc u a !Olo linaff­-, writer, joined on. The group pla~ lo, anyone who -,Jd lisle&­at political rallies, a 81ambath in 11,ooklyn Heiahta, and the like. The ......_ Arla Cen~r. whore they mode lbeir _.talion. wu one more ouch -1UJ>ity. By the tima lho Dolla rot ~ about a year allO, the y.,. oer wu already a haven of what i9 called clitter-iock, which on 1101111 a­perience I woolcl defme aa doliber­alely dumb rock and roll ~ by banda ol ambivalent ......., alle­ci-- In contrast, the Dollo ,..Y be Ibo boat i.rd rock band ainae tho RolliA( St,xa. 11,a ~ Is unavoidable, bal tho Dolla resist it, and for p,od ~t limita and data them. Un­.- 1e1y, there ia really DO - - to undenland a new band. Liu David labuan, lim MC1ffl81111 - --ba9-m,a• adl •th--el-ib.. w- 1o abf-o 1ioo - the Doom' ll)OCific ldmtit;J bapa to - la. ,.. be_, ...... out, l"'- haa - In - ~ with l'wa N- el -. - ·· -- bat .. - lib lau,r, especially in his hair and hip ,:.slunJo, and -t• the - wild unisex eroticiam, But while sufferinr ooemed lo mau Jag..,. tough and distant, Johansen ~; .. vulnerol,le and close to the surface. He is attrac,. live and dangerous as only eorneooe who always meam weU and always follows his well-me.:ininr impulsa can be attractive and dangerou8, the kind of person you forgive in advanoe lo, hurting you. That kL'ld o1 a-1 is called star quality. The rest of the band alc:o &hares mon, with the Stone,, especially the early Stones, than with more re-cent hard rock banda. They convey the ume desperate, droogy decaclonce in 19'111 that the Stones did in 1964, and tneir music is the ,;ame elementary metal blUM cacophony, only more anarchic. The Dolls do not - a das&y blues soloist lib Mick Taylo,, and they wooldn't ""°" what to do with him if they did. They are quite content lo - around lbe .... mumg now, with Nolan, who hu --1Jy aen-ed to firm ,., Ibo -roll· l·!\Y -lh k~-nr •t o tfhraen triocc k baenetd. .. w.·re a lot raster than the StoDM." lahanoen .. YB. And somebody - adda: "And younrer." Soroe red anoba put ouch Dllllie down bemuae it 18111111 eo elanentar,-, ..., i---Tbal'a IUCllly wbal it'•mwc-1 tobe,ol-and in - - the Dollo an, DOI another minimal band in the ......., o1 critical lavw lib the s'- and the MC-5, or popular - 1iu GNnd Jil\mk and Bladt Sabbath. Tbe cruciol di- la lhet the Dolio be .. p,od materiAI. Wartin, with Ibo band for bia molacliea, ,_ wtlroiate .a ,- .,_r 'old": w- -..ii na ntdh oJ bw-ll­Rlallud. and ~ in !heir - • 111111. Ho - bla laYOrlto - • .. .W llrill Bulldiac hitmaken, Jeff Bany and F.me Greenwich, and like lMnl M s:hon that mafic knack for the memorable ph..... I've heard "Rocle and Roll Nurse" only twice, .the seoond time about • month ago, and I Cl'ln still remember how the refrain roe.s. 'Jbe aonp wouldn't be $0 memor­able if they weren't &:> 9,·ell-arranged as they an, well-oompo,,ed. The Dolla may not be \lirtu060 m~icia~. but the-y know how to struC'lwe a !.:>ng. They create and intermesh within the bound& ol. their technical competenot, which ia n:actly what rock and roll bands have always done. TIK>v think up introductions and cloc:.es .1nd s,e,g­uea and fades. they add h:umonies for variety, they end a <on.- before you want ft to be O\'er or Pxtend it alter you thought it W36 d~. 1hey do dozens of little thin~~ that require nat training, but immen;ion in rod: and roll and street-type s,\'vy. Im­morsed and avvy th,y undeniably are. The Dolls are nwiaied by Marty Thau, who used to be a promo man al Cameo-Parkway and at Buddah. A promo man ii aomt0ne who l(el,; radio stations to play sinrles. and Marty 1'1lau wu very 1ood at his work. Some trendy music industry l}·pe,; whisper that Till.u Li too square for this band, but it's mor. lik,ly that they're too hip-they don't la,.., the Barry/ GN!fflwich handf.hake. Thau loYee this bond, but h, can't set U- a """"11 contract. Buddah told him thot the band wu great but loha,-,i didn't male ii; MCA told him that lahanaen ..,.. a &tar but the band - louoy. AlcM'a «1tire New Yo,k aWf na informed by p..,.idmt l«ry Mou that the Doll, .,..., ..,_ for the label"• imqe. Paul Ne1-, head al New Yan altr for Mer­cury, ._ the Dolls eo mudi lt'a alao true, ""-• that the Dolla an, the lint new band .,;th major talent lo play ouch mo­sic in aeveral years. and if anybody cu aet them rN:Orded and promoted risht, it'a n:neone liD Marty 'Thau. Ever llince the berinninr, the rich, cl-.y men who own """"11 companiea baw balotl roc:l: and roll. They'll jump on any - band-. ron to get rid ol it for a while. But It leepa cominl back; hauntinr them with Ill .,_hie r»­rnanclo. This lime Ira -nns IIIUIHlp and p1a1- 1o""" and au11estinr ~bilitlea of low d>at r»­oent people don't want to think about. And eventually, aome brave, cr-lY capitaliot will tr, to make it (G. I wouldn't aller a pe-1 guannlee. 'The Dolla are ao mudi to my - thot I have to mit­truat my taate Jua& a little. And I do - tho Dolla have reached too many - and not enou(h k.,,._,,.lhe, than woadahedtlinr on the New Yan club circuit they rMIJy ohould - hlch acbool lfl'tnl\Uiuma. aa Ibey have ~ 'The kida might not like them quite • m!lcb • they apaet. but 11,oy - ...., - lbo&,-it'• ca1aio tho ltida would like them a lot more than the a­reoord .. ecutive. -rra-.ual junltiea or no, Ibey do ha ... a lot ol punkitude, and punkilude "-1'1 cone out al atyle quite ,-et. /D Page 7 \ \ ,., Page 8 THE L" ADORATION .. · PERSONALITY CRISIS .. INCREDIBLE . . INCREDIBLE • • INC.REDI •• * RADIO HOST KLOL STEREO FM * Shows Thurs. & Sun. 8 p. m. ¥ Friday and Saturday 8 p. m. &- 11 p. m. TJOa!TS AT,....PAISl.EY <X>., STAFF Of Lll'E, U ,I H ll0X 0FflOl, E\'0U1TlCIN TAPES_. l800ltlS aod LDD"rY HAJ.illCIX OFfJCll LIBERTY HALL 1610 CHENEVERT - 225-6250 SEPT. 13th 14th 15th 16th ADVANCE. $3.00 ROBERTO·· AT DOOi $3.SO she hasn't spoken to her yet." Ministers and doctors who are not trained in psychology or psy­chiatry say the subject of homo­sexuality is still most impossibly difficult for them to deal with. Bob Lewis is a young artist who is active in the gay liberation movement. He and many other homosexuals released statements and wrote let­ters to The News deploring the mass murders which were un­earthed last week in Houston. "I am also offended by the mail-order homosexual ring which was broken up in Dallas," said Lewis. " The gay people here look at it just as the straights would at a prostitution ring. There are those who deal in prostitutes and those who don't." The most common meeting ground for homosexuals in Dallas is in about 30 bars , mostly locat­ed in the Oak Lawn area. THE BARS ar as varied in s tyle and atmosphere as the groups who drift into them. Some are what regulars call " campy queer", complete wihhomosexual comed­ians and female impersonators and others are simple quiet places where people gather to do some serious talking and beer drinking. Some are open only to women, some only to men. But most ac­cept both sexes but get a pre ­dominance of one. For many who consider them ­selves " closet homosexuals," these bars are a safe place to meet friends and not fear dis ­covery. Many of the customer s are married and say they married for social reasons. Others say they are frankly bisexual. Others are single and consider this to be a part of their gay community. Other homosexuals find the idea of socializing at bars distasteful and limit their socializing to private homes. All are disgusted by and fearful of " the straight who wander in to look at the show." Many of the places have back en­trances and are good about keeping out the people who just come in to gape. For many, the formation of the Metropolitan Community Church has been a good solution. "IT IS A CHURCH notfor homo­sexuals, but one which offers the homosexual a safe and comfortable place to come and worship. All churches are not so Christian in their attitudes," said the Rev. Mr. Vincent, the minister. He explained he performs wed­dings in the church. If the couple is of the same sex, it is called a union. But is is the same cere mony that is used for a s traight marriage. Mr. Vincent says, how­ever, he requires gay couples to go through extensive counseling to make sure they know what they are doing. He said the unions have no legal ties. "Any popular misconception," said a Dallas school teacher who calls himself Steve Johnson when giving interviews about his homo­sexuality, " is that mostgaypeople are concentrated in the world of show business or hair dressing. This is not true. A Jot of them drift there because they are two a reas where homosexuality is openly accepted. But believe me, there are as many gay school teachers in Dallas as there are hair dressers. We just don't dare admit it." MANY UNDECLARED HOMO­SEXUALS ar e leading what their gay friends call a double life. II 7~ rn~rn ~'" 11 to. ~ ~ la,, ut, 2'adu. aru 11 FfAlURING: Mixed drinks I' ·I Dancing 11 !1 Live entertainment I I !1 ~~~41-7,,_, I ;1 I Draught Beer 15¢ I I Name Beer 35¢ ,,I I Bar Drinks 50¢ I Call Drinks 75¢ I I (ALSO VISIT THE BON SOIR) I TILE{"'"'~~ ._@* * rn~*~ ~ 4516~~ (214) 526-9328 9 ~ -----......-· ............ .........,..... ........ • • ♦ • • t • • • - - "" "' '- ,.,,, 1911111 11-S CLUB POOL - DANCING - MIXED D11115 Open Tuesday thro~&h Sunday ~P• - 21■ (Closed 8 0·1d1ys ) Z305 S. SHIPHEID " There are plenty of very sought after yount men in this city," said Bob Lewis, " who make it a point to date the prettiest girls they can find. Many a girl would like to marry them, but their object is to be seen. In order to keep an embarrassing situation from occurring, they have to keep 521 M30 switching girls. The pressure is intense," said Bob Lewis . " I did this for a long time and finally gave up. It wasn't fair to me and wasn't fai r to the girls I was dating. But survival is the main thing and we all have our own ways of doing it." Hom·osexual Procuring Ring Uncovered That was the headline scr eaming from the top of page one of the Dallas Morning News, August 15, 1973. According to the News, this was a nationwide operation and was uncovered by police in a raid at 3716 Cole Avenue. John Paul Nor­man, 45, the alleged leader, three adult men and two teen-agers were arrested. A mailing list of 50,000 to 100,000 listings was seized along with booklets containing the pictures and names of teen-agers and young adult males. Captain Bennie Newman, com­mander of the youth division said there was no evidence to link the Oddyssey Foundation to the brutal murders of the young men in Houston. Detectives, led by Lt. Harold Hancock of the intelligence di vis - ion raided the second floor apart­ment which was described as a - " crash pad" and seized a pickup truck full of files, pornog raphic literature, a camera, photo-en­graving equipment, stationery, an electric typewriter and hundreds of booklets with names and ad­dresses. A quantity of marijuana was also seized. Those a rrested we re booked for conspiracy to commit sodomy, possession of commit sodomy, possession of nar cotics, and contributing to the delinquency of a juvenile. The Odyssey Foundation had a San Diego, California post office box, and the Cole apartment was lis ted as "Epic International." HOW IT WORKED - Thousands of unsolicited letters were mailed inviting readers to become mem­bers of the Odyssey Foundation for a yearly membership of$15.00. For an additional $3. 00, one could buy a booklet containing pictures of young men, their names, physi­cal descriptions , ages and interests. According to Officer Newman, the youths were procured from bus stations and from solic­itations by mail. But the booklet gave the impression that these were bright young men eager to learn from travel. If you wanted to be a "sponsor," you financed the youth's (called "fellow") flight to your town where he would be a guest in your home for a few days before flying to the next " spon­sor." According to Newman, the boys received expenses and some pocket money and usually stayed from one to three days. Dallas was the "dispersal point." John Paul Norman, freed on $7,000 bond, was arrested in 1954 and 1956 for committing sexual assaults in Houston. Disposition of these cases is unknown. In Calif­ornia, Mr. Norman was convicted in 1963 for sex pervision and in 1965 was committed by the s tate Page 9 L department of mental hygiene as a sex offender. In 1971 he was con­victed for sending obscene litera- • tu re th rough the mail. The three men and two teen­agers who were arrested with Norman were later released with­out charges. FROM A LESS SENSATIONAL POINT OF VIEW - According to gay grapevine talk, the Odyssey Foundation had been in Dallas for almost a year and most gays as­sumed the police were aware of its existance, but hadn't bothered to close it because it was small potatoes compared to the ever in­creasing number of rapes, murders and robberies committed daily in Dallas. Those who claim to be in the know say the "Foundation" was merely "one man with big ideas" that didn't work. Had it been a truly ''nationwide'' organization, it would have operated from a plush Turtle Creek address, instead of a sleezy Cole Avenue upstairs apartment. The "fellows" were not serious scholors seeking to broaden their education, but hust­lers struggling for existance. The booklets pictured many pretty young faces, but was always ob­solete, as the " fellows" were un­dependable, here today and gone tomorrow. But in at least one in­stance, a young man is vacationing in Europe with his "sponsor" and receiving $100 a week "pocket" money. One can't help but wonder if this raid wasn't carried out to show Dallas citizens that their police force was on their toes, so to speak, in contrast to Houston police who have received a lot of crit­icism for not seeing a pattern to so many boys missing from one section of town. Otherwise, one feels this is merely an instance of homo­sexua\ prosti.tuti.on, hardly dif­ferent from heterosexual prost­itution. Wrong? Yes! But when a heterosexual prostitution ring is broken, does it make headlines? •~~ ANTI-GAY VIOLENCE, The Press, and Pacifism: a Boston report by Allen Young - BOSTON -- The following ap­peared on page 5 of the Boston Globe on Saturday, July 14: "Man killed, 1 hurt in Arboretum assault "By Thomas Dotton, Globe Staff ''One man was killed and another seriously injured early yesterday morning when they allegedly were lured from a downtown Boston bar to a nonexistent party, robbed and beaten by six assailants and thrown into a sewer at the edge of the Arnold Arboretum. "Police identified the dead man as Jeremiah Lynch, 21, of Gar­rison street, Boston, and his injur­ed companion as 22-year-old Stephen Tuscher, of Oak Street, Wayland, who was admitted to Faulkner Hospital, Jamaica Plain, Page 10 MR. CLUB HOUSTON An estimated crowd ofa thousand attended the First Mr. Club Hous­ton Contest held at Gene Howie's popular Farmhouse Dance Bar in Houston, Texas. A runway and stage in the round gave everyone in the house a good seat for the show. When compared to previous Houston contests, the Mr. Club Houston competition was the heav­iest, according to many. Twenty groovy guys were in serious com­petition for the title: "Mr. Club Houston.', The judging was comprised of people from various cities across country. Two of the seven judges were Mr. Jack Campbell, from Miami, President of the Club Hous­ton; and C. J. Harrington, the recent winner of the Mr. David Contest. The Texas Tornado, Tiffany Jones, was invited back from Miami to MC the Houston contest. Her talent, plus several musical numbers by Kitty Key, Mr. Connie Francis, and Mr. Ernestine, help­ed to complete the contest. Each contestant was scored in 1) Towel, 2) Original costume, 3) Swim wear. From these totals were picked six finalist who were given questions by Tiffany Jones to answer. After the questions, another total was reached to de­termine the three winners. A young new face, Mr. Richard Ornelas, was awarded the First "Mr. Club Houston" title; Mr. Jimmy Choate was First Runner Up, and Mr. John Graves was Second Runner Up. All three trophies were presented to the winners by Mr. David, (C. J . Harrington, winner of the contest held recently in N. Y.C.) Each winner received a trophy, cash, and a years free pass to the Club Houston Baths. Richard will be in Miami, Florida in February along with twenty-seven other Mr. Club winners, to compete for the National "Mr. Club Bath Chain" title. As in the past, we are confi­dent that Richard will bring back to Houston another National tro­phy, as have C. J. Harrington (Mr. David, 1973-74), and Mark Ambrosy (Mr. Gay U.S.A., 1973- 74). 2nd Runner-Up ID 3J n nf f!Jal las FREE DANCING I \ FREE AFTER HOURS I WEEKDAYS - 2:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.111. FHID,\YS & S,\Tl'Rll,\'rS - 1:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. \ I Free Beer Bust 5:30 Sundays \ I .J.J07 J{c~ (jj)alln4J ffetraJ 526-9368 -.. - the CLUB baths in cities coast-to-coast Come Any Time We Never Close MR. RICHARD ORNELAS "MR. CLUB HOUSTON 1973-74" CLUB HOUSTON 2205 FANNIN Houston, Texas 229-0156 ( ~ Together Clubs for Together People ) ,...\ "' ( . for "multiple contusions" and was listed last night in fair condition. "Medical examiner George Curtis said Lynch had inhaled a mixture of mud and water and suf­focated after being thrown uncon­scious into a sewer. "According to police, Lynch and Tuscher had met casually near closing time in a Bay Village bar and were invited to a party by six fellow patrons. Tuscher told detectives that, lured by pro­mises of booze, some pot and a lot of fun,' he and Lynch left the bar and got into a vehicle with the six men. "After driving around sections of Forest Hills and Jamaica Plain, Tuscher said, the vehicle stopped near a rear entrance of the Arnold Arboretum at South and Bussey · streets. Police said the eight men got out of the car and conversed until someone yelled: 'Now!' "Lynch and Tuscher were re­peatedly struck with 'clubs, knives and other weapons,' according to police, and 'several sticks covered with blood' were later discovered at the scene. Tuscher told police that both men were also robbed of cash, wallets, jewelry and watches. "Police quoted Tuscher as say­ing the six men dragged Lynch and him to a sewer main at the edge of the Arnold Arboretum grounds. "Lynch reportedly w,is dropped first through the 27-inch opening into the deepest part of the sewer with Tuscher thrown on top of him. Police said the cover of the main was replaced and the six assai­lants drove away. ''Trnscher told police he waited until he knew his assailants had gone before calling for help. He was eventuall} heard by an un­identified passing motorist. "Dct. Sgt. .John Daley of the homicide division and Det. Sgt. \mold White of Station 13 are conducting the investigation of the attack. Robbery has been described as the motive." After I'd finished only the first paragraph of the preceding article, I knew that Jeremiah Lynch and Stephen Tuscher were victims of faggot haters. By the time I was finished with the article, I guessed that the bar referred to was The Other Side -- Boston's most fam­ous gay dancing bar - - and I pretty much could imagine the whole situation. :\fy emotional response was complex. One element was fear, but I'm almost immune to fear. Cruising can be a dangerous bus­iness , and while unlike some people, I am not turned on to the danger, I am always aware of it. Will