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The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1971
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The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1971 - File 001. 1971-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3262/show/3230.

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(1971-07). The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1971 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3262/show/3230

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1971 - File 001, 1971-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3262/show/3230.

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Title The Nuntius, Vol. 2, No. 7, July 1971
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date July 1971
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28911959
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript CALENDAR AUSTIN AUSTIN BOOK MART llS East 6th St •• •• •• •• ••. • . • , . PEARL STREET WAREHOUSE 18th and Lavaca , • , • , , , , • • • • • • CORPUS CHRISTI CHAPARRAL BOOK MART 413 Peoples St. , •• • • , • , , , • , • , , HADRIAN'S PATIO CLUB 6000 Agnes (Hwy. 44) • .• , , , , , , . , DALLAS BAYOU CLUB 'Jl 17 Rawlins • , , • , , , , , . , , , , • , CANDY STORE, The ll 14 Throckmorton , ••. , , , , • , • CRESCENT ART THEATRE 2100 Elm •••••• • .• • , , • . , , . • , DETOUR LOUNGE 3113 L ive Oak St .• • •• , • , , •• , , , KING OF CLUBS 2116 North Field ••• • • , .. , , • , ORCHARD CLUB 2311 North Henderson , , , , • , , , • RONSUE'S 3236 McKinney . , , , • , • , , , • , , , • T J's of DALLAS 3307 McKinney , , , , , , ... , , . , , , HOUSTON ART CINEMA ½ Blk. East of 6100 Kirby Dr. (BATHS) Mr. Frizby 3401 Milam •••• , • , , , , • , , • • • CARAVAN, The 5404 Nordling • • • • · • • • • • • • · • DIXIE DISTRIBUTING CO. 4231½ Bellaire Blvd. • • • • • • • • • • ENTREE', The 1322 Westheimer • , • • • • • • • • • • • EAST END NEWS 7114 Lawndale • , • , . , , , , , , • , , • FARM HOUSE, The 3535 Westheimer • •• , • , , , • , • , , •• FRIZBY, Mr. J.«I 1 Mil am ••• • •••••• • ••• •• •• GALL EON, The 11~ Richmond Ave, , , . , , , • , •• • • 478-0176 884-0058 526-9330 526-9408 747-2688 823-0846 741-0218 821-4350 526-9333 526-9368 528-8186 523-8840 691-9489 668-0913 528-8840 926-0325 622-5942 523-8840 528-8787 JULY, 1971 G. B. INTERNATIONAL 1840 Westheimer , , • , • , • , • , , • , GUILDED GARTER, The 2613Milam • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • HI KAMP 3400 Travis • ••• • , , • • , , , , , , , , La BOHEME 1504 Westheimer . , , • , • , , , , • , • , MAIN STREET NEWS 4418 South Main • • • · • • • • • • • • • • MARY'S BAR 1022 Westheimer • • • • • • • • • • • • • • MATCHBOOK ADVERTISING 4615 Mt. Vernon • • • • • • • • · · • • • ' MID.'TOWNE LOUNGE 2923 South Main • , , •• • • , • , • • • • MODEL MAN 412 Westheimer • , • , • , •,. , , , • • • MINI-PARK THEATRE 2907 South Main • • • • · • • • • • • • • • NORTH HOUSTON NEWS 8718 Jensen Drive , , • , • , , , • , • • • RANCH HOUSE 5607 Morningside • , •• , • • • , • • • • • RED ROOM 612 Hadley , , • , , ·, • • • • • • • • • • ROARING 60's 2ll5 South Shepherd • • •• • , •• , , • , ROSALIE NEWSTAND 1402 Texas Avenue • , , , • , , • • • • • ROSALIE's TOO 900 Preston • ••• , , , , • , , • , • • • SIXTY-SECOND BAIL BOND 2319 South Shepher~ , • , •• • , • • • • • TIME TO READ 3110 South Shepherd •••• ••• , , • • · TOM FRI END P.O. BOX 55541. .• • •• , • , • , • • • LAREDO LAREDO BOOK MART 901 Santa Ursla ••• , , , , , , , , , • • • SAN ANTONIO APOLLO NEWS 515½ E. Houston Street , •• • , • • • • EL JARDIN 106 Navarro Street •• , • • , • • • • • • • SAN ANTONIO BOOK MART 129 East Houston Street • • , • • • • • • WACO 528-8911 528-8808 528-9772 528-9552 528-7142 528-8851 524-5612 528-9397 528-2652 528-5881 691-8411 226-8242 528-9430 226.S0JJ 22fr7534 526-4406 528-8950 464-0052 223-5477 CAPRI (Artlilm Theatre) 1319 Harth 15th St, •• •• •• •••• , , , , • • • • PARIS ADULT THEATRE & BOOKSTORE 810 Austin Street , •• , , , • , • • • • • Everyone's Fun House - Dallas RON SUE's .... 526-9333 4# DR. KAMENY INTERVIEWED ~tlz,e cffeUNCZ--IUS 40t TEXAS -a -,:, 0 (I) e..n.. :.:.:.,. .. 3 a .. a (C n- ::::, 0 :::, 0 V, en a G) (.I..). n -· ~ < 0 (I) (I) 0.. en C -· (I) :::, (I) :::,. . :::c: 0 .. (I). . ::::, V-·, en G) G> a l> "-< -< C j Nev, Orleans DA Arrested - Austin -. ·.~ ~ .­tll, e KA.MENY SPEAKS AT The following interview is with Fronk Komeny, pres­ident of the Mattachine Society of Washington and the first "known" homo­sexual to run for the con­gress of the United States_ The benefits of his campaign ,o the Gay community ore numerous besides opening the door for many· more to become a part of the govern­ment they suppott. He has traveled thr9ughout the country en-cauroging Gays to become a, part of their government- He spake before a crowd of about seventy five people at the Gay Pride Conference, at the University of Houston on June 19_ The title of his speech was originally to have b'een .. What is Gay Liberation?" but due to some mi sunder­standing the title was chang­ed to "Gay's in Polit'ics"; on this subject Dr. Kameny is well versed. The. inter­viewer was Mr. Scottie Herbers. Q. Dr. Kamney, what do you feel is the Gay' s big­est problem in this country? A. That can take the next - -h~ur . io ;,,;s~er( Broadly, of course, · it's·. the .. same problem that every minor­ity group hos-Qam~ly, t),e negative attitude-s -which result in damage to self­esteem, self-congidence, -self--imoge, . dignity and so on. Those _attitude,- which. tell a person he's second class and second rate and th;,t· h-is condit.ion is second class and second rote. He actually begins to believe this at the gut level and starts to act that way, to respond to life in that way. 2 UH As I have said, all minority groups have this in common. It's the kind of thing that's being fought with such slogans as, "Black Is Beau­tiful" and "Gay Is Good:' Thot's general. Now, more specifically, of course, are simply the manifestations of societal , prejudice ar:,d o variety of ways ranging from denial of employment, whether private or public, to the crimina.l law and it's administration and implemen­tation. Those are among the problems. One of the major problems which arises out of the others is the relative­ly complete lack of social resources for homosexuals. About the only thing that we really have in most places at present ore the gay bars. They serve a very real func­tion, but they are far from the ideal social arena. And this means that for thoes people below the legal bar age, whatever that may be in various cities, there is absolutely nothing in the way of social I ife. I think this is a very critical need. I get calls from people in their teens who have ab­solutely no social life at all with their peers--no dating, dancing, leading a comfort• abl.e, rewarding social life. They have absolutely noth­ing. So here is an important area. Q. Well this is one thing -mat I run into personally here in Hou slon is that a person in their teer>s has no where to go unless it is a "het" or "in it" establish­ment and .there is simply no pl ace for them to go. What are the alternatives, I mean 8{UN'TIUS MAY l971 OUSTON, TEXAS JIM GARRISON NEW ORLEANS DISTRICT ATTORNEY what can we do ta provide a place for the"below 21" in th is community? A. Well, they are beginning to be set up in some cities at present it is still mor~ i~ the talkeng stage, than beyond that. For example coffee houses, which since they do not involve alch o I ere open to anybody. Just as one example, not neces• sarily the best, the Univer­sity of Maryland, the Gay group on that campus (,as a coffee house which is open every Friday, it's open to to an~dy on or off compus. There ore p Ions in Washing· ton for opening of another coffee house downtown which will be open to Gay people of all ages. We held a number of dances in Washington which were open to the whole Gay com• munity, without restriction to age, we had people there from thirteen and up. There is a group in New York, called "Gay Youth" which has an upper age I imit, noth­ing to do with the traditional lower age limit of 21. They have chapters in a number of cities, they are largely socialy orient.,d although by no means totally so. These are the first beginning, exploratory efforts to remedy a situation which very much remeding. Now Washington, all bars ore open at 18 and New York as well which helps thpt situation a I ittle bit for the upper end of the teens, but in most other cities it is 21 and it raises a major problem al I throuth that area. I th ink th.at the Gay community, the homoph ii e orgin izations in the post have been very much afraid of having lo do with the younger people. I think they have been almost paranoid about it. This is changing considerably, none of the newer groups have lower age limits, Mattachine of Washington, which is one of the older groups, totally deleted all mention of age in it's regulations, about a year and a half ago. So that at least you are beginning to bring people into the com­munity, but of course Hith the subject being talked about increasingly now it's unlike the situation in the years back where the Gay teenager thought he was the only one in the world; he did not know of anybody else. He is at least aware of the fact that there are lots more around and there­fore if he searches there is in fact something to be found, in which he was not sure existed before. I pre­dict that in the next couple of years you w i II see the the first high school Gay dances and I expect the PTA's will scream and the school boards will screetch. We will go on and organize them and if they make too much of a fuss we will simply call them into court and through the constitution at them and we will go right on ahead and organize them and it will probably will be the same sort of