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The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1971
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The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1971 - File 001. 1971-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3587/show/3562.

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(1971-06). The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1971 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3587/show/3562

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1971 - File 001, 1971-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3587/show/3562.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1971
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date June 1971
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28911959
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THI MUMTIUS CALENDAR AUSTIN AUSTIN BOOK MART 305 Eaat 6th St, • , , , , , • , • , •• , • , PEARL STREET WAREHOUSE 18th ancl Lavaca , , , • , • , , , , , , , , BEAUMONT THE OTHER PLACE 7665 College , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , CORPUS CHRISTI CHAPARRAL BOOK MART 413 PeaplH St, , , , , , , , , , , , , • , , HADRIAN'S PATIO CLUB 6000 AgnH (Hwy, «) , . , , , , , , , , , DALLAS BAYOU CLUB 3717 Rawlln1 , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , CRESCENT ART THEATRE 2100 Elm , •••••••••• , • , , •••• ROMSUE'S 3236 McKinney , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , T J', af DALLAS 3307 McKinney , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , HOUSTON ADULT LIBRARIES 1312 Wut Alabama , , , • , , , , , , , , 1536 Wuthelmer , , , , •• , , , , , , , , 609 LaBranch , , •• , , •• , • , •• , , • ART CINEMA ½ Blk. Ea,t af 6100 Kirby Dr, , , ••• UST EMO MEWS 7114 Lawndale .............. . FARM HOUSE, The 3535 We1theimer, • , , , , , , , , , , , , • FRIZBY, Mr. 3.401 Mil am , ••• , , • , •• , • , • • • , , GAYBOY INTERNATIONAL 2151 Rlchmancl • , •• , •• , , , • , , •• GALL EON, The 71'1!J Richmancl Ave, ... , ..•....• HI KAMP 3«>0 Travl1 , , , • , , •• , , , , , , , , , La BOHEME 1504 Wuthelm•r , • , , •• , • , , , , • , 478-0176 866-9080 884-0058 526-9330 747-2688 526-9333 526-9368 528-8080 528-8930 226-8076 528-8186 926-0325 622-59-42 523-8840 528,9810 528-8787 528-9772 528-9552 THI! MUMTIUS JUNE 1971 MAID SERVICE 38"0 Unclerwoacl f ♦♦ I I f I♦♦♦• I♦ I 668-9438 MAIN STREET MEWS « 18 South Main I I I It 1 ♦II ♦ I I It 528-7142 MARY'S BAR 1022 WHthelmer , • , , , , • , , • , , , • 528-8851 MATCHBOOK ADVERTISING "615 Mt, Vernon 1 1 t I I ♦ t I I t I f I f 524-5612 MID-TOWNE LOUNGE 29 23 South Main I If I It It It I I I I 528-9397 MODEL MAH 412 Wuthelmer • , • , , , •• , •• , , , , 528-2652 MINI-PARK THEATRE 2907 South Main I It I I I I It I I I I I 528-5881 HORTH HOUSTON HEWS 8718 JenHn Drive , , , , • , , , , , , , • 691-8"11 RANCH HOUSE 5607 Marn Ing 11 cle , , •• , .•• , , , , • , RED ROOM 612Haclley , , , , •• , , , , , , , • , , , 226-8242 ROARING 60'1 2305 South Shepherd •••• , ••••• , • 528,9430 ROSALIE HEWSUMD U02 Texa1 Avenue t t I I I I I I f I I I 226-8020 ROSALIE'• TOO 900 Prutan 0 It t It I It t I I I I I I 226-7534 SIXTY-SECOM D BAIL BOND 2319 South Shepherd ••• , , , • , , , , • 526-4402 TIME TO READ 3110 South Shepherd , •• , ••••••• , 528-8950 TOM FRIEND P.O. BOX 55541,,. , ••••• , ••••• "64-0052 LAREDO LAREDO BOOK MART 901 Santa Ural a •••• , • ••••• , , , • SAN ANTONIO APOLLO MEWS 515½ E, Hau1ton StrHt t I I I I I I I I EL JARDIN 106 Navarra Street , , • , , •• •• •• , • 223-5477 SAN ANTONIO BOOK MART 129 Ea1t Hou1ton StrHt I I I t • I I t t WACO PARIS ADULT THEATRE & BOOK STORE 810 Au1tin Strut I I I t I I I I t I I I I Everyone,s Fun House - Dallas RON SUE,s .... 526-9333 PLANTATION FIRE GHARGES VOL.UME 2 NO, 6 : JUNE 1971 ,HOUSTON, TIXAS -< 3C c-, ► '=0-- -' --,:, c-, C) ::::ia;:: 3C ~ --I -< ~ ,-- = ,►-- ►=E ►... ~ ~ = 3: C: ,,►---- ~--I ~ ~ / C, C) 3C ~ ~ --I THOMPSON'S ''LADY'' TAKEN Sr? r· V I 'l :.J "~ '"~ JI O)'.)"J rl :) rr7 v" '",.J· 11'I- -~ ,\.-.-11 • ... ,, <3VUN'TIUS MAY 1971 =============~~V~O~LU~M;E~2~·;N0~-~5~======================::0USTON, TEXAS PLANTATION CLUB FIRE NO MYSTERY! If the picture obovi, brings bock memories of good t i mes and fond memories think what it does to the owners of the business. Gene Howell just the other day in discussing the subject of the P lontotion Club expressed not on\-v regrets ot the loss of he and Emit Newton's club but the mental ongu ish over the past many, many months. Loss of bus­iness is well over the hundred thousand dollar mark and personal income in excess of fifty thousand. Many hours spent with investigating officers of the arson squad and other low inforcemenl personel . When asked if there was any aniimosity toward any individuals having been charg­ed in the burning of his club Mr. Howe ll said: "I om only truly sorry that it wos people that I had considered my friends, having entertained them in my home and respect­ed a s s ubstantial pe rsons in our community. It is with re gret that this has been done by persons of the Gay community as it is reflect ive on all of us ." On F ebruary 19th last year about 5: :ll a .m. Mr. Howell was called and told his club was on fire. When he arrived there were a num­ber of fire engines on the parking lot and in front of the building on the street. Firt!men had already broke into the club ond water was already about ankle deep. This started many months of untold inconviences to the persons directly involved and hard work for the arson division. On the day of the fire the club records , in- PAGE 2 d1v1dual bank accounts of the owners and all were checked and found to be in good sound order, thus eleminating the question which is sometime asked in fires of this nature. Following the burning of the Plantation the Palace Club burned followed by the Bullseye some time later. The P/antotion Club and the Palace Club fires were ruled arson and the Bullseye ruling was not definite at the time Mr. Porks of the arson divis­was interviewed but he said it was still being investigated. In September 1970, Ronnie Levine, owner of the Palace Club offered $10,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible lor the fire s. Emel A. Newton, Jr. offered at the time $600.00. In January this year the Harris County Grand Jury returned indictments in the Palace Club fire first,charged were Ronnie Levine, Palace Club owner, Larry Shea, former partner in the Palace Club which was burned. Also charged in the Palace Club burning was Vern Bechtel. These persons were arrested the last port of January and are now free on bond pending trial. At the time Mr. Levine was arrested he stated: "The charges should be dropped against me within ~ days, at that time everyone will know of my innocence". In trying to contact Mr. Levine at the time of this writing we were unable to do so. It is understood that he is still under bond and the charges have not been dropped. Charged in the burning of the P lantotion Club fire is Lorry Shea and Lester Ogren. To our knowledge at this time Shea hos not been served. Lester Ogren plead guilty to the chorge and hos been sentenced to five years imprisonment. Persons appearing before the Harris County Grand Jury were Emit Newton, Jr., Gene Howell, Mike Whiticker and Bob Coppell. Mr. Newton and Mr. Howell ore in Houston available as is Mr. Coppell when the trials ore scheduled. Mike Whiticker it seems hos left the city ofter alledg­edly being threatened by persons charged in the Palace Club blaze. In a chance meeting with Bob Coppell at the Farm House the middle of May, Mr. Coppell told of the fear he hod for his safety and well being. Mr. Coppell said, "Yem Bechtel threatened me in the lobby of this club and told me that I would not be able to testify in the arson trials if I remained in Houston. He also told me I would not be safe on the street, driving my car or anywhere else, that with the connections they had in Houston I would be charged with just anything". Mr. Coppell was asked ii he took these threats See PLANTATION - Pg. 23 RITTER ARRESTED Terry Wayne Ritter, alias Theodore Wayne Hall, 19 surrendered to Houston police at 3am on May 22nd. The former manager of the now defunct Romulus Club was released later in the day on $1000 bond. Ritter hos been charged with making a false alarm call, a felony. Another person, a young lady, hos been arrested in the case, an olledged conspiracy to harrass The Form House Club. Arson squad records show Ritter was involved in an or son case investigation in 1966 here, but insufficient proof against him resulted in no charges being filed. The police received a telephone call telling of a fire-bomb being placed in The Farm House Club shortly after Ritter and a companion, also a minor, hod been refus­ed service there. Pol ice in­vestigations discovered an alledged conspiracy between See RITTER - Pg. 23 AARC Church of Montrose Pickets SEE STORY - - PAGE 23 30 ARRESTED IN CLUB- RAID ALA's DALLAS MEET On the 24th of Apri I, 1971, at about 1: 15 a.m., the manager of the Armadillo Club was arrested with ~ minor and two adults at the Armadillo Club. Scotty, the manager, was charged with serving a minor and running an open saloon. The two adult patrons were charged with disorderly conduct and interfering with an officer. About ten uniformed radio patrolmen were involved in the search for minors through­out the Annadi llo Club. The two adult patrons have plead­ed guilty to the charges The charges against the minor and against the manager are still pending and will be aojudicated, according to at­torneys for the Club. Later, at about 11:00 p.m. on Moy 7th, the manager of the Armadillo Club was driv­ing to the club when he saw a large assembly of pol ice cars at the intersection of Tuam and Baldwin. He went on to the club and immediately began o check on the minors present ond while in the pro­cess of evicting one, the police arrived. About 26 THE uniformed and vice squad off­icers this time went through the club searching for breach­es of the pub Ii c weal. They checked IDs, licences ana health cards, arresting about ll patrons and 5 employees. Of those arrested, 21 were mi no rs c horged with possess­ion of alcohol and 2 were adults charged with interfer­ing with an officer. Vice Squad Officers Tel lo and Perez took 2 bartenders and the man running the phono­graph downtown while Vice Squad Capt. McMin ime and Vice Squad 8fficer Posey took Scotty, the manager and a waiter in. Charges similar to those previously filed were again made. All charges wi 11 be fought in Court, according to attorneys. However, official records show that only 9 of the minors actually have been charged. The situation concerning the other 21 minors remains a mystery as none of them have been advised of their present status. Task Force on GAY Liberation Coming out of the closet for gay people might be one step easier when a group of gay librarians carries out its educational program at a June meeting of the Americian Library Association. This group's aim is to revolutionize I ibraries in meeting the needs of gay people. Taking place in Dallas, Texas, June 19 to 26, the programs wi II coincide with Gay Pride Week. The Task Force on Gay L iberotion of the Social Re­sponsibilities Round Table, American Library Association, is planning a series of pro­grams at the 90th annual conference of the American Library Association in Dallas. One of the highlights of the week wi II be an open house, where all librarians attending the meeting, straight and gay, .will have a chance to get to know one another. On Sunday, June 19, for the edification of all concern­ed librarians, there will be a program on the relation of the homosexual to established religion. T uesdoy, in an area generally featuring commercial di splays, gay I ibrorions wi II give out free kisses at a "hug a homosexual" booth. That evening there wi II be a pro­gram on "Intellectual freedom -ordial at the University of Minnesota," with J. Michael McConnell, fired from his job because he applied for a license to marry his lover, talking on the problems of the gay librarian. Wednesday evening will feature a program on "Sex and the single cataloger; new thoughts on some unthinkable subjects." The prejudice of libraries in providing access to materials will be discussed there. Another highlight will be the First Annual Gay Book Award which will be present­ed to the book recent! y pub­Ii shed which presents a posi­tive view of homosexuals and their life style. The week's activities will be climaxed by a gay dance on Thursday night, to which all wi II be invited. The American Library Association, founded in 1876, is the professional organizo­tion of librarians in the United States, with a membership of over 30,000. About 5,000 librarians are expected to attend the conference. The Social Responsibili­ties Round Table, with over ll>O members, was organized two years ago, because it was felt that the American Library Association and libraries were not responsive to the real needs of people. The Task Force on Gay L iberotion was organized in Detroit in 1970 at the Annual Conference of the Americian Library Association because it was evident that libraries were not meeting the needs of gay people. PROGRAM Saturday, June 19 9:00 - 11:00 p.m. STRATEGY SESSION - Open to all who wish to plan an active part in the week's activities of the Task Force on Gay Liber­ation. As with all other meet­ings, one's particular sexual orientation is no hinderance in participating in any of the week's activities. Sunday, June :JI OP EN HOUSE - An oppor­tunity to get to know each other in a relaxed, informal at01osphere. 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. I I Private Club I (Membership available) H/JQ/£ Large Dance Floor 3535 West/Jeimer flt Jonell HOUSTON'S MOST UNIQUE DANCE CLUB featuring 8/oontz Ill/ Stflr Blues Bflnd OPEN EVERY EVENING 7 p.m. 'til 2 a.m. Afterhours 2 a.m. 'til 4 a.m. Friday & Saturdays ----- GENE HOWEL - Owner LYNN HUDSPETH - Manager MARK WILLIAMSON - Head Bartender GEORGE ELROD - Bartender JERRY ROSS - Bartender LYNN GAREY - Doorman PHONE 622-5942.J PAGE 3 EXCHANGE OF IDEAS GAYBOY opened by I 0,11 Dtlly l 1504 Westheimer KEG PARTY SUNDAYS S 7 (S1.00) 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. SPEAKER Ruth Shivers. 6:3> - 8:3> p.m. SURPRISE A very exciting and relevant program which will be of interest of al I (place to be ammounced). Mondor, June 21 - (to be announced). Tuesday, June 22 3:00 p.m. - 5-.00 p.m. FREE KISSES (at the JMRT Booth) Alternately called, "Hug a homo sexual'' 8:3> p.m. - 10:00 p.m. INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM­ORDEAL AT THE UNIVER­SITY OF MINNESOTA - J. Michael McConnell. 