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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1972
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1972 - File 001. 1972-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3423/show/3398.

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(1972-05). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1972 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3423/show/3398

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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1972 - File 001, 1972-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3423/show/3398.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 3, No. 5, May 1972
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date May 1972
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript • I S ARRESTED IN DALLAS CHRIS LEE Dallas - Between 9 and 9:30 PM Friday May 5th, two plain clothes vice squad officers gain­ed entrance to the Batchelor Quart­ers, Dallas' newest baths, by sign­ing membership applications which stated that they were not police officers. There were seven cust­omers in the baths at the time the officers made the five arrests. Two of the people were in seperate rooms and were not bothered by the police. Three men were ar­rested on charges of sodomy (oral copulation); the three were in the sauna at the time the two officers observed them. Two men were arrested for lewd and obscene acts (mutual masturbation); they were arrested in the TV room. Henry McCluskey, attorney for the arrested is seeking to have the cases thrown out on the grounds that the officers made false state­ments to gain entrance to a private place. According to a source at the baths thl situation that occured Friday night will not happen again. "The officers signed statements which were noterized stating that they were not police. Our lawyer has gotten this straightened out and we don't expect them to come back. We are still open 24 hours a day." according to an employee of the baths. ' One of the arrested men stated that the officers made the state­ment "we are going to make a visit to the Delta Baths next." It seems that the Dallas Vice Squad is out to protect the public.from private acts is private places. If these two "het" policemen could gain entrance to the baths what is going to stop some het from juct ac­cidentally getting in and being offended; after all, that is what the police are doing all this for to keep the public in Dallas from seeing something that might be dirty. Well thats the attitude that the police seem to have about the whole thing. The law is the law and as such they have the duty to uphold it. This obviously selective law enforcement will continue as long as the police have that out­dated Texas penal code to use as a weapon against minorities such as the Gay Community. t}ie <f}VUN'TIUS Volume 3 No. 5 Moy, 1972 ~====:;=:===:::z:~===========:::::;::==:======:=====-====HOUSTON, TEXAS GAA MEMBERS BEATEN Police do nothing New York - The Gay Activist Alliance charged today that at least eight members of its organ­ization were beaten, kicked and punched at the politically prestig­ious Inner Circle dinner Saturday night by "men in tuxedos," and that the police stationed at the New York Hilton did nothing about it. The named Michael J . Maye, president of the Uniformed Fire­fighters Assn., as the assailant of at least one member. At least two eyewitnesses-both city of­ficials- saw Maye's attack and are reportedly willing to testify about it. According to one, Manhattan De­puty Borough President Leonard Cohen, the 6-3, 215 pound Maye, a former national Golden Gloves heavyweight champ, "threw his whole body into his punches." Despite repeated efforts, Maye could not be reached for comment. A Police Dept. spokesman said the matter was under investigation. At the same time GAA is also calling upon District Attorney Hogan to investigate the incident, particularly the refusal of police on duty either to stop the attacks bers point out their attackers­whom they also believe included hotel help backstage. One of them was tall, heavyset, wore a T-shirt and worked either in the kitchen or as a stagehand, they said. The Inner Circle is an organ­ization of past and present polit­ical reporters. "The Inner Circle incident," said GAA president Richard Wan­del, 25, "is just another case where police refust to do anything involving gay people-and also be­cause I suppose they didn't want to touch those who may be im­portant." Ronald Thomas, 22, head of the organization's legal action com­mittee, who was cut on the face from someone's punches, declared today that for, "an hour and a half" after he was escorted out of the ballroom area he pleaded with police to let him and others id­entify their assailants. "It was a gross incident of refusal to en­force the law," he said. John Vouriotis, 18, of 6 Clinton st., said he was thrown against the wall of a room backstage and kicked in the groin, told how after­wards he and Thomas "spoke with 12 patrolmen and three sergeants and all of them refused us per­mission to go back into the hotel. One sergeant gave us the excuse that the Hilton management did not want him to let us go in and press charges because, as he put it, there were dignitaries there./' And Allen Ross, 22, (Ross is a sometime name because he is at< dripping from my mouth I was taken to the escalator, beaten again and thrown down the escalator. The police on the ground floor saw the beating and did absolutely nothing. One of the most severely hurt was Jim Owles, 25, a librar ·an at New York Theologic, · •. ,m·, ,ary. Gays Unite To Bring Attackers To Justice Morty Manford: bruises on face, torso and genitals; possible in­ternal injury. Jim Owels: seven · stitches around left eye, possible perm­anent" eye damage. Bobby Rome: lacerations on face, possible pe~manent eye dam­age. Allen Ross: generar bruises. Dr. Bruce Voller: general bruises. John Vouriotis: general bruises, three stitches in forehead. Saturday, April 15: At 11 pm members of the Gay Activist Al­liance, some of them also mem­bers of Mattachine, entered the New York Hilton Hotel Ballroom to distribute leaflets against the suppression of gay news to mem­bers of the Inner Circle, an organ­ization of political reporters. The demonstrators were attacked by guests of the Inner Circle. Police did nothing to stop the attack. Details are given in the next article from the New York Post. Sunday: GAA headquarters is­sued a press release, typed on New York Mattachine stationery, which was reported on WBAI. That same day Mattachine mailed copies of the press release to its Board of Advisors, all its members, 250 homophile organizations across the country, and Matta chine's oress list. • f ' • Monday: Pete Hamill's column in the New York Post stated that one of the primary assailants one of the primary assailants was Michael Maye, head of the Uniformed Firefighters Associat­ion, a former national Golden Glo­ves heavyweight champion. WBAI's Pete Wilson continued radio cover­age for Mattachine and GAA. Tuesday: The New York Post printed the accompanying article describing the attack. After the Mattachine meeting that evening, the Board of Directors reiterat­ed their pledge to assist GAA and the entire gay community in bringing the affair to the ptlblic's attention. Directors authorized a special letter to the Mattachine membership and urged that the membership take the time to in­form themselves of the facts in this case. To quote from a pres~ release by Rich Wandel, President of GAA: "It is apparent from the lack of notice in the media that many people would like to see this incident hushed up. We have no intention of allowing that to hap­pen.'' Wednesday: GAA represent­atives stated that New York Civil Liverties Union counsel Paul Chevigny had agreed to donate his services in pressing charges against the Police Department. An important New York law firm is -- PAGE~ (7 t () \.~ .J ·\ EVERYONE'S FUN HOUSE PRESENTS THE BEST I N THE AREA IN THE ART OF FEMALE IMPERSONATION: SONG, DANCE, SATIRE AND RECORD PANTOMINE ! '•~iiu7 ---------------~-------' He received six s tiches tha t night at Roosevelt Hospital , two be low and four above the le ft eye. Today and four above the left eye. Today his left eye is closed to a s lit and the left s ide of his head is swollen. Like othe r GAA members, pe r ­haps 20 or 25, Owles had gone to the Hilton to protest a number of things: the media's ha ndling of homosexual stories, police in ­action at the Daily News Apr il 10 when some GAA members were allegedly attacked, an April 5 News editorial referring to "fair­ies, nances, swishes, fags, lezzes­call 'em wha t you will" -and some­thing they heard about a skit that night. According to Owles, a guest left early in the dinne r to tell those at the Firehouse, GAA headquart ­ers at 99 Wooster St., that in the skit involving Councilman Michael DeMarco (D-Bronx), whom they view as an enemy, " there was a ma le r eporter dressed a s a homo­sexual in drag who was lis ping and quite derogatory." Several GAAs who rushed to the Hilton started to leaflet the ba ll­room but Owles couldn' t get in. "I was outside the ballroom itself · when one of our members, Bob Rome, came up to me, his lip was bloody and his eye was fun­ny , and he said he had been at the microphone onstage, and had been beaten. Suddenly a bunch of men in tuxes s tarted pushing people down the e scala tor. I was separated from my group and then all of a sudden, someone-very big and in his late 30s-took a slug at me, hit me and I hit the floor . I got up again and he hit me in the face agai1 with his closed fist. " Owles said, however, he really couldn' t identify his a ssailant, be­cause " it happened so fast" and also because he blacked out for a while. The alleged Maye beating ap ­parently involved Mor ty Manford, 21, leader of Gay People at Colum­bia Uni ver sity. Manford cannot. positively identify his a s sailant. Manford said after he had dis­tributed leaflets in the ballroom­" by and large we were received very well"-he went to the esca­lator area outside because he had heard shouting. When he got there, he said, he saw several of his "gay brothers and sisters" being attacked. " I went to pull away one of the assailants ," Manford said, "when behind me my prime assailant pulled me by the hair, punched me in the face, knocked me to the ground and continued to punch me in the face about a dozen times." Manford said other men in tux­edos tried to pull his assailant away " and then he gave me one final kick in the head and walked BAKER'S MAINTENANCE SERVICE 127 NORTH EDGEFIELD AVENUE DALLAS, TEXAS 2 ------JUNE Cleaning Special MAY Carpet rooms (regular size) $25.00 f Good through June with this ad.\ FREE estimate call 942-2837 away. As he walked away, I said, ' I demand that that man be ar­rested.' Someone behind me said, 'you' re not demanding anything' and threw me down the escalator." Manford said that from photo­graphs he is almost positive his "prime assaliant" was Maye. He continued: "I was lying on the es­calator and a baldheaded man in a tuxedo continued to beat at me in the stomach with all his strength." Manford also believes he was attacked at the same time by someone else, whom he says may have been Maye. On the es­calator Manford did not see his second attacker. A city official who did not see the actual beating but knows the GAA members said he saw Man­ford " lying on the ground at the 45th St. entrance opposite 'Cab­aret.' His eyes were glazed, he couldn't focus, he was moaning and trembling, there was an en­ormous lump on his forehead, and if you touched the side of his stomach he just gasped. "Someone walked out and said Michael Maye should be arrested, and a sergeant, who wore glas­ses, I could identify him, said " I'm not going after Michael Maye on the say-so of you creeps.' " "When I heard that I decided not to wait for the police am­bulance so we called a cab and took him ourselves to St. Luke ' s ." Deputy Borough President Cohen said that while the homosexuals were dis tributing literature Maye was " very agitated and angry" and he had to be restrained by his friends . Then Cohen said he saw Maye outside the ballroom " take a swing at a youngster who fell down the escalator'' and that he saw him punch and kick a young­ster while on the escalator. " he kicked and he stomped while the escalator was moving down and when it was over he bounded up the down escalator. There were at least 40 people who witnessed this." Cohen said he saw a police of­ficer in a black raincoat who did nothing. Cohen said he told Theo­dore Kheel and Broox Borough President Abrams what he had seen "and at that point left the dinner I was so disgusted.'' A second city official said he I screamed at Maye: " Stop it, you pig." "I had a very clear picture," the official said. "The police were escorting one or two kids out, very gently. One young policeman in a black leather jacket was going down the stairs with one kid by the arm. No arrests or anything. " All of a sudden like Superman, Michael Maye pushed everyone as­ide. He went down the escalator, pushed a policeman out of the way, and began to pummel the kid and kick him in the groin. Not kick exactly, but stomp five or six times with his heel. .. " GAA member Michael Mc­Pherson said that Maye at one point rubbed the knuckles of his right fist into his left hand say­ing "God, I hate those bastards." There was also trouble back­stage. Robert Rome, 25, a collection manager for an elec­tronics firm, said he went behind stage, grabbed a microphone and managed to speak for about two minutes until he was set upon, he believes, " by a rather huge em­ploye of the hotel, who came up behind me, pushed me against the wall and punched me in the face. I got up on my hands and knees and said, 'I'll leave' and the man said, 'Oh yeah?" But, he said, · another man in Tux intervenedand said "I'm a friend Qf yours. Get out of here." Rome said he was pushed down the escalator also. Dr. Bruce Voeller, an associ­ate professor of biology at Rock­efeller University, said he ·was attacked by several men in black dinner jackets "and one of them had a wrestler's armlock around my neck. Another hit his fist on my chin.'' He said some of those who witnessed the attack "seemed to be officials sponsor­ing the dinner.'' Joseph Famm, of WABC Radio, president of the Inner Circle said he didn't see anything: "i saw no blood. Believe me I didn't see anything. The Inner Circle is not in any way involved. We were run­ning a private affair, and they had no business coming in. I don't know wbat they were beefing about be­cause we did absolutely nothing offensive against their organizat­ion. No one should invade our privacy. GAYS UNITE studying the second case against Michael Maye and six others, not yet identified, for the six GAA members listed above. The New York NEWS and New York TIMES finally published small articles about the attacks. The New York POST printed an editorial demand­ing a "more than perfunctory ing a "more than perfunctory police inquiry." Thursday: The rest of the story is mainly in our hands. We must fight this battle now, before the assaults become more widespread. If you have been thinking "Maybe I should send a buck or two," please send $5. Those who have been wondering "Shall I send $5 or $10?" send $10. Those who have in the past sent $50 or $100, send $100 or $200. The battle in the courts will be long and costly. This battle must be supported by us, the gay community. Make out a check for your tax-exempt don­ation