thing as with the first college groups, there wi II be a lot of static and it wi II take a few very very determined people to push the thing through the first few times and after that ii will be gen­erally excepted. Q. I do feel that it is going to take some courageous people, I have to agree with you there. Who would you say you draw your largest amount of support from? A. Support in what sense ? Q. Finicial, moral, and just the actual running of a political campaign? See KAMENY - Page 31 ARRESTED New Orleans District Attourney Jim Garrison, vice squad officer Robert Fry, vice squad chief Edward Soule, and to other people, were arrested on federal charges of bribery, illegal gambling, and obstruction of of low enforcement; the justice depcrlment announc­ed. Attourney General John Mitchell announced in Wash­ington that five other people were being sought. Accourd­ing to a 113 page affidavit filed with the complaint payments of up to fifteen hundred dollcrs a month were being made to Garrison and the pal ice offical s to protect illegal gambling, machines owned by TAC Amusement Company. Tape recordings of some of the actual tran sec­tions were part of the govern­ments case. Garrison, who is the district, who was involved in a long running investigation in an attempt to show that mare than one per son was involved in the assination of President John F . Kennedy. The gover­nment affidavit names Pershing Gervais as the informant to expose the alledged gambling operation. Garvai s was identified as chief investigator on Garri­son's staff between 1962 and 1965. Gervais was quoted that for nine years he was the conduit for pay offs from pinball machine owner John Elms to Garrison. With bi­monthly payments ranging from two to three thousand dollars. The charge of perjury was filed agni st Clay Shaw less than two days after he was acquited of the conspiracy charge by a jury in late February 1969. Alter That trial, the New Orleans Times Picayune and the New Orleans States-Item ran front page editorials claim­ing Garrison as being unfit for public office. Meanwhile Garrison was coming up for re-election in 1970, and not stand the newspaper's broadside and slapped an­other charge on Shaw to stop that press. It did so effective­ly, that Garrison was able to eek! out a victory at the pol ls. The case had served its purpose regardless of the fact that there was no evidence to support perjury. More lo the point how• ever was the foci that Garri­son was guilty several times during the conspiracy case of manufacturing evidence ogni st Mr. Shaw or attempting same. Garrison's aids look a burglar by the Shaw resi• dence lo climb over a wal I and break in ta plant a piece of convincing "evidence," but the burglar refused. During the trial Garrison used a dope addict in jail to testify that he hod seen Shaw exchange a parcel al the Pontchatrain Lake front at dusk al one hundred yards di stance. Not brought out at the Ir i al was whether the weather was clear enough to have afforded the addict such an identifiable view. A few years before the Shaw case Gorri son was having· a fude with an ex­pol ice chief in New O~leans named Giavusso. The pol ice chi el found that Garrison was a regular patron al a house of prostitution on Conti street which was pointed green. A raid on the house produced the madam and the girls, includ­ing Garrisons favorite, but no Garrison. He had left fif­teen minutes earlier. The favorite ended up as Garri­son's receptionist at his court house office. It goes without saying that she had no previous legal experience. But then neither did Garr ison. His previous legal experience before becoming district atlourney was lo defend the madam of the i,een house. · Before running for District attourney, Gorri son, registered with a downtown employment agency lo find him a job. The agency was unable to find Gorri son a job. Before the Shaw trial, Gorri son was a frequenter of an old, establ lshed Gay bar in the French Quarter. He has had a reputation for liking teen aged boys. See February 1971 issue of NUNTIUS page 22, article on Garrison's being accused of molesting a thirteen year old boy. Garrison has also been district atlourney while the Gay extortion ring has also been operating, see February 1971, NUNTIUS, page 7. This is where vice squad members start sex play in public places and arrest any takers they can get after the sex, and later drop charges if the person pays them thousands of dollars. Also see NUNTIUS issue March, 1971, where a Texas heir had sex with Garrison one evening and was arrested the following evening for approaching the exited male organ of a vice squad member Such is the double dealing of Garrison. It is a miracle that he is sti II in office and not impeached. Persons who know Gar• ri son well and who have worked with him say that he is mentally ill and not with reality. "HAIR" e 1n Houston It was Wednesday night and we were on our way to see .,Kitty's Litter" and Hair at the GB International. The two people who were along for the ride couldn't believe that I was taking them lo a bar lo see Hair. I kepi trying to convence them that I had some sence left, but lo be honest I was afraid we were in for a real bummer. We were early enough to see the female impersonation numbers, who are worth going lo see by themselves, but it was clear in my mind that many were there in this packed house to see a show fall flat on it's face. Hair is a social protest with emphisis on communico-­tion through the music media. In this scence the medium becomes the mess­age. The show is not meant to entertain but lo point up serious flaws in the Ameri­can way of Ii le. The fact that the show is so much fun is due largely lo the fact that people can laugh at themselves. The level on which the play operal!'S is somewhat confusing because you expect there lo be some hidden meaning, slop looking the play is honest. It is America quaking beneath the yoke of military fascism, and its youth dying from the hate, the war, the polution, and the drugs which are al I the product of a sick country. The building that is being used presents a few problems and you soon real­ize that a lot of continuity is lost because of the poor lighting. The sound has a few rough edges but al I considered the effect is still there. Long pauses between the scenes are disturbing but they give the waiters a chance to wait on you: The costumes and make up are alright, someone must have gotten the idea of what the show is about. The players develop well and you get the feeling that this is a professional production. Hair was meant lo be a ball-breaker i.e. shocking, but if ju st doesn't seem to be that anymore. Above all the show has become fun for the audience. The music, dancing, and singing are a part, a reflection, a sign of the tribal meeting going on around you and if you want the performance to be a success then you must be­come a part of the music, dancing and singing, The shows before Hair change daily and are a must as is this fantastic produc­tion of Hair. S. Harbers GAY MURDER, SUICIDE Dallas - Police said the shooting of two men on an East Dallas street appeared to be a case of murder­suicide. The victims were ident­ified as Walter J. Guillory, 28, of 5124 Live Oak, and James A. Harrell, a 38-year­old Baton Rouge, La., man. The shooting occured ~bout 6 p.m. following an arguemenl between the two men in the 800 block of Munger, witnesses told police. Guillory was shot twice in the chest and stomach, Harrell once in the brain. Both were dead on arrival moments later al Parkland Hospital. At this time the reason far this tragidy is not known. opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE ~@rrow~rro,r~@rro arro ID>~[UL~~ The 90th annual con­vention of the American Library Association was held in Dallas the week of June 19th through the 26th. The ALAISRRT Task Force on Gay Liberation provided an al tern ate program cJ activities. June 19th several mem­bers of the ALA meet :,,,ith local supporters of Gay L i':ieration in the Task Force Site to review plans for the counter convention. Israel Fishman reviewed the aut h­ority underwhich the task for,ce constitutes a I ig it i­mate branch of the ALA, according lo ALA organ­izational rules. Round Tables are major groups within ALA dealing with particular areas of interest and authority for the creation of Round Tables is found in the constitution of the ALA. NUNTIUS In 1969 The Soc ial Responsibi lily Round Tab I e (SRRT) was establ ished by the ALA in order to provide a forum for the development and implementation of new concepts in library service. In 1970 The Task Force on Gay Liberation was organ­ized according lo the by­laws of SRRT. The purpose of The Task Force on Gay L iberation is to ra ise issues of di scriminat ion against gay people with in the lib­rary profession and lo make library service awards available to gay peop le. Mr. F ishman s tated in the strategy session that the intention of the Task Force was lo provide not a disruption lo the AL A meet­ings, but an a lternative to them. The Task Force is against neutral ity and con­servatism. It is not enough PUBLISHED MONTHLY HOUHQN, UXA$ E41tw - Phil FTGllli Auistant E41tor - P•I 4' key Hlwrti1ins - Ti111 ,._, Production - M«i• s-ot, '615 MT. VHMDM HOUSTON. TIXAS 77006 524-5612 SUBSCRIBE TO THE NUHTIUS $,C. - 12 Issues Cl ossified Advertising - 10f per word ENCLOSED$ ___ __._ ______ _ Nome ___________________ _ Address _________________ _ City ________________ _ State _________ Zip ________ _ The NUHTIUS ~15Mt. Verao11 HonfH, Te•s 77006 3 for the I ibrory to be the refuge of the homosexual. So thot goy people con be recognizf>d as one of the unserved groups of American library users, there must be a program of consciousness­roi sing. The General Discussion period of the first meeting brought out that the real oppression felt by goy people is the