10:00 p.m. - 12 - INFORMAL RAP. Wednesday, June 23 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. BUSINESS MEETING (see official pro­gram for meeting place) In addition to a review of the year's activities, plans for "new directions," and el• ection of a new coordinator, there wi II take place the First Annual Gay Book Award for the best book published in 1970 or 1971 that most furthers the Gay style. a positive view of experience and life 8:00 - 10:00 p.m. SEX AND THE SINGLE CATALOGER­NEW THOUGHTS ON SOME UNTHINKABLE SUBJECTS. 1. Classification - Steve Wolf. 2. Subject Headings - Joan K. Marshall. 10:00 p.m. -12:00 INFORMAL RAP Thursday, June 24 11:00 p.m. - ? - A VERY GAY DANCE - Open to al/ free spirits and will be held at the King of Clubs, 2116 N. Fields, phone 741-0218. Friday, June 25 9:00 11:00 p.m. POST MORTEN All meetings will take ploce in the suite of the Task Force on Goy Liberation in the Adolphus Hotel, unless other­wise noted. Please check there for last minute chonges and additions to the program. The Task Force wi II al so be participating actively in the Free University, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 9 :00 - 12:00 noon, as well as having rapping tables at the SRRT specta.:ular program and business meeting on Thursday evening, as well os being present at the SRRT booth at various times. Point: - Am I mistaken in assuming that Catholic gays conceive of themselves as a ghetto group which would care to worship apart from their straight fellow-members of the Mystical Body of Christ? Certainly the MCC seems to .have experienced no difficulty in letting it be known that gays constitute at least a majority of its membership. Or do Houston gays differ from those on the West Coast? Counterpoint: - As I see it, all gays think of themselves as ghetto in this sense: they Clln be themselves fully only when with gays. There may be exceptions to this, but the condemnation of straight society makes the gay retreat and seek a subcultural social life. Naturally, this carries over into the I ife of worship. The gay knows he is not ac­cepted by straights al Mass. He feels almost that he is there under false pretenses. But when he can worship with others who are gay, his con­science is no longer up-light. He feels he is at home. His worship becomes freer_ And since worship does not involve only the act of worship, but the social contacts before and after, the gay prefers to worship with other gays be­cause of the social contacts that are there for him. Should the day come when a straight parishwill accept gays openly and genuinely, the need for gays worshipping apart may no longer exist. Only time can tell that. Point: lrrespan sibi I ity: th is is what I have found to be characteristic of a notable number of the gays whom I know. And here, I fear, we are confronted with an old problem: Which came first, the hen or the egg? Are many gays irresponsible, simply because, as a persecuted mi­nority, they have never been regarded as re span sible sol id citizens? Or is their irresponf sibility a consequence of the disturbed state of their lives? If I have been injudicious in my choice of words, please forgive me. As a homosexual, I dearly love the members of the community and enjoy their company. I regard homosex- CNIIPIIRRIIL BOOK MIIRT FINEST LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES IN CORPUS. ....•.• --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 413 Peoples S~. Corpus Christi, Tex. PAGE 4 ual ity as an addition to, rather than a subtraction from, the human condition: A di­mension which enables us to see and enjoy elements of reality which are absent from the experience of straights. Still, I have, as it w•e, come so late to the I ife and am a priest. So perhaps I am more sensitive ta the faults of my family and would like to see them eradicated. Counterpoint: - I don't pre­sume to have all the answers. I can only give my opinions, based on observation and reading. Many times we are tempted to stereotype the gay. How can we say gays are irresponsible? There are gay doctors, lawyers, priests. It would not be fair lo say that they are irresponsible. They would suffer in their profess­ion if they were. Among white and blue collar workers also, there can't be one answer. Each individual has to be judged on his own merits. But when we say irrespon­sible, in what are they irre­sponsible? That is very important. In some areas of life an individual (gay or straight) may be responsible and in other areas very irresponsible. The extent of his interest in that particulc.­area might determine that. Point: - In closing I should like to include two quotations which you might like to use Counterpoiat: - Thank you for your consideration in sending me quotes that you felt might be used .•• They w~re good, but I feel that they were a little too deep for general reading • . . They almost demanded study and that kills reader interest. Anthony/ Vecera Soon to be one of the most fun places in town is the new Gayboy International Club in the location of the defunct Romulus Club. The plans of Joe Anthony and Tom Vecera for this large club are really exciting. Fashion­ed along the lines of the Playboy Clubs, the Gayboy International Club wi II be the first of its kind anywhere. European wait•• in charming costumes, with small tails cunningly attach­ed in the appropriate places, to be known as Gayboy Bucks, will add to the atmosphere of this mast interesting club. Entertainment will be provid­ed when the best is available. Some really interesting live entertainment is now being discussed which wi II be a pleasant surprise to the Gay Community. New lighting and furnishings also make the Gayboy International Club more excihitg. The firs! club to publ ical­ly use such a name, the Gayboy International Club is exclusively for the Gay Community, and the hets will not be welcome, according to Mr. Anthony. The Gayboy lntemational Club has a free smorgesbord buffet seven nights a week fer members and guests. Pro­fessional bortenders serve anything the patrons wish mixed at 90• up, with beer at 50• and nan-alcoholic beverages available. It's a hoot and you'll thoroughly enjoy it! GLF HALTS METHODIST CONFERENCE Memb.s of the Gay Liberation Front confronted a Methodist conference May 31 and brought the meeting to a standstill when they demanded to be heard. Delegates to the South­west Texas United Methodist Annual Conference first over­whelmingly voted not to allow the group to speak. A second motion giving them the last five minutes of Monday night's program, passed by a nc.-row margin. As the first meeting of the four-day conference open­ed, members of the self­described homosexual group passed out pink leaflets with a Ii st of ten demands-includ­ing one calling on the ch.,ch to make "sizeable reparations to gay people in the form of programs, facilities and money." In the first moments of business a bearded, long­haired young man who indet­ified himself as Jim Digger, 24, of Dallas, demanded that the conference give his group an audience. A shouting match develop­ed between Digger and msn­bers of the audience. Includ­ing the Rev. Robert Tate, minister of the First Methodist Church in Austin, who was against allowing the group to speak. At one point as Tate spoke, Digger Shouted, "Pharisee." Another Gay Lib represen­tative shouted, "Souls c.-e the business of the church." A CHRISTIAN DOPE ADDICT TELLS TRUE STORY A couple yeors ago I was a complete and total mental and physical wreck. I had no one to tum lo and no place to go. No one cared or respected me and I didn't even respect myself. This was the result of two years of being a dope addict. If all began in 1968. I was nineteen yeors old. I was engaged lo a girl who was sixteen. She was the most wonderful thing that had ever happened lo me. I was very much in love, not with her, but with the idea of having a descent Christian life. Six weeks before we were to be married Nell was killed in an automobile accident. This completely shattered me and al I my dreams. I then left my home town, which I had never left before. I didn't know where I was going or what I was going to do. ended up in Houston. It wasn't long before I was approached with a new a spec! of life, homosexuality. I had had homosexuality tendencies since I was twelve, but I had been fighting these desires. Now I knew this was what I really wanted lo be. In a short period of time I met a man who I fell in love with. We soon decided to move to Los Angeles, Calif. I got a fairly good job as a cook al a truck stop. I then began college at UCLA. It wasn't long before I was aware of some strange actions from my lover. We had been in LA for over two months and he still hadn't been able lo find a job. He had become very nervous and couldn't stop talking, even to the point where I wasn't able to get any sleep. One day when I got home after work I found him in bed. He had a fever and was shak­ing terrible. I didn't know what was wrong but I wanted to call a doctor for him. He wouldn't let me call one though, and said he would be all right as soon as a of his got there with some medicine. When his friend arrived my lover told me he needed twenty five dollars, for the medicine, but I would pay any amount so he would get well. It was then I saw what had happened to my lover. He was a spead freak, and the medi­cine was spead he needed for a fix. If I had known al I the pain and heartache I would have to go through before it would be over, I wou Id have left him then and there. But I was young and I did love him. We had a long talk the next morning. He told me that he was hooked on spead very badly. He was fixing twice a day which cost five dollars a fix. He couldn't get a job to support his habit and he couldn't kick it. I told him not to worry I wou Id take care of him. I soon had lo get another job besides the one I already had. I now had two jobs plus going to school five hours a day. On week days I could sleep about five hours in the afternoons. This soon was getting to me. I was getting behind in my studies. I knew I couldn't go on much longer. It was then my lover started lo give speed to me, in capsule so I could keep going with no sleep. I was having to take more and more to keep going. It was then I informed my family that I was gay. It had just the opposit reaction than I had expected. My mother wrote me let­ters telling me how sinful I was. She quoted Bible pass­ages condeming homosexuals, and constantly reminded me of Nell. Now I was tired from working and school and depressed by both my lover and my mother and stil I great­er by my religion. My lover soon found the solution to my problems. It came in o capsule. It was a 2500 mg Dexamyl either base speed. He started shooting me up. It wasn't long before I was shooting more than him. I started lo lose weight, slowly at first and then faster and faster. I was a stocky 250 pounds when I started. In eighteen months I was down to 150 and 145 pounds. I looked five years older and felt even older than that. I had all but lost interest in school and I knew I couldn't continue much longer. It was then my lover left me. This was the last straw. I now had no one, I was a nobody, I didn't want to live anymore. This was al so a hard time in LA for all speed freaks. The supply of speed coming into the city was all but stopped. I even would buy acid (LSD) and shoot it as all acids have speed in it. I even tried herion twice, luck­ly I am allergic to 1t as it made me deathly ill. One night I decided to end it al I. I bought twenty Red Devi Is ( seconal s) and shot all of them at once. This should have killed me within minutes. A friend of mine found me in o11y apartment. He realized what had happened to me. He called two friends of his for help. These two people were to become the two most important influences in my life. Bob and his lover John were both twenty some odd years older than myself. They were christians, and members of a christian homo­sexual church, the Metropoli­tan Community Chu;ch. -- They saved my I ife that day, and I am glad now that they did. At f irst I could not understand why they worked so hard to do so, and not just lo turn me into the pol ice. A few days after my at­tempt lo commit suicide, John PAGE 5 PAGE 6 HOUSTON'S ADULT LIBRARIES #1 - 1312 West Alabama Movie Arcade J Mini-Theatres Largest Gay Selection of BOOKS, MAGAZINES & fllMS In The World S I € r )( #2 - 609 LaBranch Across From Greyhound Bus Station Movie Arcade Magazines & Films * 3 #3 - 1536 Westheimer Movie Theater Arcade & BOOKS ""',;;;;---...¢1~ OPEN 21/ HOURS II DIIY 7 DIIYS II 'WEEK THE OTHER X PLACE~ P( )( H,-l}A'.\(~I,G 7665 COLLEGE ST. - 866-9080 BEAUMONT, TEXAS and Bob were at my apartment to see that I was alright. I then asked them why they had done al I they had. They did not even know me. Why were they spending their time and energies ta help me stop destroying myself. Bab told me then that he was a Christian and he cared what happened to al I people. That turning me into the authorities would not do me any good but maybe even harm me. That a person must receive help in the form of love not to have it forced on them. Bob told me that he and John loved me as a Christian and cared what happened to me. Before they left that day, they told me if I wanted lo qlJ it drugs altogether to come to them and they would help me. But I had to go lo them on my own accord with a true desire to stop using drugs and ask for help as they could not help unti I I wanted to stop. For the next two weeks I continued lo shoot speed. I didn't see Bob and John at al I in those two weeks. After these two weeks I knew 1-. wanted to stop and I wanted John and Bobs help to do so. I then went to them and with tears in my eyes, I not only asked but begged for help. For the next ten horrible days I went thru mental and physical anguish while going thru withdrawals. I could cry out for help, for them to get me some speed, then when they would pretend they were going to I would beg them not to. I would curse them tell them I hated them and i~ the same breath tell them how much I loved them. I hated myself for having ever used speed but hated trying to get o'ff of it just as much. During the whale ten days I was never a lane. Jahn or Bab was always with me day and night, twenty four hours a day. They would comfort me and pray for me. I gained courage and strength from their presence. Knowing that someone really cared was the greatest thing in helping me through this ordeal. After those ten days I knew I would never use dope again. I still desire speed, even after two years being off of it. But I won't ever use it again. A person once on dope will always desire it the rest of their lives . A person stops using when they really have a desire to. But they never will be able to stop the physical and mental desire to use it again. You must have the w i 11 power and. determ i not• ion not to go back ta it. After I kicked speed I started working with Bab and Jahn and people I ike them ta help addicks.l cannot promise them anything but the regain­ing