for the legal battle payable to THE INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF HUMAN RESOURCES. Mail this check to New York Mat­tachine, 243 West End Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10023. Well, Sissy, where do you stand on Gay rights? My knowledge of election cam- "Oh an attempt to smear you", paining is very limited but I do I said. believe that the Farenthold man- "Yes, in East Texas". agers could easily be given a run I didn't bother to question her for their money. regarding her actual position of the Young folks, about 300 strong gay rights issue. Clearly she was were gathered in Hermann Park not interested. Sunday April 30, for the Faren- Houston's Montrose area has a thold rally. There was beer, music, tremendous gay population. She had popcorn and a warm afternoon sun. probably just addressed more gay In the course of speaking the can- people than she will encounter didate told of her desire to tackle anywhere in Texas. Why belittle the real issues should she become the gay movement to this group? govenor. She said that Ben Barnes (Even the non-gays are sympathe-tried to throw her off course in tic.) Nothing at all about gay would East Texas with issues like bus- have been better. Barnes use of ing and Gay Liveration. Today smear tatics in Ea"st Texas, where she was clearly not going to dis- . the gay population must be near cuss such things. She went on rock bottom, may call for action on to accuse her opponents of re- in East Texas but not in Houston's presenting big business. Montrose where gay rights are Later I managed to question very much an issue. her about the gay matter explain- So much for campaign advise. ing that I was a member of Gay There is no major guernatorial Liberation. candidate who supports our cause. She told me that "Ben Barnes To the best of my knowledge only PAGE 3 Welcome Home, MR. ROXANNE ! ! ! Latin Lavely is baclc ta stay ! Nevertheless, you may want to go to the polls Saturday and pull the lever for a few local candidates who have declared their support. Like Gertrude Barnstone for the Senate from the fifteenth district; or Michael Noblet for represen­tative from the 90th district. Then there is Ron Waters running for Cont. page 4 Gay Becomes Minister has run all over East Texas ac- two openly support gay rights. SAN CARLOS, CAL. - William "There was no suspicion or cloud cusing me of favoring busing and They are Debbie Leonard, the Johnson stood before 96 clergymen whatsoever.'' homosexuals." She apparently Socialist candidate and Henry C. and lay delegates from 19 churches thought I wanted a clear explanat- Grover. (I've never heard of him and told them why "my gay life-ion of the word "Gay" since she either . but he did respond favor- style" should not bar him from had substituted the more familiar ably to our questionaire). Should being ordained a minister. "homosexual". Her uncomplai- you find the people unsuitable a After 2 1/2 hours of discussion mentary emphasis on the word · choice would have to be made on Johnson, 25, of North Hollywood, "homosexual coupled with her the basis of other important is- had the votes of 62 delegates to Lady Bird Johnson accent took sues, of which there are many. endorse his ordination on June 25 _me_ b, y:_ s_u.r:p,_r_i se_. _______________________. , paas sttohre offi rtsht e kUnonwitne d hComhuorscehx uoalf - All New - All Gay - Dancing - NI/TY LOUNGE 2915 legion St. Mother Pat YOUR HOSTESS Christ. Johnson came from Houston and was a graduate of Berkeley's Pac-ific School of Religion when he began work for the San Carlos Community United Church of Christ in 1968. After years of self-examination and struggle, Johnson said. He affirmed his homosexuality to his parishioners in November, 1970, and was ready to accept the conse­quences. The Rev. Henry H. Hayden, pas­tor of San Carlos Community, said the disclosure "Came as a sur­prise." "Those who knew him well had never found anything amiss in his conduct or bearing," he said. Johnson went to work for the church's Southern California con­ference in a community relations program. Early this year he applied to the denomination's Golden Gate Association to be ordained as a minister. The association's credentials ~ommittee . voted 3-2 against recommendation because the maj­ority " were not prepared to accept homosexuality within their defini­tion of a psychologically normal orientation to life." Delegates, however, voted62-34 for his ordination. Johnson said he felt " relieved" and "overjoyed" at the outcome, but "concerned for those who opposed me." We need desperately to cele­brate our differences and look be­yong thE· superficial differences," ne said. "I believe sexual orientation is irrelevant. My sexual orientation does not interfere with my work." (Taken from the Houston Post) 12:00 NOON CLOSE 2:00 A.M. CIJriar Patch· ''When in the Cajian Country - visit usf' lake Charles, la. (318) If 36-9391 5709 Oram POOL OFF 1900 Blk. GREENVILLE Ave. GPllN, 11:... i. HAPPY HOUR SUN. - THUR. 5:00 P.M. - 7:00 P.M. 11 :00 P.M. - 1:00 A.M. KEG PARTY EVERY TUESDAY 9:00 P.M. Dall a s, Tex. WARDS DRUG I~ 824-9190 PAG.E.4 RONSUE'S is Proud to Present - MR. ROXANNE and his Fantasy Review. ~ SHOWTIME - 8:30 - 10:30 - 12:30 SUNDAY AND THURSDAY NIGHTS representative from the 79th dis-trict who says that he would be GAY proud to introduce legislation else­LIB. AT THE HOUSE_j CORRECTION proud to introduce legislation in _w HITE Austin for repeal of the Sodomy • law. (See complete list of sup­porters elsewhere in this issue). These candidates have all in ­dicated their support of gay rights. Some have a very good chance of winning and we surely need friends in Austin. The Gay Liberation Movement held a rally in front of the White House and called for more public displays of affection of homosex­uals. The rally was led by the Rev. Robert M. Clement, a Roman Catholic priest whose Church of the Beloved DisciplP is the shrine of New York Homosexuals. FOREIGN CAR SERVICE 5415 Fannin at Calumet FREE ESTIMATES on body work and repair Foreign Car Specialist -I' a a 'I 528 9362 Hours 6 A.M. to 10 P.M. Gay Film But those were the days before Festi-val Perhaps some of you recall New York City's Park Miller. Now, Brideshead Revisited. It was pub- as you walk down Forty-third Iished during the Forties. Its Street in the direction of what author, Evelyn Waugh, thought so used to be called a " legittimate seriously of the homosexual ele- tneatre," you will find "Male ment in his novel that he came Film Festival" on the marquee. from England to Hollywood. There In addition to the Park Miller, he consulted with the moguls of at least three other theatres show­Metro Goldwyn Mayer- -but to no ing male porno films on a perm­avail. Brideshead Revisited was anent or part-time basis are sup­never filmed, owing, it was said ported by Fun City's Gay com­at the time, to the censors' strict munity. Now, might Houston's ures concerning any rep- increasing Gay community be per­resentation of the theme of homo- suaded to support an art theatre sexuality. whose permanent or periodic How times have changed! Or have policy would be the showing of all they? One cannot resist the temp- such non-porno films as touch upon tation to quote the remark from a a homosexual theme or are of a French play to the effect that the- more than erotic interest to homo­more things change, the more they sexuals? . remain the same. By way of de- I canthmkofatleasttwopossible monstrating that the moguls of , obstacles to such a scheme, and MGM and the film censors were I hasten to anticipate them. First, at least partially mistaken, I should there may not be a sufficient like to mention a two-article series number of Gay people to warrant which appeared in Los Angeles' the running of a film for an entire ADVOCATE some months ago. week. Then, how about a double The two articles in question feature: the first, a real "oldie," penetrated deeply into the store- and the second, of more recent house of old and recent films vintage? The theatre could then both foreign and domestic. While' take on the character of a "revi­the gold in the hills was not val" house in which cinema buffs particularly plentiful, it was in- both hetro and homo, could be sur~ teresting. Only a minority of the of finding satisfying film fare. films listed dealt openly with the Secondly, a daily change of fea­theme of homosexuality. But many !ures (or features) would probably of the others contained scenes or mvolve a prohibitive expenditure suggestions which would interest of funds. Might this ptoblem be and delight Mr. Average Homo- solved by arranging a series of sexual. films to satisfy the interests of And so I should like to share movie-goers? If symphony and with you a scheme. How about ·concert activities are arranged in starting a film festival? this way and so involve apackage- Yes, I realize there are film deal buying of the less with the festivals and film festivals. I too more desirable attractions, then, used to suppose they were some- why not_ a series of Gay art films thing which lasted a month at the to which one might subscribe. most, with a daily change of film So there is my scheme. Pie in fare, and then were over with. the sky? Think it over. GALVESTON It's fun city even after dark Summer is here and the time is right to get the tan of a life­time, and the place is the hottest beach in Texas --- Galveston, Island. Most of you have already found out that the Farmhouse and Paul Stewart have opened a bar in that fun city. The name is the Paradise and it can be made any day of the week. The prices are reasonable and even lower during happy hours 5 to 7 seven days a week. The bar is located on Kemper (thats 22nd) in the same block as the Tiki. Speaking of the Tiki (214) Tre the bar is now in the most capable hands of two new owners, the place hasn't changed much but you will find it's much friendlier. Sundays and Saturdays the club is open at noon and before six the crown is so thick that you get to "squeeze" through some of the nicest people in the world. After dark in the "Fun City" is a different experience as the locals don't come out until late so if you find something to do between when most of the Houston people leave and the locals come out you will find it well worth the wait. Friday, Saturday and Sundays is showtime at Lafitte' s. These shows will just knock your lights shows will just knock your lights out not to mention the bartender. Out of town entertainers drop in from time to time and all in all it makes for some fune times with Robert, an all time favorite in command. Try Galveston after dark ----­the surprise will be yours! GAY ISN'T SICK l Before this gay movement can reach goals of liberation legally, politically and socially, the gay individual must possess a positive self-awareness. To quote Ghandi, the dynamic nature of true revolution is "putting one's whole soul against the will of the tyrant." How can one take such a stance with a weak, apologetic self image? Thus, the behavorial objective of this is for you to realize that your sexual preference is not pathological, and thus aid you in obtaining and main­taining a positive self-image. A classic research study done in 1957 by a UCLA psychologist, Evelynn Hooker, yields a fine cog­nitive basis for this desired self­image. Dr. Hooker obtained 30 gay men with help from The Mattachine Society. She also selected 30 M.C. & FRANK straight men who matched the gays in education, IQ, and age. These 60 men were subjected toa battery of psychological tests including the Rorschach, TAT, MATS, and their life histories. Empirical data collected, she submitted it to the blind analysis of a panel of psychiatrists and psychologisf-5. This panel could not determine, in a clinical sense, which men were gay! -Can we not conclude, as did Hooker, that there is no inherent connection between our sexual orientation and psychological pathology? Therefore, apologize to no one, least of all yourself. Our liberation begins within. The seeds of revolution must stem from our own heads, nurtured by love and under­standing from all others. (from The Oklahoma Gaily) I th GAllEON ?720 RICHMOND AVENUE HOUSTON PAGES CHELSEY ST. JOHN SEXY & BE,.UTIFUL BOOK REVIEW by Alan If you're familiar with the many previous novels by prolific leather author Larry Townsend of Los Angeles. I think you'll join with me in giving the highest accolade to his latest work. THE LEATHER­MAN'S HANDBOOK is, for the cognoscent and the leather Ex­emplars, a veritable Baedeker of B/D and S/M. For the uninitiated, it is perhaps the definitive work on sado-masochism, bondage and discipline. WARNING TO THE SQUEAMISH AND THE FAINT HEARTED: This 300 page book ($2.95 in paper­back) will tell you far more, and in far more detail, about the nu­ances of S/M than you would ances of S/M than you would ever care to know. Even some lea­ther people may be repulsed or at turned-off by certain scenes con­tained herein. On the whole, however, if you have a sincere interest in any of the kinky scenes --leather, rubber, bondage and discipline, humilation, " golden showers," "FFA" ( Fist!-----­action), or the like--you will prob­able find this nonpareil book a real turn-on. Among the outstanding attributes which this compendium offers to the novice and the Exemplar alike are - The first published statistics on S/M preferences of which we're aware. A comprehensive listing of leather bars and leather suppliers in the U.S., Canada and Europe. A fascinating account of in-group customs and mores, which the non­leather reader will undoubtedly find quite startling. Larry's initial chapter "Why Leathersex?" attempts to answer the profound question of the mo­tivations for a guy to spend per­haps thousands of dollars and years of life in devotion to what may be considered by some as the most way-out sexual deviation. But, as , that hoary aphorism put it, if you have to ask why .. . well, it's not for you. Larry is nothing if not thorough. with those who turn on to "Bond­age Without S & M." whereas his fourth treats of "S & M Without Bondage." Something for every-one. I In his ~hapter on "Equipment" Larry puts across the point that it's not so important how much one has spent or how elaborate one's equipment is, but rather how proficient one is in its use. The S (or master) who has little con­cern for his quarry's circulation, for example, will make the mis­take of binding him too tightly or in a position which should be sustained for only a short period of time. Conversely, too many S's are sloppy in the use of their equipment and hence cannot eng­ender the proper respect in their M (or slave). Being either esces­sively zealous or careless is a handicap which the aspiring Scan­not afford if he intends to move to the rank of Exemplar. Perhaps the most profound point of the book, a point which this writer has discovered to be true in his relationships with a number of leather people in the Southwest, is that the S/M or leather person is not about to rape those who are unwilling to participate in his scene, nor will he take the M farther than the M wants to go. In a very real sense, the S/M relat­ionship depends on the consent of both parties despite popular be­liefs to the contrary. There are, of course, just enough exceptions to prove the rule. As Larry admonishes in "Find­ing A Partner," if you're going to try the scene, don't kid your­self about what really turns you on as opposed to those things which may have only an intellectual fasc­ination for you. If you can 't dig it on a gut level, don't waste your