I give up cruising because of its potential danger? Probably not. (Perhaps I should give it up for other reasons -- because it has so little to do with the sense of community which we want to build and which Jim Kepner has written about so eloquently in these pages -- but that is another story.) Another element of my response to the Lynch-Tuscher story was sadness, on many levels, for dead Jeremiah and hospitalized Stephen. And there was curiosity about ~ow their families were dealing with the situation. (Had the cops told them theie sons were faggots? Maybe they had known previously, maybe not.) But my strongest emotional re­sponse was anger, directed at the Boston Globe for not telling its readers the true story of what happened to Jeremiah Lynch and Stephen Tuscher, for neatly ex- Page 12 c1smg homosexual oppression out of the story. I remembered the class I took in libel law at the Columbia Journalism School; it's libelous to say that someone is a homosexual, and even if the person is dead, his or her descendants can sue and collect! Is that why the Boston Globe hid the facts, I wondered. Well, it turns out that Thomas Dolton, the Globe reporter is a Black gay brother, and of course he knew the gay aspects of the story, but the police told him the gay facts "off the record," and besides, the Globe "is a family newspaper." So the story appeared in its truncated form, which, Dolton says, "was unacceptable to me and still is." I sympathized with Dotton hav­ing to put up with his 3ditors' dishonesty -- on what is sup­posedly one of the nation's most liberal dailies - - and beyond that I was happy with this new af­firmation of how right I was to have quit the establishment press five years ago. I almost sat down to write a letter to the editor of the Globe to complain about their dishonest journalism, but I decided instead to direct my energy into an art­icle for the Advocate and the Nuntius. The editors of the pub-lications, following standard journalistic procedures, would want certain facts for their article, and I. as a ·'trained professional Journalist," knew how to obtain them. I found out that Stephen Tuscher was still in only "fair" condition and could receive no visitors. I balked at the idea of talking to his family; what would I ask them? I called the police officers mentioned in the Globe article, but the) were not in. I called Charley Shively. a friend of mine involved with Boston's "Fag Rag," whose lover happens to be a bartender at The Other Side. Charley confirmed all of my intuitions. In fact, the police had already been to The Other Side asking questions. Charley said that he had also heard that Jere­miah Lynch's family had refused to take his body, though this could not be confirmed, and later it was learned that his family did indeed take care of the burial. (The gay­vine reflects our cruel reality.) By the time the next day dawn­ed, I felt I could no longer pro­ceed with this routine reporting project. Was I just being lazy? I felt uncomfortable with the stan­dard journalism expected of my by the Advocate and Nuntius . What did the specific details matter anyway? Could I say something about this incident that would be helpful to othr gay people? I decided to call Thomas Dotton to tell him how I felt about his article, but also to garner some more information. Dolton told me that the police were less than vigorous in their investigation. He said that one of the bartenders at The Other Side could definitely identify at least one of the as­sailants, yet the police seemed uninterested. 'Queer entangle­ments, " one of the cops said to Dolton and other reporters, as if to dismiss the murder. Later, I got through to Det. Sgt. White, who informed me that two arrests had been made and more were expected. He said that rou­tine investigation had led to the arrests, and he assured me, when I asked him whether police were less than vigorous in solving the murder of a queer, that the police would go "as far as possible" in finding the culprits. My anger at Dotton's article subsided after talking with him. He said he was willing to let me identify him as "gay" in the pages of the Advocate and Nuntius (though he told me he doesn't like the Advocate). He told me that he was a founder of the Student Homo­phile Leage at Columbia Univers­ity in 1966, but has not been in­volved in the gay movement re­cently. As a result of the Arbortum incident - - plus a new wave of as­saults on gay people in Boston cruising spots - - Dolton has re­ceived the OK from his editors to work on a long piece discussing the escalation in anti-gay violence. In addition, he decided to attend a meeting of the Gay Media Watch, a new Boston gay community group specializing in monitoring and correcting media N>verage. The obvious response to all this violence, as gay community leaders have already stated, is organized self-defense, and some Bonstonians are attempting such a group. Who could disagree? We are vulnerable, and the police, who hardly protect ordinary citizens, are not going to protect us fag­gots. (Protect us so we can com­mit felonies in the municipal bushes?) But I would be the last one to preach about the need for self-defense. On this, I feel I am a very typical faggot. I have neither the skill nor the will to fight. I have almost no experience fight­ing. I have managed to avoid every opportunity I have had to fight, and that includes everything from childhood squabbles to recent gay classes in karate held during the prime of New York Gay Liberation Front. In the hey-day of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), when the slogan was ''pick up a gun," I bought a .22 rifle, which I still own, but I have no idea what I would use it for. Two faggot friends I know bought rifles under similar circumstances, and they too no longer have any use for their firearms. (Did we ever really have any use for them, other than to impress upon our­selves and others how tough we were?) In theory, I believe in self­defense, including armed self-de­fense, but I feel incapable of it. I abhor violence, and it also frightens me. 1 would like to stop it. There is, of course, violence running through the gay com­munity, and some gay people seem to get off on it. That goes for the fascistic neo-Nazi sector of the leather crowd as well as for the effeminists gleefully predicting a sex war. But I think such people are a minority. It is no coin­cidence that gay people have always had a' leading role in the pacifist movement (David McReynolds, Bayard Rustin, Allen Ginsberg, etc.). In practice, I suppose I am a pacifistic if I were personally assaulted, and I am not convinced of the effectiveness or the validity , of the doctrine of pacifism (as in "love thy enemy" and "turn the other cheek"). (Readers can make their own puns as far as the "Other cheek" epigram is concerned.) I do think we need to find a way to take destructive power out of the hands of those who are using it -- whether it is Richard Nixon or the people who killed Jeremiah Lynch. But I am very confused. I do not know for cert­ain how to take this power away. Perhaps we are accomplishing this over the long run, by a gradual process as people learn to over­come the fears that drive them to violence. Perhaps violence won't end until there is an end to the domination of women by men, until there's an end to the domination of the poor by the rich. Perhaps it is true that as each of us strives against the destructive values of our society - - com­petition, greed, racism, sexism -­we are effectively combatting this destructive violence. Footnotes to all of this: 1.) Stephen Tuscher, in an inter­view in the Boston Phoenix, as­serts he is not gay, but"AC/ DC", and he said he desperately wants shock treatments to help him erase the memory of that awful night. 2.) The two men arrested in the case were released on their own recognizance, that is, with no cash bond required. 3.) Thomas Dotton's proposed long article on gay people as victims of violence was scuttled by the Boston Globe. The above is not fiction and it COULD HAPPEN TO YOU -­YES! - HERE IN HOUSTON - - DALLAS BARS UNITED-! DALLAS - Saturday, August 18, 1973 the Gay Bar Owners Met and decided to raise the prices of the drinks in the local gay bars. The prices will go up effective August 20 when the bar opens and will remain from now on . Beer, 15-25 cents per can; Bar drinks, 25 cents per drink and call drinks 50 cents per drink ac­cording to what it is. Also no more Happy Hours and no 1/2 price drinks. There has been some comment on these prices and these are just a few made during personal interviews in the different bars Saturday before the raise was effective: "Why should we Homosexuals have to pay for the price of drink­ing with fellow Homo's, when we can go to straight bars and get drinks for 80 or 90 cents per bar drink, 50 per can of beer, and 1.15 per call drink." "I guess the bartenders will have to suffer because, I will not be able to afford to leave a good tip paying these new prices." "It looks like I will limit my­self to one drink per evening be­cause I cannot afford to drink at these prices." "I carry just so much money with me and then I go home. At this rate it looks like I will be going home at 11 p.m. instead of 2 a.m., my usual time " "I do not have to go to Gay Bars to find tricks and it looks I ike I will not go because I cannot and will not pay these prices." " I think that we should get together and boycott the bars over these outrageous prices." The question is will the gay people of Dallas go for the new pri-ces or will they rebell? There is rumour that there will be a boycott on the bars and marches are being organized. These are