of self respect and stopp­ing the destruction of their bodies'. I let them know there are people who care and want ta help. I love the kids an drugs and I want ta help. If you are happy being a dope addict I don't knock you, but I cannot help you either. You have ta have a real desire ta quit. The only people I can help is those who want my help. In the near future there is going to be a center ta help drug addicts. In this center there will be people like myself who want to help. I wish only that we could start sooner, but it takes time to get something like this ·started. If you have a true desire to · quit drugs and want and need help, write me in care of this newspaper. I will make arrangements to help you all I can. Don't be afraid of us as we love you and want ta help no matter if you are gay or not, if you are an addict - want ta help. D. F. % The Nuntius Al I correspondence strictly confidental. The above is an article sub­mitted by an individual that the HUHTIUS feels is dedicat­ed. Through his work in this line has attracted men of the Clergy thot work with him. Aries - Keep an open mind, it's safer than on open heart. The early part of this month is a good time for visits from some very nice people. You may not find entertaining as a job as has been the case af late. Guests in bed tend to add sameth ing ta the fun of it all. Tarus - A desire for increas­ed authority and popularity go hand in hand with your need to increase your income. So put some of your assets to work. Don't be surprised if you are worth more than you thought. You are due for a surprise benefit on the 19th or 29th. Be careful to stay off my corner, things are good all over. Gemini - If you will just try to be more lika_ble (not pushy) you wi 11 find that you are. You have lots of work so get busy. When its time ta play give it all you hove got, b: of good humor and it may pay off in the end or some equally enjoyable spat. Enjoy your birthday. Cancer - It's time to realize that every trick can't be 0 lover. ~onest feelings ore fine but when you mi stoke heat for love you hurt every­one. It m oy be you are at­tempting to estobli sh a home life of your own but don't rush things. You will know when love has found you, it won't let you go., Leo - If you are not realiz­ing enough from your work it could be necessary to change profes~ions. Being a natural whore you may be tempted to use your ass-et. Remember all that glitters is not gold and it's better free not sold. If you have a stron.9 desire to change your environment you may find the chance this month. Keep cool, it's hat enough without blowing it and don't risk those social ties. Virgo - The early part of this month will bring you back into contact with that person you like so much who has been for away. Friends have some problems you can help with but do it tactfully and don't get too far in. Stress the need for more sex with fe I low workers, it wi 11 in­crease your understanding of everything. Libra - Around the 6th, 15th, and 29th you will find it easy to get what you want out of your so-cal led recreational pursuits (some of us call it sex). Be able to recognize the people who want you and heed the cal I of the bed, floor, or whatever is handy. Be careful about mounting ex­penses, those wild young boys are nice but can be costly. Scorpio - Exercise in mod­eration and curb overoptimism, ego and extravagance, you have been going to hard as of late. By being too outgoing you hove missed some very deep emotional experiences; give yourself a break and you will find tricks much easier to get. Slow down and enjoy some home life. Sagittarius - A tall dark stronger, and a long trip. Oh well, why not. Listen to ad­vice and be ready for that trip or visit even if it is iust to the beach. Summer is here and so are the tan bodies of all those prety people. You gain by becoming involved with others, don't ploy hard to get. Wait until you get in bed to play ... then it 's more fun. Capricorn - Be careful in form,ng relations with others, this is a good time for you to enjoy playing the field. Watch what you eat, you know how those high protien diets are in the heat of these warm months. Keep things simple and remember you are one of the most needed people in the world. Aquarius - Problems may present themselves having to do with your psychological base-home, family, or proper­ty . The trend of events will be favorable and you may find that this is a fun period. Use _your imagination and you will find that your romantic attach­ments and dealing with youth­ful people produce the results you wanted. Be of good cheer and have a great month. Pi sees - You wi II find sup­port and encouragement on the home front, be ready for a rapidly changing month. Keep your wits about you and attempt to preserve harmony at al I costs. If you have any unfinished work it is time to finish. You may find tricks in out-of-th ... way places, avoid them. In the past we learn what to expect in the future. The Scales Of Justice HETEROSEXUAL WOMAN STABS HUSBAND Ruth Moses, 51, of 1236 West Bell was charged with murder Wednesday in con­nection with the Tuesday stabbing death of her hus­band, Willie David Moses, 47. Moses was stabbed in the chest with a bayonet knife during a scuffle in the family living room Tuesday after­noon. T.l's nf ihtlhts FREE DANCING FREE\ AFTER / HOURS WEEKDAYS I 2:00 p.m. - 2:00 a_m ' I FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 526-9368 I I 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m. Free Beer Bust 5:30 Sundays PAGE 7 Officers said he stagger­ed into his front yard and fell dead. ANOTHER HETEROSEXUAL WOMAN ST ABS HUSBAND! Ocie Herbert Holt, 58, of 10134 Porto Rico died about 4PM Sunday as the result of a knife wound in the chest. Holt's wife, Mrs. Eva Holt, {I), told police that she stabbed her husband during an argument while returning home from a tavern. She soid that he came into the house after they got home and was going for a drink of water when he collapsed on the kitchen floor. The couple had been ar­guing about how fast Holt was driving, she soid, and she stabbed him with o smal I knife after he slapped her about the face. Mrs. Holt was held in city jail Sunday night. HOMOSEXUAL LINK FOUND IN HORMONE - Three Los Angeles physicians say they hove found that homosexuals can be detected by on imbalance in the male sex hormone. Drs. M. Sidney Margo Iese, Oscar Janiger and Richard Green discussed their pre\imi­nory findings in o study of homosexuality financed by the National Institute of Mental health. They said their investiga­tion, based on a study of 75 persons, suggests that male homosexuals can .be distin­guished from heterosexuals by an analysis of the male sex hormone, te stosterone. Testosterone, they said can be broken down into horo­monal sbbstances called an­drostrone A and etiocholano-lene E. Whenever the amount of E exceeds A in a male, Margo Iese said, there is an overwhelming chance that the subject is homosexual. The only exceptions to this noted to date, he said, are individuals with diabetes and severe mental depression. This throws aff the testoster­one flow, the physicians said. "I om close to saying that homosexuality is gen­etic," Margo Iese added. "We have not found anyone who is a strongly motivated homosex­ual and who is otherwise healthy whose E level does not exceed his A level." 98% OF KNOWN CANNIBLESARE PRACTISING HETEROSEXUALS! HETEROSEXUAL PAIR SENTENCED IN RAPE, ABORTION A Tomball man was sen­tenced to six years in prison and his wife to three years by Judge William M. Hatten Fri­day for the rape and criminal abortion of a 14-year-old girl last year. Woodrow Willtrout, 40, pleaded guilty to roping the girl, the daughter of a family friend, and his wife sandra, 27, pleaded gui hy to per­forming on abortion on her in Apri I, 1970. HETEROSEXUAL SENTENCED TO DEATH Lloyd J~hnson, '19, charged with murdering his girlfriend and her five-year­old son November 24, 1970, wo~ sentenced to death Thur­sday by a jury in District Judge E. B. Juggan's court. Johnson received the death penalty far shooting INTRODUCING - - - OUR BUSINESS FRIENDS Want to meet new people with the same interests and pastimes you enjoy? Tom Friend Box 55541 Houston, Texas 77055 Phone 464-0052 after 6 P.M. and week-ends Please send me more information about your introductory service far gay people. Print Name _______________ _ _ Address _________________ _ City _ ___ _____ _ State ______ _ I hereby certify that I am 21 years aid or older: Signed: ______ ___ _________ _ PAGE 8 LAREDO BOOK MIIRT THE MOH COMPLETE ADULT BOOK STORE IN TOWN ! ! ! --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 901 Santa Ursla Parish Leon Morgan in the head at the time he ol sa · allegedly murdered the boy's mother Mrs. Pritchere Anita Morgan, 24, in her apartment at 6364 Hirsch Rood. During the trial, pro­secutor Rick Stover presented as witnesses, relatives and police officers who testified that Johnson told them he shot the boy and Mrs. Morgan. After he was ar,-ested, Johnson told police he bought the pistol on the day of the killings ta teach Mrs. Morgan how to shoot. Johnson told police he had been I iving with the wo­man and her son for about five weeks. He told police he did not know why he shat them. HETEROSEXUAL WOMAN FOUND INNOCENT IN MAN'S CHOKING DEATH Mrs. Nellie Vasquez Robles, 37, was found not guilty Wednesday in the chok­ing death of her husband, a di sabled ex-Marine, in their home at 12715 Blue Haven. Marcelino Robles, 43, a veteran of World War 11 and Korea, paralyzed from the waist down, was found dead Dec. 14 by sheriff deputies. Mrs. Robles testified her husband attacked her and choked her and that she be­gan choking him in self de­fense. She said Robles let go and she I eft the room. Later she returned and found her husband snoring and breathing heavily, she said. About an hour later she dis­covered he was dead and call­ed the sheriff's office. The trial was in Judge George L. Walker's court. However, Judge William M. Hatten heard the verdict in lieu of Walker, who left at 4 PM to attend ceremonies in Washington on the Brazos honoring Speaker of the House Gus Mutscher. Judge Hatten explained to the jury that he was sitting in far Walker because Walker had another assignment. MOTHER, KNOWN HETERO­SEXUAL, FACES SLAYING TRIAL Patricia Ann Goolsby, 19, charged with smothering her 4-month old son Sept 22, was found sane Wednesday in Judge Sam W. Dovi s' court, clearing the woy for a_murder trial. Jury selection for ano­ther jury wi 11 begin Monday. Mrs. Goolsby' s attorney, John Lohmann 111, hos con­tended since the start of the trial last Monday that the slim reception isl should have been tried to determine wheth­er she is guilty instead of a son ity hearing. Lohmann initially asked for the sanity hearing. How­ever, he later asked that she be tried on the merits of the case. The state said that the request far the sanity hearing had to be carried out. The jury found that Mrs. Goo Isby is presently sane and is capable of standing trial for murder. Under law a new jury must be impaneled to determine her guilt or in­nocence. HETEROSEXUAL COUPLE GUil TY IN MORALS CASE After a quick change of events in the opening day of trial on a morals charge, a Freeport couple was sentenc­ed to a total of 25 years on a charge of indecent exposure to o minor involving a teen ager and a retarded girl. Wallace Deats, 42, was sentenced to 15 years and his wife, Julia, 35, was sent• enced ta 10 years on the same charge. Five charges remain against the couple stemming from the game incident. The couple changed their plea to guilty after a collec­tion of photographs and maga­zines were admitted as eviden­ce before a six-man, six­woman jury in District Judge Paul Ferguson's 149th Dist­rict Court. The Freeport couple were arrested in March after three children were picked up by a Brazoria County sheriff's deputy on Surfside Beach near Freeport. The chi I dren told of being allegedly forced to pose for lewd pictures and commit sex acts with the Deatses. In his opening remarks, Brazoria County District At­torney Ogden Bass warned the jurors, "In my humble opinion, you are about to hear a bad, bad case. Its going to be nasty, vulgar, obscene and rank. Sometimes it's amazing the accomplishments of Laredo, Tex. people for the sake of sati s­fying lust." Later, as Bass attempted to introduce the pictures and magazines as evidence, de. fense attorney Jimmy Wilcox charged that the Deatses' civil rights had been violated when the pictures and books were reportedly confiscated in the Deatses' home by a Brazoria County Deputy sher­iff. At this point, the jury was retired and Judge Fergu­son began hearing testimony from a 13-year-old child and later from the deputy concern­ing the events leading up to and including the arrests of the couple. After his action to accept the evidence, the couple changed their plea to guilty and waived their rights ta a trial by jury. PRACTISING HETEROSEXUAL CHARGED WITH RAPE IN CEMETERY! A 17-year-old cemetery laborer was charged Saturday with raping and robbing a 69- year-old woman who said she was at the cemetery ta place flowers on her husband's grave on their 50th wedding anniversary. Police arrested Nathanial Hawkins, 17, of 4905 Picklair., at Forest Park Lawndale Cenetery, 6900 Lawndale, where the woman said she was assaulted at noon Friday. She said she was about to place the flowers on the grave when she was dragged to a car and forced inside. A man tried to rape her there, she said, but she managed to fight him off. He then dragged her from the car, and as­saulted her twice, she said. He a I so robbed her of an un­detenm ined amount of cash, she said. Police said the woman identified Hawkins from a photograph taken after his arrest. He was charged with rape and with robbery by as­sault. No bond had been set for Hawkins Saturday Night. The woman was taken to a hospital where she was re­ported in satisfactory condi­tion. MARY'S BIIR - - SUNDAY SHOW - 6 to 8 - Stephany Carr & 2 guests each week CAMP TIME - -4 to 9 Manday thru Friday - Beer 35 - Set-ups 2S. OPEN -4p .... Manday thru Friday - 12 Noan Saturday & Sunday C(l/iforni" flflllospl,ere - - Biltini clfld Go Go Boys & W"iters feflturing ''the G"y /Jeer'' HIIAIAl'S -~:: \'.'est'1e1rne, ·it V/augh 528-8851 Houston ~ Browne Breckenridge Houston,s Gay IT WAS JUST FAB­ULOUS, really it was, and Marbella NEVER looked better, luv. Just EVERYbady who IS wos there, in varying states of undress, ond it wos FUN. Tragically, we missed Arthur Talk, that dear old chubs, whose arrival in Spain coincided with our departure. We' II catch him next time round ••• . ALL MANNER OF THINGS have been doing in Houston while we were fr~ licking al fresco, luvs, and thanks to so many dears who sent in the most interesting letters with the most interest­ing people, we'll share just about e1rerything with you. You knew we would! ISN'T