time in disappointing yourself and your prospective leather partner. But if you decide to get with it, choose your partner with the same care that you would use in avoid­ing the hustlers and the possible vice squad in a gay bar. l PAGE b MADAM FERTILIZER \ RONSUES MOTHER TO DRAG: FRIEND TO ALL ~--'------------ GA A to meet with American Bar Assocation Through the efforts of attorneys sympathetic to the goals of the Gay Activists Alliance of New York and the GAA NY Legal Action Committee, a hearing has been scheduled in Washington, DC, on May 28, 1972, by the Section on Individual Rights and Responsibi­lities of the American Bar Assoc­iation on the subject of the Gay Rights Platform written at the Chicago Gay Convention, which we assume you are familiar with. (A limited number of additional copies of the Playform are avail­able from GAA on request.) If, as a result of this hearing, a favorable recommendation on one or more of the planks in the Plat­form is forthcoming, the ultimate goal of persuading the ABA itself at its August meeting in San Fran­cisco to adopt the platform will be significantly advanced. In order to make the presentat­ion at the hearing as convincing and complete as possible, we are asking groups and individuals across the country to provide mat­erials that might be useful for submission. Particularly suitable would be affidavits of actual in­stances of discrimination based on sexual orientation in employ­ment, housing, public accomodat­ions and the like. Cocumented instances of the use or abuse of anti-sodomy, anti­transvestite or crossdressing statutes, plus information on how solicitation or loitering ordinan­ces are used to harass homosex­uals are needed. To date, no such information on a national scale has been compiled. We are attempting to secure such case histories from around the country by May 10. When compiled, this information will be invaluable in attempting to cure the passage of legislation on the local, state and national levels. We must move now on this project, taking advantage of the Presiden­tial election year! The national dossier will then be distributed around the nation for use in your stlte and will be used in May as well to attempt to move the U.S. Civil Rights Commission to con­duct hearings in all major cities into discrimination against homo­sexuals and to recommend appro­priate corrective legislation on all government levels. Furthermore, the Washington, DC, Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, a coalition of 124 civil rights groups headed by Roy Wilkins, will also receive the doc­uments so that these groups can aid in lobbying for passage of the provisions of the Gay Rights Plat­form on their local levels and serve as a "Watchdog" agency over their legislative process. In addition, GAA NY's Legal Action Committee and others are working on projects regarding (1) the status of gays in prisons and (2) the status of gays in the U.S. Armed Forces. Any documented case histories or affidavits on these subjects would be invaluable as well in verifying the extent of discrimination against homosex­uals so that change can be brought about. Please send all information and correspondence to: Mr. Ronald Thomas, Legal Action Committee, Gay Activist Alliance, 99 Wooster street, NY, NY. Dragon Draged 0 ff "Hair' Stage The grand dragon of the Okal­homa Ku Klux Klan and three of his colleagues tried to make a citizen's arrest of cast members during a performance of the music­al "Hair." After the lights dim­med for the show's nude scene, the four climbed into the stage, seized a microphone and made their announcement. The audience booed, the ljghts came back up for the scheduled intermission and security guards escorted the Klansmen from the theatre. Said one of the Klansmen afterward, "They were just as naked as jay lfirds." (from PLAYBOY, May 72) RR chatter Dear " Hooter Lovers", Let's begin by catching up on the happenings at the Red Room during February and March. A record breaking crowd was on hand Valentine's Day to see 20 of Houston's prettiest boys compete for trophies, cash prizes and the title of Miss Valentine's 1972. Honors went to "Love Love" 1st place Jennifer George - 2nd place and Tammi Lea - 3rd place. February also brought back the ever-so-popular amateure night under a new title "Talent Night". The contest is held from a period of 4 to 6 weeks - then the 1st and 2nd place winners of the prev­ious weeks compete in final com­petition for cash awards. Winners of the last two talent contests were Mr. Kim English - Toy Tiger, Jack Golden, Mitzie St. James and Jennifer George. The Detour Club in Dallas, Texas traveled to the Red Room with a very entertaining review entitled "Cinderella". Three young men on tour from Nashville entertained RR patrons early in March. On tour during the month of April to Miami and Atlanta was Miss. ANNOUCING: The reopening of the R.R. herself, Tiffany Jones. She reports hooters - a - plenty down in Seminole land. New faces at the RR are Bobby and Danny - bartenders·andWayne, our new waiter. Up and coming specials will see T. J. present an evening with the Golden Sisters, Mitzi St. James and of course Tiff. That's May 11th - on a Thursday. On May 2nd a special show en­titled Kitty's Litter was per­formed. 10 very talented people did several broadway production numbers and a lot of fun was had by all. The newest member to The Fabulous Four is "The Dianne Warwick of Houston" - Daschille - If you haven't seen this young man perform you're in for a real treat and a veryentertainingeven-ing. The RR would like to say good­luck and Carwell to the male lead - "Sir Barry" - it was fun and we'll miss you. Until next month here and Sunday - Tuesdays - and - Wednesdays from 9 to 12 at the greatest show -bar in town --- I'll say, MID TOWNE LOUNGE 2923 S Main St. Houston Now under ownership of Bob Coppell SPEICAL THANKS TO: E\ig George's RED ROOM Payne's TRADEWINDS Grovey LA CAJA THE BRAZOS THE SURF (Especially 'Siinny Minnie' Slim) THE MINI-PARK MR. FRIZBEE'S For helping the club off to a great start Corne see us at JAY BIRD ~EWS ~ 226-7401 •Finest in Adult Movies in t-he privacy of curtained booths. •Widest selection of adult reading material. OPEN 'til 4 A.M. Friday & Saturday 908 Congre-ss Houston, Tex. / J I t:>AG~7 ----------------------,,..__ by CHR15f0PHER &R0BB After a long absence Astral Erections returns to the pages of the Nuntius. During the past two months there has been too much news and Astral was left out to make room for more important matters. Associate Editor ARIES - Between the thirteenth and the sixteenth you will notice pronounced romantic activity; you may have to beat them off with a stick, belt or what ever it is a ram uses. More than ever you now know what you want and how to get just that; find happiness with those that you truly love. Don'tlet some wet blanket make you think for one minute that you can't love more than one person at a time. Keep on Truckin'. TARUS - Now is the time to let the real you out. Your zest for living and your warm friendly man­ner make you the ideal mate or trick; know what you want and it is yours with a little effort in the right direction (it could be the wrong direction). Between the 12th and 19th you will find that all your relationships are more than happy; they are almost enchanted. You never have to strive to be yourself but remember that people don't all share that wonderful qual­ity. GEMINI - This is going to be a mixed month for you with this in mind read further. Do not quarrel or try to make important decisions with friends or loved ones before the 12th. It is difficult to under­stand the relationship you want' you keep changing your mind so often; try to make decisions and stay in the light of the true you, what ever that is. The 12th to the 19th bring a period of good trick ­ing in this month of not so steady desires. Do what you like and like what you do. CANCER - The goddess of love, Venus, ente r s your sign on the 10th, beginning a period that even the retiring Cancer can't help but have a good time. The key to this period of activity is to be in the places that the people you want are. Join in the scene at the Hi Kamp or • give the LllJIWlli. a try on a Wed-. nesday night. If you are looking for a lover keep looking - - for some time you will not be able to settle down to just one person. On the 12th you will find that you are attracted to the out of doors for some fun, sun and hot action you will find that new people you make in this period will become the life long "friends" you have needed for so long. LEO - There are several tests of friendship comming up this month before the 12th. You will be well advised to seek help from strangers early in the month. Don't let yourself be too dependant on the old ways, go out to a bar that you seldom go to. Find joy with new people. Now after the 12th things change so much that you may feel that you are in a spin with your values changing rapidly. Enjoy the changes but don't let anyone in on your personal af­fairs for it will only cause jeal­ousy and keep you from making progress. VIRGO - The 1st to the 11th is a time for romping and playing and forming romantic friendships - who says you can't do it with a friend. Be cautious of this period and as the stars command it is only a friendship; and that's the truty. After the 11th you will find that your romantic appeal is much increased and you will find new people who are very attracted to you. Parents, business or your career may seem a bring down but don't be so serious that you let these hassels keep you from having a good time! LIBRA - If I didn't see it with my own eyes I would never have be­lieved it. ' 'The trend is for ardent love and romantic declarations ofa pleasant nature. Love comes nat­urally and can be the most en­grossing you have ever had. Anew swim s uit will be connected with the meeting of a new person. Friends that you took for granted will be s upprised at the new at­tention that you show to them. You may find that you're in demand so much that you don't have time for everyone you would like to do a thing with , but your energy is NOW OPEN SALOON SERVING YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGES. PRE-GAME WARM UP: GREYHOUNDS, BLOODY AND SCREWS FIFTY CENTS. I ·=- ~--)5t-:1--/-~ ) ' rA , , - .;_c__;, .""'if . ·r °'1 ~ - ~ SATURDAY AND SUNDAY AFTERNOONS l 'TIL 4 P.M. unbounded this month. Lets work together and see what can happen, love each other. SCORPIO - Distance is the key word this month. You may find that if you are some distance from home that people are more attracted to you or someone from a distance could become your new romance. If you decide in a fury of passion to join with another person you may supp rise everyone with your t rue happiness. This is no time to think of a relation­ship based on money or secur ity, if you do you will find that you have made a mistake. SAGITTARIUS - Having halt-some ' ., PAGE 8 DEE MARIE Tired of the bars? • PERSONAL INTRODUCTIONS • SCREENED MEMBERSHIP • MEET NEW FRIENDS • OVERCOME HANGUPS • GET INVOLVED • ANYWHERE IN U.S.A. • SAFE & DISCREET • 18 80 • INSTANT TELEPHONE SERVICE • ELIMINATE CRUISING FORGET THEM ... :•••••••••••••• ••••• •••• • JOHN RAYMOND GSF 1s perhaps the mos1 successlul 111f>,tnS 1n 1111• US. ol lmnq1nq qay : people together : Find out why more 1>eople orf> qt>!llnq mvolVl'<I wuh 1hr new GSF ! Progressive Discreet So1>h1st1t:atetl • GSF can help you Qet more Ou! ol your CJdY 11111 throuqh Pxc11mq per : sonal mtroduc11ons, no matlf'r where you l1vP.1 : Get involved NOW!! .... . President GSF Organization Dept. JG 8235 San,a MOntC<l 8 111d Los Angeles, CA 90046 Yes. John, rm mte,esr«I m Jta,n,ng more •bout the GSF Org.n,nt,on and how I c•n ffK~nd m v soc,./ Ide I enc lo" S 1. OD for post• and h•n­dlmg ANYWHERE IN U.S.A.!! ••• Since1968 : Name _____ AI'_ FINO OUT HOW GSF CAN CHANGE YOUR ENTIRE LIFE ESPECIALLY YOUR SOCIAL LI FE CALL NOW!! - (213) 654-3491 your head in those beautiful Aq- • Addfeu . ------- : C,ty ____ S1111• _ • Z,p . Phone No \\ ___ ._ ___N_A_SH_V_ILL_E'_S _OW_N _PE_R_T, _PR_E_TT_Y _& _PE_T_ITE_!~ I- ouna rtihaen gcrloouundds., but keep your feet returned so enjoy it and don't look for something you -can't find. Ad­venture and color will fill your life from the 12th to the 16th and you will be in the position to drown yourself in them the way you always do when the chips are down. Pisces always manages to muddle through somehow. It's your natural pro­tection. Go with the now and dig experience with the Archer the only comment I have is that you will get over yourselves! You will find that you are showing appreciation, gratitude and demonstrative af­fection in your relationships, and isn't it about time that you gave up that wam-bam-slam-thank-you approach to people? The sun warms your love life and creates the real emotional envolvement you need so much. Your friends will find you more interesting than usual and through them you can find some more meaning in your life. Why be so afraid to dive into that sea of love and explore its depth, Sagittarius. CAPRICORN - Lady luck smiles on you and the sun will bathe you and your relation in an elation you haven't felt before. Affairs and money are closely tied this month and what seems just the only thing that matte rs in your life, pocket book. Acting and effort will bring about what you want. Don't let people side track you too much but keep your heart open. Climb that Capricornian ladder to the moun~intop . ... but don't step on any toes! AQUARIUS You have tried to find variety in your life and this month offe rs just that. Social and roman­tic advertures will give you the excitement you seek, you will meet a person who becomes more im­portant later at a party or cele­bration this month. That long journey that you have expressed some doubt about will bring you in contact with the person you have been looking for so long. A secret enemy is posing as a friend­beware around the 22nd and 23rd that you keep everything that could hurt you to yourself. Don't try to hide things that can't be hid­den if it's natural then it will be known. Keep floating along with ~ff~~~~~~~~~ff~~~ your hostesses Ricci & Rita 18.11111 11·1 ClUI POOL • DANCING · MIXED DRINKS Open Tuesday throuh Sunday Sp• - 2a. (Closed lo"days) 2305 S. SHEPHERD ~_@_ L-PISCES - Your passionate attitude to younger people could cause some problems. Watch yourself and be sure that only the two of you are in on your affair. Your social life is on the upswfii'g and you will find that it leds you to love; we can't tell if it is going to be on the show. Homosexual Stigmas ? The founder of a church minist­ering to homosexuals this week blasted the clergy for its failure to recognize and discuss the prob­lems of homosexuality. The Rev. Troy D. Perry, founder of the Metropolitan Community Church of Los Angeles, said in a press conference that the trad­itional church has been the "in­stigator of many of the stigmas that have been placed upon the homosexual." The Rev. Mr. Perry is in Dallas to meet with members of the Metropolitan Community Church of Dallas. "A popular misconception about our church," he said, "is that it is being used to recruit people to be homosexuals. This is 11ot true. Our main purpose is to recruit people to Christianity. Nature took care of our homosexuality. We just ask that we be recognized. We don't feel we are sick, so we don't want to be cured. We just want to be accepted. Our church is open to anyone who wishes to accept Christianity. Our second function is to make the homosexual feel that