things that should be answered but will not be answered for a while. We, like you will have to just wait and see what happens. GOOD LUCK BAR OWN­ERS, GOOD LUCK PATRONS! (The above received from one of the many interested parties in Dallas) .J ! TEKIIS welcomes bfJclt our own TEXIIS TORNIIDO - TIFFANY JONES 1 Sisk lassos TIFFANY for tlJe show at tlJe BAYOU Page 13 SPEAK EASY WITHDRAWS - - August 23, 1973 Bayou Landing, BonSouir, Encore, Entre Nuit, Half Dollar, Highland, Mark Twain, Ramrod, Ranch, Ron­sue's, Sundance Kids, T.J.'s, Villa Fontana We at the Speak-Easy were happy to participate in a bar owners guilde or organization that would create unity and friendship among the various owners. The fellowship should eliminate animosities and create a better atmosphere for our community. However, it has become apparent that the majority of the bar owners favor 5trictprice controls and even controls governing promotional actvities of all the members. Our stand has been that each individual bar must be free to promote and to conduct business in whatever manner that is conducive to our individual business. We agreed to increase our drink prices in accordance with our competition because the majority of the bar owners attending the August 18th meeting favored those higher prices. We voted in the minority. It is because that we do not feel that we can "go along" with the strict controls proposed by some of the bar owners that we prefer to withdraw from any furth­er meetings for the time being. We plan to reduce our prices effective today August 23rd in ac­cordance with what we think is fair to our customers and to our business. Can beer will be 65C, draft beer 40C and bar drinks $1.10. We hope that our withdrawal does not create any further disunity or animosity. DALLAS SPEAK-EASY Buddy Rogers Bellaire News 5807 Bellaire Blvd. Open 9 AM- II PM OPEN SUNDAYS 665 9081 New York Times MAGAZINES - PAPER BACKS - OUT OF TOWN PAPERS LARGEST ADULT SECTION IN TEXAS LARGEST SELECTION OF RUBBER GOODS & VIBRATORS IN TEXAS. OVER 4000 PUBLICATIONS TO CHOOSE FROM HARD TO GET BOOKS! lfilil©WO~ 5.\00~5.\@~ Q Q Q Q ® Page 14 SPECIAL Buy two 8 MM rnov1es c'S. qet one with ti11-; Cld AH MEN of HOUSTON has first "style" show by Scott Hort.ors H I • - The Hi-Kamp entertained its favored clientele recently with a men's fashion show gaily paraded by handsome men, winners (some of them) of Texas and National Male Gay Beauty Contests. For example, one of the models was the famous C. J. Harrington. a Houstonite, who after having won several trophies in Texas, went on to win fame as "Mr. David". a gay Florida publication-sponsor­ed magazine. The attire achieved the proper oohs and ahs from the Gavs who swooned before the anractiye models. and the display of the garments was properly described by a well-rehearsed MC re­presenting Ah Men. A Clothing store here in Houston. The brunch which brings people out these days so earl~- to the Hi­Kamp was high)~- successful. and between bites of food one could get an e~·eful of meat. as plent~· was on displa~· this day. Quite a turn from the usual costumes normally seen on this stage; nameJ~- the pantomaniacs. a female impersonation show which has earned for the Hi Kamp a reputation of being one. if not the. best drag bar in this old town. Leave it to the .. Tooth Fairy (s)" to dream up ideas like this. It was a great show. the audience was well pleased. and the common comment was. let's haye another again .... soon. The Ah Men. which seems to be catering to the Ga_y crowd. this being an obdous fact exemplified b~· its audience. models. and locale. will probabJ~­achieve much success in Houston. The st~·les are ··Nol\·· and the Gays seem to like them. 3: FOREIGN CAR SERVICE 5415 Fannin at Calumet FREE ESTIMATFS on body work and repair Foreign Car Specialist • 528 8392 Hours 6 A.M. to 10 P.M. "Portia Plunkett Faces - . . . . . . . . And once again LIFE" dear friends we listen in on Port­ia Plunkett as her words drift gently down Westheimer . . . . "What the hell you want to drink Mona"?! Ah yes , it's Princess Plunkett greeting her many ad­mirers on another afternoon of frivolity and fun. We see from our post that the princess is a little down today ... She's wearing her mustache under her left jowl and frothing a bit Crom one tooth? . . . . right in the middle of her forehead. From where we stand, it would appear that the Princess is "HUNG" .... however, NOT in the usual accepted sense ! ! ! But, as she's known to be a Pushy Broad, she'll undoubtedly end up groping, gnashing, chewing and slobbering on something before the day is done. It's sad that the Pallid, Pas­sionate Princess is poorly today. She has so very much to do. It's difficult to preside over such a distinguished group of people that congregate at her feet . . . . Most of whom pass out from the rotten beer ! ! But dedicated she is . . . . or is that Decadent??? She will be her usual , charming and voluptious self come time for the meeting of the "D.R.T.'s". Then, it will be as though spring has come into her life and she'll regale one and all with arias Crom Jeanette MacDonald Cilms that she so admired as a young lass. How sad it is that the Princess has come to this .. . to sit among squalor, when once she STOOD among squalor. What has brought this noble being to these halls? Is it t rue that her heart was TIii: • (,I \~S • STEIN once broken by a Goat Herder from Zambizi . . . is it true that of the thirty-seven children she has borne . . . and NOT eaten, that one is here in this country, seek­ing out " Mother" !! Is it true that she toils so much that many have received her bounty (this again is NOT to be mis-construed) without knowing their benefactress? Is it true that thanks to her love and assistance, that there is now one fairy beautician for every three people in Texas? How beautiful is this wonderful women ... to give so much . . .. to leave behind (That's one thing she's never left . . . . is a Behind!) her Goat Herder, Her home in the Labrea Tar Pits, and her gowns and espec­ially her Florence Foster Jenkins Albums . . . AND an autographed picture of Gertrude Stein!!! \HT I~ TIii : \IO~T I\TI·: \~I: \IOIJE OF 1\111\ 1111 \l.l~\I 1"11 \ I I 111·. \I OH I.I> 11 \~ i._ \ o \I .\. . . . -·the ultim.ite'studio in t1l<1tivc Jrt phu_togr,1rh\' prl'scnts The Primus ,\kn - tlw ultimate in m,1k figure Jrl forms - in n.,lllr.d rnlor .ind a spc_c1ni111 <!f moods. · ,iv For an illustrated brochure of The Prim,;; Men','~nclo,e S2.00 and a statement that you are 18 years of age. A ·. wide variety of Portfolios, Gallerys, Prints and Mountings iri black and white or color are available. , · , P. 0. 13n, 19 I 72 I f.,,,,1"11, I t·,,1s 77024 Model ,1p11111.<1t1on, tw 7 .11,' ,,,,mus Men are now being an t!/1li!d If you feel you are "special" with interest in senous mode/Ing, wnte enclosing a recent photograph· for ,111 .1opo,ntment anrl lnrerview. Page 15 She will work and slave and toil and labor and bitch and moan and nag and gripe and curse and complain ... But she's our very own Princess Portia ... for Better or worse ..... . to be continued - - SUCCESS STORY Adon NOW AT OUR NEW LOCATION CORNER SHEPHERD AND a mens store for almost thr'ee years, he was forced to go to work for a large retail chain store when his friend 's shop closed. And for several months sold menswear, but disliked the impersonality of the job so he decided to go into bus­iness for himself and opened a Jeans Shop. His former employer's location was still empty, so he chose that site; counting on his own following and some older cust­omers he still knew. The business went well for him. A year or so In his new location, his follow­ing helped him get things started, and the new drop-in trade added to his business. His inventory and sales have been steadily increas­ing in the year and a half he's been at the present location. Adon believes in "selling him­self''. Through personal contacts with his customers, greeting them at the door, introducing himself, and helping in every way to make people feel welcome (even just the "looker", says he). This warmth seems to work, because people like shopping amid a vast array of contemporary clothes, beneath a backdrop of a Peter Max wall design; in a mood of relaxed cordiality. Free cigarettes, a casual air; even little personal touches, as Adon says, like: " .. when some­one comes flying in to buy an outfit for a party tonight, and the legs need alterations . . . I get it done in time ... it's a lot of running around for me, and a little worrying, but I get it done. That's why they come back though". Don keeps a mailing list and posts his newest fashions to his custom­ers regularly. He stays on top of new trends through publications, shows, and even visits to the bars. In his own words, he says " . . if you want to stay ahead of the 'BIG BOYS' you have to give the personal touch. Take time with your customers and put them at ease. Advise them when they want advise and tell them the truth about how they look when they ask. Don's schooling is limited to High School only, which speaks well for this intelligent young man who overcame the barriers through the "school of hard knocks" as he put it. Don works the shop alone during the week and on weekends, employs a couple of students to help out .. He's open Monday thrugh Saturday 10 'til six. When asked about his plans for expansion to larger quarters later, Don replies "I'm happy where I am. If I do get bigger, it'll still be in this shop, only I'll hire someone to help me out permanently." thirties like. This, he adds, is also part of his personal touch. When Don was asked why be outfitted the winner of the Club Houston contest held