discrimination against them by those who fear to be identified with the 11closet queens" who "pass" as hetro. June 20th Ruth Shivers spoke on the spiritual needs of the gay person. The het world tends to think of the gay in terms of his sexual activities, the gay is not considered os a whale person with the ideals and spiritual conflicts of others. "To become sensitive and responsive to the needs of others without prejudice; to develope sel I-respect and a sense of responsibility to ourselves, to others, and to God" was outlined as the sp irituol goals of the gay community by Miss Shi•,ers. The Metropol i ton Com­munity Church services was attended by several visitors of the ALA June 20th. On the 21st the I FC (Intel lectuol Freedom Com­mittee) of the ALA was approached by members of the Task Force and were requested to take action in the case of Mike McConnell, whose appointment to the library of the University of Minnesota was cancelled because of his life style. The IFC refused on the grounds that the case did not foll under its juri sdic­tion. 11Hug a Homosexual" booth was set up by the Task Force. The booth received very little action but hod omple television and notional news coverage. The 1 'counter-con-ference" meetings was high­lighted by Mike McConnell who spoke to approximately a group of 150. Mike told of his appoint­ment to the University of Minnesota and the letter of confirmation which was resended following his op­pl icotion for a I icense for marriage to his mole lover. Mike won his coc;e against the University of Minnesota in Federal Di st­rict Court. The verdict is still pending in a higher court which was appealed by the University of Minn­esota. The Intellectual Free­dom Committees foi lure to censure the University of Minnesota ofter the verdict handed down by the Federal District Court and the re­solution in his favor ;,ossed by the Minnesota Stole Lib­rary Association brought great disfavor from Mike. Mike outlined five sig­nificant points which he feels brings his complaint under their jurisdiction. 1. The Regents di sop proved his contract for political reasons. 2. They interferred with the perrogotive of the head of the library. 3. The appointment was never discribed as contin­gent upon approval of the Regents. 4. The disapproval of the contract was upon "marital" grounds, which is a direct infringement of a specified point of intellectual free­dom, as outlined by the I FC. 5. The Regents' di sopprovol was in port because Mike 2,500 ONLY $20.70 5,000 ONLY $39. 95 1\'t\~\~C, ~\)~~ coP'I ot1'1 4615 MT. VERNON 524-5612 McConnell was not ashamed of being Goy, ond was not content to I eod his own I ife style quietly without bring­ing it to any kind of public attention. Mike summarized a resolution to be presented to the ALA membership. The resolution basically is that there ore minorities which ore not ethn re in nature, and that discrimina­tion against any minorities, whethor of etl)n 11: or non­ethnic nature, should be strenously combated. The first annual Goy book award was presented to Isobel Miller, orthor of A PLACE FOR U~ Hm novel was origionolly pub­lished by her own Bleeker Street Press in 1969, and wi 11 be brought out I oter this year by McGraw-Hill. "Sex and the Single Cataloger - - New Thoughts on Some Unthinkable Sub­jects" was jointly present­ed by Joan Marshall and Steve Wolf. Joan Marshall's main topic of discussion was library of Congress subject heodi ngs. Joan pointed out that the closer one exomi nes the LC subject headings, the more it becomes evident that the LC norm is a white, Christion (Protestant) mole who is hetrosexuol. Only white males, etc. ore con­sidered as categories with­out quolificotion. All others are considered as role­ployer, approximating the white mole norms: Negros as businessmen, women as con sumer, j ews as scient­ists. Steve Wolf pointed out that bias is shown in the terms employed to describe homosexuality in the Library of Congress system. Object­ive classification should employ such terms as 0 min­ority sexual preferences and behaviors" or "alternative alternative sex styles". Revised terminology in classification by I ibrorions and I ibrory users should be pressed was Mr. Wolf's conclusion. The Talks were followed by a lively discussion of various way of bringing to The talks were followed by a l ively discussion of various ways of bringing to general notice this dis­soti sfoction with common terminology. It was general­ly agreed that a two pronged attack would be most ap­propriate: formal applica­tion for changes through the L ibrory of Congress Bureau­cracy, combined w:ith con­tinuing pressure and indivi­dual effort on a local level. On Thursday morroing, opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE the suggested reso lution on non-ethnic minorities was presented to the membership meeting. The membership voted overwhelmingly to adopt it in the followmg form: Whereas at least be­tween six and ten percent of the population leads a some-sex life style, And whereas gay people suffer arbitrary discrimina­tion in employment and housing when their inter­personal orientation becomes known, And whereas the striv­ing of gay people to liberate th ems elves from arbitrary discrimination poses for librarians problems similar to those of other oppressed minorities. Therefore be it resolved The American L ibrory Association endorses the following statement of position: The American Library Association recognizes that there exist minorities which are not ethnic in nature, but which suffer oppression. The Association recom­mends that libraries and members strenonusly combat discrimination in services to and employment of indivi­duals from ALL minority groups, whether the dist­inguishing characteristic of the minority be ethnic, sex­ual, religious, or of any other kind. by Jeannie Stone Written for The Advocate SUICIDE "HINTED" IN DROWNING A 37 year old man drowned in on apartment swimming pool in Dallas. Police identified the victim as George Flemming, 37, who lived at the Hocka­day T erroce Apartments, 5615 Belmont. Flemming, a native of Scotland who hod lived in Dallas since November, was pronounced dead ju st before midnight Thursday ofter he was pulled from the Hock­aday swimming pool by his roommate, Richard Longstaff, 32. Longstaff told investi­gators he hod been with Flemming beside the pool before going into his apart­ment. After returning outside about 15 minutes later, he found his roommate floating face down in the pool. Longstaff said he pull­ed the victim from the water and applied mouth-to-mouth resuscitation in an unsucce­ssful effort to revive him. It is rumoured that this death was not occidental but suicide. ~~\RANCH HOUSE 5607 MORNINGSIDE {in the Village) PENTAGON GIVES IN ON GAY DRAFT OUESTON In perhaps the most significant advancement far gay rights since the beginn­ing of the homosexual move­ment in the United States the Pentagon three weeks ago radically revised its 20-year-old policy of dis­crimination against homo­sexual men. The change was quiet but sweeping. Medical History farm no. 89 used at induction center examinat­ions to "screen out" homo­sexuals and other undesir­ables was replaced by a new one. From farm no. 93 the question concerning a man's "homosexual tendencies" has been omitted. Other questions which were con­sidered either confusing or unnecessary were eliminated at the same time. So was the requirement that the form be signed under penalty of perjury. New farm no. 93 is the result al several surveys mode by selective service personnel in an effort to simplify and reduce the am­biguities of the examinotion. For many months n~w the De/en se Department has been squirming under the yoke of its policy which categorically excluded homo­sexual men from any branch of military service. The regulation was a wide-open invitation to draft dodgers. Draft boards had no effective control. As a molter of fact the government was never able to successfully chal­lenge a man's word if he declared "homosexual tend­encies." All prospective draftees who checked "yes" to the question 11Have you ever had or have you now ... homosexual tendencies?" and stood by their word and rejected attempts to get them to supply so-called expert "proof" had ulti­mately to be disqualified on medical grounds. The Com­mittee to Fight Exclusion of Homosexuals From the Armed Forces with head­quarters in our offices, has helped over 700 droll-age men with this specific problem_ But as the name suggests, the Committee's primary concern was to get the sex question removed from draft exams and thus bring an end to the c lass di scrimination against homo­sexua ls. The importance of the change from the standpoint of the practical rights of homosexuals, and al I men, is t remendous. There will be cries of anguish, of course from short- sighted, self-serving draft resisters and their agents. But the larger issue is that men in a free socidty should not have to discuss their sexual behavior with an agency of the government for any reason. The right to privacy in our sexual affairs should be one of our basic liberties. Sexual feelings are a matter of private conscience. Under the old directive every man who even answered the sex question on his draft ex­amination was thereby com­promised. The greatest single evil was that in the process of screening out homosexuals all 19 year old men were required to register their sexual feelings with the federal government. No one knows how many homosexual men may wish to go in or stay out of the armed farces. The figure is the subject of speculation. But the count one way or the other is not relevant. The essentiol question is thot homosexuals should never be treated as an un­varying, all-inclusive group, or prohibited from any of life's pursuits as though they were_ To the military way of thinking all homo­sexuals were considered medical