IT JUST TOO, too exciting about all the changes taking place in some of our local watering holes? Of course it is, and especial­ly all those stories, confirmed & purely silly both, about the sole of this place and that place. It's just so exciting to be involved in such big­business affairs, even pre-­siding over bankruptcies, Luv. One of the larger flesh­pots, rivalling Forest Lawn for quietude in recent weeks, has changed hands, actually, and will see the advent of one of Houston's most literary types in the saloon business west of Montrose. Joe Anthony Society Scene s already serving up daily & nightly rations of fun and games at Mary's ond Queen's Haven, and we all know how fascinating those two places is going to be just terribly successful in his latest venture in the old Romulus location, we look forward to seeing how he does things. Others are curious about his newest venture, Goy boy International, too. And you know it . . . SO TACKY, ACTUALLY, just to trot in and repossess the Armadillo's furnishings! Tasteless, Abbey Rents, tast­less! THE Et.f'LOYES at the Romulus have been just so fascinated by the frequently repeated senario where their young manager, Terry Ritter, keeps stuffing $20.00 bills into the shirt pockets of some uniformed policemen - cheek to cheek. One can only assume, luv, that the dear boys in blue are collecting for the Widow's Fund or some other worthy cause. Surely! THAT DEAR BOY, so successful in all he does, just sold his very attractive River Oaks house to some other dears, and we know they're just going to be so happy out there among st the trees where some of the most interesting parties hod some of the most interesting people over the past few years. And Maxine Messenger, who really appreciates a stiff price, is just agog over the figure men­tioned in the ;,urchase con­tract, and headlined the item, complete with cameo snapshot of dear Dick. Tasteless, tasteless .... THAT DARLING GER­MAN boy, Willie, <and his associates ore about to open another lovely addition to the Montrose area, just down the way from their funfunfun Michaelangelo's. It's called Alexander's and you just know it's going to be boffo. We wouldn't I ie to you! DENNIS DAY, LIBERACE, and just who knows who else we run into at the Tattooed Lady! Bock just barely and we find the dear place just bumpy with show-biz persons (which just titilates Cora to near collapse!) And wasn'r it sweet of that dear, dear "Shirley Ankles" to trot the charming Liberace by to say whatever was said! Of course it was, and never you mind that nasty rumour about his PR career resting on the prostrate bodies of so many former friends. He hos a charming smile . ... THEIR FRIENDS WERE SO drained emotionally to learn of the divource of Jack and Roland. Jack, poor dear, has moved in with Jim. that dear boy who hos those charm­ing apartments and town­houses and laundries and funny tenants, who hos moved out. It's all so confusing, but we understand that each is keeping custody of a poodle. Golly. AND TO MAKE IT even more interesting, and you know we I ike it kept interest­ing, Jim is also itemising possessions for a possible divource in his own house­hold. These property settle­ments can be so tiresome, luv, and then there's always the poodle to c onsider! Yes. THAT DEAR OLD dear, Art, was recently inconven­ienced by a gentleman caller who left Art's residence carrying away cozy memories and Art's car. Now it ' s off to gay, exciting and pol ice-troppy New Or leans to identify the body--car, that is. Alter that, it's time to revise his guest list. Poor poor dear. 0 WOULDN'T YOU KNOW that while we're gone new clubs spring up I ike daisies, in chains practically! Yes, you know that. We went round to see the newest, the Hi Kamp, and thought it utterly tasteless and noisy and vulgar a nd sure to be a howl­ing success. The owners, known to their many fr iends, patients and clients as The T oath Fairy and Wonda the Witch, are such funsy dears, really, and we know they're going to en joy t ripping fan­tastically through this newest addition to our night I ife. With so much help from their friends, luv .. . . . IT WAS UTTERLY rural and such bumpy fun! The Form Hou se, luv. And when we sow that German-speaking bartender al I tri eked out in those clever togs, it was all right-in-place again. So glad to have that dear Gene and Emit back in the soloon­ery. And so g I od to see tower­ing Lynn lurk ing about the pl.,ce doing whatever so well. Dears, al I of them: and such a funfunfun place to drink and dance while irremedi­ally damaging one's inner ears. UTTERLY FASCINATED by the negotiations that Fronk Coven and his PR man, that dear old boy Don Moore, who is such acharming fellow, really, are in concerning their acquiring another of our watering holes. Frank, so well known in Dallas for his clubs t here, is just terribly anxious to come into Houston with s i,;,ilor operations, and we know he' ll just be terribly successful and happy about i· sucessful and happy about it . a ll when he does. And so many ore anxious to watch him do it. And will. NOW THAT DEAR Lanis and h is associates hove sold the Romulus to J oe Anthony ( it's renamed Gay Boy Inter­nation al, I uv, and that's something, it has to be!), just everyone is so curious to see just where t he much-spoken­about Terry Ritter wi II sur­face next. It is almost too much to expect after the past few months t hat this 19 year old club manager will not be put to further commercial use by dear Lanis. Of course, so much of this young man's career wi II depend upon the dispositions of the courts, but surely Someth ing Will Be Done . • . . THANKS AGAIN, LUVS, for al I those marvy notes with all that marvy informat ion about a ll tho se marvy people . Keep them coming in, and PEARL STREET WAREHOUSE 18th & Lavaca AUSTIN 478-0176 PAGE 9 / MEN L£.41tN TO Hf: A "MODEL MAN" Fosltion Modeling PltoloVfop/,y Television Self /mp,ovement CALL - 528-2652 41Z WUTNIIMD-77006 -ND CLASS STARTS THIS MONTH CALL FOR INTERVIEW-we' II use what we can after editing the hard-core slander and so forth. But do, oh please DO! restrain your­selves on some of that tlltty language! If your little notes EVER fell apart in the post, the uglies in Pc.st Office uniforms would Visit You Officially. Sticky, that. And thanks, those calls too, luvs, for all interesting telephone with such attention-arresting information about our own! Loved every single taped one of thej , and you know that's the truth. And so, my dears, keep doing it: We'll keep mentioning it. Ta ta lor now .... KILL THE QUEERS by Don J~ckson "Psychiatry is waging a war of extermination against homosexuals", said Dr. Frank­lin Kameny, "The psychiatric profession is the major enemy of the American Gay Com­munity." For the fifth time in a year, Gay Liberation i sis dis­rupted a shrink convention. This time it was the American Association convention in Washington, D. C. Enraged shrinks pushed and shoved at Gays, as the Gays forced their way into the convention hall. Veteran Gay Militant Dr. Kameny "liberated" the ros­trum and told the shrinks that the disruption could be viewed as a formal declaration of war. "This is a declaration of war against you", Dr. kameny said. Komeny was answering a challenge by Executive Di rector O'Donnell of the National Association for Mental Health. Last November, Gays disrupted the NAMH convention in Los Angeles. At that time, O'Donnell said "if you go against us, we'll set your movement (Gay Liberation) back ten years". Since then, agressive anti· homo sexua I provocoti on s by shrinks have increased. In December, they pressured the Nebraska legislature into declaring that all incure­able" homosexuals are "socio­paths", and as such con be incarcerated for life in state mental hospitals. The American Medical Association, and NAMH af­fi I iate, launched a vicious anti-homosexual crusade in its magazines, TODAY'S HEAL TH and the AMA JOUR­NAL. Other shrinks busied themselves writing anti­homosexual hate I iterature. Costeration under various guises came into common use os a 11treatment" for homo­sexuality. Dr. Hans Orthner, a neurosurgeon, announced that he had excellent results "curing" hundreds of homo• sexuals by destroying the sex nerve center in the brain with an electric shock probe. Other neurosurgeons boasted that their surgical methods to destroy the sex drive with various brain surgeries or by cutting the nerves leading to the genitals were equally effective. In California, atro­cious 11experiments" were performed on homosexuals in state mental institutions and prisons. In most instances these atrocities were committ• ed without the consent of the "patient". Dr. H. 8. Glass, presi­dent of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science told the national conference of that organization: "There will have to be forced abortions to rid the world of uncontroll­able defects such as mongo­lism and sex deviation". Dr. Glass, a geneticist, sounds more like a eugenist. His remark is almost identical in warding to a remark made by the late Adolph Hitler to the German Eugenics Assoc. In April, 1971,Dr. Sydney Margolese announced that he had discovered that homo­sexuality was caused by an endorcinolog ical imbalance-­an excess of the male hor­mone, etiocolanolone. Dr. Margo Iese predicted that his discovery would lead to a drug for the "treatment and prevention of homosexuality". Dr. Margo Iese' s research was funded by the National Institute for Mental Health. It provides a way to imple­ment Dr. Glass' "Kill the Queers'' proposal. Since hormone secretions begin before birth, it wi II be pos­sible to detect and abort homosexual fetuses. Gay Liberationists take HOUSTON'S NEWEST - PAGE10 3400 TRAVIS at FRANCIS 528-9772 OPEN 8 p.m. 2 a.m. ( Fri. S Sat. after hours) BEER /JUST --- Sundays 8 to 10 ---pool td/Jles on the /J(J/cony --- hosts JOHN & BILL RICHARD AMORY'S COLOR stan-in& JON 1VERSON as CYRUS WHEELWRIGHT "'The man was Herculean . . . immense chest and shoulders, hairy ... he had the teshcles of a bull." \ \ Based on the celebrated novel by Richard Amory / Published by Greenleaf Classics. Inc. ABOUT THE PRODUCTION Based on the famous underground novel by Richard Amory and filmed in Eastman ct>lor on location amid the rugged grandeur of Northern California's Trinity Alps and the Big Pines National Reserve, the picture marks the first release by Sawyer Productions, ltd., a Hollywood-based film company that owns the rights to the entire trilogy of "Loon" novels. "Song Of The Loon" has secured for itself a nitch among these unusual literary works that have built for themselves a lasting following. Originally published in 1966 by Greenleaf Classics, Inc., the novel was to immediately become, and remain, a top best-seller. Sales figures later c\lnfirmed the book to be during the next three years among the top 10 best-selling original paperbacks printed in the U.S. as substanti­ated by articles in both The Wall Street Journal and Publisher's Weekly. Basically a fantasy set in the Western American wilderness of the 1B70's, veteran director Andrew Herbert has retained the pastoral quality and poetic beauty of the story through the delicate camerawork of photographer Robert Maxwell. The extremely controversial nature of the subject material presented in the picture was not without problems in filming. Nude scenes and masculine kissing, so much a part of the original script. has been adhered to in the filming. Good taste and an intelligent approach to the material by cast and crew alike helped to circumvent any possible trouble during location shooting. Much thanks 1s owed to members of the U.S. Forestry Service for their cooperation and understanding during production. MINI PARK iili►iirii • • I CO~ING ATIRACTIONS "GAY GUIDE TO CRUISING" A how-to, where-to, whom-to manual of homosexual crusing. One-to, what to do; three-four, how to score; five six, pickup tricks ... etc. etc. "HUSTLER'S PUNISHMENT" Lots of leather in this film about a rough-trade hustler who encounters someone even rougher. "MALE EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL" Including "Love Slave of Rome", "Harem Scorem", "Easy Lovin", "Hod a Piece Lately" and "Christmas Magic". ►t4=ii=i=ii "DESIRES OF THE DEVIL" Voodoo power over a young man forces him into a life of sexual bondage. ·-------- -------------------- PAGE 11 01 i:JA"I all this as evidence of a monstrous conspiricy for the genocide of homosexuals. Gays feel that the shrinks are angry because of the disruptions, and because Gay Liberation has exposed anti­homosexual psychiatry as a hoax-nothing mare than a semantic device to veil the religious beliefs of shrinks with the respectability of scientific terms. Shrinks say that hamo­sexuality is a disease be­cause heterosexuality is necessary to reproduce the species. The fact that other primates ore dominantly homo­sexual yet sti II manage ta have a rampantly growing population does not impress the irrational shrinks.,.. nor does the fact that dominantly featuring homosexual human cultures survive and florish shake their religious conviction that the human race will become extinct without universal state enforced heterosexuoli sm. With equal logic it could be argued that since people need hove intercourse only once every ten years to maintain a O population growth, that heterasexualism is obviously a disease and must be stomped out as a genitic strain lest people become as numerous as cock­roaches. During the early port of this century, eugenics was a respectable and popular science. Eugenics is the science of improving the human genetic pool by encour­aging people with "good" TIFFANY JONES & JERRY VANOVER SNOWTIME genes to multiply, while dis­couraging or preventing re­production by individuals whom the eugenicists felt were inferior. During the 1920' s, many American states, induding California, passed eugtn ics laws, which provi~ ed for the compulsory steril­ization of habitual criminals sex deviates, the mentoll; ill and the retarded. But it was in Hitler's Reich that eugenics raised to its greatest promi nonce. Eugenicists proclaimed that Jewishness and homosexuality were genii ic defects that hod to be stomped out by the "final solution". Gypsies, Blocks and were added to the Later, Slaves Ii st of "diseased" racial strains. If the First World War was "The war to molce the world safe far democracy", the Second World War was the war to make the wa,ld sofe from eugenics. The outrages of the eugenicists united the world against the Nazis. Finally, the eugenicists declared that all non-Aryans were ''untermenchen'' on inferior, subhum<S'I species. The terrible science reachec:I its culmination in the extenninotion of twenty million people in the crem­atoria of Belsen and ['ochou. Now, the disreputable science is again raising its ugly head under the label of psychiatry, neurosurgery, genitics and endocrinology. The ne• eugenicists, being mostly