recently at Gene Howie's fabulous Farmhouse Club Mr. Richard Ornelas, the answ'er was plain: "The boy won on his good looks. Now he needs streetwear to compliment his good looks. That's what I have to offer here, and I hope everybody will realize you can be a 'winner' by wearing the fashion look from my shop." Don stylizes his clothing to the individual and claims that everyone has his own look. He believes his show has the look everyone wants. I believe people should blend their personality with the clothes they wear, is what, in essence Don proclaims. When asked about jewelry for men, (Don carries a full line) he said that it's very much back in fashion today. Particularly sterl­ing silver ... bi:acelets, pendants, etc., and gives that "fun look" to men's clothes. Don is indeed an interesting in­dividual. Fun to talk with and a pleasure to trade with. Meet him soon. You'll like him. And what's more, you'll see why he's suc­cessful. Don makes the scene regularly, and with two trips a year; one to Dallas and the other to N.Y.C. for the market shows, he still uses his own eyes to see what the kids really want. What the over PROFILE of a WINNER later he opened "ADON's". Air. Friz/Jy Adon, owner of Adon's store for men here in Houston is a young man originally from McAllen Texas. For some time now, has been a Houstonian, and about four years ago developed an interest in men's attire, and subsequently went to work in retailing. Associ­ated with a close friend who owned Page 16 1-'kl'O ' f BATH CLUB,--, Ho11sto1,, 3401 Milam at Francis -entrance on Francis Membership $2. per year Vi.,,t., Tuesday - Wednesday & Thursday Friday Saturday & Sundoy $3.00 Vi ~it c, $5.00 OPEN 24 rs. CLOSED MONDAY 523-8840 The Mini Pork Theater for the Best in Adult Entertainment "GIVES THE AUDIENCE EXACTLY WHAT IS NEEDED ... PLUS A MORE FOR THE PRICE Of ADMISSION." -Aaron Bates, GAY MAGAZINE "THERE ARE NO MORE CLOSETS." -VARIETY "CASEY DONOVAN WINS THEM ALL AND IS EVERY-GAYS DREAM." ALL IIIALI CAST STARRING CASIY DONOVAN Sl Di~ount between 5 & 7 p.m. Free Coffee Student Discounts OPEN 11 A.M. 'ti'! 12 A.M. Mini Park 2907 Main Houston 528-5881 -LOS ANGELES ADVOCATE FOR MATURI ADULTS Coming Attractions New show every Wednesday Not just nude .•. but real hard action, penetrating positions, every homosexual act staring California's wildest new stud stars. Page 17 ''TRAD•N TRICKS•• W/M - - - Now Hear This! -­I want to hear from gay males over 35 -- It's not that I don't dig younger dudes - - but I want to exchange ideas etc., with those n~arer my own age. If you're sincere and haven't found the lover you,'v~ a,lways_ been looking for, but didn t beheve to exist this might be Kismet. I'm 5'8,'' tall and my weight is 140# and have brown hair and eyes. W /M BISEXUAL - 37 - Discreet, shy, oversexed - craves unusual exciting experiences with under­standing people. Box 13X, 4615 Mt. Vernon, Houston 77006 WANTED: Experienced male model, young, for explicit shots. Good pay. Call Jerry after 8:00 p.m. at 522-8088. NEED A ROOMMATE CALL GAYMATE INC. 782-7616 ------ --------- YOUNG, W/M - Blond, blue-eyed= wants to meet other males for relationship. Rick, P.O. Box 953, Forney, Texas 75126. PHOTOGRAPHER -- Will shoot anything you can do - or will print and develop your first 2 rolls of film free. Box 23232, Houston, Texas 77028 EL P~ .TEXAS - .!,ay Liber­ation -Forum -. P.0:' &x 12493, El Paso, Texas 79912. PORNOGRAPHY COLLECTOR - New and old - trade - buy or peruse! JA3-6577 - 8-11 P.M. "HOMES FOR HIPPIES, ETC.'·• - Montrose Area! $6/J - $140 payable monthly or weekly! Do your own thing! 52400574 or 781-8643 ------ ------- WANTED: OCCASIONAL MAS-SEUR for felaxing, unhurried rub­down by appointment. Send rates, phone number to P. 0. Box 35125, Houston 77035. The Houston HI-KAMP announces that beginning with NOON, SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 9th, brunch will be served Upstairs at the Hi-Kamp and every Sunday thereafter. AIR CONDITIONING - HEATING SPECIALIST For all your Heating and Air Conditioning needs and service - Call T. R. AT AIRLINE AIRE - 523-9540 Day or Night - Resi­dential or commercial. PAMPER YOURSELF. Enroll now for private lessons in classical piano or singing with a profess­ional who is interested in your progress. Telephone 723-3254. GAY COMMUNITY COUNSELING SERVICE (Dallas) 826-2192 - - -.. - - - - - - - - - - - - - FORT WORTH - - God loves you and so do we. Join our Christian Study Group (817) 838-9564. W/M Professional. Legally mar­ried, clean cut. Desires to meet same, age to 45. Send photo please. Box 46F - Houston 77006 MALE MODELS - National fine art photographer needs Houston models for photographic port­folios. Emphasis on neat, trim build -- ballet or gymnastic ex­perience helpful; but not necess­ary. No previous modeling ex­perience required. Applicants paid $20 for test photographs, percent­age of portfolio sales if accepted. All art photographs - - no "porno". Apply by sending recent photo­graph, age, telephone and address to PRIMUS PHOTOGRAPHY, P.O. Box 19172, Houston, Texas 77024. All applicants will be contacted. The MCC Thespian Players are planning a performance monthly. There are tentative plans to play cities in Texas and the Southwest. anyone wishing to audition for thee calling, 521-8299 in Dallas. TV REPAIR - Free home esti­mates by experienced technician. Call 821-2197, nite or day. -­Dallas. PIK U SCENE(S) HEAVY - - - Bondage, s/m, leather, w/s, chains bits, & bikes. Lists many names w/pixs, addresses. $2. Now. Lists, Box 84, Pacific Palsds, CA 90272. Also stud story or whip race uses only $2. 28, CHINESE - I stand 5'9" tall, slim built, with black hair and brown eyes. I would like to write and meet gay guys 23-35 years of age, with hairy and well built body. Will send photos to guys who will write to me. - TAN WANG SENG, P. 0. Box 817 - Cebu City J-317, Philippines I Send a letter telling me about you - - I'll ta_ke it from there - - please be candid and young in heart. If ' you've never answered an ad before but considered it - - andwer this one. Respond with a snapshot and I'll do the same. Box A, 4615 Mt. Vernon, Houston 77006 Mt. Vernon, Houston 77006 COLT STUD FOR YOU - Will send fotos and 150 page story about me in explosive masculine muscle scenes for only $3.00 now. Mr. Colt, Box 84, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272. Hurry now for unique poses. VERY RESPONSIBLE BUSINESS­MAN would like to share his ele­gant mansion with one or two other successful gay men. No strings at all as I am a trade queen strictly and would not impose on you at all. The house has a nice pool and lots of room, fine furnishings. Reply Box X, 4615 Mt. Vernon, Houston, Texas 77006. Serious in­quires only please. QUIERO qualified instruction in Spanish conversation and grammar in exchange for excellent instruct­ion in piano or singing. Write TMT, P. 0. Box 35125, Houston 77035. ' , _ - - - - - ---------- / POWERFULLY ENDOWED STUD I Champion Marine wrestler body, plus wild action for you. All ways, ruggedness you will want to ~we. Pictures and curiously satisfying story $2. Savnite #10, 6515 Sunset Blvd. , Rm 202, Hollywood, CA 90028. Turn it on now. NUNTIUS PUBLISHED MONTHLY HOUSTON, TEXAS Editor - Phil Frank ftln-Hf I\ (? IMT'• Last but not least was Miss Ray Hadaway of the Half Dollar - a big boobbed ????? she was! Absent from the above were Bill and Ray of the Villa Fontana and the Entree Nuit - -either at the Cowboy game or at the Bus Station - - getting a shoe shine - Frank Caven - he blew money for a phone call from El Paso saying he couldn't do his number which was to be Swan Lake - - Tex and Joe , - , ain't heard from them yet and Bob from the Ram­rod. If you missed this show, we raised $287.00 for the church, you missed the funniest show in the history of Dallas Drag. The Dall-y Awards· - another feature of Ronsue's which brought a large turnout-Chee ck Kline of the Bayou Landing walked away with the trophy for Bartender of the Year. Mama thinks you earned that one honey!! Waiter of the year was our own adored Madame Fert­itizer at Ronsue's. Entertainer of the year went to Sabra Garth - old grace herself. Comedy drag, Sal al Marie - God only knows she's a funny one! Group Drag went to the Supre­mes - speaking of this lively group - - they were not the group that beat up on Miss Jodie Layne at the Mark Twain over a feather boa??? Chelsey St. John drew the trophy for serious drag - she's always so beautiful. Ferry from the Ranch received trophy for Manager of the year. Ronsue's and Bayou Landing tied for Fun Bar of the year. Then my dears, Bitch of the Year from the Campi Awards last year surged forward and ac­cepted the congeniality and human­itarian awards!! For herself -­Then she fell off the stage! You've come a long way baby! MOTHER OF DALLAS Associate Editor - Steve Jonsson Advertising-production/ Bob C appe II In closing, annonymous present­ation of trophies delivered via yellow cab received by Mother for humanitarian, Big Mable for Mana­ger and Joe Gibson for Bartender -- We are very appreciative ofthe fact that there was much love and affection behind these presentat­ions - - Mother thanks you!! Mother of Dallas August in Big D! Just full of act­ivity. fun and hot humid weather. Makes a girl want to strip down to her skivvies and go "Skinny Dip­ping. Lady Millison finally broke down, shes been giving in for years, and cooked a fantastic din-din for some of her closest and dear­est friends. It was deving. This small celebration began at J. Car­roll's abode, and ended in the bars, hours later. Had all the makings of a disastrous Monday. Mother uttered not one bad word that was to come over that hidden tape recorder at that little gather­ing! Regardless of what voice vage­ly sounded like hers says. Water­gate ain't got nothen on this little fun group. Bertina, I think we're in trouble. Mother thinks steps should be taken to retri ve said tape from ingenious Alexandria. Girl, be satisfied with that lovely pair of pink panties that "butch" trick left you. Big Mable's Style Show -- now that was a hoot. A gala benefit for the MMC - it was a huge sue- Page 18 cess. The models were fantastic, Nurse Moo and Miss Philpot from Sundance Kid had to exchange lin­gerie so as to model some of the shorter fashions. Most all the bars were represented in some form or fashion, and Big Mable says, "never again!" Speaking of Big Mable - the sweetest pussy in town - Vaseline and sugar for a quick wakerupper? All I know is, that Jess and Miss Elliot said it worked! Another event, featured at Ron­sue's, for the church, was the Bar Owner's Drag Show!! Mar­garet from T.J.'s blew all our minds with a fantastic rendition of "Old Fashion Girl", Teresa Brewer style - - Joe Philpot of the Sundance Kid, complete in bikine, boots, and HOOTER twirl­ed to wild number, and Terry from the Ranch did the stripper. Den­nis from the Bayou Landing was the hit of the show with his medly of Tammy Wynette along with Ron­sue and her "Ahab the Arab" routine. It was a hoot of a show, and you can catch pictures of this event on screen at Ba_you Landing! 