and moral 11rejects." The rationale is the very same as that used by pre­judiced civilians to cate­gorically exclude homosex­uals from other fields of service and work os wel I. Thus, the homosexual who will use the prejudice against him to evade the draft is in a way a .. plastic pansy" or "Auntie Tom." He is the sort of homosexual who is willing to play the sick role assigned to him by society as a means to his own selfish ends. In so doing he hurts the cause of gay rights more than anything else. In other situations he may be the homosexual who protests that he is as qualified to teach school, to be a civil servant, to work at government con­tracts, to be bonded, etc., as is a heterosexual. Under the new Defense Department directive som.e homosexuals may still be rejected from service - but it will be on an individual basis, as the result of a personal interview_ Quite simply if the Defense Dept. is able to discover homosex­ual tendencies in o prospect­ive draftee through psychi­atric interview let it try to do so_ Or if a mon feels that his homosexual proclivities somehow should disqualify him from the armed farces let _him initiate the discus­s ion. The burden of proof would then be on him. But the blanket discrimination is now gone - we hope for­ever. It is not a patchwork reform. It represents o rad­ical and positive change in the government's attitude toward homosexuals_ It is on acknowledgeme:it of the foct that homosexuals are after all human beings. Thot they should be judged like other human beings accord­ing to their individual merits. It recognizes the fact that some homosexual men are fit for mi I itory service and some ore not. This attitude is far more realistic than one which tries to determine military fitness by whether a man is gay or not. The test of manhood has changed. The Tangent Group June 1971 lPHONES -526-4406 2319 So. Shepherd 528-1000 Aries - Most of you hove learned by this time if you can't put in in your mouth stay away from it- You will find yourself in the social spotlight with a true interest in getting something done. Just hope its you that gets done_ On the 1st, 19th, and 23rd lie low its your pocket book, not your ass that someone is ofter. Remem~er if you can't sit on it, or get it in your mouth, forget j t. Torus - The people around you everyday are a good AUSTIN BOOK MART FINEST LINE OF ADi.JL T BOOKS AND MAGAZINES IN AUSTIN. --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 305 East 6th St. Austin, Tex. s '#'il.#JAN .ANNOUNCE.MENTl§l#jJ fRieNtlS, ROMANS, COUNTRYM€N ... • Tb€ I NT€RNATiONAL ORt>€R of The ){NiGbTS of CAesAR iN'7iT€S you TO hAve A RoMAN BALL BECOME A MEMBER OF THE MOST UNUSUAL LODGE IN AMERICA. FOR GAY PEOPLE ONLY. MEMBERS HAVE ENTRANCE TO All CHAPTERS. ---~- CbApT€RS: A!'iTINOUS·BON GF.NIE. •IEIColly Roirn.a,:n.. Empilre (ORCHARD CWB) 2311 N. HENDERSON 821-4350 (BAYOU CLUB) 3717 RAWLINGS 526-9330 Caesa,r's C<0>Utr1tyS1,1Pd ( AT THE BAYOU) .., STEAKS COOKED TO YOUR SATISFACTION * VARIETY OF DINNERS AT REASONABLE PRICES ~ SERVICE BY GOOD LOOKING ROMAN SLAVES '#'FINEST MEAT MONEY CAN BUY '71"0PEN 7 DAYS A WEEK SKXTUS-POMPl!.IUS. 6 § J ' MIIRY'S BAR - - SUNDAY SHOW - 6 to 8 - Stephany Carr & 2 guests each week CAMP TIME - 4 ta 9 Monday thru Friday - Beer 35 - Set-ups 2~ OPEN DAILY 10 A.M. SUNDAYS - 12 NOON Bikini clfld Go Go Boys & Wfliters Feflturing ''the Gfly beer'' HAMM'S you know now queens talk and it is sure to get bock to someone who will use it against you. Your radiant true self wi II come out to­ward the end of the month ... rejoice. Sagutarius - Cupid s play­ing a very sweet tu e, enjoy it, ball everyon beware, do not make on\ romantic decisions until after the 14th. You can make fantas­tic social progress the last three days af this month if you are prepared. Someone who you don't know yet wants to help you find true happiness. Enjoy, enjoy - Ii fe is to short to be moody or sod. Capricorn - All love-minded Copr i corns hove some emot­ional adjustments to make before the 14th. After the 14th there is a tremendous force that wil I bring a beaut­ifu I love to your I ife. The romance will be highly color­ed but difficult to capture and hold during the first part of this month. Things will be changing lash during mid month so be careful of things falling out from under you. Aquarius - If yau feel your­self developing strong at­tachments for a person who is older, quiet or in a posit­ion of authority don't be suprised. For best luck don't discuss your affair as its origin is of a mystical nature. If you have been flirtatious, take care for there will be many broken hearts during the first half of this month. You are not one to waste time with self indulgent sadness, be direct, positive, and enjoy. Pisces - Good before bad - love smiles thru the last half of the month. Before that you may find one love to be a true enemy. Avoid in­dulgence in luxuries and 102'2 Westheimer at Waugh 528-8851 Houston 1J@ It is with some reluc­tance that I feel compelled to answer certain charges against me which were print­ed in the February and June issues of this newspaper. I feel reluctant because I -do not wish to become a port of the segment in our society which seems to thrive on gossip and back­bitting. Truth - I have never owned, I don't presently own, nor do I ever intend on owning a financial interest in a club. Truth - I am not under in-dictment or free on bond for allegedly burning anything. I freely admit that my bus­iness activities and personal life were closely investigat­ed after the fires which destroyed the old Plantation pleasures which your mate can not afford . . • this makes him feel he is losing his independence. The first part of this month brings strange, whirlwind, or unac­countable romances. They may seem glamorous but this is only illusion ·and later things will show them­selves for what they ore. and Palace clubs. This investigation was prompted by my personal friendship for many yeors with the owners of the clubs and the many rumors point ing the finger of gu ilt in several directions at once shortly after the fires. Truth - On April 7, Mr. L. Ogren pied guilty to thirteen seperate counts including the burning of the old Plant­ation club, the burglary of my apartment, and the at­tempted burglary of Ronnie Levines Apartment on Oct. 3 of last year. He received a five year sentence in the State Penetentary in Hunts­vi lie. Truth - Mr. Bob Capel is an opportunist from Dallas leaving the now defunct Aquarius Club to seek his fortune in Houston. Mr. Capel approached me in May "on a business proposition." For $2,000 he would not appear as a witness in any forthcoming arson trials concerning the concerning the burning of the clubs in Houston. When I explained my neutral posit· ion in this matter and told him that ii he had concrete information in these cases he certainly should testify and . that extortion is a federal offense. He became outraged ond stated that he would see myself, Ronie Levipe and Larry Shea behind bars. No threats of any kind were made to Mr. Capel as I have no reason or wish to threaten him or anyone else. My attorneys and the F .B.I. are aware of Mr. Capels Houston activ­ities and share my feelings that we al I should hove more important things to do than become i ngaged in cheap theatrics. Truth Further rumors, name calling and other un­stable, immature actions wi II not be answered by me. I make a sincere plea to everyone of you who read this to let our I aw enforce­ment agencies do their job in connection with the Houston club fires without the "benefit" of rumors which tend only to confuse and hinder their efforts and bring discredit instead of desirable social recognition to our community. Vern Bechtel MR. LEVINE SPEAKS Mr. Levine came to the poper office and made the following brief statement to-wit: "It is up to the courts and to God to prove my innocence." C II\ 0 QC E IU GIi: ~• N ""'' Cu .: i 0 ~ ;! on CID "' !! ~ I"U' ' IU z o- o0 =">' 8 - ID • CD ~ In Sdn Antonio it's period 106 NflV(lffO St. SUNDAY KRUNCH - 3 to 5 The ni•ble fingers of DANNA ot the pi••• 223-5474 TIFFANY JONES - MISS RR MR. DAVID JERRY VANOVER 912 HADLEY HOUSTON, TEXAS 226-8242 KEH - KEH - AL featuring TIFFANY JONES & JERRY VANOVER SHOWllME Wednesday & Sundays 8 to 11 •• '- • DON'T MISS AMATURE NIGHT EACH TUESDAY 612 HADLEY HOUSTON source to dominate. After al I you can do it without them knowing it. I am not saying take up S & M this month but you can be butch. Beware of offending people in official positions {such as the pol ice) they are very eosly set off in this hot weather. Things ore going to be very active, just re­member someone has to pay the bi II ond keep those hot pants on their beautiful. Gemini - It's not o good time for you to go running to someone, if you let them come to you - you moy be able to come together. Help­fulness to others is a qual­ity which will pay off this month - don't expect reward but your life will be mode more enjoyable. Keep your emotions in bed and deal with people on a rational p I one for o change;; Cancer - Ruled by the moon your emotions tend to be st ired and influenced by it's phases_ Romance is favored under the influence of the full moon on the 8th. People in your home tend to be stir­ed by the same things you are. Beware of sensitive people, they are not ready for o violent change in your actions .. Steer neighbors into more pleasing situations and you will bath enjoy it. Leo - Ruled by the sun y.ou should realize that life is more stable than others believe - don't be too sen-sitive. Your tricks are not your property, don't become upset if they find others as interesting. Your greatest source of pleasure is still your steady friend, lover, room-mate or whatever. All your taste may be in your mouth but remember that you hove the power to enjoy whatever you do. Virgo - Romance is not fav­ored the first three weeks