Jews, ore free from anti­semitism, but ore vehemently anti-homosexual and to a leseec extent anti-black. Many of the nee>-eugeni ci sts in­volved in the anti-Goy con­sp iri cy ore saying that Blocks are geneticly infecior and hove smaller brains and LQ.' s than coucosions. The fact that the neo­eugenicists ere almost un­onomously Jewish is relevm,t_ The anti-homosexual taboo con be traced to the ancient Jews. Homosexuality was acceptable and comlllOflploce in all othec ancient civilizat­ions. It hos been suggested that the Jews adopted anti­homosexuali sm (and circum­cision) as a national symbol, I ike a flog, in a,dec to di st­ingui sh themselves from their neighbors - and to increase their birthrate, thus gaining ••• I •••• Wednesdfly & Sundflys 8 to 11 612 HADLEY HOUSTON PAGE12 a military advantage over their neighbors. Anti-hom,sexvalism I,.,. come a patriotic attitude connected with the territorial ambitions of the Jewish king._ It became an abcessian of the Jews and permeated every aspect of their culture. It was carried into Christianity by Saul of Tm-sus (St. Paul), who spews forth anti-homo­sexual venom in the .. Epistles of Paul", mare than half of the New Testament". There is an anti-homosexual taboo built into O.ristianity, but it lacks the intense patriotic fevor of the Jewish taboo. Gentile scientists seem to overcome their subconscious hate,but even Jewish athiests have such firmlyrooted antt­homosexval obcessions in their cultural heritage that it dominates their mental processes to the extent that it dominates their mental processes ta the extent that the y cannot view homosexual­ity rationally. Hapefully, American cultural inhibitions against mass extermination will pre­clude a restaging of the last days of Belsen and Dachau. Mare I ilr.ely, the neo-eugen­ici sts will attempt genocide by murdering homosexuals while they are sti II fetuses - as they hove already im­p. ied. EDITORIAL - YMCA & YWCA: BAH! The Young Men's 0.rist­ian Association and the Young Women's Christion Associat­ion in Houston do not tum out to be as Christian as their legal names imply, nor as O.ri stian is defined gen­erally. The Downtown YMCA and YWCA both discriminated against the American Asso­ciation of Christian Crusaders (AARO and its Church of Montrose by cancelling the Church's reserved spoc:e on Sunday the 23rd of May, 1971. Both places hod accepted the Church's reservation of space to use for church services, then reneged at the last moment on their agreements. This shabby treatment of the O.urch of Montrose and its pastor, resulting in financial loes and ernboffassment, is not ta be casually excused. These so-called "Christ­ion.. organisations violated their agreements for the sole reason that the 0.urch of Montrose serves primari lly a homophile community. Ap­parantly these "Christian" associations are not prepared ta follow the lead of their purported Master and extend the hand of Christian brother­hood to such as we. A sad commentary on the basic principles of the YMCA and the YWCA- And rather silly considering the universal ~ putation of both institutions! The Gay citizen no longer has to tolerate the malicious opinions of the hets of this wo,I d. Those days ore long and mffcifully dead. As for the YMCA and YWCA we would remind our readers and friends that both derive port of their financial support from the United fund. Even allowing for the extortion techiniques used by the United Fund ta receive "Do­nations,. from salaried em­ployees here, we would urge the homophile community to say N9! ta any further donat­ions to them. Instead, direct yo .. donations ta the Church of Montrose. If you wish to support a Christian organ­isation, then suppor1 one whichhas ow genuine interest at heart. letters to the editor Don Jackson 1822 W. 4th St. Los Angeles, Calif 90057 Editor, I wish you would quit using the word straight as the opposite of Gay. Straight means right, correct usual, ordinory,moral truth, faimess, honesty accurate, upright, reliable, and candid. Its antonyms are tricky, dishon­est, crooked, swindler, ab­normal, confused, devious, dis solute, unnatural, and vicious. (funk and Waggnell' s Dictionary). When straight is used os the antonm of Gay, you imply that Gay is unnat­.. al, and abnormal. The continued use of the ward straight has an undesirable sub5onscious psychological effect on the readers and militates against pride, self­esteem, etc, and causes Gays -to think of themselves in a negative manner. I suggest that the non-­p- ejudical word "Het" be used instead of straight. You will note that most of the underground press hos already switched to the new usage. I AM NOT ABNORMAL P .S. I enclose a submission which is also furnished to Liberation News Service and out of state Gay publications. Dear I Am Not Almonnol, We thinlc your idea is a goad one, and in this edition of The NUNTIUS we have used the word "het" in several insfonces, along witla the ward "straight" to • scribe a person of hetero­sexual persuasion. The word "straight" has talcen on many mcwe meanings in CurTent English usage over the post few years and the dictio,wry definitions are no longer final. This is typical of any living, vital language; the dictionaries will catch CJP /ater.J Editor Dear Phil, Houston's Gay scene hos been -,st fortunate ta have three first class quality clubs. Can you name any other city in America which has three? The aid Palace Club was first, the Romulus, then the Phoenix fire bird rose out of the ashes to penthouse level and became the new Palace and then ca- that cut; Tattooed Lady. The Palace Club -s the most beautiful Gay spat in America, even if it did look like some femme fetale saeen star's kosher beclraa... As usual, the Gay crowd ignored quality, aost staying away claiming the Palace os being "too" elegant. If a city has 20 and mare gay bars, why shouldn't 2 or 3 of them be fine places? If one is going out to gay places, why be forced to limit one's self only to dirty, uncomf«­table grubby ugly places. Soae kid themselves that they don't feel c-fortable in a fine place. Others have a mistalcen opinion that fine places me nelly. What is nelly about the Houston Country Club, the Riv...- Oaks Country Club, the Houston Club or the Bayou Club? These places are all fine Either way, the genocide of Gays will be disastrous for the world. The ecology probably requires a certain pe,-centage of Gays for ecol­ogical balance. In addition, a high percentage of artists, composers and literary figures are Gay. Gays such as Shak~ spear, DaVici, Michaelangelo and T choikowski have brought beauty into an ugly het world. Mr. FrizJJy 3401 Milam at Franis entrance on Francis POLICE "PEEK" "The Nuntius" contacted Miss Anne Hamadt, Assistant Director of the Houston Public Lil><ary, concerning the installation and use of a two­way min-or by the Houston Police Department in the men's restroom at the Library. Miss Hornack was queried cancen.­ing the mirror and she related that its installation had been made at the request of the Houston Police Deportment. " . . • she didn't r• member just haw many years ago. .. Because of nU111erous cmnplaints made by p-ons of the Library con­cerning ••certain actions., that were transpiring in the Library's facility. When aslr.ed if the •irrar had been a determining factor in reducing the number of complaints, the Assistm,t Director stated that, "Y cs, it had been a dete,minant in c-iling these actions" and that such ..,._ pleasant activities had calaed down. She went on to say that recently the staff of the Library had received very few ca111plaints from their patrons and that " • . • spells of c0111plaints caae in cycles~., Houston Membership $2. per year Visits $5. each OPEN 4 pm CLOSE 8 am 7 DAYS A WEEK "all gay & safe" 523-8840 PAGE 13 \ 2,500 ONl Y $20.70 5,000 ONLY $39.95 1\'f\5\~G ~l)~~ c.oP't on't 4615 MT. VERNON 524-5612 and you don't see many nelly types there at all. The Gays lend lo be flighty and patronize one bar over the other for silly or ufiknown reasons ignoring qual ity as they fly from bar to bar. business, but have been deplorable in some of their actions and lack of actions. As flighty as most gays are, even the most staunch custom­ers are not going to put up with some of management's abuses. pocketbook and taste os we// os others not having been bit but stung by your "quality" clubs. You haven't mentioned nearly all the "quality" spots where servire rather than decor is in evidence. Editor Dear Editor, Scene 1 had seventeen arrests the 22nd of Moy which was actually at 2: 3'.) o.m. Sunday. Two pl oinclothesmen come in, sealed the door, and searched everything and everybody. All personal 1.D. checked, employees al I had health cords, all licenses were in order. The owner was confident that everything wo s in good 0<der as he hod comp I ied with every regulat­ion. He .stopped serving by 2 on the clock and took away ot :i: 15. At least they thought they had. them with consuming or serv­ing after hours. While this was probably ncl horrossment for being a Gay bar, the morality of these policemen deserves a more than cosuot examination, because they were dead wrong. Is it not part of their oath of office to prevent crime and violations of the law? While ignorange of the law is no ex OJ se these cust­omers al the bor would have preferred to not break the law and deserved to hove been given the chance. Here is a victimless crime. Here ore two police-­men standing by idly and encouraging the consumption by their permissiveness and the clock wrong. What kind of respect for the law does the pub I ic get from this sort of treatment • from the police? The police in an orderly society are to .. be asked for help rather than to be feared by law abiding citizens. I hope that these orresl­ies fight this case in court, win, get the arrest records di strayed, get an apology, and gel the two policemen di sci i­plined with a lowered rank. Dear Out, It is port of the manage• ments job to protect his cvst. omers as well as his license. The ball hos been droppea or I misunderstand your letter. Scene 1 has had a bod clock for some time - "so we are told". Do you really feel that the po/ice are ot fault here? Just hope management paid the tab for the paddy ride - neglence - !!! Editor The sod result appears to be that we are well on our A bar fly whos bit. way ta losing our finest gay places from lad, of support. Dear Bit Barfly - The fire department had been in the day before asking them to remove the rear exit sign. This the manager did the same day he was asked to do so. The power was switched off lo do this as a result the clock lost time. The police called the paddy wagons and hauled seventeen to iail, charging Lucky regular customer ::::::======'jJ Outof Town-------"'111!1 Management has been interested in getting more It might be a matter of When in Dallas-Visit ~OO~~~lroif £!\OOif if~~£!\ if~OO 2100 Elm St. 747-2688 'N.6'.-•1.-,r"'-.-, I.J ;,, aJ,,1/ II- ..l.tlaitw,,.,/ ART CINE.MA Houston's Only 'the original' Art Cinema ½ Block East of 6100 Kirby Or. IN UNMRSITY VILLAGE 528-8186 Private Club for your undistrubed viewing pleasure (yean membership $1.00) OPEN All NIGHT --- - -·------------------------------------------~ PAGE 14 er 3,,a.•~ ORIGINS, EFFECTS, PROSPECTS: The Sodomy Laws Must Go By George Schatzki At present, every state except Illinois has some law which prohibits so-e<1,lled "un­natural sex acts," usually called "sodomy" or "the abom­inable (or "unspeakable") crime against nature," Typical­ly the laws prohibit one or more- of the following: bestiali­ty (intercourse with onimal sl, buggery ( anal intercourse) and oral-genital contacts. Almost all of these laws do not distinguish between consensual and non-consensual acts, nor between pub Ii c and private conduct, nor between homosexual and heterosexual relations. Most of them do not exempt sexual acts committed in the marriage relationship, and there actually have been isolated instances in which married persons were prosecut­ed far these acts. My comments are intended to set out very broadly the hi story of sodomy and of its most feared manifestation, homosexuality; its present status in our society; and some of the legal ramifications. Hebrews While it is not entirely clear when the first so-cal led "sec­ular" laws against homosex­uality or sodomy emerged, most historians agree that taboos on this bype of "un­natural" sex were legislated by the Hebrew tribes; these prohibitions found their way into the Old Testament. It is generally believed that homo­sexual practices - especially anal intercourse - were com­mon among the Canaanites and the Egyptians. Moreover, not only was homosexuality com­mon in the "cradle of civiliza­tion" (the Nile Valley and Mediterranean Basin), but it was practiced in Scandinavia, through the land of the Galls and the Celts, as well as in the Far East. And, of course, in Greece, the zenith of ancient civilization, homosexuality blossomed and was considered highly desirable. With the possible except­ion of Persia, in no ancient civi Ii zation were homosexual­ity and bestiality treated with such fierce opposition as by the Hebrews, who were of the view that persons practicing such "horrible" acts should be put to death. Still, early in their history, the Hebrews had practiced homosexuality through male prostitutes who were em­ployed at the temples; it was then bet ieved that intercourse with these men produced some sort of supernatural blessing or power. Even today this sort of bet ief about homosexual relations is fairly common among primitive tribes. While it is true that the early Roman Empire contained in its laws a prohibition on homosexual behavior, the pro­hibition appears to have been ignored. Indeed, at least one emperor of Rome, Hel iogabalus, was believed to have been raised as a priest in a homo­sexual temple. Abstinence Ideal When the Roman Empire became Christian, several new laws aimed at "unnatural" sex acts were passed. The Chris­tians proscribed all sexual acts which ·were not procre~ l ive. (Indeed, the Christians urged total sexual abstinence as the ideal but permitted sex within marriage if it was repro­ductive.) In Middle Age En gland sodomists were thought to be heretics. Indeed, the term "bugger" derives its meaning from the common be! ief that heretics were al so sodomi sts, and heretics were known as buggers. Over the years the chur Over the years the church lost the power to impose sanct­ions such as death or imprison­ment on offenders of religious laws. Apparently as a result, in 1533, the first secular stat­ute in England was passed to deal with sodomites. Over the ye-ors, the substance of that law has became enseconced in our tradition. The Christian taboo on all sex activities which do not have the potential of reproduction has resulted in many laws prohibiting not only anal intercourse and best iality, but also oral intercourse. Usually it is homosexual