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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972
File 018
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 018. 1972-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3497.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1972-10). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 018. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3497

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 018, 1972-10, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3497.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Publisher City Art Studio
Date October 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript AnT THAT LIVESI This is what protid owners and admirers of Bay Houston's art use is the most accurate way of describing this really eititing art, and rightly so. The finest eiamples of masculinity to be found in physique art today. Our aim is to present with taste and dignity the male body al its most endting and beautiful. Art to be displayed as what it is, ART, not the usual "plastic" type of cartoons offered hy so many and called "physique art." These are beautiful double-weight prints made on Off-White. Lustre silk mat finish paper, ready to frame. For some really beautiful and exciting works of the male figure at its best fill out the coupon below, or use a plain piece of paper, as long as your signature is on H. Custom art from your favorite photo, price on request. What cbtdd be more personal than an original oil painting of that special someone, painted by Mr Houston. P. K*R Strifes RT 3 BOX 399 - BRENHAM, TEXAS 77833 hx drawings in «m 8 X 10 * $7.00 Q Cnebud plana find % {con, elm*, M.O.) ntra fergirmail, fewgn, or •ptr.ial Jul- •Ittar* *>r elaaicne*. fltmi print below PORNOGRAPHY People who read pornography tend to be well-educated, well- read, and socially and politically active, according to Dr. W. Cody Wilson, an expert on the subject. Dr. Wilson, former executive director of the U.S. Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, also said non-religious, young married men are the type most likely to be a consumer of pornographic material, Dr. Wilson told the Medical Association of Atlanta that nobody has been able to pinpoint the reasons why, but said, "I wouldguess that the type of person as described has more social contact,' and would frequent places where there is less inhibition toward sex." Wilson said the commission found that the sex criminal's exposure to pornography during childhood and subsequent years was "very, very low, and in many cases, almost nil." Wilson said studies do indicate that there may be positive connection between moral depravity and pornography. "But what we can't determine right now is what comes first- the pornography or the moral depravity," he said. "We tend to think that the person might have been morally depraved before he discovered pornography." "Another disturbing thought is that most clergymen, lawyers and teachers who are supposed to be sex counselors are actually in need of sex education themselves," he said. dividual and wait tor another "crime" to be committed -- assault and battery (touching the decoy). This puts the police in a position of power because now they have two charges, and they can bargain. The prosecutor may propose a plea - copping situation. Next comes the scene in court. Present are the judge, prosecuting officer, arresting officer, the defendant and (perhaps) his attorney. Therefore, there are only two persons who were actually present when the incident took place -- the arresting officer and the defendant. What happens next is "the administration of justice." The arresting officer (the decoy, now in uniform) takes the witness stand. He states his name and rank and then proceeds to give his account of what happened. I have been the attorney of record on many such cases and I have never heard the arresting officer's testimony vary more than a few sentences. The arresting officer testifies that he was approached by the defendant, asked to go further into the woods, and while there, was touched by the defendant on the genitals. The defendant now has an opportunity to tell his story. He states that he stopped to relieve himself and entered into a conversation with the decoy; that tho decoy was overly friendly and seemed to want the defendant to "come on" to him. The defendant, unsure of himself, is cautions and does not make any move until he is sure the decoy ' 'knows the scene." At that point, aninvitation is made, sometimes by was of a gesture and sometimes by words. Once this overture is made, the defendant is arrested. (The testimony of defendants clearly indicates that is is very unlikely that straight private citizens would be approached in such cruising situations.) It is virtually impossible however, for the gay defendant to defend himself with strength and dignity before such a hostile judicial system. The judge, being the finder of fact in District Court, finds the defendant guilty. He, in effect, is saying that he does not believe the defendant's testimony but does believe that of the arresting officer. This is an essential part of the entrapment tactic. If both parties were telling the truth, and if the judge weighed both testimonies equally, he would then have to find the defendant not guilty. The defendant, in a criminal action, does not have toprovehimself innocent -- that is presumed. The prosecutor has the burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant is guilty. In the above mentioned example, the judge should find that the police decoy enticed the defendant to commit a "crime," and therefore there was no solicitation. Or, in the alternative, he should find the defendant not guilty because thepro- secution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt. In order to be guilty of assault and battery, for example, the victim must be put in fear of a touching followed by an unconsenting touching. In the example presented, the decoy was never in fear and he consented to the touching. ^\ MARY'S BAR ~ >pen JO AM. Sunday - 12 Noon Every Wed. - Draft Beer 7 'til close .15t Sunday Buffet 'amp Time - Ho 7 Mon. thru Fri. - Beer 35t |.022 Westheimer at Waugh 528 8851 Houston | Page 17
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