he is a person and need not be ashamed." Mr. Perry noted that not all of 528-9552 °'"..., 10.. I 1504 Westheimer KEG PARTY SUNDAYS 5-7 (SI.N) COMMENT ~ALANDER~- The lusty month of May is upon Treehouse Cabaret Theatre. Their us, but the arts ·schedule hardly initial offering is "Skulduggery in measures up to that old cliche. the Skies" presented by the Following a particularly action company of Royal and Ancient packed month of April, May looks Players. Located in the Wood Oaks to be somewhat slower and much Apartments at 5900 Bissonnet, this less exciting. Perhaps the sum- melodrama wnl be performed only mer doldrums have an early start on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday this year. Regardless, there are evenings. For an evening of up-some bold ventures in the per- roarious fun try this show. Hissing forming arts set for this month. the villian and cheering the hero Perhaps, just perhaps, you'll find can be such good fun. something to appeal to your finer Along the lines of special events values. we find "Disney on Parade" at the "What's so bad about living with Coliseum beginning May 9th. We a stranger?'' continues through the all certainly remember the Mickey month of May at the Dean Goss Mouse Club, so it might just be Dinner Theatre. The Dailys favor- an evening of pure nostalgia for ed this production with good a great many people. Gene Kelly reviews, and that is all we have troupes into the Astrohall May 31 to go on for this month. With such with an extravaganza called an intriguing title it must have "Clownaround" staring Ruth something in the running. Buzzi. Designed to be performed The Windmill continues with in major halls and coliseums their production of "Fiddler on the throughout the country it sounds as Roof". Due to a month long so- if it is an enlarged musical comedy journ in Austin, this critic has not with little plot, just lot's of laugh. been able to attend, but reports Foley's choice quality stuff are that the Windmill has sue- brings Shawn Phillips to the music ceeded where others have failed. hall for a concert May 13th and May 30th finds the producers taking Stephen Stills to Hofheinz Pa vi l-a plunge into the deep end of the ion for a super show on May 19th. pool with a production of "Bus Other than Alice Copper on May Stop". It is indeed unusual for a 7th at Hofheinz that's all that could dinner theatre to attempt anything be located on the Rock Scene this other than light comedy or musical month. comedy, so this should prove a We can look for a new face with most interesting offering. · the Houston Symphony on May 26th. Houston's venerableAlleyThea- It's one of the old favoriets of tre closes out a superb production this particular critic, the incom-of "Taming of the Shrew" on May parable Phyliss Diller. She will 14th. Should old English be your no doubt lavish her acrid humor cup of tea, don't miss this event. on the masses, but surprise every- The Alley stage comes alive again one when she sits upon a bench May 25th with a production of the and bombards the eardrums with smash "Child's Play". Reportedly a little classical piano. One must the first regional outing with this be versitale these days. show, we are most anxious to see Should you ever get the urge to it in the fine Alley tradition. Special visit some of the fine straight student performances will be held clubs Houston has to offer we make the 21st and 23rd. Now to ·the Houston "Just A Minute" 2319 So. Shepherd Houston, Tex PAGE9 SHERI POWERS Titles: MOST PROFESSIONAL IN DALLAS BEST SERIOUS PERFORMER {Zodiac Ball) the following recommendations. La Bastille is the home of name HOMOSEXUAL STIGMAS entertainment in our town. Al-• his dealings with other churcuesJ though primarily a jazz club, they have been negative. also feature some of the well- "There are many protestant as known pop singers on occassion. _ well as Catholic and Jewish clergy­The club known as O.D.'s, still men and congregations who have in it's infancy is starting big expressed an interest in the subject by bringing in some of the very and want to be able to do something best in club entertainers. Among about the stigmas attached to it.'' others, look for Della Reese this The Rev. Richard Vincent month. For an evening of truley pastor of the Dallas church noted fine listening try Les Quarte Sai- that several churches in the Dallas son on Market Square. The music area have asked members of the is nearly all opera with an occas- community to speak at their wor­sional leap into show tunes. The ship services. voices are superb. Look for the Miller Theatre in Hermann Park to start operation soon. Check the dailys for the many fine free events held under the stars. The old Houston Music Theatre will spring to life this month. After the trial run with Debbie Reynolds proved so successful, enter­peneur Diec Ott has chosen to plunge in full force with a season of stars beginning in June. But May will bring us one, if not two package shows. H.M.T., it's good to have you back! That's the month of May at this writing. There's plenty to do with few conflicting engagements this month. Again we say ....... support the arts! 209 Part V and Conclusion a homophile novel by William J . Lambert, III After basic it was four weeks of AlT: Advanced Individual Train­ing. After those four weeks 1 would be an official 716.1: a personnel specialist. For AlT I was transfer­red across post. Everyone in basic training went their separate ways. Everyone was cleared out of the area. No more basic training at Fort Ord. Beatnik was shipped off to Texas. Bookworm went to New Jersey. Miss Green went to New York. The others went lo their assigned posts in Texas, New Jer­sey, New York, California, Wash­ington. Each went off to serve God and his country. I moved from one end of the post to the other. I moved to Fort Ord's personnel school: PASC. I went IIFTER DIIRK LOUNGE 332-0417 1112 8th Ave. OPEN 2 p.m. 'til 2 a.m. Ft. Worth, Tex. KEG PARTY Sunday 5 to 7 ALLEN HUDGENS & CHARLES HEFNER (Your Hosts) ,,..,....~-==--------------- -----r--------------------- SABRA' GARTH llis name \\as .Jerry Pale. ,Jerry I lcnl itself nicely lO the mispro­nunciation , "fairy". The fat boy I was the type we I\Ould have been talking about behind his back even if he wasn ' t queery. It seemed as 1 if by calling someone else a queer I the attention was momentarily I shifted from the rest of us. Keep the allcntion of others on the others I and they scarcely had time to stop and look at us. As long as some- I one else was the subject of con- I vcrsation we were safe. The time to worry was when people tired of I the obvious queers and went look­ing elsewhere. I Gerald Danner: short, thin, ef­feminate, another odd one. He I wasn't thoroughly repulsive. He just wasn't good looking. He was I one of those in'between individuals. He was not quite as bad off as I Jerry Pale. They w~re both sad I cases. It was sad if you were queer I and didn't have looks - - or if not looks then at least a body. Jerry '---'----:---:----:-----------,---,,-------' was fat. Gerald was thin. They over and was put through the whole his eyes: queer's eyes. I(was funny . immediately became close friends: routine again - - the...a.ss~~f about the way you could tell by the two pathetic beings clutching for FORM, FACE AHO FIGURE new barracks, new sheets, nP..111, eyes. All the others - - his voice, something in the dark, having sym-blankets, new pillows. New faces his actions, his name droppings -- pathy pains for the plights of each gathered from other forts, other could ~e misleading. Never the other. They bunked together. Jerry locations, other basic training un- eyes. slept on the bottom, Gerald on its: from Honolulu, from Ft. Leon- His were pig eyes that were but top. They became Mutt and Jeff. ardwood, from Fort Lewis. We part of a pig face and a pig body. They were talkedaboutandlaughed talked about life before the Army, He was an auntie at eighteen. You at. after the Army. We talked about could tell he wanted sex. You What would Matthew and John the hell of the Army. I tried to could also tell he wasn't getting have seen in me had I been ugly? pick out the queers. it. It was hard t had I been too skinny or too The fat soft one who spoke it. It was hard for the repulsive fat/ if I'd been ugly and misshapen/ funny, who tried to be friendly, ones, really hard. They couldn't Would I have gone to bed with who no one really wanted to be do it on looks because they had Matthew if he had been thin like friendly with: he was queer. I none. They couldn' t attract with Gerald? Would I have gone to bed could tell by his actions, his flut- their bodies because their bodies •with the lieutenant if he had been tering hands, his limp wrists, his were repulsive bulks of flesh with fat like Jerry? But for the grace voice. I could tell by the way he no beauth and no lines. Occasion- of God go I. One couldn't help spoke, the things he said, the people ally they might find a person with feeling sorry if one really under-and places he had seen, the names tastes ·for the ugly, but there were stood their plight, and I think I ~~ dropped, his sill.v simple smile, too many ugly ones to go around. understood it. To have been born • with such desires was pathetic. They must have been born with them. In their condition they surely Ginzburg goes to prison After nine years of appeals, Ralph Ginzbug has gone to prison for three years on a puritanical technicality. As publisher of the mildly titillating EROS magazine and two other publications, he was convicted in 1963 of violating the century-old Comstock Act against. mailing obscene materials. Three years later, his conviction was upheld by the United States Sup­reme Court in a controversial de­c1s1on that evaded classifying Ginzburg's publications as obscene but declared his promotions of them to be "pandering" -- a doctrine never before applied and rarely invoked since. Before sur­rendering to authorities, Ginzburg tore up a copy of the Bill of Rights; a short time later he and a convicted bank-robber, both in handcuffs, were transported to the Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary. A number of prominent persons protested the sentence in a full-page advertisement in THE NEW YORK TIMES. Playwright Arthur Miller wrote, "A man is going to prison for publishing and adver­tising stuff a few years ago which today would hardly raise an eye­brow in your dentist's office. This is the folly, the menace of all censorship- -it lays down rules for all time which are ludicrous a short time later." (Playboy '72) Editor's note: From Greek Myth­ology, Eros was the God of Love, son of Aphrodity. The magazine Eros was dedicated to Jove and was well written and printed on fine paper. Only four issues were printed before the prude's struck it down. Since then, the volumns have become collector's items and are of considerable value. The Circle of Friends in Dallas have the four issues in their have the four issues in their library, and those wishing to read them are welcome to do so. wouldn't have gone out of their way to acquire the taste. They would have been crazy to have done so. For who wanted them? Who wanted them in youth? Who wanted them after they had aged? Let them find companionship with each other. It was something. Something was daily - better than nothing. The fat one wanted me. It was easy to tell since I was queer. He was unsure: unsure that I was homosexual. He approached me slowly. r had a headache, a backache. He offered to give me a rubdown. His father had been a masseur. He had learned some of the techniques. "Go ahead," Milton said, wink­ing, " let him give you a rubdown." Milton was straight. Milton thought I was straight and he thought Jerry was a faggot. He thought the whole scene was extremely funny. "Why not?" Robert smiled. "It might help." The others in the barracks nodd­ed, gave their approval. They smiled and winked when Jerry had turned his back. They were witnessing a queer on the make. They thought it was one fun game. So I obliged. A blanket was spread on the floor and I laid face down on it. Jerry gave me a rubdown while the others grouped around with their smiled, laughs and snide remarks. Jerry pounded on me and worked my muscles. The pain went away, and I felt relaxed. He finished and I went to bed and slept. "You better watch out for the fat boy," Milton said. We were walking past the bowling alley on the way to the movie. Our -even­ings were free during AIT. It was a relief to get out after the class for a movie and to feel for a few minutes like civilians. "I swear to God, he's trying to get into your pants." "Because he gave me a mess­age?" I laughed. "Come now." "Just mark my words " Milton said softly. "You're going to wake up one of these mornings and find that thing trying to play with you." "I'll lock my chastity belt " I smiled. ' There was a line outside the theater. There was always a line outside the theater. After a day of schooling everyone wanted to feel like a human. We took our places in line. "Speaking of the devil," Milton said, motioning up to the front of llll• MARKET 763-5363 n . bea. u t,1:ful Galveston :Isle the line. '·There's little Jerry now with his other little friend. Let's go up and ask him if he's been saving our places." "You must be kidding. " "Come on," Milton smiled. "you go on up and when he lets you 7ut in then I'll follow. You can give me cuts." "He's hardly going to gime me cuts, crowds , or much of anything else," I said. " We're hardly that close of friends. " "Okay," Milton said, moving out of line. " You wait here and I'll go tell your girlfriend that you' re way back in line and that your feet are about to give out." " Don't be funny," I said, reach­ing a hand out to stop him. I was too late. He was hurrying toward Jerry. In a few minutes they were both motioning me forward. " Look who I found up here," Milton said, smiling. " It's Jerry." "How's your feet?" Jerry smil­ed. "Oh, they're horrible," _Milton said. " Here, Jean your weight on me.'' "I'm afraid Milton was over exaggerated," I said. The ticket window opened and the line moved forward. We bought our tickets. Milton Jugged me over to the pop corn stand where he bor­rowed a quarter for a large bag. "Where did your friend go?" Milton asked, munching one of the salted kernels from the bag and offering me a handful. "He and Gerald went on in and · sat down," He said. "Well, let's go find them,"Mil­ton smiled. "I do believe you're her pimp," I said. He smiled even wider. "Okay," he smiled, " so I've been discovered. I confess. I'm her pimp and she promised me ten percent of any action." " That means you'll be coming out on the short end," I said. "She would have to pay me." "Maybe I had better pimp for you. Do you have a pimp.?" "l work for an independent or­ganization," I said. "Foiled again," he laughed. We went and found our seats. The picture started before I found where Jerry and Gerald had finally decided to sit. I thought I heard Jerry laugh during the Tom and Jerry cartoon. It was a high-pitch­ed and rather hysterical laugh. * * * * * * **** * ***** "You will write, won't you?" "Do you really want me to?" I asked. "Yes," he said. "Promise me you'll write." "If you want. .. I said. I propped one of the pillows behind my back. He was sitting off in one of the chairs. wearing only his shorts. He held a cigarette in his right hand. " I feel so hopeless," he said. "I mean. really he lpless. If there were anyway I could arrange it so I could stay. you know I would. Since they've eliminated basic at least tempora 