behavior rather than 11devian•" heterosexual behavior, that incurs the wrath of the govern­ment and the society in general. Kinsey Exact stati sties as to the frequency of homosexual pract­ices in our society are not available. The Kinsey reports of the late 1940' s and early 1950's are considered the best sources we have. They indicate that more than one-third of the white male population aver the age of 16 has had at least one orgasm due ta homosexual relations, and that approximate­ly one-half of that same pop­ulation has at least recognized some strong homosexual in­stincts or yearnings. About 10 per cent were exclusively homosexual for a period of at least three years in their adult lives, while four per cent re­main homosexual throughout their adult I ives. Kinsey and many others have noted that homosexual behavior is not limited to the stereotype, that is, to the intel­lectual, the artist, the effete and the effeminate. Persons in all walks of life (truck drivers and interior decorators, ath­letes and professors, doctors and candlestick makers), per- .tu GALLEON :mo RICIIMONO AVENUE HOUSTON sans with all personality traits, engage in some homosexual acts. Many are married and have children but seek other sexual or emotional outlets, perhaps only from time to time. Most "homosexuals" at one time or another if not regul­arly, engage in heterosexual relations also. Thus, the ward "homosexual" may be mis­leading. It may have reference to those who are exclusively homosexual; it may refer to those who prefer homosexuality; or it may refer to anyone who has engaged in any homosexual acts, or hos even recognized homosexual instincts within himself. (If the definition is the last, approximately one­half of the white male populat­ion is homosexual.) Activism However defined, homo­sexuality is much more in our society's eye today than in the past. This seems true not only because of the increasing aca­demic interest in the subject, but al so because of the increas­ing activism of a number of homosexuals and their organ­izotion s. These institutions have taken many roles for them­selves. Some are attempting to make society more tolerant and to change laws which re­press sexual "deviants." Some hamophile organizations are attempting to give homosexuals M.C. a sense of identity and a self­image of which they are not ashamed. This is accomplished through meetings and discuss­ions of mutual problems and experiences. These organi zat­ion s may take on a somewhat "militant" facade, such as Gay Liberation, which pro­claims that "gay is good." Or they may be more passive. But al I try to be unashamed. There are, for example, homophile churches springing up in different parts of the country. These churches pro­vide all the usual church cere­monies and counselling, includ­ing performing marriages for their parishioners. (While there are no statistics on the subject, apparently homosexual mar­riages are not so stable as heterosexual marriages. But in all likelihood, one of the major factors for this apparent difference is the lack of legal sanctions for the homosexual marriage - there is no divorce procedure to inhibit permanent and legal separation. Nor is there any children to hold together a couple who other­wise would part.) The sense of strength and determination of the homophile movement in our country is best illustrated, perhaps, by the newspaper reports that homo­sexuals intend to "take over" same small towns in the hope of finding peace from harass­ment due to their sexual pre­ferences. PAGE 15 \ ------ - - - --- ---------------- -----------------, TIME TO REIID 3110 S. Shepherd 528-8950 BOOKS and MAGAZINES - -- For All Ages --- MOVIE ARCADE 25' OPEN 7 a.m. -- 2 a.m. ROSIIUE NEWSTIIND 1402 Texas Ave. 226-8020 Alt. ADULT BOOKS and MAGAZINES MOVIE ARCADE 25• MINI THEATRE $2.00 OPEN 8:30 a.m. -- 11 p.m. N. HOUSTON NEWS 8718 Jenson Or. 691-8411 FINEST ADULT READING ON THE NORTH SIDE MOVIE ARCADE 25• OPEN II a.m. -- 9 p.m. MIN ST. NEWS 4418 S. Main St. 528-7142 BOOKS and MAGAZINES --- For All Ages --- MOVIE ARCADE FREE PARKING OPEN 9 a.m. -- 10 p.m. ROSALIE'S TOO 900 Preston (on the Square) 226-7534 ALL ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES ---- MOVIE ARCADE 254 ----- OPEN 8 a.m. --12 p.m. EIIST END NEWS 7114 Lawndale 926-0325 FINEST ADULT READING ON THE EAST SIDE MOVIE ARCADE 25• OPEN 11 a.m. -- 6 p.m. Visit Houston's Finest Full Line and All Adult Newstands at the above locations. fj~ --- P AGE16 Meeting Places There are other institutions that exist to satisfy the sexual appetities of the homosexual and that are necessary because of homosexuals' inability to make safe liaisons as readily as heterosexuals. Homosexuals ore forced to such places as gay bars, which are much like "straight" bars, except that their atmosphere is usually more predominantly sexual; baths, where homosexuals con retire with others and obtain what con be described as im­personal and satiating sex; and porks and restrooms {"teo­rooms''). These locations make it possible for many people who otherwise lead "normal" lives to engage in some quick, im• personal sex, much as their fathers made use of the neigh­borhood bawdy houses. How many people use these foci 1- ities? No one knows. However, one writer has estimated that between 50,000 and 100,000 persons use the gay bars of San Francisco to make sexual liaisons. Because there ore laws against sodomy and against solicitation to engage in sod­omy, many of these meeting places ore patrolled or spied ~pon by the police. Typically, the police either spy through poles in the walls or other openings of suspected teo­rooms or individual police officers ore charged with le.od­ing {seducing?) suspected homosexuals into making poss­es. As a result of these police practices, which vary in style and intensity from locale to locale, none of the homosexual meeting places ore very safe. Other Forms As for heterosexual sod­omy, the statistics, again, are not complete. Kinsey estimated that nearly 60 per cent of the white male population has engaged in fellatio (oral-male genital relations); that about 17 per cent of the rural mole population hos engaged in bestiality. It is also clear from the Kinsey statistics that sod­omous activities increase with married couples. However, while many psy­chiatrists and psychologists are of the view that sodomous octs ore often desirable and • I / • beneficial for marriage, many times they ore intimidated from so advising patients because of the low. Moreover, educated persons, married and unmarried, often refrain or hove guilt bee I ings because they know of the lows. While it is true that some people ore incarcerated for sodomy {in Texas in 1969, 39 persons were committed to the state prison for sodomy offen­ses), according to Kinsey and others, almost all of us would be in jail for sexual offenses if the lows were enforced. This lock of uniform enforcement is itself a problem. For example, police can discriminate against interracial couples or against other '"undes irobles." More­over, the laws give rise to the potential of blackmail, by SIIN ANTONIO BOOK AIIIRT COMPLETE LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 129 E. Houston St. San Antonio, Tex. private persons and by the police. Repeal Even if one ignores entire­ly the rude invasion into people's privacy which is im­posed by sodomy lows, it is submitted that whenever a low prohibits conduct in which large numbers of persons en­gage, absent some very strong reason for keeping the low, the low should be abolished. When dealing with "antisex" laws, and sodomy in particular, there ore many reasons for removing the laws from the beaks: arrested for the offending con­duct only when the. police have evidence of Q violation, the po I ice ore forced to engage in conduct which is undesirable, such as spying on restrooms or soliciting sexual contacts with others. 3. In those communities where considerable police ef­fort is put into apprehending sexual deviants, there would appear to be misallocotion of police resources. 4. The lows reinforce the mores which compel the pre­sence of a deviant subculture in our society. 1. Given the widespread Job Sanctions practice of sodomy and the relatively small number of pro- 5. These laws also provide secutions, the danger of abuse a retionalization for private of pol ice and prosecutori ol sanctions again st "sexual discretion is greatly enhanced. deviants," such as refusal of 2. Since persons can be employment. PAGE17 .,. 6. The threat of criminal sanctions encourages extortion and pol ice corruption. 7. There is injury to the institution of marriage, c reated by the "threat" of prosecution (no matte r how unreal istic this may be), the establishment of sexual taboos and the possible inability of married couples to o btain good professional advice because of statutes outlawing the ve ry conduct which pro• fessional s might adv ise. 8. One intu its that the moral c I im ate and sense of the notional community does not adamant ly insi st upon punish­ment for sodomous behavior. 9. The re is no e vidence that there is an iota of funct­iona l harm caused by any of the se practices. 10. It is not des irable to deve lop the disre spect for law that is engendered when it is violated with impunity by mil­lion s of pe rsons. The key to constitutional a ttack on so domy statutes is the lack of any secular or fu nctional interest in society's preventing th e condemned acts. There is no evidence that· bug­ge ry, oral-genital relations or best ial ity adversely affects the physical or mental well being of the parti cipants. If there were some ev idence, only then would we be faced with the more common dilemma pos­ed by stat utes that purport to protect selves laws). individuals from them­( such as marijuana MUMTIUS The Majority Sodomy laws are really nothing but laws on morality, with no substantive bas, s other than h istory, founded almost entirely in religious beliefs. Some have argued that the government has a legitimate interest in protecting the peace of mind of the many people who object strongly to sodomy - that these people feel safer by knowing that those who perform sodomous acts ore commrtting crimes. This position would justi fy any legislative act desired by a majority. A major­ity could always restrain a minority, whether or not the conduct of the minority inter­fe red with the conduct of the majority. Sodomy laws do not further the majority interest, for the majority is in no way affected by what others may do with their private sex lives. Given the basic premise that there is no rational, let alone compelling, secular or functional j usti fi cation for sodomy laws, one can begin to construct a constitutional theory for attack. This is not the place to go into the rami­fications · of constitutional theories, but a broad out I ine suggests that the F lrst Amend­ment's ban on the establish­ment of religion, the due pro­cess clauses of the Fifth and 14th Amendment, the Ninth Amendment, and the ~oncepts of privacy all can be uti Ii zed in attacking sodomy laws. PUBLISHED MONTHLY tteUHQN,lEXAS Editor~ Phil Frank Auistam Editor - Paul d'Arcy Advertisin9 - Tim James Production - Marian Smoots 4615 MT. VERMOH HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 524-5612 SUBSCRIBE TO THE HUHTIUS $4. - 12 Issues Cl ossified Advertising - 10¢ per word ENCLOSED$ ___ ________ _ Name ___________________ _ Address _ ________________ _ City---- -------------- State ______ ____ Zip ___ _____ _ The NUNTIUS .c615 Mt. Vernon Houston, Texas 77006 P AGE18 IIPOLLO NEWS COMPLETE LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 515½ E. Houston St. San Antonio, Tex. She had the sort of open, large­featured face that never loses its beauty, and a figw re that was extraordinary for a woman of fifty years. Mrs. Hartley felt a sudden surge of pl ea sure, brought on by the familiarity of the station house and the vo-from Dartmouth, the boys enter; ed the Columbia school of Law where they studied for three years. It was after those three years that the boys started go­ing in different directions, although they did remain in New York and share the same At a t ime when some courts are ready to knock down restrictions on hairstyles, anti• abortion statutes, and require• ments for motorcyclists to wear helmets, the sodomy statutes should be easy prey. Indeed, if it were not for the emotional­ism that surrounds the subject, these anachronisms would prob­ably have been laid to rest long ago. cant lots and the warehouses. apartment on the East Side. They took her back to the early Glenn became a junior partner years of her marriage, when she for a new vigorous legal firm, and Mr. Hartley and Glenn had -while Rick became a salaried lived in a duplex just four George Schatzki is on the blocks from the station' and faculty of the, University of right across the street from the Texas School of Law and is Lev~rid-ges: The Leveridges vice president of the Texas were good neighbors who soon CLV Board of Direc tors. He became their best friends. They wrote the CLU's amicus brief had two children: a daughter, in a lawsuit last year" that Louise, whom Mrs. Hartley did successfu1ly challenged T exas- not see· much of, since she ' s prohibition of sodomy ~be- played with the girls from a tween married couples. "" different block; and a son; The NECKTIE ' Rick, whom Mrs. Hartley saw almost as frequently as Glenn, for the two boys were constant companions. Mrs. Hartley and her husband had always op­John E. O' Connor proved of Rick as a playmate For, her " trip down to the for GI enn: they seemed pretty evenly matched in strength, in railroad station Mrs. Hartley intelligence,and in disposition, had put on her lightest summer without either tending to over­dress, a white skimmer silhou- whelm the other. After school ette with open collar and brass and during their vacations, the buttons. She had better dresses, boys would go off together, but none more cool. Tho\Jgh on usually to the lots by the rail-a day like this, Mrs. Hartley I road, which had been unofficia - decided, coolness was simply ly designated as the neighbor­impos sible. Nothing less than hood playground. They were air conditioning could have saved her from the murderous inseparable. Even after the Hartleys had moved from New- Houston heat, and by the time h the taxi had reached the station port News out to Warwick, 1 e she was prespiring freely. It wasn 't much better inside the station house, despite the noisy working of a fan perched upon the cigarette machine. The clerk on duty informed. her that the train from New York would be fifteen minutes late, so Mrs . Hartley went outside to the station platform, and there she waited. There was a meager breeze on the platform and the air was heavy with the smell of salt and loud with the shouting of three negro children playing tag on the vacant lots between the railroad and the warehouse district. With o handkerchief Mrs. Hartley patted away the I ittl e slivers of perspiration from her upper lip. She didn't mind her discomfort. What wor• ried her was the possibility of her looking a fright by the time the train arrived, bringing home her son Glenn, whom she hadn't seen for years. Mrs. Hartley wanted lo look good for Glenn. boys would commute b_y bus or bicycle to each other.' s home, and that soon became unnecess­ary when the Leveridges them-selves moved out to Warwick. The boys attended grade school and high school together, took the same courses, doubledated with the same girls, and chose to attend the same college. They had chosen Dartmouth. Each week Mr. and Mrs. Hartley would receive one of Glenn's good long newsy let­ters, which always contained much mention of Rick: how he and Rick enjoyed their double in Richardson Hall; how Rick had received a bid from Zeta Psi and Glenn had not, while Glenn had received a bid from SAE and Rick had not, and so they'd decided not to join any fraternity (that dee is ion had bothered Mr. Hartley, a good SAE man}, and how they were both developing ambitions for for the lega l life. The ambit­ions held, and after graduation consultant for an insurance· company. Mrs. Hartley had al• ways wanted to go to New York to see them, but she had been tied down· by one thing or another in Newport Nev,s: her husband' s death, the time-con­• suming task of managing his estate, her presidency of the ·Women's League, and other matt.ers. During those ' years Mrs. Hartley had seen Glenn only once - ages ago it seem­ed, and that was du6ng the frantic ordeal of Mr. Hartleyt>,. funeral. Only recently had she found herself, for the first time in her adult life, without any-.