4615 MT. VERNON .HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 524-5612 P .S. We would also like to extend our sincere thanks to Ray and Jim of the Flower Palace, who opened the doors of their shop completely to Ronsue's for flower arrange­ments for the Dall-y Awards. They were lovely. ************* ~NOW OPEN ~ "IN THE HEART OF THE COLONY" ~ POSADA DEL SOL ~ 1318 Westheimer ~ Cocktail Hour 4 - 7 ~ Open 12 noon daily ~ 528-8049 . I , ... I , Richard Ornelas is the winner of the contest recently held at the Farmhouse Club by the Club Houston. Richard is twenty-four years old and hails from Corpus Christi. Richard has lived here in Houston for only nine months but in that short time has made a great many friends. The title bestowed on him was "Mr. Club Houston - 1973-74", ,rnd was one of the least twenty entries. The contest took place at the Farmhouse Club under the auspices of the Club Houston and with the cooperation and master showmanship of Gene Howle. Along with his trophy, Richard won$300. in cash and a $25.00 gift cert­ificate from Ah Men, along with a year's free pass to the Club Hous­ton. (And he's there a lot these days) Standing at 5' 11" and weighing in at 165 pounds with strong black hair, this muscular trophy win­ner is personable, exuding warmth and is an invitation in itself to remind oneself what a few work­outs can do for a man. He will be going to Miami in February to enter in the National Club Baths contest and will be sponsored by the Club Houston, Houston, Texas. A profile; JENNIFER GEORGE Jennifer George is a popular attraction at Houston's Bayou Landing and is seen there every Wednesday and Sunday at show­times. In a recent interview, some questions were_ tossed at he~, and the following 1s a summation of "How Jennifer George Really Is." "I picked the name Jennifer because I liked it." In that simple sentence spells out the simplicity in which she (he) sees and says things. Personable and warm off­stage · dynamite on stage. He de­scri~ s how he got his "last name" ... "George". "It was given to me, actually, by my friend Ki~ Keye one night at Gene Howle s New Year's Eve Ball at the Cork Club here in Houston. At that time I was simply a contestant, and o_nly used the name Jennifer; when Kitty got hold of the last name, she said I needed a last name, and tagged me as Jennifer George and it's been that way ever since." I didn't really becom a serious performer until after the Bayou here opened up and even then I wasn't taken very seriously. I had won many first place trophies in "drag" but hadn't really per­formed much. Several times, was all and that was at the Old Red R~m when Tiffany Jones was still there. She recruited me to fill in when she had out of town en­gagements. But when the Landing opened here, Kitty got hold of !Ile again, and I was o_ne o! the kids performing on opemng rught. After that I was sent to Dallas to be tried out in their club up there to see how I was liked by th~t. crowd, and when I go the praise and applause, I was re­turned to Houston to become a regular. Since that time, they've sent me up there to do other ~hows, and for awhile when they discon­tinued the shows here, I used ~at time to get together new matenal and gowns. And then, when Dawn Winters reopened the shows here, I was back to work again. And have been here ever since. When asked how she regarded her trophies she replied: "Out of the eight' I've won, five were for first place. I feel I earned them and am very, very proud of them. It encouraged me to go ahead into professional work." Jennifer chooses the personal­ities she portrays on the strength of her moods. She shys away from being just "one person" for ex­ample. But admires other people like herself who become a part­icular entertainer, because either way it's tough. She continually studies and looks for new tech­niques; particul~rly in make-up. Before becoming a performer, Jennifer worked in a bank for three years, and after emerging into show business, doesn't sense any change in herself. Simply a matter of expressing the waylfeel when I see or hear an entertainer, and translating my feelings for the audience gives me the lift I want. I feel I'm sharing something very personal with my audience. - Jennifer's lover helps along the way, being the severest critic, but helping to encourage at the same time. Jennifer looks hard toward his lover of almost a year for the kind of support only a lover who believes in something and can give help and encouragement. Ac­cording to Jennifer, straight_bars are easier to play to; the audience always seems more appreciative. But gay bars are the real chal­lenge, and applause from her own kind means much more to her. "I don't live 'drag' twenty four hours a day. I turn it off when I'm off stage. That keeps me fresh. And really, my work is only a small part of my life. I do it because I LIKE to, and not because I NEED to. The only need I feel, is to give an audience the lift I feel when I perform, and give the kids their money's worth. . Off-stage, few people reco~ze Jennifer, who is very attractive out of make up and costume. Those who do recognize the showman, never hesitate to compliment him. But as Jennifer puts it ... the "highest compliment to me, is a full house and lots of applause". Adked about the new eighteen­year old law, Jennifer says: "It's great. Now a kid can start at. a younger age and develop in his prime years." LETIERS TO THE EDITOR Dear ?. Frank, Your paper STINKS! Harold Washburn Dear Mr. Washburn, The NUNTJUS like other papers serve a dual purpose - this one you can read or wipe with - The rolling stone you can either read or smoke! Phil Frank Dear Phil, What ever happened to the guy that ran the club that showed "HAIR" every night? NO NAME Dear Nameless, He now operates Mary's, one of Houston's "swingingest" bars. Phil Dear Editor, I've been to the Farmhouse a number of times when I'm in Houston and I'm trying to settle an argument between friends here in Galveston. Is it true that the owner actually sings at his own piano bar. Is it true, or are they just pulling my leg? G.H. (Galveston) G.H. It's true. And Gene's many ad­mirers will tell you he has a fine voice. Prior to being a club oper­ator, he did some professional singing along with bis accompanist Emet and still has an excellent voice. You can see him perform oc­casionally at the Farmhouse, but business usually keeps him pre­occupied. He likes to do it when he's not that busy - ask him to sometime. Editor Dear Editor, . One night I left a beer bar with a full beer in my hand, and no­body stopped me. Later, I left one of the big dance clubs and the ~an nearly fell off the stool running after me to grab the cup out of my hand before I left. Later that same night I went back to the same beer bar and even THEY didn't let me out that time. What's the deal? I get all kinds of answers. Mark Wilson (Baytown) Mark: In Houston you cannot leave any beer bar AFTER MIDNIGHT with a beer in your hand. At NO TIME can you EVER leave a mixed­drink bar with a drink in your hand. That's the law. Phil Dear Sirs, I am from out of the state and plan on visiting Houston soon. I was wondering how many Gay bars there are in Houston. J .C. (Hot Springs) Dear J.C., Not enough that advertise with us! Ed. Dear Phil, How's Acapulco for cruising this time of year? G.H. G.H.: . Great. But the Bahamas are m, this year. Phil An body over "30" i'm well past thirty. I still enjoy life, and make the bar scene regularly. But I don't dance at all, and therefore Cmd myself for­e" er in a place where all I can do is chit-chat long enough to get stoned on booze, while my poten­tial trick is dragged off to a dance floor somewhere and I lose him. How the hell does a fellow my age compete? F .K.S. (Houston) My Dear F .K.S. Learn to dance. U you're one of those who just can't, then fake it. Pick a busy spot on the floor and just move your feet. Uyourpartner is much younger than you, he'll be to enraptured in the music to watch you closely; if be does watch you, smile. But he's still WITH you. Ed. (well past 30) Dear Sir, I'm from Corpus. How come you never write anything about us down here? We used to buy your paper but now to get it have to sub­scribe - - - Allen (Corpus Christi) Dear Allen, I am in hopes a correspondant will be there next month. I hope you're around to help fill him in when he's there. Encourage the bar owners to get up some news, other­wise and send it to us . We're hungry for news of Corpus! Sorry about the availability of the Nuntius in Corpus but the bar that handled it and advertised in same did not pay for the ad or the papers that you bought! Phil Frank Publication ol the I\OIM o, pbotog.rapt, of any person-.00: o,gonizqtion in article~-o, M'!