of this month but ofter the 19th things should become very interesting. Misunder­standings moy creep up and reach supri sing proportions in o short period of time. Keeping on the level and making sure you ore under­stood pays off. It's a good time for new tricks but don't go to deep before the lost week of this month. Learn your limits and stay within them. Libra - Ruled by Venus the planet of love ond beauty makes you a very good person in oh so many ways. Beware a pair of lovers they could seem to be broken up but os soon os you I otch on to one he'll run back to his partner - how tacky. Your independent nature will not ol low you to stay with one person very long. Play the field its more glamorous and you will find people running ofter you for a change. Scorpio - All right you hove some dues to poy but if you ore careful you can do it without undue suffering_ It's hot so subdue your desires, they wi II get you something you really don't wont. Enter­tain ot home the lost of the month, you could meet some great people this way. Keep your secrets to yourself - opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE 9 WHEN IN DALLAS VISIT FRANK CAVEN'S KING OF CLUBS • The Main Bar (BOYS ONLY) • ♦ Great New Sound S.'IJstem ♦Les Dames Room (all girls club) +The Red Room "swinging music" 2116 N. FIELD New Orleans Boobville, USA New Ori eons, once the fun spat of the Gays from all aver the United States is unrecognizable as such today. The an ce great atma s­phere of the "Quarter" is now depressing to se~. ,he streets are filled with un-clean, longhaired, half nude persons lying or sitting on the steps, curbs and sidewalks. At every street intersection and at intervals inbetween you ore solicited for funds by these beggars. They have sores on their faces, arms and legs adding even less to the once fun-filled streets of the New Orleans French Quarter. The Gay bars whi~h were numerous some years back no longer hold the relaxed, enjoyable laughter of the old days. The bars that have weathered this great change are few and do not attract the qua Ii ty light-hearted gays. In talking with people who are long time residents with homes in the Quarter it was learned that the corrups paliticans of this city ore somewhat to blame for this disgusting condition. Driving in the Quarter at most times is virtually I Dilly 10a■ p 10 1504 Westheimer KEG PARTY SUNDAYS 5 7 (S1.00) 741-0218 impossible yet we were told walking was dangerous. The .. vice cops" it seems are apt ta toke you in on su s­p i sion of just most anything ranging from hustling to murder in order to make your trip costly, embarrassing and uncomfortable. If the pal ice do not get to you first the legitimate professional hustlers and muggers strip you of your valuables along the poorly lighted streets. This is a common occurance even with residents of the French Quarter area. The long time bars that have lasted are definitely not tourist traps. They are all serving drinks which are most reasonable in price for the size and quality, this is hats off to the owners of the New Orleans Gay bars. Another attraction in New Orleans French Quarter is the Club New Orleans baths. BEWARE - there is a sign at the entrance that we are not responsible for loss of personal proper­ty." There is nothing to indicate that you might check wallets, watches, etc., at the desk. You have lock­ers or rooms with keys yet even with the key to your room or locker there is still no safety of your property - is this business that despir­ate? If this is your bag - take an ly what you need in the way of cash for this trap. The charm of the city is lasting if one con over­look and this is difficult, the• risks and dangers of this once fun city. :•••••••••••••••••••••••• TEAR OUT •••••••••••.•••••••••••••••: :. THIS COUPON ENTITLES YOU TO A FREE • :. KISS OR A DRINK OF YOUR CHOICE FOR :.., 29f AT THE ... ::, 0 ~ KING OF CLUBS C..:. 2116 NORTH FIELD DALLAS, TEXAS . ( PRESENT THIS COUPON ) : ••••• , ••••• ••••••••••••• TEAR OUT ••••••••••••••••••••••••••: ~A~~oppj~-~ .,..,~ ~ - vJ,'th J . ' Hie, how can anyone be so dumb as to think that the shows we now see in all the clubs have completely new performers. This is not true! It is the same persons with new material and costumes. It seems that with the growth and popularity of the shows the quality of the performers has greatly improved. The competition has made most of the "drags" work and better their acts to the point of now being better than good "female im-personators." We even have some who are qua I ity dancers and use their own voices. Each month with the influx of gays to our com­munity or the opening of closet doors, new spots open. There are three that are going to be open are are already open now, that is that we know of, might be more. The Guilded Garter is to open real soon at 2613 Milam in the old "Players Image" location. Della Oare, Sherman and Larry will host this new showbar. Dell a Dare is a female­impersonator and has appear­ed in a numb er of clubs here and elsewhere - this makes her known to many. A few of the clubs are Ron sue' s, Dallas, Aquaris, Dallas, Villa Fountaina, Dallas, The House, Dallas, The Old • I House, Fort Worth, The Jungle House, Oklahoma City, and in Houston she has been seen at Mary's, Queens Haven, Scene 1, Palace and Entree'. Della uses her own voice and unless you are aware of her not being a man would not know the difference from her ·very realistic female appearance. Second on the scene is The Caravan at 5404 Nordl­ing in the North side of Houston. This is new to this section of the city as the other Gay bars are in the downtown or south­west area. We have not seen this bar but understand the place is exceptionally nice. We hove seen some of the personnel and if they look any better on location than they do off - look out - the place is a sure fire winner. Last but not least by far is the opening shortly which is an understatement as it is alrealy open is Lynn's Cherry Tree in the West University Village of the southwest section of Houston. Lynn Hudspeth has been namely known ta the club and bar groups of our city as "Mr. Clean" and has managed and worked in some of our leading cl.bs and bars. There is not too much known about plans for this new .. Tree" the ,.. ENTBEE ••• "THE MEETING PLACE FOR HOUSTON'S FRIENDLY PEOPLE" 12:00 NOON - 2:00 A.M. • - • OPEN SALON - - - 1322 WESTHE /MER but it has an upstairs and downstairs pool area as well as patio and dance area. We understand that the music system is the finest in the city. Good luck Lynn. The club address is 5607 Morningside. Rumors had it that the widely known Bayou Club in Dallas was closed. This was far from the truth from what was observed the last week of June. There has been additions, such as a new bar and patio and more air conditioning. The crowd was heavy all over the clubs many bars and patios and dance floors. The Bayou sure attracts a lively group of ghosts for it not to be in operation. Dennis Sisk and Jock sure seem to be putting all into this, Dallas's best known club. The Orchard Club has a complete new look. We are told this has been remodeled and is a place for the girls to enjoy. Love the new carpets and bar arrangement and know the boys are awed with envy of the girls new and modern club. Ki I ling time in the heat of Dal las mid-afternoon we went to the Crescent Art Theatre. For a week-day and miCHJfternoon there was a * SHOWS great crowd escaping the outside heat to have their temperature rise with the xhowing of the "heated ' film on the screen". Visit the Crescent Art in Dallas for an uplift ing. TJ' s hosted a real live beer bust and Weiner party Sunday June 20th at Queens Point, Lake Dallas. The invitations were printed with complete map and directions as to how, when and where. Margaret know s how to show her appreciation for the sup­port of her many friends and customers of TJ' s, the fun " dance bar" of the colony. Ronsue' s - never any­th ing like it! Showtime at 8: 30 - no room avai I able and had sent ahead an hour and a half to have space saved. All of Dallas turns out for this Sunday show. Wonder why "Sue" doesn't have a show during the week for the Dallas group and the Sunday show for out-of-town• ers. Saw friends from out of town all over the place, New Orleans, Houston, Fort Worth, Oklahoma City, and Austin. The show at Ronsue's is o must even with the capacity crown. Mr. David of the Red * MIXED DRINKS Room in Houston was the guest at Ron sue' s Sunday as was Afrodesia from Shreveport, Louesiana to add zest to the review. The Houston' s Mr. David made his f irst appearance in the "Big D" area and will be back in mid July. Che ck at Ron sue' s as ta the dat~. Frank Coven' s King of Clubs has a great new sound system with fun for al I. He has in th i s f ine club the "Les Dames Room" (a ll girls club) with its own bar and dance floor. A must for both girls and boys when in Dallas. The Candy Store, anoth­er of Frank Covens clubs is somewhat new on the Dallas scene with an all new "Gay light Show" and separate pool room and comfortable dance floor and atmosphere. From observance th is club has a great deal to offer, ••not just candy". The Swinger is one of the fun spots, you have to drop in to see what we mean. Has a polio? for dwarh?