· thing important to do. Whe had finally resolved to visit Glenn ' at the end of summer when, yesterday morning, she had received a long-distance phone c all from her son. What he said had given her a great shock. He was coming home. He had given up his practice and was leaving New York for good. Why? He wouldn't say over the phone. "But what about Rick?" Mrs. Hartley had asked. It seemed that Rick was staying behind. Glenn's voice had hall an unusual matter-of-factness about it, and Mrs. Hartley hod listened for some clue, some indication ... "He' come de train," the negro girl announced. Mrs. Hartley lookec:I uown the tracks. Sure .enough the train was coming. A smal I crowd had gathered on the platform, and now they moved out from be­neath its shade over to the place where the passengers would alight. Mrs. Hartley could feel her excitement mounting as she accompanied them. As the train groun'd and c lattered to a stop, Mrs. Hart­ley scanned the windows for Glenn's face, but it was not to be found. Anxiously, she watched the passengers as they filed out, and was beginning to think that Glenn must hove been de layed when she felt someone squeezing her arm. She turned around. It wa s 9' ,b~: 01 te I h m n d y n t t IC lenn. temperature rose to one hundred "See how sneaky I've ond how I survived I' ll never gotten?" he said, grinning. know_ And the n Leona Price "Why Glenn! You should and her beau from Richmond, by spanked, surprising me like and George Minor and that girl that." he courted at Mary Washington . He dropped his suitcase Oh, we've been keeping our and they embraced. When he preachers busy t his summer." picked up his suitcase again, She hesitated. she had her first good look at him in over two years. He was different - much more so than she had expected . His hair was thinner, he was wearing glasses and the skin on his angular face had become dry and slack, as though he had just recovered from a serious illness. "Your old room is all fix­ed up," Mrs. Hartley said, as they slowly made their way towards the stationhouse. "Yes­terday was Mildred's day off. I had ta beg and bribe her to help me get ready." "Good old Mildred. I'll make it a point to be extra nice to her for the first few days." "She' ll be glad to see you," Mrs. Hartley said_ She nodded at someone she knew, then continued, "Do you want ta check at the baggage room ta see if your trunk has arriv­ed? I'm sure it hasn't, not if you sent it yesterday. You'd better be prepared to rough i I far the rest af the week. " "I think I will check," Glenn said. He did, and Mrs. Hartley's prediction proved correct. "That just goes to show - Mam knows," he said. They went outside, climbed into a cab and gave the driver their address on James River Drive. "Go sh sakes, what heat!" Glenn said. "I'm glad you had the common sense not to drive down yourself." "I guess you New Yorkers are getting a fair shore, too," said Mrs. Hartley. 0 Yes, Yes indeed." ·'Oh, by the way, did you know that Mahlon Phelps has become engaged to a girl from Petersburg? I mentioned it in my last letter, which I sent two days ago. It probably missed you. "It did. So Old Mahlon has finally taken the fatal step, huh? What date have they set for the marriage?" "Sometime in October, and what a blessing. A wedding where everybody won't be boil­ed to death after the first ten minutes." " Yes. Lord, I'd forgotten how grueling those summer weddings could be.'' "And haven't there been a lot of them this summer!" said Mrs. Hartley, getting onto her favorite topic. ' 'Bob Lambert and Beverly Ann Osbourne, Troy Gordner and Winnie Dire­sen. The Gardners were so unhappy that you couldn' t show up and usher at that wedding. And then there was Herb Bai rd and Ellen Singleton, when the "What are you thinking about?" "Oh, ju st about Mahl on Phelps and Bob Lambert." Mrs. Hartley nodded know­ingly. "Yes, they've all gotten married, or soon will be. Your old gang." "It makes me feel very . .. out of it. 1 ' "Speaking of your old friends, I saw Joe and Tessie Mallory the other day with their little boy. Frankie?" ''Freddie.' ' "Yes, Freddie. He' s such o darling . thing, and so bright. Texxie' s expecting another in a few months, and they're both happier than a pair of clams. But here, I've been doing all the talking. You tell me some things. How is Rick? Is he staying in the old apartment, now that you've left, or what?" " Rick is fine, said Glenn, looking out the window. "Ap­parently his new apartment hos worked out very satisfactorily.'' "Oh, he'• moved already?" Mrs. Hartley asked, and when Glenn nodded, she continued: "I see. I had gotten the im­pression that you boys had left simultaneously." "No. He left before I did. Several weeks ago. " "Well, I certainly hope he didn't leave you in the lurch, without paying his share of the rent.' ' " Now, mother, you know Rick better than that. Would he pull such a . . . " 41No, no, Of course not. Where is he staying now?" "He's got a nic e four­roomer over on the East Side. Nicer than the one we hod, although ours was o five-roomer.'' ''A four-roomer?" Her eyes narrowed_ "Has he got another roommate?" "What?" he said, burning away from the window and fac­ing her. "I 'm sorry. I was look­ing at the new Sears building." They struggled to hold their balance while the cab swerved <1round the corner and into Huntington Avenue. Then Mrs. Hartley repeated her ques­tion: "Has Rick got another roommate?'' "Oh yes, he's got another roommate.' ' "I hope there hasn't been any trouble. You d id port good friends, didn't you?" "Yes, mothe r, ye s. Rick and I ore still ... on the best of terms_ Yes. The best of terms. " With a shock, Mrs. Hart ley noticed that her son was fight-ing bock tea rs. Quickly, she changed the subject ond told him about the new downtown Sears store, which they had ju st pa ssed, and the new Hidd­enwood shopping center, which wos sti ll under construction. She carried t he bulk of the convers ation unti I the cab bro ught them to their de stinat­ion. Glenn parked his suitcase next to the stairwell and walk­ed side by side with her into the I iving room. Mrs. Hartley t ried to visualize in what ways the room had changed since he had last seen it. The main d if­ference, she decided, was in the greater number of framed photographs. Her favorite was hung an the wall over the side­board. - a color print of Glenn and Rick at age ninet een, standing before snow-cavered Vermanl liill s, 'their arms ·on each other's shoulder, wearing knitted caps and blue ski­jackets with the round scarlet medallions earned at a recent ski-meet. Two smiling pictures af youthful health and foo: i sh­ness. " Why don't you fix us some drinks?" Mrs. Hartley said. "Gin ond tonic for me. There's some bourbon toa, if yau'd prefer thot." "Gin' s the thing for a day like this," Glenn said. They went out to the kitchen, and Mrs. Hartley watched him pre­pare the drinks. He brought the drinks over to the form ica­topped kitchen table and sat down across fram her. " Well," said Mrs. Hartley, " this is just like a id time s, isn't it?' ' I don't mean our sit• ting and drinking, but just . . . you and me, sitting and talking over the same .,"Id table. I e at all my meals in here now. Only when I hove guests do I eat in the diningroom, which isn't often.' 1 11 lt's time to change that," Glenn said. " We' ll have some meals out in the diningroom, and we'll have some people over for dinner, too. You shouldn't be alone sa much, mother. 1 1 "Oh, it isn't so bad. There' s Mildred, and there's Mrs. Mackey. She' s pretty much alone too, she a nd her husband, ever since Anno L oui se got married.'' "Anno Louise is married? Oh yes, I'd forgotten." Mrs. Hartley took several refre shing swallows from t he metol c up, studying her son a ll the while. 11Glenn, now that you've left New York, what are yaur plans, or haven't you decided? Do you wish to remain in New­port News?" the room in the world, it's economical, and i t ' s a nice neighborhood. Unless, of course, you'd rather I ive in an apart­ment?" "I'd rather stay here, if you can stand having me around.'' Mrs. Ha rtley smiled. Now that the most important thing had been s ettled, s he went on to the next most important th ing. " Hove you thought yet about where you'd like to work? I hear that Mr. Hastings in the sh ipyard's legal office is re­t i ring, so perhaps there'l l be some room there.' ' " Perhaps. But I still don't want to work for a ca rporation. Have you seen Herb Hoyle Hayle lately?" "As a matter of fact, I was just tal king ta him los t night. I ran into him over at the Mockeys. Naturally, I ta ld him you were coming back to town. And he was ve ry enthusi­osti c. He sa id that if you were going to stay, he'd be more than happy to take you on os a junior partner, provided you could pass your Virg inia bars. It sounds I ike a wonderfu l opportunity. '' " It is a wonderful oppor­tunity, Mother . Good old Herb. That's one f irm I'd be proud to join anyday. " "Well, you just hop r ight over there, and you talk with him. Incidentally, Herb J un ior has just graduated from U. Va., and he's going pretty steadily with Bitsy Sullivan. You re­member Bitsy, don't you? No, I guess not, since her family's only been he re less than two years. Anyway, she's a darling girl and just perfect for Herb Juniar. And wa it a minute. I' ll bet the Hoyles invite you a ver for d inner. Oh, I hope they do, because then yau con meet He nodded. " Yes, mother, I'm through will all t hose ... carpetbaggers." He utte red a PHONES 526-4402 528-1000 I ittl e la ugh. "I'm home to sta y." ' Well then you might a s well stay here. You' ll have a ll 2319 So. Shepherd PAGE 19 1971 their youngest niece Beth, Who­' s slaying with them for the summer. I'll bet you'd like her. She's not very pretty, and she wears glasses, but she's very vivacious and lots of fun to talk to and ... why, I' ll bet you'd really have a good time with her. And then there's another girl I'd like you to meet - Lindo Gresham. A friend of Doi sey Sansamino' s. She's a widow and probably a few years older than you, but she's so sweet and a real beauty, and just dying to be taken places." The Year of the Middle-Class Junkie "The Year of the Middfe-Clo11 Junkie," i• whot two pfOlllinent doctors ore colling 1971. Dr. David J. Bentel end Dr. David E. Smith ore co-directors of the University of J:lellfornio'1 Drug Abuse Information Project. HADRIANS PATIO CLUB In this article by Dr. Bentel ond Dr. Smith, they report on the ,apid sp_reod of drug abuse beyond the ghettos, into the more affluent homes of America. Members admitted Out-of-town Guest free $1.00 Heroin, recent newspaper headlines proclaim, is no longer limited to the "lower classes," but is now infecting the sons and daughters of respectable, well-to-do citizens of middle-class and upper-class America. Mrs. HC"rtley was about to describe another eligible girl, when for the first time whe noticed the necktie her son was wearing. She had been nagged by its familiarity, and now she remembered it. It was the striped red and black tie Rick Leveridge hod given to Glenn for Christmas - oh, nearly five years ago, yet it seemed almost brand-new. Mrs. Hartley gazed al ii in silence. . 1971 has become the year of the Middle-Class Junkie. Shocked, distraught, unbe­lieving parents who discover that their son or daughter is a heroin addict are demand­ing government and com­munity response to deal with the crisis. Glenn wrinkled his brow, his bewilderment obvious. He started to soy something, but then the bewilderment voni shed and gave way to realization. .He gave her a sheepish, painful · smile. Investigations reveal that young, teen-age white kids, just like the kids in the ghet­to slums, rob, steal and pro­stitute - "hustle" - on the streets to support drug ha­bits of $25, $50 and even $150 a day. An 18-year-old son of a well­to- do Mill Valley, Calif., resi­dent committed 376 burglaries of local homes to support his ,150 a day habit which re­quired that he steal and "fence" $500 to $600 a day "Yap, yap, yap, " said worth of merchandise. Mrs. Hartley. "How I do babble on! " Slowly, almost hesitantly she finished her drink, and then she smiled bock at him, but said nothing. Selling drugs to other kids in school is another common way tu finanoe a drug habit. In some high schools, the boys' lavatory is called "the drug store" because of the volume of illicit business done between claSSP.S. ~ ~ ~ >< ~ 0 ~ LET . 0 u 00 ·.C.-... ·C- t.. 0.. IT ALL N ca 'i' ~.,, Police in most of the larger cities agree generally that al­most 50 percent of all property crimes are committed by young heroin addicts desperate to get enough cash together to make their "connection." Dr. George Gay, Chief of the San Francisco Haight-Ashbury Medical Clinic's drug detoxifi­cation section, feels that the new style heroin users are sick because their lives and their world are sick, in spite of af. fluence. They are almost total­ly alienated from the rest of HANG OUT ••••• with the new •~ba llsUPporte r" Li fts 'em up and out in that special , masculine way. ' "ballsUPporter" is the new guy's garment thot gives comfortable outward .,,. support to the bolls while leaving thot rest of I you to 0 hong loose" up f ront. j Not a jockstrap. " balls­UPporter" is specially 1 constructed to pocket and lift forward jus t the - ·, ·, bolls. No leg s traps. 