1·ily here at the fort, they' ve got an excess of pe r sonn­el.'' " It's the Army," I said. " It's just our God, our bos s , our master. It says move and we move. You must s ure ly accept that. " " I accept it," he ans wered. " It's just that these last weeks have been so damned . . . . " He crushed out his cigarette. " I'm going to miss you. " "You'll find someone else," I said. "No, he said, getting to his feet suddenly and going to stand before the drapes that hid the windows. "No, I doubt if I'll ever find anyone else like you.'' " You just think that now," I said. I had heard these words too often before to put any real weight on them now. "After a while you '11 forget all about me and someone wise will be there in your bed. You' ll be saying the same things to him." " You don't really believe me at all, do you?" he asked, turning. " I know you," I said. "That's why I'm saying what I saying. " You don't know me," he said. "or else you would know that it's going to be hell for me without you. ' ' " It will be hell only until you find anyther." "Oman it, don't be so smug!" he said, coming over to the bed. "Listen, John," I said. "I'm not trying to be smug. I'm just trying to be realistic. Oh, I appreciate what you're inferring. I'm happy that you've had a good time. I won't lie by telling you that I haven't had fun, too. You've got good looks, good body, good style, but I 've heard the parting words too damned often to put any real stock in them. I've said them my­self too many times to attach any real meaning to them." " I'm different," he persisted. He sounded so convincing I almost tended to believe him. "I'm too hard to satisfy. Do you know how long it had been since I had had anyone before I met you? It had been a damned two years." I didn't bother asking him what his farwells had been like to his other little plaything. What would have been the point? "Two years," he said, standing over me. " I can't just pick up anybody. " DA VE & STEVE'S "The guys THE CANDY STORE (Memberships Available) only gfrls welcome liquor in the bar which Do llos Ft. makes Worth area'' OPEN DAILY 4:30 2:00 a.m. 3014 Throckmorton DALLAS, TEXAS 526-9408 PAGE 11 RONNIE SIOUX RONSU/ "-----------------s-a_v_e-:d--:d~o""in_g_t:-:he_ w_o_r-:k~ oursel ves. I was going to mention Matthew, but Matthew was best left buried for my sake as well as for J ohn 's. "I have to be care ful," he con­tinued. " I'm an office r in this God­awful Army. Queer officers are something else. I jus t can't go hopping into bed anytime I want. If there were only someway, some­how I could s tay he re . I pulled back the covers and moved to give him room. He look­ed down at my partia lly uncove red body and then at the space waiting beside me. He put his hand on the head of the bed for ba lance as he slipped off his shorts. Then he got into bed. I tossed the covers over him. His body was warm against mine as he lay s ilently on his back. He reached for the cig­arettes on the night table, got one, lit it. He blew smoke at the ce il­ing. I moved closer until our sides and thighs made contact. Then I shifted to my side and moved a hand to his chest. His skin felt smooth, his nipple s ha rd. " Listen," I said. " We don' t have much time. Why spend time thinking about the future?" His stomach was tight: no fat, no flab. " What if you could find a way to stay? Wha l then? In a very few days I' ll have finished AIT. Then I'll have to go and you would be the one s taying . Farewells are bound to come eventually. The Army keeps its personnel nowhere for long.'' I reste d my hand between his legs . He moved slightly lo c rush his cigarette out in the ash tray on the night table. Then he rolled over to face me. lie nestled his h~ad to kiss the V at my neck. " God, how I'm going lo miss you," he spoke into my flesh. * * ..:,: "" :..'< .,,, ,:, .,, ....... ;;, ',': ,:- • AIT was n' t basic t raining bul it was J\rmy. Some things in the Army rema ined the same, we re common place, were redunda nt. There were the si I ly inspections where civilian clothes were hidden. ' Unauthorized clothes we re packed up and excess junk was gathered in suitcases and boxes to be carried across the road to the other bar­racks whic h we ren ' t ha ving their big inspection until the next week. Towels, underwear and socks were all rolled neatly and placed in the fool locke r. Everything had to be neat. We put the razor, the razor blades . the toothbrush and the soap we didn 't use all on dis play. We put the ra zor, razor blades, tooth­brush and soap we used into the suitcase to be carried to the bar­racks ac ross the road. We poli shed our bra ss. We walked over to the shoeshine s tand to pay out $3 to gel our boots and shoes polished . It , We swept the floors, waxed the floors. scrubbed the showers, washed Lhe ur ina ls and lhe toilets. We dus ted the woodwork, the mop­boards. th e window panes, the pipes, the ra fters, the beds. We washed the windows, dr ied the windows. We r epeated the routine. We went out in the mornings to pick up lhe c igarette butts, pieces of paper, chewing gum. We pulled the weeks out of the lawn. We cut the grass. We swept ·the streets. AIT was school. We marched off to class in the morning: typing, offi cial document!;, ~:nglish. We marched from class to c lass. The cla ss would end and we would file outside , get inlo (orma tion and march off again to a nother building and anothe r brainless teacher with his s imple-assed lectu re. We began taking innoculations for meningitis . Basic had been discont inued but it was feared the disease might s l ip over to the rest of the Fort. P recautions has to be take n. llcsearch was to be con­ducted to determine who the car­r iers were. I wondered if John had been a carrier .. John had gone to Fort Sam llouston, Texas. He swore he would write. Surely they musl have conducted lesls when lhcy had found Matthew dead. We ma rched oul of a c lassroom where an im beci le was trying to leach us lhe bask fundamentals of lhc Engli sh language. The teacher hadn'l know lhe basic fundamentals hi mself. lie slood corrected lhree limes. /\I I the sludcnls seemed to knm, mo re than lhe teacher. Wt• gol intoourformalionandourclass leade r marThed us off lo another buil ding . We fell inlo lwo lines, marc hed up lhe slcps, were given a number. stopped in front of a man in whi te, opened our mouths. They swabbed our throats . They wanted throa t culture. One kid aelually gagg1•d on lhe slick. vomited on the f1 001·. The line moved forward. We marched oul the olher end of the bui I ding. We got inlo our fo r mat­ion. We marched off to another class. I gol a letlcr from .John. fl was short. lie said he wou ld write more late r . lie was busy getting seuled. lie mi ssed me. * * * * Herc comes lh e bride. big, fat, and wide. lle re comes thegrnom as · skinny as a broom. How a p ropos! They played the Lohengrin Wedd­ing \larch and I thought the words mumbled in accompaniment by chil dr en fo r l ime immemorial was quite app ropriate for thi» part­ic ular occasion. CONT. ON PAGE 14 RONSUE/ MR. ROXANNE welcomes all of his friends from the days of the TARA and the Aquarius to come and see him! DALLAS JOKE My wife, Roy, said to me, " George, it's about time you learn­ed to play golf. You know golf, that's the game where you chase a ball all over the country when you are too old to chase men." So I went to see Jones and asked him if he would teach me to play. He said "Sure, you've got balls, haven't you?" I said " yes, but sohetimes on cold mornings they're kinda hard to find". "Bring them to the Clubhouse tomorrow," he said, " and we will ·tee off. '' SHOWTIME What's tee off?" I asked. He sa?d, "It's a golf term and we have to tee off in front of the Clubhouse." "Not for me", I said, "You can tee off there if you want to but I'll tee off behind the barn somewhere." "No, no," he said. "A tee is a little thing about the size of your little finger." "Yeah, I've got one of those." " Well," he said, "You stick it · in the ground and put your ball on top of it." - I asked, " Do you play golf sitt­ing down. I always thought you stood up when you put your balls on the tee." Well folks, I thought that was stretching things a little bit too far, and I said so. He said, "You've got a bag, haven't you?" "Sure," I said. He asked, " your balls are in it, aren't they?" "Of course," I replied. "Well," he said, "Can'tyouopen the bag and take ont out?" I said, " I suppose I could, but damned if I'm going to." He ~sked if I didn't have a zipper , on my bag, and I told him no, I'm the old fashioned type. Then he asked if I knew how to hold my club. Well, after fifty years I should have some sort of an idea, and I told him so. He said, "You take your club in both hands." Folks, I knew right then he didn't know what he was talking about. Then he said, "You swing it over your shoulder." "No, no, that's not me; that's my brother you're talking about." · He asked me, "How do you hold your club?", and before I thought I said, "In two fingers ." He said that wasn't right and got behind me and put both arms around me and told me to bend over and he would show me how. He couldn't catch me there, be- & THURSDAY 9 cause I didn't put in four years in the navy for nothing. He said, " You hit the ball with your club and it will soar and soar." I said, "I could well imagine." Then he said, "And then you're on the green." " What's the green? I asked. "That's where the hole is," he said. "Sure you're not color blind?" I asked. " No. Then you take your putter." " What's the putter?" I asked. "That's the smallest club made," he said. "That's what I got, a putter." "And with it," he said, "You put your ball in the hole." I corrected, "Youmeanputter." He said, "The ball; the hole isn't big enough for the ball and the putter, too." Well, I've seen holes big enough for a horse and wagon. Then he said, "After you make the first hole, you go on to the next seventeen." He wasn't talking to me. After two holes I'm shot to hell. "You mean," he said, •:You can't make eighteen holes in one day?" "Hell, no. It takes me eighteen days to make one hole. Besides, how do I know when I'm in the eighteenth hole?" He said, "The flag will go up." That would be just my luclt!! !!! ti/ 11 l BILLIE McALLISTER RECORD ALBUMN % 2621 Throckmorton - Apt 136 Dallas, Texas 75219 Please send ___ copies at $5.98 TO:------------------- Include $1.00 for postage on each record. My check or money order in the amount of_____ is included. • 612 HADLEY HOUSTON r _pr~sents . UN THREE" ts guests PAGE 13 RONSUE'S 3236 McKINNEY DALLAS, TEXAS 526-9333 open l p.m. - close l a.m. DAILY! Methodist- Who really cares? by Ken Larson A legislative committee of the 1972 United Methodist Church Gen­eral Conference has rejected a proposal to add a provision to the denomination's Book of Discipline specifically stating that homosex­uals are eligible for the ministry. The rejection came on April 18. F. Gene Leggett of Dallas, sus­pended by the Southwest Texas Conference in 1971 after reveal­ing his homosexual lifestyle, ap­peared before the general conference's standing legislative committee on the clergy to ask 70 committee members to-recom­mend favorable action on his pet­ition to a plenary session of the conference. After hearing him for 10 min­utes, the committee voted to re­commend that the general conference reject his petition. The vote was not recorded, but only 2 committee members indicated opposition to the negative recom­mendation. CONT. ON PAGE 15 "Big George" highly reccomends RONSUE,S & BAYOU LANDING in DALLAS ' !"'AGE 14 Quality Printin~ at Printed while you wait prices. City Art Studio 4615 Mt. Vernon 524 5612 Complete Service - Layout, Typesettinμ;, and Printing. Next time you need printing try us and you will see their 1s a difference • m quality but not m pnce ·~· .. ,~J .. .,,~,·married.The small group sat in chairs as the organ music began. The bride dressed in ·a while gown with a while veit draped down over her face. She walked down the aisle slowly lo where the groom waited all dressed in black. It could have been a funeral. It was amusing yet sad: one of those comedies which border on the tragic. Yet, I cou\dn'tbringmyself to laugh or to cry. I just watched the fat bride's repulsive body be­hind her white veil. I observed the groom's body beneath the black of his coat and pants. "And do you take this lo be your lawfully wedded wife, to humor, cherist, cl cetera'?" "I do." "And you'?" "I do, loo." The rings were exchanged. And I now pronounce you man and wife. The veil was raised. Gerald Dan­ner bent forward to kiss the chubby veil-framed face of .Jerry Pale. llnlil divorce do you pa1·t. ;;*',( ***** The party was over. finished, done. The remnants of the merry­making were s<·allered heller­skcltt• 1· around the room: cups. bottlt·s of boo,.<. half-eaten food. 1 The hosts \\en he1·ding the last of the gut•sts 0·11 of the apa 1·tmenl. I final!, h1ard thL' door close. I sat· in a chair in the li\ing room. I s.ill held the tumbler of liquor ir> m., hand: ll\o inches of bourbor. still sloshed in the bottom. I wail•od. Je,-r.1 1·ame back into the living r0<im. walked slowl.,· across the rug t,, sit on the Ottoman at m., feel. .. I'm glad .mu came ... he said. He sct•mcd som1•what embarrass­ed. His fat features we1·e flushed. "Heall,·. I am ... .. You thought I wouldn't come?" "Straights often look on all of this as part of our sickness. They avoid us and this sort of display like the plague. ·· Poor .Jerr.,: I n1uldn·1 help but smile. He still considered me one of the straight world. lie still didn't kn<m the truth. '·Then I thought maybe you would come iust out of curiosit.1 to see the freaks on parade. I thought you would come and snicker and laugh. You know, make fun. You were the only straight we invited. Gerald said it was a mistake to invite you. lie said you would make fun." .Jerry paused to look at me. He gingerly extended a hand toward my knee, thought better of touching and brought it back to rest with his other hand in his lap. _ "We take this seriously, you know," he said. "This wedding and all, I mean. It might seem a bit silly, like we were just child­red playing al out little games, but we're not children any longer. We had a wedding here tonight: a real wedding. ~:ven the priest was a real priest. It meant a lot ot us. I think it would have killed me if you would have laughed." "You don't know me very well, do you'.''' I said. knowing as I said it that there was no one who really knew me well. Nol even my parents knew me. ' 'You're not the type that will let a person know you, are you?" he replied. "It's not because they don ·1 want to know you, not because the.1· don't lJ·y to know you. You've got this aura about you that draws people to you like a magnet. It's like a big neon sign that blares out: I'm good looking and I'm fun to be with. And you are good look­ing and you arc fun to be with. Rut th1•re·s another you inside that bod.,: am., ster.,. a stranger, some­one rw one eve 1· seems to see com­pl1• tL•I~ - - not even you. Maybe that second ., 011 is also part of your charm. There·s always those peo­ple \\ho try to figure out the myster­people \\ho 11·~ to figure out the m, steri1•s. Though I somehow d,;ubl thL'.' "i 11 e,·er figure out yours.·· . I stood up. looked down at him. He was still SL'ated on the foot­stool. His pig-like eyes looked at me. Ile suddenly didn't look quite as ugl_, as I had ah,ays imagined him. Ile didn't look handsome or prett., but either was he really ugl_, an~ morL'. ··r\l' found happiness today.