••tis.inv- \~ TJ)e._NVMJ.IUS is not· to be COftStrued os eny i""ic.tion -of 1hr .seKuol orientation of such jlerson o, "'1fanlaotlen: Page 19 FUN.SPOTS Mr. Texas and also Mr. David trophy winner, C. J . Harrington in a candid shot at one of his favorite new spots in Dallas, the SPEAK EASY Buddy Rogers and his other half Arthur pointing to the plaque in the entryway of their club The drinking bar is lavishly displayed with mirrors and behind the glassware, are stained/veined mirrors giving a bright gleam to the stemware. Carpeting is trad­itionally red; the drinking bar's elbow lean is heavily padded with red vinyl; The deep low chairs are all red and black with all black table tops . There are several "meat racks" around the first balcony ledges (on the main stand­ing area of the floor) with tall bar stools at each. There are some white surfaced tables sprinkled for effect in certain portions of the room. Opposing the dance floor, there are three huge mirrors just under the "Speakeasy" sign which remains lit by a surrounding chain of chase lights; The dance floor itself is bathed in subdued light­ing under professional spots norm­ally used for shows, but which imparts warmth and color to the dancers. The dance floor is con­structed of parquet. The game room is in a sepa­rate two-level area of the room and contains two pool tables a marble table, Air Hockey and a Pong game. The room has good air circulation, equipped with exit forced-air blower and three elec­trostatic air cleaners. Music is supplied by a juke box of high quality. The SPEAKEASY - Dallas BON.SOIi( The Bon Soir of Dallas, which recently changed hands from Bob Strange to Tex and Joe, finally waited out the Alcoholic Beverage Commission's standard waiting period prior to issuance of a new license, to re-open in grand style. The only major change apparent since the change is the front en­trance, which is now on the opposite end of the building. Other than that, little has changed except for the personnel. Ken (formerly manager of the restaurant at the Houston Bayou Landing and before that manager of the Red Room) is senior bar tender. The smaller room packs itself tightly around the ever­going piano and bar, giving one a lifted feeling immediately on entering the smaller room. As bars go, the Bon Soir will soar to new heights, attracting in­dividuals of moderate income levels and higher, although there is absolutely no snobbery here. · The bar itself has the kind of personality that appeals to the in­dividual in that income bracket. The second thing the Bon Soir has going for it, is that fact that people are not "paired" here so much as other places, and it seems a bit easier to become acquaint­ed with strangers. THE RANCH !I t/Je RI/NCH This Beer Bar features itself as Dallas' largest leather and Western Bar. Open from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. daily (with after hours Sat. & Sun). Located at 4117 Maple, this bar is convenient to reach from almost any point in the Big D Gay area. Unusually structured with many rooms and each on a separate level, this bar is rough-hewn and obviously is what it claims to be. The service is good and the drinks modestly priced. the ENTRE SPEAKEASY Naturally mixed drinks are served here, and a moderate dance floor accommodates many couples for dancing. The juke box faces the dance floor away from the main bar, and therefore talking is at a pleasant level here. Well managed, maintained, this club will exist for a long time to come. Particularly since Tex and Joe have earned for themselves a reputation of solidarity in their busineas. NUIT THE SPEAKEASY announces Sunday Brunch every Sunday begin­ning at 1 p.m. Those of you from out of Dallas, will especially ap­preciate this, as it seems to be the earliest activity in Dallas that day, and the staff there are always happy to guide you on to other places afterward. A good place to start at Sunday if unfamiliar with Dallas. The Speakeasy in Dallas: Run by Buddy Rogers and his long-ti.me "other half" Arthur this club is the combined effort which includes the original owners of the Did Atlantis (Al and Gene). The bar is staffed by Grady, Bill, Terry, Arthur and Buddy, with Sonny Suwal acting Maitre' D. Billy acts as overseer in Buddy's absence. (look for his picture elsewhere in this issue). (Bill Merrill) Page 20 Age and other kinds of inspect­ion are made in the ante room at the front door for customer security and is screened from the interior of the club. One interesting detail about the decor, is a lighted actual Barber's Pole Lamp, spinning merrily all night long; an Al Capone Picture; just as you enter the place you pass an outside street (sidewalk bus-waiting type) bench close to a lighted pole with a white glove atop, noting your entry on Easy Street. Take a right and you are on Speak E. Street. Back-stepping a moment and looking at the door you will see old-ti.me speakeasy portals of the type used during the prohibition period. Rarely seen these days are the tiffany pool lights above the pool tables- - - - -.. '! . ; ,,,~; _.. 1; • , , ,;,J! 1 • . - ►. ,~~ J Bonsoir's newest addition. The campy pianist who packs the room The Entre Nuit seems to be doing quite well .for itself. Pre­dominantly a girls bar this establishment has its share oi: good looking males too. Well decorated, well maintained and with good se_rvice, it is easy to see why this club has been successful since its opening. The little things Bill and Ray (the owners) dream up to keep up cuiitomers interest seem to work well. For example, Mon­day, September 3rd., drew a nice crowd for the dance contest· every­one was delighted and trophies were awarded. Such activities keep up interest in the place; that coupl­ed with the good management modest behavior of the clientel' show the Entre' Nuit to be one of the "better" bars in Texas. Vil/A FONTIINII ENCORE Remember the good old days? Well they're still around in Dallas, in the guise of the Villa Fontana on Skiles. Modestly decorated with carpet­ing throughout, basket woven chairs, a full patio with sprinkl­ing statue-fountain (a Dallas Gay­Bar landmark), the Villa reflects its maturity gracefully. Softer music, little buffets, varied clien­tele, this old gal of a lounge still has that bit of nostalgia that brings fierce loyalty and support from young and old alike, as it seems this is Dallas' "institution". The growing pains during the opening of the many clubs which in earlier years were not around, caused the grand old lady of Bars some suffering, but true to form, revived itself and remains very much alive and successful. Open 7 days a week, this bar has an appeal no other club in Dallas can match. Memories! ! ! T.J. 's . . .... strong as ever. The indefatigable Margaret, owner of T.J.'s seems to have one of those magic qualities that put and keep a joint together. From the beginning, T.J.'s has been more than just a Gay Bar to her, as Margaret set about to prove that Gays not only will patronize a girl-owned bar, but will like and respect the gal that owns it, even if it is 100% a bar for boys. That point over the years ha-s been proven. And through the years, from the day when hand-holding and beer-only in Dallas, afforded the most to offer, to the present day when dancing mixed drinks have made the scene, Maragret herself remains unchanged. Simple in speech, kind of country, as she describes herself, she still per­sonally cleans or helps clean the joint every day. Does the ordering, works the door, ans still manages to get out to the other bars to play with the patrons and friends she so gracefully serves at T .J .' s. This place is about as uncompl­icated as a bar can get. It's rough in appearance, but clean, modest in decor, but clever, and appeals to Gays of almost every walk of life. People don't seem to worry about much at T.J.'s when they get there, because everyone, it seems, wears their hair down here. And that, I would suspect, accounts for the place's success. Located on McKinney in Dallas, TJ's has never displayed a sign, and has always managed a good relationship with its neighbors. Parking up and down the street and around the near corner, and behind the lounge, afford plenty of park­ing ease. Margaret is best known as aper­son whose word is her bond, and has established this reputation over the years in her dealings with her "kids". One person was quoted as saying: "If she said so, it's so! And I'll punch anyone in the face who says outherwise. Mar­garet doesn't lie." Almost all the bar owners in Dallas will agree with that too. The lounge, there­fore seems to be a reflection of her personality to some extent. An honest atmosphere. No artificial­ity. The smiles behind the bar and at the door are sincere, and the attitude pervades throughout the room. Business is good here. And will continue!!! The Encore front view - 4516 McKinney - Dallas Coining an old expression, The Encore, like the Phoenix, has risen from ashes to become one of Dal­las's most exciting and versatile clubs. Originally dubbed the Entre' Nuit when it first opened its doors some time back, the club was gutted by fire and closed for sometime. During the interim an insurance settlement delayed the re-opening, and Tex and