41 ~ Adj.Jstoble waist strop ,..· lets you give the amount of .. litt .. you wont for a casual mascul ine look. A must under jeans, trunks and for everyday wear. Perfect for al I sports too. You' 11 love the look and feel of it ... and it's al I you. mode of the finest materials. Guaranteed work• monship. Order by waist size. L.M.&S $3.49 ea. 3/ $10. add 50f ea . a rder far pa stage. BRAWN PROD UC TS, Box 7065 Son Diego, Cal. 92107 America. They no longer iden­tify with or trust society or even see much good in it. (HWY t i L €OP ARO They feel that they have been betrayed and deserted by their parents, their teach­ers and their society. So they drop out, sometimes literally. Heroin, they feel, is their best or perhaps only path of escape. Drugs are the current "in" thing with the kids. Everybody has heard about them, some have tried them, but all are curious. The average kids from good families who experiment with drugs are not mentally ill, but rather going through the normal process of adoles­cent turmoil. SWIMMING POOL-INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AGNES IHWY. 44> Drug use Is an excellent way of rebelling because the conventional morality consid­ers it "so bad." There is a tremendous infor­mation gap between parent and drug-using child. The high­er up the status ladder - the FULL KITCHEN-Serving STEAKS and SEA FOOD 6000 Agnes (Hwy 44) Co I Phone-884-0058 I us Christi, Tex. •--rRAD"N TIIICKS"" -♦ lNI AD¥0CATI Fa. in"'-•ion ,._.dint suliscription rot.• of Aaerico' a No. I ttoaophile C-ity N-spopor - write Box 7~95, Loa Anoelea, c.lifomio 9000-4. SKIPPER'S GUYS GUIDE. There ore guides to bars, guides to organ• i zotion s. Why not a guide to the guys themselves? That's what the all-new SKIPPER'S GUYS GUIDE is--a useful, informative booklet that includes ads fr om over 175 great guys who ore looking for corres(?Ond­ents, friends--ond action! If y~u're over 21 ond looking for the some, order your copy of SKIPPER'S GUIDE today. Send $3 and statement of age to: Skipper's Guides, Box 92, Donvil le, Kentucky 40442. Al I copies sent by first-class moil. SECRET MAIL Receiving and forwarding service available for letters, packages etc. Discretion assured. Write Morton Service, P . 0 . Box 35986, Dallas 75235 for details. 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COCK RINGS - Brochure $1.00 A TASTE OF LEATHER Box 5009-N San Francisco 94101 more prestigious or affluent the parents - the less they seem to know about what their kids spend their time doing. They typically lament after­wards, " I just can't understand what went wrong. We did everything we could for our kids, gave them everything they ever wanted. I just don't for the life of me, understand how they could have gone and done what they did." The upper-class parent, like the lower, may not even realize for months that his kid is chronically addicted to heroin. He may only find out after his child's behavior and life patterns have so deteriorated that the youth's waking hours are spent on a bizarre com­pulsive search for the n~xt fix. Typically at that point, par­ental reactions will be irration­al, emotional, full of hostility and misgivings and no help in solving the problems. Community drug treatment programs often employ young, experienced ex-ilrug users on whom the needy can rely for treatment and advice. Unfortunately, such projects usually receive very little financial support and are severely limited in capacity to handle the thousands of new young addicts being "born" on the streets every month. Fortunately, however, there is evidence of a slow shift in the attitude of the general pub­lic and the official agencies toward drug problems. There is a gradual but beneficial shift in attitudes regarding education and treatment. Only when we accept a com­bination of the social and health care approach to drug addiction and reject the crime and punishment logic, can pro­gress be made toward resolv­ing middle-class heroin addic­tion and the broader problems of America's Drug Epidemic. THOMPSON LOSES CLUB Integrity Bombs Lanis Thompson, former owner of the Romulus Club and the Tattooed Lady Club, lost both enterprises in the first week of June in what must be the most incredible debacle in business circles since Robert McNamara pro­moted the TF X as an economy measure. At 11:37 pm Wednesday June 2nd, Mr. Frank Arnold, owner of the Tattooed Lady Club marched into the club with his wife, a formidable couple, and pronounced the closing of the club. Mr. Arnold made it clear that Mr. Thompson, operator of the club, was in serious arrears and that from that moment the Tattooed Lady Club was closed. Guests were advised af the closing and asked to leave at once. Later in the evening a meeting was held in the club between Mr. Arnold and em­ployees af the defunct Tat- ~~,~~~~ your hostesses Ricci & Rita 1011111 et·s CLUB POOL - DANCING - MIXED DRINKS (■e■ltersllips available) Open Tuesday through Sunday 5pm - 2am (Closed Mondays) 2305 S. SHEPHERD 528 9430 PIIRIS IIIJULT THEATRE and BOOK STORE THE MOST COMPLETE ADULT BOOK STORE IN TOWN. --- MOVIE ARCADE 25f --- 810 Austin St. Waco, Tex. tooed Lady Club ta determine the reopening of the establisl>­ment. Hapefu II y some ar­rangements wi II be made to continue the city's most charming gay club in operat­ion ·under different manage­ment. In the meantime the former Romulus Club, now named the Gayboy Interna­tional Club, was opened by its new owners, Joe Anthony and Tom Vicera. However, this transaction was clouded by an interesting assortment of facts and non-facts. Mr. Anthony said there was con­sidable difference between siderable difference between what he had been told by Mr. Thompson as to the financial circumstances of the defunct Romulus Club and what the creditors of the Romulus Club claimed. Mr. Anthony said that Thompson's p-esentation of the facts suffered bad I y in compori son with the facts as determined by his attorneys. In fact, Mr. Anthony said Thompson's statements were patently false, albeit in somewhat more colourful language. Arnold's actions and statements would indicate his basic agreement with Mr. Anthony's observations. Thompson, whose re­putation for frequently self­professed integrity hos been sorely wounded by the lal>­yrinthine manoeuvring of the past few months, was un­available for comment. Mr. Arnold when con­tacted June 3rd stated: "Lanis Thompson is a soft con artist and a thief. I let him operate the Tattooed Lady for s ix months with an option to buy, ta date he hos not paid anything to me." c,...:...,. CD = ::I .<..C.. -..t. <C ..0.. .. ~ CD -.:, E CD u0 :r: ,==a - 0 - :CrD: ..a::: a. ~ -,a ·- u CD a. V\ [;)@[ro ®ffi APARTMENTAL - RESIDENTAL $7.50 up BEST MAID SVC. 3840 Underwood Bartender & extra help available 668-9438 / 666-6015 l PAGE 21 .._ .... MR. TERRY "Miss Dallas" TIie a.... Striesand of Review MR. SALLY RON SUE'S Everyone's Fun House "MR. DOMMA" "Diana Ross of Review" BEER - WINE - SET-UPS "MR. FERTILIZER" Mother of all Drag of Dallas MR. LISA Tall, Tan and Teriffic High Priestess of Soul 3236 McKinney - DALLAS ROMMIE SUE In San Antonio it's period 106 Navarro St. SUNDAY KRUHCH - 3 to S The ni•We finprs of DAHHA ot tlie pi-. 223-5474 PLAN rATIOH seriously and he replied: "I om afraid to get into my car without checking the hood, trunk and underneath it and hove been doing this for some months. I don't walk out a door without looking each way before passing through it. My friend and I do toke these threats seriously." Mr. Coppell then asked: "Check around and see what hos happened to Mike Whit­icker? He hos not been seen since lost Friday night when he left very suddenly and there is no one that knows what hos happened to him, not even his roommate Dusty. Mike hos received the some threats that I hove". bondsman that if he received a coll from Coppell and the charge was extortion and nothing else that I would pay the bond fee". Mr. Thompson was then asked what he thought about the threats and he answered: "these threats ore most serious". RITTER R i tier and another person to make the fol se alarm report, supposedly taking place in the Club Romulus. Ritter's record includes other previous arrests with convictions. Witnesses have also alledgedly implicated Ritter in recent harrassment tactics against The Armadillo Club, resulting in police raids in search of narcotics. In each In checking THE NUN­TIUS found that Mike Whitick­er did leave Houston rather suddenly. It is understood that he is with his family instance anonymous telephone out of state but we do not calls were received by Hou-know his exoct whereabouts ston Police. No charges but are led to believe he is have been filed in connection all right. ;~::. this investigation to . .Mr. Ccippell then volun'. ._ teer;il: "Ronnie. Le.vine hos ~rior )9 becoming man-offere'd. me $10,000. to leave ager of Clob Romulus, Ritters town and not testify at 'the ~.b~si~c,ss,-,,erience included. • f th · t • I b posing in ·n,e nude for beef-or coming arson. no,• ut,.. , t:.Cke - n:Jagozine pictures. I have refused h,! . offer. I ,A ...,. d • d h • " cco,.1~ • to employees, on t nee t e1r money . membe~; ·~nd guests, his Mr. Coppell then said: management of the Club "I have I ined U? an attorney .Ro1J1ulus 'l'OS marked by and bondsman recorr,.;encfed·· exotic checking account pro-by Lannis Thompson to bcu,1 ceedyl!l';:5, ,unusual bookkeep-me out and act in my 0 defence 1· ng met h c, d s and steadily in the event Ronnie Levine • , qeclinin • business. After ofkte rh ' my having refused to •s ever·a · 1~w e• ek "s of v1· rtua II y no ta e ,s mon~y filed extortion business, the Club Romulus charges against me in retal- Id M J A h iotion". was so to r. oe nt ony The NUNTIUS contacted Lam is Thompson and was told: "Yes! I refered Bob Coppe II to on attorney, one of my ex-partners and ol so to a bondsman. I told the ond Thomas Vecera. It is now goyboy International Club. AARC PICKETS HOUSTON On the afternoon of Moy 8th the Rev. Dr. Billy Hudson and the Re~. Don Flanders of the AARC Church of Montrose went to the Downtown YMCA of Hous­ton to arrange for a church service to be held on Moy 23rd. A meeting hall was reserved for the newly farmed Church of montrose and pay­ment was deposited and duly receipted by the YMCA auth­orties. The AARC (American Association of Religious Cru­saders) ministers then pro­ceeded with their plans for the first service by printing announcements and contact­ing supporters of the hom~ phile community- Circulars were distributed giving the dote and place of the first religious service and response was impressiveM A number of professional and religious leaders of the area expressed support for the Christion ministry of the two mioi sters, and were pleased that the YMCA had for the second t ime made space available to a primarily Goy rel itious organisation. (The Metro­politan Community Church was the first such group.) · On May 20th Mr. A. J. Firkessen of the YMCA telephoned asking for the Rev. Dr. Hudson. Dr. Hudson got in touch with Mr. F irk­essen the next day and was odvi sed that the reserved space would not be made ovoi fable to the Church of Montrose because "the air conditioning was out and the assembly hall hired by Dr. Hudson was full of construct­ion material." Dr. Hudson asked if another space would be made available on such short notice by the YMCA since it would not be possible to notify the people who were coming for the service on the 23rd. Dr. Hudson wo s advised this would not be possible ot the YMCA. It was suggested he contact the YWCA. Dr. Hudson telephoned the YWCA and was told space would be avoiloble on May 23rd. Arrangements were then made for the YMCA to transfer the money deposited to the YMCA and o poster to be placed in the YMCA announc­ing the change of location. About four hours after these arrangements were made, Dr. Hudson received a call from the YWCA and was in­formed the spoctl promis,:,d was now unavailable to him and his religious group. Tlie YWCA now claimed the spo~e had been previously reserv,:,d but that the reservation hod not yet been posted in their ledg, r. Dr. Hudson in desperation called the YMCA (at about 5:00 p.m.) seeking assistance, but was told by Mr. Firkessen that "I'm sorry but there .is nothing I con do." When oskl.d if the YMCA would reimburse him and the church for the circulars Dr.Hudson was told, "No." Although this amount it is a strain on such a small church's budget. Upon investigation on Moy 23rd The Nunti us dis­covered that the space in question at the YMCA was not filled with construction material and it's air condit­ioning was functioning. The regularly scheduled YMCA Sunday Service was held i11 the morning. Of course, this is no great surprise to The Nuntius. The YMCA simply did not want the Church of Montrose to use their hollow­ed facilities and lied to arrange the matter. The space previous I y reserved at the YWCA was of course, empty unti I abou~ 4:00 p.m., two hours post the 2:00 p.m. time set lo.- the Church of Montrose services. The YWCA also lied its way out of permitting the use of its sacred premises by the Church of Montrose. On Sunday, Moy 23rd, at 2:00 p.m. , the Rev . Dr. H,,dson and the Rev. Mr. Flanders along with two associates in the Church of Montrose (one of whom is o resident of the YMCA) picket­ed the Downtown YMCA at 1600 Louisiana fo.- about an hour without incident. They arrived at the YMCA in o VW bus bearing signs of protest ot their unjust treat­ment by the YMCA. After the picketing, the bus was then driven through the Montrose area of Houston to call attention to the YMCA dup­l icity. The actions of the YMCA and of the YWCA would in­dicate the misuse of the name "Chri stian" in their legal titles. These organisations simply lied and cheated the Church of Montrose because the church ministers especi11l­ly to the homophile communify of Houston. Period. Probably the most ri­diculous thing about this is the well-known reputation of the YMCA in every country of the world as a virtual male brothel. Hardly everyone work­ing or living at a YMCA is Gay, but at the same time, quite a large number who do, are. And if this information starts a witch-hunt by the usual sexually mal-adjusted yahoos interested in such bizarre things, so be it. In the meantime, the YMCA and the YWCA might consider changing their names to avoid further abusing the name " CHRISTI AH." AUSTIN BOOK MIIRT FINEST LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES IN AUSTIN .. - --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 305 East 6th St. Austin, Tex. PAGE 23 .... Publishers of Gayhoy Magazine are proud to announce the opening of the nations first GA YBOY INTERNATIONAL 14 c. 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