·• Jcrn said. --:-.1a.,be it's just a fleeting momL'nt. a temporary ill­usion but a t l1•ast l're expe1·ienced it fo,· a t inll'. I ·n• gil en my whole L self lO c;,,,·ald. nn 1,hole being is his. There·, happiness in that sort of gi, ing. 11·, a happiness I doubt you \\ill e,er knell\. That's sadbe­cause _\IHI ha, e an a\\ fully lot to gi\e ... .. He happ_, ... I said. I laid my unfinished drink on the table .. Jerry stood Lo join me. \\ e both walked throul{h the living room toward the door. (;erald had disappeared mimentaril\ . I listened for him, heard nothing but my own breath­ing and the sound of .Jerry and my footsepls on the rug. " One quest­ion, ·' I said before he could open the door. "Whal'.'' . he asked. .. Whal exact!.\ did you tell them at the fort'.' ' ' · · \\ e told them that we were queer .... Jerr.1 said simply. "We told them that we loved each other and if they didn't let us love as civilians that we would love in the barracks as soldiers." "Tell Gerald good-bye," I said. "lie thought you would laugh, you know," .Jerry said. "He really thought that you would. He thought he knew you. At least for a moment he thought that he did." "Make it last," I said. "I can tell that you don't think it will," Jerry said. His hand was on the door knob but he still hadn't opened the door. "Maybe down deep I know you're right. But at least it is now. The future wiH just have to take care of itself." "I want you to be happy," I said sincerely. "Really I do." He smiled, opened the door. I stepped out into the hallway. "The Army sucks," he smiled sadly. "Yea," I said, "The Army su­cks." He still hadn't shut the door when I had reached the elevator at the end of the hall. He was still standing there in the opened door when the panels 2 6hosed between us. I went to .the same old bars, saw some of the same old people. Pearl was still behind the bar, still gnrn ing older. Mary was still there to greet me as if my exit from her life had been but a number of days instead of months. There were the faces that nodded, that smiled. that greeted me as a long­lost brother: faces I couldn't re­member and had probably never remembered. It wasn't really the same. It had changed, had not re­mained the same as when I had left it. Somewhere in the courseof events Sally had moved on, George and Peter had gone to Seattle, Marrianne and Milly had disapp­eared to San Francisco, Madison had even run off with a Greek sailor to God only knew where. There was a whole grouping of new faces, new bodies, new cocks which had taken up residence. His face was new, new but yet somehow I thought I had seen it before, might suddenly recognize it if given the opportunity. There was something about his eyes. Innocence? No, not innocence per se. They rather reminded me of my eyes peering back at me from a mirror in my early days of active homosexuality. "I bought you a drink," he said shyly. His voice was low, soft, almost indecipherable. He wasn't really looking at me when he said it. He was looking passed me, look ­ing toward the wall. "You shouldn't have," I said. "I wanted to," he said. For just an instant his eyes looked into mine before they were again staring passed me. "Thanks," I said. · He was young, almost innocent if not entirely. His hair was dark fell in bangs over his eyes. It was dark in the bar so I couldn't tell the color of his eyes. They were but black pools reflecting the light of a crystal ball revolving I've met people who have told·,, in the corner. _He wore a T-shirt me that the bars never change, ~nd fade~ blue Jeans . He was wear­that they're always filled with the mg /en~is shoes. He ~ore ~hor_t, same old faces night after night we! built. He had a di~ple m his after night. The old faces sup- ~Jt n cheek . th~t was_ endent even posedly just get older and every- b le . he . didn t smile. He. had a one grows ancient together. u_ gmg ndge down along his !~ft I've often wondered how they thigh that a lone coul~ ~ave easily could figure that. Granted there are accounted f~ir the admiring glances the regulars - - the faces that are he was getting from an_Y number of at first new, then old, then stag- th~'?!0P\e crowded. 1!1 the bar. nant - - but even the regulars even- 0 ~ d ask to Jorn you but tually change or move on to other I'm afrai_d you'd say no," he said. places. Homosexuals seem to be a He_ was nght. 1 would have prob~bly restless breed: always on the out- said no. He ~as t<?O ,att_ractive, look for that new bar that new too sweet looking. I d1dn t hke them place where they can' again _ t?o perfect. The perfect ones were at least for a while - - be a new f~ckle, 1 knew th~t for a f~ct. face, a new body, a new penis. Th~y told me y~u d say n?, he I came back to Los Angeles. hurried on, seemingly afraid that ·=----=---=--=-- NEED NEW COSTUMES? Want something "Origina I"? Costumes to fit YOUR personality! Strippers & Female Impersonators For appointment - call a~er I 2 noon . 528-1000 2305 S. Shepherd Ricci Cortez Houston, Tex. I had dismissed him. "They'?'' I ashed. He looked confused for a mom­e nt. Again his eyes came into focus and met mine. Thev seemed to plead , to beg for something. Then they we r e off again, surveying something elsewhere. "They,., he repeated. "People. They sai\f you we r e a lone r." " They were r ight,'· I said. " Listen," he said suddenly . I thought his voice qua ve r ed s light ly . " I've got to ta lk to someone." I a lmost told him to t ry his mothe r but had second thoughts . The r e was something about him tha t I found s trangely appealing. "Sit down," I said. "You must think I'm some kind of nut," he said, not sitting. He said it quietly, almost in a whisper. " You must really think I'm some queer bird." " Sit down!" I said. He sat down. " God," he mumbled. He put his head in his hands . "I'm doing this all wrong." "What all wrong?" " This," he said, not looking at me. "I know this was the wrong . way, but it turned out to be the only way. I've tried for two days to get an introduction. Nobody knows you. Oh, Pearl knows you but she always says you don't want to bothered." " Pearl is right," I said. He dr opped his hands, looked at me . His face was handsome even in its apparent misery . " Why me?" I asked. " Why did you have to talk to me?" "I wa s in the Na vy,'' he said. " I mean, I was in the Navy but didn' t know shit. I don' t know any­thing about broads or about queer bars." He turned his face into his hands again. " Somebody said you made it all the way through basic, that nobody was the wis er, andyou still went up and told them you wanted out." "These ' theys' certainly seem to know a lot about me." " ls it true?" he was looking at me again. I decided his eyes were blue. They were shielded by long lasher. I decided the lashes were almost too long for a boy. " Why?" I asked. " Why could it poss ibly concern you?" " I came to Los Angeles for -a piece of ass,'' he said. " I couldn' t stay in Dego. The group of guys down there would have given me a bad time if they had known I had never put it to a girl. So, I told them I had this girl friend in LA. I said I had to fly up here to ball her.'' " I remember you,' ' I said sud­denly. His face had clicked. "I saw you with Sally." I vaguely r ecalled the sailor seated with Sally in the bar, vague­ly remembered how innocent he had looked even then. " Sally is going to get it for s tatutory rape," Mary had said, or something like that. He had had shorte r hair then. "I thought she was a girl " he said. " Really I did. I actually thought that son of a bitch was a girl." " so what happened when you found out?" "I thought I loved her," he said. " Another funny: I a ctually thought I loved her." " What is it exactly you want from me?" I asked. He was mak­ing me uncomfortable. It had been a long time since I had come upon a face and a body which appealed to me as much as his did. " I went back to Dego," he said. " I went back and told them I was queer. I came back to LA but she had gone. Nobody knew where she had ~one. " "Listen, kid." I said softly. I could detect a least three faggots who were t rying to overhear our conversation. "Just because you screwed one drag queen, just be­cause you told the Navy you were queer does not make you one. Get out of the bars. Go some place where you will have a chance to meet some real girls. You a r en't going to find a nything but queens down he re." "He started to cry. I could see the tears welling in his eyes, gathe ring to flood his cheeks. His eyes turned glass/like with the tea r ing . He blinked and the wet­ness flooded his cheeks . " I want you," he sobbed, trying a trying to hold back his sobbing, t rying to wipe away his tears with the back of his hand. " I think I wanted you the first time I ever saw you -- even when I thought Sally was a gir l." He left off t;ying to wipe away the tears, looked down at the table. We sat in silence for a long time. I didn't know what to say_or BEER WINE what to do. "Oh, I'm queer all right, " he said finally. "I knew it even be­fore Sally." "Give yourself a chance in the straight world ," I said. " You're still young." " I've gone about this all wrong, haven't I?" he asked, looking up at me. He sniffed, wiped at his eyes again. " I knew it was the wrong way. I wanted to do it wome other way. But no one would introduce you. Those who knew you said you didn't want to be bothered. Those who didn 't know you were as an­xious for an introduction as I was. It could have gone on for years. I couldn't have waited that long." "I've got to go," I said, standing quickly. FROM PAGE 15 In his remarks, Leggett said tnat his s uspension by his conference sets up a dichotomy within the church in which a homosex­ual may be gr anted rights as a layman but not as a minister. l;'AGE 15 He said also that approval of his petition would not automatical­ly throw the ministry wide open to anyone, but simply says that no one will be barred because of his sexual orientation. The petition urging that homo­sexuals be eligible for the minis­try is one of three filed with the general conference by Leggett. Others would spell out the right of homosexuals to membership and participation in the church and affirm homosexual acts as a gift of God. The legislative committee will consider the other petitions later in the two-week session and then send them to the plenary session of the 1,000 conference delegates for final action. Many general conferencewatch­ers have observed that homosex­uality may well be the most hotly debated divil r ights issue of this vear's quadrennial meeting . MIXED DRINKS Under New Management 214 23rd (Tremont) f!/Jance on one Galveston 713 763 9031 PAGE 16 NEW OWNER LYNN (Mr.Clean) HUDSPETH Fr,:, Sat., & Sun. Spokesman for three supportive groups - - the Social Principles Study Commission, the Board of Christian Social Concerns and the Family Life Commission - - insist their statements do not condone homosexuality. They do affirm uni­formly, however, the need of the homosexual for the fellowship of the church. The furor began last winter when Time magazine became aware of the Family Life resolution, seeing in it an implicit condoning of homosexuality. In a highly unusual act, the ed­itorial committee of the Family Life Commission responded to subsequent pressure and offered several changes in the document. Heading off the possibility of a minority report from several members of the Commission, in­cluding three Methodist bishops. The original document called on local churches to extend to homo­sexuals the fellowship of the church. According to the new word­ing, homosexuals are to beoffered the "redemptive life" of the church. Backing away from the further possibility of implied ap­proval of homosexuality, the Com­mission has now projected the church as a healing community for homosexuals. Other portions of the document dealing with homosexuality remain essentially the same, with calls for removal of laws which de­fine homosexual acts performed by consenting adults in private as a crime and a special ministry to persons and families facing crises in sexual identity. The Board of Christian Social Concerns, traditionally the most liberal agency of the Methodist Church, issued its own resolution on sexual behavior following a re­cent meeting of its executive com­mittee. An earlier meeting of the full board had failed to produce agreement on the wording. The delecately worded state­ment, as it finally re-emerged from committee, neither condones nor condemns homosexuality. It echoes the Family Life proposal in calling for an end to laws which govern private sex acts un­less they can be shown to be con­trary to the public good. It goes on to state with sign­ificant forcefulness, however, its convictions about those sex acts which it considers intolerable: " We assert that criminal law should prohibit sexual acts accompanied by or characterized by voilence, threats, or coercion, sexual acts by adults involving children, or sexual acts or displays in public and offensive to the public." The Social Principles document declares homosexuals to be "per­sons of sacred worth" to be wel­comed into the church and ensured of their human rights. Dr. Paul Ramsey, professor of Christian ethics at Princeton Univ­ersity and a committee member, believes the new Social Princip­believes the new Social Princip­les statement should not have tried to deal with homosexuality at all. "The subject requires far more study than the Commission had, or~ could have, given it." he stated in a paper delivered to the delegates of the Southern New Jersey Con­ference on March 18. Dr. Ramsey insists the state­ment assumes something he be­lieves is not yet known about homosexuality - - that it is not an illness and is not transmiss­able. He added, "Of course, in a transcendent sense, diseased per­sons, even those with com­municable diseases, belong to the fellowship of the church. But the Commission meant to mean more than that. Verbally, we were told that the statement meant a homo­sexual should be welcomed as i:ninister of a church." He con­cluded, "The Commission, in my judgment, was unwilling to come clean- -by either deleting the entire statement or spelling out the mean­ing of 'welcome into the fellowship of the church' . . . Instead, the statement as it stands is largely a pious platitude, whose utility seems to be to secure the church's subscription to something it has explored neither theologically nor medically nor practically." Methodist Bishop James S. Thomas of Des Moines, chairman of the Social Principles Com­mission, revealed that the paragraph on homosexuality caus­ed the study groups more concern than any other in the whole docu­ment. He observed, "I believe that the church is going to have to face the person who happens to be a homosexual and still affirm him as a person. This is what we ~ --- -r ' l DELTA -~ WARRIOR ---l -- - ~- -=...I sought to do in the social princi­ples report. In the end, we had nothing to say about homosexual acts as such." Reactions indicate, however, that some persons in the church still consider condemnation the only Christian stance. Rev. Char­les Keyson, founder of the Good News evangeli<:al movement within United Methodism, objects to the fact that no mention of homosex­uality as "sin" is made in the Social Principles document. An example of a more temperate and perhaps more typical response appeared in an alternate social principles proposal offered by the University Park United Methodist Church in Dallas. It condemns homosexuality as an "aberrant form of sexuality" but concludes with a plea that the problems of homosexuals not be