­what is the cowbell for - what is the arrangement on the cigarette mach ine? In the Gallery 1 to find it was now the "Cetour". This change mentioned in another article already in The NUNTIUS. * LAUGHS Au stin, Texa s still boasts the gala fun spa t your hostess Marie g iv• ing her a ll for the customers a nd friends who frequent the Pe a rl Street Warehouse in our capital city. Hats off to Ma rie for s uch a great fun spot. Corpus Christ i has the all new and fabulous of the state s c lubs. The only club complete with swimming pool and a ll , and when the term complete is used it appl ies to a ll activitie s, pool, dancing, p in-bal I and good and friendly service. ''Big George' s" Red Room under the manager· s h ip of Ken Paul a lways s e ems to be doing some th ing " gran.dou s" for the select cl ientel fr equent ing this re d-hot- spot of the in-the­grouve clique. Fantas t ic is the only way to describe the shows to be seen here on Wed. a nd Sunday. The amature show on Tuesdays is a must for the most in fun and laughs in the weeks start. Tiffany Jones (Miss Red Room) direct s the show and also puts her best foot for• ward for all to see, th is is a full t ime job and the re ­sults rewording for the show is tops. The Red Room Review has on the bil l of attr actions Mr. David, Jerry Vanover and Terry Tham as a long with guest stars each show. The Galleon, home o f the BP (beautiful people) is stil I the center of activ ity in the Southwest area with just everything anyone can want. Wha t is said is still very true "a night out in Houston is not comple te without a dr ink at the Galleon". Hie, what do you mean• your eyes hurt? You haven' t seen anything like it before! Can' t imagine what you are talking about unless it is the reali s tic f ilm at the Art Cenema. Can't under­stand your going so often to see the best in " art film". The Farm House, one of the new clubs to be added recently to our growing I ist ha s been packing them in. This club is well run, large enough to accommodate the crowds and ha s adequate space for done ing. A very fine fun spot with everything go ing for it. Mr. F ri zby, the only gay bath Houston ha s ever had is be ing patron ized more by ou t-of-towners than the local group. Each n ight there are ne,w and d ifferent faces at l1 0 I I I • 'I "t " tJ '' ,. SIIN ANTONIO BOOK MIIRT COMPLETE LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 129 E. Houston St. San Antonio, Tex. Mr. Frizbys. If you ore tired of the same old places and faces, check out the baths. Joe Anthony has again done it and not only chang­ing the name of the club from Gayboy International to GB International but the locat­ion as well. GB International has on the program at this time one of the finest productions of Hair seen by anyone. It has been compared by the audience to shows of Hair produced in California and Los Vegas and is said to be better. If you haven't seen it, call now and make reservations to do so. This is o must on all calenders. Hi Komp - this is not on expression but one of the fastest swinging clubs on the circuit. Check this spot for service, good drinks and fine music. One of the steadiest • most pleasant bar is the Lo Boheme at 1504 Westheimer. For o fun enjoyable drink in one of the friend I iest clubs stop in and see Dennis. The Goy beer bar in the whirl of things is none other than Mory' s - yes and this is no joke. The fun bar is open mornings from ten o.m. with o line group gathering at this watering hole. See it! Our Mid-Towne Lounge in them idst of the action is cool, comfortable and o happy atmosphere for the fringe downtown group. Houston boosts one of the notions few all Goy theatres, The Mini-Pork. This theatre books the best fi Im available for the enjoy­ment of adult audiences. Rita and Ricci ore still packing the Roaring 60's catering to o great group of ladies_ This club is one of O kind and the best of its kind. These two girls ore o big credit to our Gey community and we all do appreciate them. Poppo Bear (Rita) is the wheel that runs the Sixty Second Bond Company and om not sure but under­stand is also in the in­surance business. 12 NEW BAR IN DALLAS "Get off the straight and no, row and detour to the Detour" is the slogan for Dallas' newest, swinging gay ''saloon''. The Detour located at 3113 Live Oak Street should be serving mixed beverages by the time you read this article. In case the final approvol hos not come thru from the Texos Alcoholic Beverage Commission,you'II probably recognize the old established establishmenr as the Gallery One formally owned by Wolter Price since opening in late 1966. David Fleming and Buddy Rogers ore the owners of the Detour and the chon~e over becomes effective with the issuance of the mixed beverage permit. The bar hos been completely re­modeled and enlarged to about three times it's original size. Most Dallosites and out of !owners as well will remember Buddy and David from the good old Atlonti s days. Arthur and Brent, co­partners to the co-partners will be around to make your visit to the Detour even more memorable. The new youthful image at this already established location should be exciting to the young and old alike. When in Dallas why not DETOUR! GB SABOT AGED What we hove been told about the air conditioning at GB International being sabotaged hos been checked out and found to be true. The wireing was pulled out and the copper line that carries the freion was cut. The .:ost to repair the dam­age was $500.00 plus the loss of busi~ess on o busy week-end night. The owner of GB coll ed the police as well as o private investigator to find the person or persons re­sponsible. We ore told that with the information gathered so far that charges ore forthcoming. POSTMAN SACKED HE'S GAY An ananymou s I etter moiled from Houston, Texas to the Post Office Deport­ment in Washington, D.C. in July 1968. This letter stated that J.B., employed by the U. S. Post Office in Houston was a homo-­sexual. In September the some year J. B. was called before the postal inspectors to defend himself against these charges. J_ B. was not in­formed of his rights ta council or any others. They promptly told him the penal­ty for false statements. The penalty is a fine up to $10,000 and 5 years im­imprisonment. After having been threatened with this J.B. gave o signed statement of admission which follows: State of Texas County of Horris I, J. H. B., after first being duly sowrn make the following statement freely and voluntarily. No threats or promises have been made to me in exchange for this statement. I have been shown copy of o letter sent to the Post­master General hy an anon­ymous person, alleging that I om a known homosexual. I am o homosexual but I don't know to what extent this is known. I hove no social contact with any other postal employees. My homosexual activities are general limited to the house I om buying at ---­in Houston. I hove visited other homosexuals in their home or apartment- I do not visit public places where known homosexuals hong out and I hove never been arrested or even questioned by any local I ow enforcement people in connection with my homosexual activities. l have read this state­ment of one page and it is the truth to the best of my knowledge and belief. ].H.B. Subscribed and sworn to before me this 11th day of September 1968, at Houston, Horris County, Texas. Witness W. F. Hanson Postal Inspector R. L. Qu inters, Inspection Service Sr. Clerk The INVESTIGATIVE SUMMARY Houston, Texas: Homosexual activities of Regular Carrier J. H.B. 1. An investigation in the obo, e subject was mode at Houston, Texas. The Post­master General received an anonymous letter which was mailed at Houston, T exos on July 16, 1968, and is quoted as follows: "You hove a moi Iman on your payroll at Houston, Texas who is o known HOMOSEX­UAL. He works in the High­land Village Station, in Houston, Texas. His name is J. B." 2. J. H. B. is nicknamed "-". He furnished a sworn statement in which he acknowledges that he is o known homosexual and en­gages in homosexual act­ivities at his home in Houston and also with other homosexuals in their home in Houston and al so with other homosexuals in their home or apartment. WFH:ps W. F. Hanson Postal lnsp!)Ctor Enclosures: Swom affidavit of J. H. B. dated September 11, 1968 Letter to Postmaster Gen­eral, postmarked Houston, Texas, July 16, and receiv­ed in the office of the Chief Inspector July 18, 1968. OTHER LETTERS AND INFORMATION TO FOLLOW IN NEXT ISSUE. During this period from from September 1968 to January 1970 J. B. has been fighting this case in the federal courts. The claim of the Postal Deportment being that the defendants conduct was predicial to the government. This claim is not defined in any section of the postal manuals. CHIIPIIRRIIL BOOK MART FINEST LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES IN CORPUS.. --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 413 Peoples St. Corpus Christi, Tex. I ' f' ' MR.TERRY -'Miss Dallas" The Barbra Striesand of Review MR. SALLY RON SUE'S Everymu's Fun House "MR. DONNA" "Diana Ross of Review" BEER - WINE - SIT-UPS "'MR. FERTILIZER" Mother of all Drog of Dallas MR. LISA Tall, Tan and T eriffic High Priestess of Soul 3236 McKinney - DALLAS MR. JODIE LAYNE "Sex Symbol of Dallas!!" ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ your hostesses Ricci & Rita 10.IBIIG et•s CLUB POOL - DANCING (memberships - MIXED DRINKS available) Open Tuesday through Sunday 5pm - 2am (Closed Mondays ) 230S S. SHEPHERD The years and months of legal bottles with our government has been very costly for J. B. both in cash plus unemployment ond the mental anguish. The final appeal has been made lo the U. S. District Court in Washington D. C. J. B. in his fight has asked for help from the Mattachine Society in Wash-ington D. C., American C ivil Liberties Union, Hou slon, Playboy Founda­tion, Chicago, Ill., ond has now made an appeal to the Society of Individual Rights (SIR) in San Francisco. Additional details of this infringement against J . B.' s right as a c iii zen will be printed later in the NUNTIUS. In all the appeals ta the above mentioned he has had nothing but encouragement and being told to keep up the fight that the case was important lo the homophile community. This is our fight - citizens and taxpayers of the homo­phile community. THE MUMTIUSMAKES THIS APPEAL TO YOU AS READ­ERS AND MEMBERS OF THE HOMOPHILE COM­MUNITY TO HELP YOUR­SELF AND J. B. IN THIS ALL IMPORTANT FIGHT FOR RECOGNITION AS RESPONSIBLE CITIZENS WARRANTY OF WORKING IN OUR GOVERNMENT. We have withheld the name af J. B. to prevent further 14 528 9430 Small World Department SINGLE PERSONS LESS PRONE TO CRACKUP-­STUDY Single America, s are much less likely lo have mental breakdowns than married ones, says Harold J. Dupuy, psychologist who directed o survey for the National Center for Health Statistics. embarassment but if you as readers wish to corres­pond with him - request his address from the NUNTIUS. Donations of any size from any readers will be greatly appreciated. This case is of the uptmost importance to us all - please help. Send contributions to: J. B.'s FUND % MUMTIUS 4615 Mt. Vernon St. Houston, Texas 77006 It has long been general­ly thought the reverse was true. But earlier studies concentrated on the marital status of people in institut­ions, and "if single people get into trouble they're more likely to end up in institut­ions," Dupuy told the pub­lications Behavior Today. HOMOSEXUAL MINISTER San Antonia (AP) - Gene Leggett, an admitted homosexual was a m in1 ister wi!hout a church or credent­ials late last month. Fellow clergymen sus­pended him from the ministry Tuesday in on emotional session of the Southwest Texas United Methodist conference. The vote wos 144 lo 117 It was taken one day after members of the Gay Liberal­ion Front disrupted the annual conference meeting by voicing a plea in the bearded, moddressing minist­er's behalf. Leggett took the vote calmly and said he wi II sur­render his credentials as a minister - as well as his membership in the church. Two other ministers immediately announced they al so will turn in their cre­dentials in sympathy with him. Leggett I eft the meet­ing with another conlro­vers ial ex-minister, Wil Schaefer of L credo, at his side. Schaefer, al so a Metho­dist, was stripped of his credentials as a minister recently because of his ro­mantic relationship with a divorcee. Leggett, 36, is o resident member of the Dall as Theatre Center. He also operates a home in Dallas coiled the "House of the Covenant" for homo­sexuals and others whom he feels the church hos not reached. A veteran of o decade in the ministry, Leggett said he planned to continue his work at the home, which is not affi Ii ated with the church. He has been with the Dallas Theatre Center on a church appointment for the past six years. Previously he served churches in New Jersey and ot Dilley ond Austin in Texas. The church considers the appointments of each of its pastors on a annual basis. Leggett' s case was taken under special study by the board of the ministry after he announced he was a homosexual. The board - which handles all matters dealing with clergymen said opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE Leggett had been found "unacceptable in the work of the ministry." The reo sons were not spelled out. Officials said he could have remained a minister but not assigned to th; Southwest T exos co~ference. They said arrangmenls could have been made to assign him permanently to the Dallas area. Leggett refused such arrangements "on grounds that I do not feel that I am unacceptable lo the work of the ministry." He told the conference however, that he was willing to take an appointment in the church if offered one, "although it seems there are so few Christians left in the Methodist church that probably no one would ac­cept me as I am - as a minister of the Methodist church." There were no offers. One conference dele­gate, the Rev. Albert Clay­ton, asserted the church was skirting the issue in the hand I ing of Leggett' s case. He said many churchmen "feel his homosexuality is the key issue and that he needs to be tried on this issue," meaning a church trial. Soon after the vote on Leggett' s case, the Rev. Richard Heacock, who spent 11 years as a missionary in Alaska, ond the Rev. Bob Williams of San Antonio said they will leave the ministry as a result of the conferen­ce' s decision. Heacock is a brother of the Rev. Jack Heacock, the church's district superin­tendent at Corpus Christi. Members of the Student Notional Coordinating Com­mittee later issued a list of request on the conference on behalf of the Negro com­munity here. MY WOMEN'S PRISON CLOSED DOWN The much-criticized Women's House of Dent ion was closed Sunday as the last of its 422 inmates were moved from the Greenwich Vi II age prison to a new facility on Riker's Island. The 39-year-old prison in the heart of the Vi II age has been a source of controversy and investigations for years. Inmates complained of over­crowding, dehumanizing physical examinations and rampant lesbianism. GAY LIBS DISRUPT MEETING San Antonio - (UP) - The Goy Liberation Front disrupted an incident-lorn Methodist meeting last month forcing premature adjourn­ment admi st a flurry of shouts and near-Ii sticuffs. Earlier Thursday, a fl amboyanl former clergyman strode into the meeting and burned his ministerial creden­tials "as a symbolic act of disgust" for the church. The Gay Liberation Front's outburst came during a routine business session near the close of the South­west Texas United Methodist annual conference. Self-described members of the homosexual group, seated in the balcony; sud­denly unfurled long paper banners emblazoned with Scriptural passages. The group's demonstra­tion was in support of Gene L eggelt of Doll as, an admit­led homosexual who was suspended from the ministry during on emotional session of the conference earlier this week. PEARL STREET WAREHOUSE AUSTIN I 8th & Lavaca 478-0176 ~ I There were shouts and the audience of several hundred persons was in an uproar. The presiding bishop, the Rev_ 0. Eugene Slater, immediately adjourned the meeting. As the bishop began saying the closing prayer, a young man in a dress, Pat Brown, 25, burst into the aisle and rushed toward the speakers platform. "Don't touch that man!" shouted someone in the au• dence as the long-haired Brown threaded his way through the crowd. "What man?" said another in the audience. Churchmen surrounded Bishop Salter and refused to allow Brown near him. "Those people totally and flagrantly violated our rights," Brown shouted, "and the Constitution pro­tects everybody." Retorted a churchman: "We hove freedom of assem­bly, and you violated that!" Brown jumpted up on a pew and continued to shout at the crowd as it slowly left. Leggett later said Brown become angry because Leggett was not allowed to address the conferende. Leggett said he hod op­prooch. ed church officials about speaking to the group before the conference close~ and had been assured the matter would be referred to the delegates for a vote. He said he felt sure there would hove been no incidents if he GAY PRIDE WEEK IN AUSTIN Last weekend was the Gay Pride Week in Austin; Goy L iberotion hod meet• ings, a march, a dance, and a picnic which were dis­cribed by a reporter on the scene as being "incredible." The entire event was carried out with a flair that only Austin Gay Liberation seems to possess. The ability to deliver a message to the public while at the same time providing a most enjoy­able time for the people envolved. This is one of the best ways of changing peoples attitudes. Our re­porter was estatic the first time we talked with him Sunday morning. Saturday afternoon hod been allowed to speak. The Goy Lib outburst came within a few hours ofter ousted Methodist min· ister Wil Schaefer strode down the aisle of the church and dumpl>d his burning credentials on Bi shop Slater's desk. 11Bishop, here are my credentials," said Schaefer, who was dismissed recently as a Methodist preacher at Laredo over his relation• ship with a woman. about 200 people carrying signs ·and banners marched up congress to the Capital building. On reaching the Capital the crowd began congeroting on the steps outside of the building. A sudden downpour caused the crowd which then num• bered about 250 people to rush for shelter inside the public building. The guards in the building must have thought the crowd meant to cause some violence and locked the doors before anyone had a chance to get inside. Not letting the rain stop them the speakers went on as usual despite the fact everyone was soaked. The rain made it a worm humid night ir. 4.uotin but that didn't stop about 250 people who attended the dance from enjoying them­selves very much. It was held at a barn about 15 miles from Austin, with a fine selection of recorded music, free beer, and swimming. The pool was put to good use by many people, several of whom had misplaced their swimming atire and simply went in without it. The dance and skmny dip provided some good wholesome fun for all the people present. Mr. Friz/Jy 3401 Milam at Francis entrance on Francis Membership $2. per year Visits $5. each OPEN 4 pm CLOSE 8 am 7 DAYS A WEEK ,...,._) PRIVATE BATH CLUB~) ""all gay & safe" Houston 523-8840 opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE Free beer and snacks were much in evidence and the informal atmosphere of Austin produced a warm feeling in the hearts of everyone. Sunday brought with it bright sun and 400 Gay picnickers, and for one who is accustomed to polution, the bright sun and clean air of Austin's Kyler Park was a welcome relief. Peep· le got together with one another and talked of the events of the weekend. The people who were at the march telling the story to people who couldn't make it. Food and beer were pro­vided by Austin Gay Lib. and it was fun for everyone. Rain fell on the picnic and only dampened the bodies not the spirits of the people. All of the comments made about Gay Pride week in Austin tell about how re­laxed the hets are about Gays. This could be because of the way Austin Gay Lib has unified with the Gay community and provided the hets, Gays and everyone with real understanding of what a Gay is. Animal Farm is the name of a highly amusing allegory written some three