Joe relocated to the site where the present Entre' Nuit is now located on Skiles. Having then sold out to Bill and Ray, the Encore became the new name at the old site, and is now operating full swing. And swing best describes the place. A huge dance floor, surrounded by nine large mirrors is border­ed at the far end. by a draped stage, and tables and chairs on deep pile blue carpeting. The furn­iture is attractive; the chairs blue and the tables free of tablecloths gleam in white and wood grained surfaces. The customary candles adorn the tables. The Bar area is covivial and large, accommodating approxi­mately 25-30 seated, with ample standing room for at least 100 more. And this seperate area, al­though only part of the main room, seems to have an intimacy all its own. Mirrors abound at the bar, with signs plastered over the register, enumerating the many coming ev­ents. Tex and Joe, known for many years as Momma and Poppa, are no new-comers to the Dallas­Fort Worth Scene. Years back they have operated among other notable places, the Toga, Elvira's (Ac­countable for the go-go craze), the El Toga, etc. Having had many problems in the past due to the fire at the present location, it seems that almost miraculously the two have bonded old friend­ships and draw a heavy crowd to a place that is totally new inside showing no scars of the past. The game room is located to the rear of the building allowing much greater light to play by, and caus­ing no discomfort to the other patrons. Predominating is an early crowd of under twenty-ones who love to dance under the strong music, and somehow blend in closely with the over thirty group manning the barstools. If one were to pick a name to describe the club, it would have to be the "Rendezvouz ", for so many people not seen for so long, now seem to headquarter here. The crowd feels the warmth of the establishment from the moment of entry, with good will exuding from the Bar-Tenders exuding from the Bar-Tenders (Remember Tommy of the "Red Room in Houston, and recently of the Houston Landing?) who some­time include that heavy-pouring Poppa himself. Dancing - gaiety - laughter - music, food and buffets, games, easy accessibility, (only one block from Central Expressway offHen­derson) and cruising, must be the reasons for the Lounge's success. Parking is virtually unlimited, and located not far from Ron­sue's, TJ's, and almost a direct show down Henderson-Knox puts you close to the Entre' NUIT, the Villa, the Baths, or in the other direction, easy to reach the New Club, the Mark Twain over on Lemmon. The Encore will feature live entertainment, Bands and the like, and on occasions will provide shows. A new patio is planned for the rear of the building (through the back door) that will be approxim­ately 25 by 50 {eet and covered by the original Blue Umbrella Canopy which housed the Toga Bar· this patio promises to pro­vide' delightful surrounding for lunches, buffets, etc. Featuring mixed drinks, the En­core has HAPPY HOUR daily 1-7 p.m. with bar drinks only fifty cents and draft beer fifteen cents. Well respected in the Dallas Community, the Encore has cert­ainly become one of the city's finest bars. It is located at 4615 Mckinney Avenue in Dallas. tlle MIIRK TWIIIN THE MARK TWAIN - The newest addition of culbs on the Dallas scene, the Mark Twain, has heightened the business beyond its highest expectation, according to Frank Gaven, its owner and operat­or. Evenings at the Mark Twain begin earlier than most bars, at­tracting a good cocktail hour group; this perhaps because of its con­venience and ease of location on Lemmon Avenue. The decor speaks splendidly but is not overdone, and therefore, when one feels the coat and tie atmosphere, it is only just a feel­ing; blue-jeans abound. Bob Scott temporarily assigned as Maitre'D, can be remembered as a Houston radio personality whose talent for meeting people is only exceeded by his employer, who seems to combine an awe­some energy into making people feel warm and comfortable as soon as one steps foot into the Club. i ' - l THE ENCORE, 4516 McKinney, Dallas, celebrated its first An­niversary by having a gala party August 26th. The festivities in­cluded the live entertainment of a special guest artist, the fabulous "HELENA" a pianist and vocalist formerly of Shreveport, La., and New York City. Free champagne and draft beer were given away and the festivities drew a very large crowd. The Nuntius along with the many Gay Bar owners and their patrons join in honoring that event and congratulating Tex and Joe in the success. Best wishes for the coming years. PutJ P: Aside from the decor, the vent­ilation is beautiful; on the hottest nights while the club is packed (and that seems to be a standard thing at the M. T .) it is always cool and free of smoke. A fireplace speaks for the air conditioning power, for it burns brightly all evening imparting a warm living­room feeling to the place. Along with the usual "teasers" the Mark Twain offers up in so­liciting business, it serves up an unusual Sunday. For example, for $1.50 on Sundays from 6 to 9 p.m. you get all the draft beer and delicious steak sandwiches you can eat. Also unusual fare on Mon­days is the ITALIAN DINNER serv­ed from 6 - 9 p.m. for $1.25. Each day special prices are offer­ed during cocktail hour from 4 - 7. To add to the glamour of the Mark Twain is the very sophisticated piano bar, on the SECOND FLOOR; complete with entertainer and full bar. Lavishly decorated this area is now open to the public. Coming soon will be a huge patio, complete with its own bar, a-la-old Bayou Club days. Service here is excell ­ent, and one can't help wondering where Frank is able to find such competent and good looking help. Perhaps that accounts for the mas­sive business the place is now doing. Congratulations Dallas. You've done it again. Elegance and simplicity under the heading "MARK TWAIN". Page 21 Paqe 22 ''JAY'' :~.!,.!,~ f c ·a,§ E Popularly known simply as "' OJ .c - E "Jay", this young lady of the old - :5 ~ ~ ~ Atlantis Girl's Bar days, having -~ - ,s ·; ' earned her popularity over the £ : '.; ~ ~ years in Dallas going back to the - .., - o old "Alley Door", has recently ~ ] ;.::: S !; ~ opened a new popular night spot !:: g. Jl :t ~::: called " Jay's" lounge. Downtown ::: .::: E-< _g ,S ~ on McKinney, and close by to the OJ,_ c "' ~ , ever-popular Bayou Landing the :5 OJ·;::-' .o .., new lounge has promise for a 5 :t 55 ~.!!l bright future. 'o OJ E-< ~ ·c:: -~ Details eluded in this column OJ ,£ -t; ~ .g i:, a_re due ~ lack of time to con­e OJ ::E '- i:, c firm particulars, but look for the O .o " OJ "' next issue concerning this bar. Operated by a female, with female bartenders, this place will be predominantly geared to girls, but will invite the patronage of boys as well, this according to a re­cent conversation with Jay. Future plans and events will be detailed in the next issue of the Nuntius. BAYOU LANDING HOUSTON The Houston Bayou Landing an­nounces its First Annual Dude Par ty, Monday September 17th, beginning at 9 p. m. until closing. No cover charge will be imposed that night and free draft beer will be given away from opening until 10 p.m. that night. This will be an old fashioned Western Party, a spokesman for the lounge said, and prizes, laughs, fun things will be done throughout the evening. Everyone will be encouraged to wear cowboy outfits. This will also be the same even­ing that the new "MR. MYSTERY" contest will begin. According to the contest basic rules (pertinent data will be posted at the lounge) the customer will be given a " guess card'' as he enters the lounge every night, and will, after the last one clue each night is given, turn his guest-card in and try to name " MR. MYSTERY". This will be a real person, someone who will be on the premises every night until his identity is discovered, and every night another clue will be added to help the guesser's choose the person. A notarized affadavit will be on file beginning with the contest night (9/ 17) and wil I re­main sealed until the identity is exposed. If he is not discovered before October 31st, he wilJ be presented that night, ending the contest. But spokesmen for the Bayou say it'll be too easy to last that long. For example, at least once (times picked at ran­dom), the Mystery Man will be on stage with a brief flash of light to expose all or part of him. You just have to be there to catch that glimpse. Otherwise, new clues will be posted daily, and the MYSTERY MAN HIMSELF WILL be on the premises every night until the con­test ends. Prizes ofa rather gener­ous nature will be posted along with details at the club. DALLAS The Bayou Landing of Dallas played to a full house Sunday Sept. 2 when it brought from Houston Dawn Winters and her company to entertain. The usual Ham­burgers were served along with the free beer prior to the show, and after the show began, then was standing room only . . . . and little of that. The show was good, and Dawn represented the Houston Bayou Landing well that night. On the same night the Bayou Landing of Houston played to a capacity house when Tiffany Jones played there. More than one thous - and people paid to see Miss Jones perform at what is Houston's larg­est gay bar. FROM THE ZODIAC CALENDAR BY WOODY PooP 2? The I VOLUME 4 NO. 9 SEPTEMBER 19731 UNTIIJS 4oe I " ! -I ~ . \ in 111E1'Jdirms~rthel $•U8'- 12 Issues .. JJc~~med Advertiising - 10¢ per word Norrie ' ,Y._dres-s -------:------- __________; ;.;.,s,oCittye_..; ....•,-.=-====-=--=--=--=--=--_..:._ __ Zip ___ _ The.Nutmus· .- 4'TS i'lt. Vemon . ~~on;. Tecos 77006 "MR. CLUI HOUSTON" Dallas Gay Pocurin
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