compounded by "insensitive and repressive measures." Revolution by Allen Young Homosexual: Oppression and Lib­eration, by Dennis Altman, Outer­bridge and Dienstfrey, distributed by E. P. Dutton, 1971, 242pp., $6.95 - hardcover. Homosexual: Behavior Among Males: A Cross-Cultural and Cross-Species Investigation, by Wainwright Churchill, Prentice­Hall, Prism paperback edition, 1971, 347 pp., $2.45. Changing Homosexuality in the Male, by Lawrence J. Batterer, M.D., Dell Publishing Co., Delta paperback edition, 1971, $2.95. "But how is gay liberation rev­olutionary?" "But what's your politics?" Questions like these, often toss­ed out like a mean challenge by straight radicals are very annoy­ing. The hostility and negation be­hind the questions make political gay people want to refuse to answer. Then there are the gay people who have always felt alienated from the political pro­cess, who hate politics, or others who once participated in the pro­cess and now believe that "poli­tics is a butch trip." They'd rather not think of their gayness as a political phenomenon. But gay liberation does offer a revolutionary perspective, and we do have a set of political ideas (granted that these ideas are em­bryonic and formative). It is only logical that we begin to set these down on paper. Much of the ideology of gay liberation is premised on writings from the women's liberation move­ment. Books like Sisterhood is Powerful, edited by Robin Morgan; Sexual Politics, by Kate Millett; and The Dialect of Sex, by Schul­amith Firestone, even though the authors are not explicitly identifi­ed as gay and even though they do not relate directly to the gay experience, are basic texts for anyone seeking the revolutionary dimension to gay liberation. Or, as one gay men's newspaper put it, part of gay liberation "is men listening to women. The first book, as far as I can determine, which explicitly puts fourth a well- developed gay liberation perspective is Homo­sexual: Oppression and Liberation, by Dennis Altman. At the outset, I should acknowledge, as does the author, that this perspective is limited by the fact that he is male and white. There are other things to learn from lesbians and from Third World gay people about their lives and viewpoints. Altman, a 27-year-oldprofessor of American government at the University of Sydney, is an Aus­University of Sydney, is an At trailian, but he has visited the United States, and the book focuses and Retoric on gay liberation as it has deve­loped here in America. One of the most important features of Altman's book is that he places the concept of gay liberation in the context of contemporary cul­tural and political currents. A sampling of names from the index will give you an idea of what I mean: Edward Albee, Ti-Grace Atkinson, James Baldwin, Abbie Hoffman, Martin Luther King, etc. Many of these people, of course, are not gay, but the point is that Altman seeks to deal with such concepts as '~a theory of sexuality" and the decreasing disjuncture be­tween politics and culture." Nor­man Mailer, for example, is quoted more often than any other indivi­dual precisely because he has chosen to define himself as a prototype American male, while "maleness," or masculinity, is one of the targets of the gay and feminist movements. One of the most interesting sect­ions of the book is a discussion of the relationship between gay liberation and the counter-culture. "The counter-culture may nothave fully embraced homosexuality," writes Altman, "but it went far enough in the direction of under­mining guilt, hypocrisy, and ex­treme sexual repression to make for a new type of homosexual." While putting down the '' square gayworld," and suggesting that it is part of the dying American culture, the author seems to con­culture, the author seems to elude that gay liberation as a move­ment is limited primarily to gay freaks. He's probably right, but that seems to be more of a prob­lem than an accomplishment. Here's how Altman sums up the revolutionary dimension of gay lib­eration in terms of its place in our era: "The critique of American soc­" The critique of American soc­iety that gay liberation has adopted bears the marks of a decade of rising expectations and rising frustrations. Just as the black roles, and the elimintion of the homo/hetero dichotomy. Although there is some personalized writ­ing, especially in the section on "coming out," Altman chooses a more analytical style which occa­sionally borders on the academic, but which remains lively and in­teresting. In addition, the author prepared an excellen~bibliography which fills nine pages with small print. One of the titles in that bib­liography is Wainwright Church­ill's detailed study, Homosexual Behavior Among Males: A Cross­Cultural and Cross-Species In­vestigation, which was originally published in 1967 and has now been reissued in paperback, presumably as a result of new interest in the topic. This book predates the gay liberation movement; further­more, the author never defines himself as gay and he keeps with­in his professional role as a psy­chologist and sexologist. The main purpose of Church­ill's book, and it is a worthy one, is to refute the widely-held sickness and sin theories about homosexuality propagated chiefly by psychiatrists and clergymen. The author makes extensive use of the statistical research done by Dr. Alfred Kinsey (to whom the book is dedicated) and his col­laborators, as well as research done by the anthropologists C. S. Ford and F. A. Beach. There is interesting historical data as well. While Churchill's book is well­argues, and the author communi­cates a sense that he has warm feelings about the humanity of gay people, there is something a little too academic and defensive oabout his approach. The reader, and annoyance with psychoana­lysts, but it is more professional disdain than gay rage. Churchill's male chauvinism is a major problem. He unquestion­ably accepts certain widely-held myths about lesbianism - - for example, Kinsey's assertion movement has revealed how far I (based on his research) that male the society resists on racism, so homosexuals are more numerous the youth revolt, fueled by the war than lesbians. He has a great deal in Vietnam, (was) struck by the of difficulty finding a proper place extent to which the American I in his analysis for effeminate extent to which the Ame males. It is almost with approval dream is an illusion based on that he points out that most male extreme competitiveness ana in- homosexuals are "very typically equality, and on American masculine," and he describes domination abroad. Women and those who adopt stereotype "fag­homosexuals have introducedcrit- got" behavior as "neurotic ex­ical concepts of 'sexism' and 'het- hibitionists." erosexual chauvinism' in demon­strating that the very bulward and center of the dream, its faith in home and family, often disguised oppressive and crude power re­lationships." Among the other topics tackled in ·this tightly written book are the relationship of gay liberation and black liberation, the challeng­ing of masculine and feminine At the same time, however, the author seems to understand the evils of masculinity in a "homo­erotophobic" (anti-gay) society: "The ideal of masculinity that "The ideal of masculinity that develops under these conditions develops under these conditions is one in which male chauvinism, arrogrance, crudeness of feeling, PAGE 17 and even brutality become em­phasized.'' Churchill's arrows are directed primarily at the psychiatric es­tablishment. One of its members, Lawrence J. Batterer, M.D., is the !ates in a series of shrinks to become rich and famous for "curing" homosexuals. The title of his book, Changing Homosex­uality in the Male, is typical of his phony liberalism. The word "changing" is a mere euphemism for "curing"; Batterer somehow senses that "curing" is no longer so acceptable an approach. The man is a pig, and I'm in­cluding him in this review be­cause revolutionaries need to know their enemies. This book describes his ideology and his therapeutic techniques. Once on his couch, patients tell about the reality of the gay oppression which brought them there. (Gay people talking about themselves is the most val­uable part of the book.) Their raps with the therapist {quoted atlength) are filled with guilt and self­hatred, but rather than helping to dissiapte these feelings, Batterer nurtures them as a good force. The therapist uses the patient's own observations and "known em­pirical data related to a homo­sexual way of life" to" cut through resistance." Resistance to what? To becoming straight, of course. The patient is supposed to take home tapes containing selected parts of the therapeutic dialogue (with stress on the patient's hopes for turning straight and his disgust for the gay life.) Hatterer's approach to male homosexual therapy reveals an in­trinsic relationship between male inism and heterosexual chauvin­ism in our society. In discussing the need for the ''male homo­sexual in transition" to find a "suitable woman," Batterer warns against "a woman who frequently shifts female responsibilities- - domestic activity, shopping, in­terior decoration, choice of clothes, planning of social events-­to the male," and against a woman who "may easily preempt the male's traditional role by obvious aggressive activity in decision­making about spending money or the actual earning of it." He shows us what his idea of "normal" is: "In normal late adolescence and early adulthood, the male gains a sense of his maleness in attraction to and con­quest of sexually attractive and de­sirable women." It makes me sad and angry to think that Hatterer's book, and not Churchill's or Altman's, will be influencing (directly or in­directly) so many other profess­ionals. But at least we are beginn­ing to have a basis to challenge the shrinks' monopoly in writing about homosexuality. ~I :J' ,- q P.\GE lf. MOVIE REVIEW BLEAK EXISTENCE The Last Picture Show Written by Larry McMurtry and Peter Bogdanovich Directed by Peter Bogdanovich (Loew's Delman) k '.ts-ntthing's blac here," says the waitress of the town coffee shop to the adoles­cent boy on the verge of grad­uating from high school. A Hank Williams tuen is playing on the juke box and the boy and the waitress look out at the decadent north Texas street, so typical of any small town where nothing any small town where nothing e11&r ~e are born in this town, live and die in this town. For amusement, there's the high school football team that doesn't know how to tackle, the basketball team that loses 121 to 14, the drive into Wichita Falls, or the picture show. When these don 't suffice, there's always some­f one around waiting to get laid, just to remind themselves and others that they're still alive. Writers Larry McMurtry and Peter Bogdanovich have created a menagerie of characters so auth­entic and so fr. htenin in their loneliness that the viewer can not help but feel that an image of himself is trapped on the screen. As an observer, there's Sonny, who on the threshold of adulthood, sees the women in the town be-tray their husbands, the men guzzl£ Pearl beer, and his schoolmates strive for the sexual fulfillment that is their only means in life to prove that they're a member of a clan which does nothing but wait for old age and death. By the time the film reaches its conclusion, the only fortunate ones in the town are the ones who have died. Sonny is consoled after the death of his mute friend and told, "Never you mind." Why should he? No one else does. His only course in life is to become one of Ulem - - - a Pearl beer guzzler who chases after women and plays pool in the cafe at night. One would hope that he could rise above it, but it is too obvious how en­trapped he is. The entirety of the film is ex-ecuted with the care which won it eight Oscar nominations, in­cluding Best Picture of the Year. 1·/(i aar & I 000"1 Game . ~ .,. It p,m, ope n da•IY * * @~ From the thick Texas accent so typical of our rural areas, down to the old Pearl beer bottles of the fifties, not a facet of the period is overlooked. Only Ben Johnson's name is recognizable among the actors, but the entire cast is so throughly convincing that one can never drive through a country town again without the feeling that you know the people who live there. Robert Surtees' black and white photography places the film in its proper perspective by sup­plying a perpetual overcast which parallels the shadows that hand over the people's lives. Director Bogdanovich deserves a special accolade for capturing the depravity of the human spirit. ~ardless of how depressing it might seem, he shows the reality of life so brutally honest that one cannot help but resign himself to seek a better way to live. Anything but resignation to an existence that resembles that of the sagebrush that blows through the north Texas streets. IMPRESSIVE FICTION Mary, Queen of Scotts Written by John Hale Directed by Charles Jarrott (Galynn Terrace) Undoubtedly when the readers of Lady Antonia Fraser's meti- * 2609 N. PEARL * (off CEDAR SPRINGS) 742-3269 culously researched biography saw that the 40 week best-seller was in producer Hal Wallis' hands, they knew to expect a faithful transposition of the novel to the screen as well as a first-rate production. Lady Fraser's readers were being toopresumptious. Pro­ducer Wallis used the Lady's title but employed scenarist John Hale to write his "original screenplay" which sneezes at the historical accuracies which Lady Fraser so painstakingly put across. Once again the public has been had. But all is not lost. Wallis has still delivered an impressive re­construction of the life of the Scottish queen. The first half of the two hour film is relatively accurate, but after a brief intermission Mr. Hale's originality comes to the front. Mary meets twice with Elizabeth of England, meetings Mary longed for in actuality but never accomplished; she becomes involved in the plot to kill her second husband and also commits adultery with the Earl of Both­well, neither of which is historical-ly accurate. It's effective on the screen, however, and gives the scholarly drama a bit of rouge. Mary's twenty years of captivity stretch for twenty minutes on the screen and the trial which sent her to the block is completely SHOWPLACE OF THE SOUTH WEST STARRING THE FANTASTIC "MR. DAVID" ~~~~~~ GJ.Y HOU5TON __,, w z ~ >- <t 3: C w w a.. V'I 0 ...J <t IL. IL. ::, al RICHMOND >- al ~ W. GRAY ::.:: WESTHEIMER W, ALABAMA 2 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY 59 C ~ w ::r: a.. w ::r: V'I ::r: I- ::, 0 V'I RICE 4 5 6 8 25 w V'I 0 ~ 1- z 0 ~ ~- 1-- U-Nt-VE- .. -.,-Tv~-o Indicates new bar. 1. FARMHOUSE 2. GALLEON 3. ALTHEA'S 4. RANCH HOUSE 6. LA BOHEME 7. NUNTIUS 8. MARY'S 9. 