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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972
File 006
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 006. 1972-10. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1972-10). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972 - File 006, 1972-10, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3505/show/3485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 10, October 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Publisher City Art Studio
Date October 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript ACLU Defends SIR Speaker A suit was filed in Marin County Superior Court against the Navato school administration for preventing a classroom talk by the representative of a homosexual organization. The action was brought by the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Northern California. Joining in the petition were the two teachers who had invited the speaker--Kristina O'Donnell and Lawrence Siegel--as well as students who wished to hear the talk, parents who wished them to, and the organization which supports the civil rights of homosexuals, (SIR) Society for Individual Rights. The controversy arose at the end of last school term when homosexual Robby Robillard was sche- eduled to tell of the discrimination gays experienced to students in Personal Philosophy and Minority Studies classes at San Marin High School. Although representatives of other discrimi- Remcho points out several court decisions that support this right, including one which states, "The classroom is peculiarly the 'market place of ideas!' The Nation's future depends upon leaders trained through wide exposure to that robust exchange of ideas which discovers truth 'out of a multitude of tonuges* (rather) than through any kind authoritative selection." He explained, "This kindofunreason- ing authoritative action is exactly the opposite of the kind of democratic experience that we want our children to learn in school." Frank Fitch, heard of SIR'S speaker bureau explained that Robillard was not invited to discuss sexual activity, but rather the problems of discrimination by society of a minority group. He states, "Just as a white cannot adequately inform a class about the subject of discrimination against blacks, so a non-gay cannot adequately explain the discrimination nated groups (blacks, women, stu- experienced by gays. Frankly, we dents) had spoken earlier in the are quite surprised by this action year to the classes, the school of the Novato school, since we are administrators refused to allow supplying speakers for secondary Robillard to speak, and even ob- schools of the Bay Area at some- tained a reprimand for the teachers thing like the rate of one a week." from the school board for inviting Attendance at the lecture in the speaker over the principal's question has been optional for the objection. student with written permission ACLU Staff Counsel Joseph Re- from parents required for admit-, mcho states, "Theissueis whether tance. school administrative authorities The ACLU action requests a can thwart the wishes of students, court ruling that the speaker not parents and teachers to hear re- be refused an opportunity to speak sponsible discussion of contro- at the school, and that the re- versial issues within the class- primand be withdrawn from the room setting. It is particularly teachers' files, ironic that this situation happened in a school district with an enlightened official guideline which says that 'students have the right to study any controversial issue which has political, economic, or social significance." MADAM FERTILIZER 61 Years young! - mother TO DRAG - FRIEND TO ALL GAY PRISONERS DENIED PAROLE Two inmates of Oregon State Prison were denied parole last week on the basis of their homosexuality, according to William H. DuBay, director of Stonewall, Seattle's residential treatment center for homosexuals in trouble with the law, drugs, or alcohol. In a letter of protest to Oregon Governor Tom McCall, DuBay said the denials of parole to Larry Slopak and Ron Endersby were "blatant example of biographical discrimination which has resulted in the consistent denial of parole to homosexuals in irison, in spite of the liberalized laws regarding homosexuality in your state." DuBay also said the reason for the denials was obvious: "In denying parole to Mr. Slopak, William Newell (chairman of the parole board) cited the Bible and his own sexual values, a clear CAPRICORN 1J/22-1/20 AQUARIUS 1/21-2/19 PISCES 2/20-3/20 ARIES 3/21-4/20 TAURUS 4/21-5/21 GEMINI 5/22-6/21 626-2820 626-3626 626-3633 6 26-45 33 626-5252 626-5433 CANCER 6/22-7/23 LEO 7/24-8/23 VIRGO 8/24-9/23 LIBRA 9/24-10/23 626-8320 626-8232 626-8242 626—8310 SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS 10/24-U/22 11/23-12/21 HOROSCOPES BY PHONE IS HERE The telephone has led us to Time of Day Service, Recorded Weather Information, Party Information by Phone, Dial a Prayer, and now "HOROSCOPES BY PHONE". Centuries ago the rich had their personal staff of astrologers to counsel their daily activities, to help make decisions for the day, and in general, advise them on everything they did. As time went by, horoscopes dwindled in popularity and little was said about it as the world became mechanized. Now the boom has set upon us again as people the world over are studying and becoming involved. Interest is highest in matters of love, money, and health. Daily forecasts search upon these subjects. People are talking, writing, and living astrology. There are those who frown upon it, but then there are physicians who perform operations by it, individuals who date by astrology, and people who wouldn't consider making any major purchases unless it was approved by the stars. Because of this new high interest, a new service is being brought to Houston--HOROSCOPES BY PHONE. HOROSCOPES BY PHONE was founded by young Houstonian, Ken Wynn, with his first full month of services beginning October of 1972. Each Zodiac sign is assigned a phone number which will provide a daily horoscope along with commercial message. Ken and leading TV and radio personalities take turns in delivering the introductions, horoscope, and commercial messages. The horoscope is changed around midnight each evening. Listed above are all the horoscope numbers, so be sure to give your horoscope number a call each day. Each horoscope number may also be obtained from the phone company's "information" and will be listed under "Horoscopes" when the new phone book comes out. HOROSCOPES BY PHONE is already receiving a great amount of interest and studies of other horoscope services in other cities show an expected 2 million calls per month. This should provide an excellent service to those interested in horoscopes as well as to those providing the commercial messages. abuse of his authority in punishing those who do not subscribe to his own religious convictions. At this point, these men have become political prisoners since they have been denied freedom and access to treatment, not on the basis of any crime or misbehavior in prison, but because of their values." DuBay asked the governor for a new hearing for each of these men "to eliminate once and for all this rank discrimination against homosexuals on the basis of their sexual orientation." Gay Drug Center Wins State Approval Stonewall, Seattle's residential treatment center for Gay persons in trouble withdrugs,aIcohl,orthe law, was certified on August 21 as an approved drug treatment center by the Department of Soc- * ial and Health Services. According to David J. Baird, Director of the Stonewall Treatment Center, this is the first program to qualify under a new law enacted by the legislature last year to regulate drug treatment programs. Baird also commented: "The new regulations are a part of a sophisticated plan to provide comprehensive and coordinated services for alcoholics and drug abusers in each community. We are proud to qualify as a member of the team of helping agencies serving the Seattle-King County area. More citizens involvement is needed to solve the problems of drug and alcohol addiction, and the and alcohol addiction, and the Department of Social and Health Services is offering every support to those developing new and innovative programs." In June, Stonewall also received state approval as a parole program for ex-offenders coming out of prison and those on probation. Page 5
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