900 CLUB 11. RED ROOM 12. MR. FRIZBY 13. HI KAMP 14. MID TOWNE PAGE 19 9 16. MINI PARK 21. THE NUMBERS 17. EXILE 22. ROUND TABLE 18. LA CAJA 23. BRAZOS BAR 19. GOLD ROOM 24. GLASS STINE 5. ROARING 60 'S 10. COBRA CLUB 15. SURF 20. PINK ELEPHANT 25. STORYBOOK Mr. Friz/Jy Houston 3401 Milam at Francis -entrance on Francis Membership $2. per year Visits- Tuesday - Wednesday & Thursday - $3.00 Friday Saturday & Sunday Visits $5.00 OPEN 24 hrs. ] CLOSED MONDAY 523-8840 THE NUNTIUS PUBLISHED MONTHLY HOUSTON, TEXAS Editor - Phil Fronk Assistant Editor - Poul d' Arey Advertising - Tim Jomes Production •- Mori on Snoots Associate Editor• Scottie Harbers 4615 MT. VERNON HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 524-5612 PAGE 20 OUR COl\lVIUNITY NOThiNG hUMAN is AlieN TO us TROY PERRY IN DALLAS Soldier has to prove he 1s Gay but where was the Gay community (BUT WHERE WAS THE GAY COMMUNITY) Troy Perry flew into Dallas Tuesday (April 25, 1972), held a press conference with the Dallas Morning News, TV Channels 8, 5, and 4 and completely captivated his audiences spreading his own particular brand of "charisma" all over the place. The news media asked the quest­ion they always ask: What causes homosexuality; How does the homosexual fit into God's sche_me of things; Is there a conflict be­tween Reverend Perry's homosex­uality and his theological training; Is there greater acceptance of homosexuality in America today? Reverend Perry easily answered these questions in his GAY AND PROUD manner. But one wonders why they were asked. News story reprinted below is from the Dallas Morning News - Channel 5 did not show any of the film taken at the press conference. Channel 8 viewers saw less than a minute of the interview and even that was spoiled by the news commentator's statement: "Homosexuality is on the increase in Dallas." (Perhaps he meant to say, "Since gay people are coming out of their closets, homosexuality appears to be on the increase in Dallas.") The evening service at the Beth­any Presbyterian Church was delightful, fun, spiritual, fun, ed­ucational fun, and beautiful - - - but only 106 people were there. Church leaders were disappointed. A great deal of effort had been made to noqty the gay community of this important event: Articles appeared in the church Newsletter and the NUNTIUS - OUR COMMUNITY, weekly announcements were made in church, and leaflets were passed out in most of the gay bars in Dallas. Some traveled from Ft. Worth, San Antonio, Houston, Oklahoma City, and Tulsa to hear Troy Perry. But where was Dallas? It's true many homosexuals are turned off by formal religion. And considering centuries of religious persecution of homosexuals, who can blame them? But the tiny few who did come together that night had a genuine feeling of concern and warmth for their gay grothers and sisters that surely can't be found in some gay gathering places. But then, perhaps that's not important. (Reprinted from the Dallas Morn­ing News.) ONE TO TOUR EUROPE ONE's Ninth Annual European Tour will take off from Kennedy Air­port in New York on September 8, 1972 to begin the most original such Tour to date. Members of our group will converge on New York (with some optional activities there) from all parts of the U.S. and Canada to initiate three weeks of getting acquainted with one ano­ther's viewpoints and those of homophiles in several European countries. These Tours since I 964 have built a record entirely unique in the Homophile Movement. They are always carefully planned to include major points of interest that are prime tourist attractions along the route, but it is never forgotten that a Gay Tour is not just another tour. Arrangements are carefully made to meet with members of ONE who live in Eu-rope , and also to visit homophile organizations there as well as Gay bars and other establishments in cities where they exist. Such visits often feature a ban­quet, a dance or other entertain­ment for the visitors with warm hospitality which quickly melts the barriers of language and custom. It is such things and the genuine camaraderie which develops be­tween Tour members which ex­plains why there are people, each year, who have been once, twice or more times on previous ONE Tours. The April 2 ONE Institute Lec­ture Series event in Los Angeles was devoted to showing of color slides taken by Tour member Les (of Detroit) during our 1971 Tour. The slides showed happy Gays from all over the U.S. (and Mont­real) rambling through the beaut­iful countryside and picturesque cities from Holland to Italy. On Good Friday, Pfc. Philip Andrew Schmidt, 20, was handed an undesireable discharge from the Army for being Gay. The sepa­ration concluded a 62-day ordeal of threats, detention, isolation, frustration, terror, and an attempted suicide. The apparent harrasment, along with the un­favorable discharge which robs him of most Veterans' benefits, was the result of bureaucratic suspicion about his homosexuality and the confusion in the Army regulations themselves regarding the discharge of homosexuals. Schmidt entered the Army in December, 1970. Early this year, he was processed for duty in· Vietnam. On February 7, he re­ported to the Overseas Replace­ment Center (ORC) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. The next day, he pre­sented himself to Major Ruther­ford, Personnel Adjutant of the ORC, requesting discharge on the grounds of his homosexuality. He was armed with a notarized aff­idavit, a letter from Franklin E. Kameny, president of the Mat­ta chine Society of Washington, D. C., and a letter from Dr. William Ferguson, a psychiatrist for the lseattle Counselling Service for Homosexuals. In part, the affidavit read: "I Pfc. Philip Andrew Schmidt, do hereby affirm and certify that I am a homosexual by tendency and inclination, and have been so for some time; that these tendencies are proving increasingly difficult to resist, especially in the all­male environment of the Army; that I expect to remain homosex­ual, having neither the desire, the intention, nor the expectation of changing these tendencies and inclinations.'' An interview with an Army psy­chiatrist was scheduled. On the next day, after a preliminary scre­ening interview, he was released for shipment to Vietnam. Schmidt then contacted the Commanding Officer of the ORC, Major Merle D. Cox, who told him he would have to be investigated by the Criminal Investigation Division (CID). Sch­midt phoned the CID office on base and was told that he could get five years in jair for sodomy. He refused to go in for the in­terrogation and called his lover, Eddie Nalley of Washington, D.C. to see what could be done through his congressman's office. The next morning, Schmidt was discovered with his wrists slashed in an apparent suicide attempt. He was rushed to the hospital, attended, and quickly released. He was sent to Mental Hygiene for an interview with an Army psy­chiatrist, Major Zeff. Zeff again released Schmidt for shipment on the grounds that he was perfectly normal, though suffering some "misorientation to military life," and "resentment of ~uthority." He was then placed in a den­tention room of a baggage building for three days. He was not allow­ed any phone calls, even to obtain counsel. On February 14, just a few hours before he was to board the plane for Vietnam, a phone call came from his Congressman, Robert A. Roe (Rep., N.J.), and he was released. He contacted Stonewall, a treatment center in Seattle for an attorney. On phoning Kameny in D.C., he was advised to submit to the investigation and give the name and address of his lover. Kameny assured him that by reason of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, the Army cannot prosecute for off-base, non-mili­tary related offenses. On the morning of February 16, Ash Wednesday, David Scott, a Seattle attorney, arrived on base along with Chuck Stargo, a staff member of the Seattle Counselling Service for Homosexuals, and Wil­liam H. DuBay, a director of Stonewall, for the purpose of re­presenting Schmidt during his in­terrogation by the CID. The three were first interviewed by Major Coe, who informed them that although it was Army regula­tion that homosexual persons be discharged, it was left to his dis­cretion as to how the claim of homosexuality could be verified. The Army medical authorities had refused to do it; the only alter­native, he claimed, was an in­vestigation by the CID. Cox de­fended holding Schmidt in the de­tention room, saying, "I had the responsibility to tell that man to sit down and stay there until he boarded the plane. After that at­tempted suicide, I just didn't want any more monkey business." DuBay and Stargo, as represent­atives of organizations involved with the emotional health of homo­sexual persons,expressedconcern about the Army's threatening ta tics and treatment of Schmidt as a mal- ,' ,J' inger. "You have threatened him with Court-Martial and prison for evidence that he is obliged to give in order to prove his homosexuality - -and this in spite of the fact that Army Regulations call for sepa­ration by reason of just homo­sexuality or homosexual tend­encies, not just overt acts." Cox repeated that an investigation by the CID was the only way he could verify Schmidt's claim. Because of the suspicion of mal­ingering, Schmidt was being forced to confess to a crime of sodomy to prove his homosexuality. He might get out of the Army, but he could possibly get five years in jail. This point was confirmed by officials of the CID who said, "We only investigate felonies. We can't be of any help in this case, un­fortunately, unless he admits to some crime." Du Bay and Strago were not admitted to the two-and-a-half hour interrogation by an Army investigator. During that time Scott made several calls conferring with made several calls conferring Kameny in D.C. Under advise, Schmidt gave the name of his lover and the history of their relationship, which began since he had entered the Army. His orders for Vietnam were cancelled. From February 16 to March 31, Schmidt was detained at his battalion area under a "Miscell­aneous Hold." On March 11, Nalley and Kameny, as witnesses, were interrogated together by the CID in Washington, D.C. On March 14, Schmidt was in­formed that he was receiving a undesireable discharge. He de­undesireable discharge. He de­cided to appeal the decision and a hearing was set for May 3, postponing the discharge until the •middle of June. Because of mount­ing emotional pressures caused by the delay, he waived the hearing on March 27. On March 31, the day of his discharge, Schmidt was illegally ordered to perform detail in his civies. While tearing down some shelves, he stepped on a nail which penetrated his tennis shoe deep into his foot. He had to be treated at the hospital. The follow­ing day, he flew back to Washington D.C. The Rolling Stones will be in hlouston on June 25 for two shows. Tickets wi II be on sole for one day only, Sunday, May 21; begining at 8:00 A.M. This is the only Houston concert ste for the stones this year. The show and tickets willbe at Hofindze Pavi Ion. ONE TOUR Who goes on these Tours? A surprisingly varied membership, ranging in age from the early 20's into the 70's/ Tall and Short, fat and lean, goodlooking -- and the rest of us, all thrown in together. A travelling cross-section of the Gay Community it is, Gay Am­ericans meeting Gay Europeans, while learning wonderful lessons in tolerance, appreciation and understanding. Director ·or the Tour will again be ONE Founder W. Dorr Legg. It is also hoped that ONE Presi­dent Jim Kepner may also be able to go. Of special interest is the fact that among the Tour members will be the Reverend Troy Perry, founder of. the Metropolitan Com­munity Churches, and his charming young friend, Steve Jordan, founder of UNIDOS, the first group for Gay Chicanos. Rev. Perry plans to be meeting with individuals and groups along the way who are in­terested in learning more about the program of Metropolitan Com­munity Church, with possibility of opening up branches in European cities of this rapidly growing as­pect of the Homophile Movement. Another equally prominent member of the 1972 Tour will be Pat Rocco, equally famed as a singer and as a director and pro­ducer of gay movies. It is ex­pected that during the course of the Tour he will be producing a movie using charming young models selected from applicants in the various countries visited and photographed in the settings of their homelands. If it is found pos­sible to be fitted into his schedule, Pat will also make a documentary of gay life and the European Homo­phile Movement, Handsome and charming, Pat will in his own right make a happy addition to the ONE group. All in all, the 1972 ONE Tour gives every promise of being a memorable and exciting event. There is little doubt that at this early date complete plans for the entire Tour can only be sketched out in their broad aspects with every likelihood that many in­teresting details can be· developed and added before take-off time September 8th. There are various prices for 1 options every budget. If you haven't been . to Europe and don't want to go alone, go with your friends and mine - go ONE's Tour. For ad­ditional information write to One Institute, 2256 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles, California. A Tour of this quality is made possible only through the kind generosity of Friend of ONE, Chuck Thompson, who provides the facilities and expertise of his years of travel service experience to ONE at cost. It is requested, therefore, that all Tour members make their travel arrangements to and from New York through ONE Tours. This will help him to make such budget prices available. PENIS BUILDER You can now buy this beautifully designed Hyperemiator (penis enlareer) direct from the factory - shipped the same day we receive your order. This amazing new desien and technique has been thoroughly and scientifically tested, and proven effective and safe. Our Hyperemiotor will: • Increase size of penis, both diameter & length • Obtain immediate rigid erection, even though normal erection is difficult. • Couse penis to be more sensitive to touch • Increase staying power • Increase desire 30 day money bock guarantee if not completely satisfied with our produc,ts. WHAT YOU RECEIVE WHEN YOU PLACE THIS ORDER: • A complete Hyperemiotor Un it with instructions, ready for u••· • Plus a bonus offer of the only Moyo:r.ine written about the subiect showing before and ofter pictures, complete history (with pictures) on all the known devices and methods ever used for enlarging the mole penis. For this complete pock age bargain send cash, check or money order in the amount of . .. . $29. 95 To: SAEPAS ENTERf>RISES Poat Office Box 66003 Houston, Texas 77006 ADULTS ONLY Nome __________ _ .Address _____ _ City ___ State __ Zip __ (PLEASE PRINT) On Homosexuality, Marriage and The Attempt to Change PAGE 21 "Doctor, what chance is there for me to change?" Answer to the question, com­monly asked by homosexuals, de­pends on the patient, says Dr. Martin Goldberg, psychiatrist at the University of Pennsylvania. "Entering into marriage while concealing one's homosexuality is an invitation to disaster," the psychiatrist warns. If he or she truly wants to change, there is a chance but if the individual is worried only about social or familial pressures, the chances are nil. Even for the well-motivated per­son the psychotherapy will be long, painful and expensive, Dr. Gold­berg writes in the journal Con­sultant. Another frequent question seeks advice on revealing the problem to a prospective marriage partner. Corses of Action If a homosexual individual ex­presses desire for change but is reluctant to see a psychiatrist, Dr. Goldberg advises two practical courses of action: Encourage the patient toattempt heterosexual contacts social as well as sexual. Persistent ex­posure to the opposite sex may help bring about a change in pattern. Encourage the patient to exam­ine areas other than the sexual aspects of his life to see if they rontribute to the deviation. GO<: 7 MID-TOWNE LOUNGE 2923 5.MAlN HOU5T0N FOR A GOOD OLD-FASHIONED FUN-TIME NIGHT OF GO-GOING; PIANO-SINGING; HIP-TWISTIN::i; COWBOY-ROOTINC; FOOT-TAPPING; *BEER-DRINKING; PATRY-FEELING; MAKE THIS ONE STOP YOU DON'T MISS! *(fjRING YOUR OWN BOTTLE WHENEVER
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