decades ago by George Orwell of 1984 fame. In Animal Farm the bigger and stronger farm animals tyran· nize over the smaller ond weaker farm animals. And the most familiar line from the book is: "All animals are created equal, but some are more equal than others." Now all of us are pre­pared to swear by the principle enunciated in our Declaration of Independence: "All men are created equal." But too often we honor this principle with no more than a national assent. In other words, what we agree to in our words, we contradict in our works. We seem to soy: "All men are created equal, but some ore more equal than others." We ore like the Kansas City taxi driver with whom the writer had a dis­cussion some years ago. He maintained that there is nothing quite so potent as a morals builder as the realization that there are people who are inferior to us in at least one way. But all of this has to do with justice, with what we owe each other. When the Apostle Paul writes the Galatians: "There does not exist among you Jew or Greek, slave or freeman, male or female. All are one in Christ Jesus," he is speaking of love, of that virtue which is the very essence of supernatural , divine life. Paul is telling the Galatians that the various divisions of: national and/or racial allegiance ("Jew or Greek"); social class' ( 11 slave or freeman"); sex ("male or female"). All of these may before have counted for a great deal with his readers. But now they have been christened; they have put on Christ, as one puts on a ceremonial robe; and so they have been mode Christ ion. Now Paul's list was adequate for the age in which Paul I ived. Ever since, it has been the obligation of those Christ­ians of whom he writes, to up-date that Ii st and make it more relevant far the times in which they I ive. For our own time, certain classifications con be sugge sled. But the very mention of them sometimes pro,es too painful, too close to home. So how about these? Age: the very yo•,ng and helpless; teen-agers; young adults; the middle-oged; and those whom we shal I cpll .. senior citizens." Life-style: hippies; street people; coll or-and-tie pre• servers of a. more gracious way of life; the open-minded, whether liberal or conserva­tive; the close-minded, whether liberal or conserva­tive. Sexual orientation: morr ied fathers and mothers of , children; dedicated celi- 15 •••••••••••••••••••••• • ~ "H A I R" ~ •••••••••••••••••••••• BE SURE AND SEE "TIFFANY JONES" AT THE RED ROOM - WEDNESDAYS AND SUNDAYS bates in convents, rectories, relitious houses; the unmar­ried, for whom married lif~ or entrance into religion would be a tragic mistake; ~nd those who love not wise­ly but too well and toward whom Jesus extended on especial sympathy. In Poul's listing there is something which might at first escape our attention, and it should be kept in mind in our preparation of o more timely and relevant Ii sting. Pou I coll s attention to what people are and not to what they da or to what he may suspect they ore capable of doing. And in .... this connection we may learn much from meditation upon a brief statement by •a character in Shake spears' s Coriolanus: "What he cannot help in his nature, you account a vice." 18 ii GAllEON In a recent civil suit in Tyler, the courts held that the death of on insured was occidental when he was shot by on irate hu sbond committing adultery. The suit(Great American Reserve Insurance Co. V. Sumner, 464SW 2nd 212), arose when the insurer denied payment of occidental death benefits to the insured's estate. The court required the company to pay, stating (in classic legal fashion), "Death is not the usual or expected result of adultery." We hope that this ruling will be expanded to include fornication. 1.720 RICHMOND AV fNUE HOUSTON UNITED STIITES CLOSET QUEENS SINK TO NEW LOW WASHINGTON - The US Count of Mi I itary Appeals, the highest military court in the land, has decreed it is i I legal for an officer to "fraternise" with enlisted men. It did so in upholding the conviction of Navy Lt. (j.g.) Carl R. Pitasi, 28, of Boston, for fraternising with Seaman Robert E. Clark during the Fall of 1968. This obviously trump­ed- up charge was the only one the ghouls of ONI could smear Mr. Pitasi with when their leering attempts to pin a sodomy charge on him fell limp. While clearing Mr. Pitosi of the sodomy charge, the court convicted him of fraternising by entertaining Seaman Clark in officer quarters at the Great Lakes, 111. Naval Training Centre, eating lunch with him in a civilian restaurant while both men were in uniform, socialising with him in local bars, buying him civilian clothing and loaning him his car and officer quarters while he, Mr. Pitasi, was on leave. These heinous crimes were sufficient in the eyes of those dedicated to just­ice in the Navy to strap Mr. Pitasi to the mast, as it were. One can only imagine (with little difficulty) the lurid investigations tech-niques typically used by the subhuman} employed by the Novy in such matters, and the effects on Mr. Pitasi and Seaman Clark. Sadly, this sort of evidential sexual guilt on the part of the US Navy Officer Corps is all too frequent these days. The projection mechanism of the closet queens in braid is all too obvious. Although the taboo of fraternising has been part of military custom for cen· furies, and with good reason at one time, it is not speci­fied in the written Uniform Code of Military Justice of the United States. However, the Court said fraternisation is part of an _.unwritten military common law" and thus is punishable under the Code as conduct "prejudicial to good order and discipline in the armed forces." Previous convictions for fraternisation have al­ways been associated with other "crimes" such as sodomy, and Court officials said it was the first time a man had been punished simply for fraternisation. It was also obvious a classic example of the closet queen in full pique! opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE " Browne Breckenridge Houston•s Gay WELL, LUVS, IT'S been sud, an interesting month past, really it has, and one of the BIG pleasures for just everyone with any taste was the welcome arrest over in New Orleans of that ogre, Di strict Attorney Gorri son. Again, that is. This wretch was arrested only a few months ago on a charge of molesting a minor boy over there but we a II knew that he'd be able to wiggle out of it. But this last arrest, for bribery, illegal gambling and just much more, luv, is a nice Federal charge! Thank you, J. Edgar Hoover, John Mitchell and all the other darlings in the Justice Department for WONDERFUL work! New Orleans will be sud, a nice place again without this sick, sick, sick closet case in the DA's office. And you know it, luv! ACTUALLY, WE WERE JUST in New Orleans re­cently and sadly impressed by the way this Garrison nu,mer had harrassed so many of the Gay bars out of the Quarter over the years. Tragically, however, the Quarter has been infested with an enormous numbdr of utterly filthy, stinking, disease-ridden parasites who masquerade day and night as hippies and re­volutionaries. These di S· gusting drones are nothing but thieves and addicts and bearers of contagion, my dears, and most of them are willfully playir.g at whatever opening soon Society Sane insignificant ,.relevancy" is au courant with the wit• less at the moment. And they're TACKY! Fortunately, luvs, we ran into that dear thing, Ron Sue of Dallas, club owner and artiste, who made the visit in New Orleans so much more fun. And one cannot forget the charming old dear who owns the chic apartment building where we stayed as guest of the Lady H. Even though trolls ate the air conditioning unit supply Lady H's apartment whilst we were in residence, all in all everything was just AWFUL. THERE WAS A DIVINE party on board a princely Admiral's yacht for a group of patric­ians to decide matters pe~ toining to the comming Social Season. We're just thrilled, really we are, to know they got things settled well in advance of the season It's Important to have a sense of direction about such things, and you know it. And such a fascinating group, too. Who do YOU know who gets $2,000,000.00 cheques sent to him, luv? Not bloody many! And all those titles! Anyway, this group of patricans is plan• ning a more formally organ• ised club or something for our community just to keep the standards up and to have just lots of goad times and isn't that just ducky. Why, certainly! ANOTHER PARTY, resembl­ing one of those marvy on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE Benny P.ernstein radical chicy socially aware do's was recently held at a ,mall and charming house in Nor· fol k Street. It was in hon­our ofthe fourth anniversary of Al and Tom and the guest list was eclectic. Very. It included that dear New Orleans boy, Hank, whose inability to keep his hands off minors is SO well docu• mented, and he did not break his record the night of the party, either. All over the water bed, too. Tsk. Tsk. Tsk. Utterly tasteless ... WE WERE ALL NOT the least suprised when a River Oaks denizen and his wife Ii led for divource recently. Now we assume he and l,e will be happily settled in the Montrose area while she sails off into whatever land divourcees head for with their settlement. A NUMBER OF THE PATRI­CIANS and others of wealth and/ or power are watching with keen interest the correr of a well-known Texas pol­itician believed to be On The Way Up. These gentlemen are most serously interested also in seeing the ridiculous Texas sex laws changed to permit consensual relations between adults of whatever ·ex. And they would like to see this politician's attitude towards this move into modern ti mes harden into favourable action soon. That's the way it's done in Texas, honey-ch ile: you know where the bodies bathe and offer a tour guide service for a fee. Hallelujah! WE HAVE BEEN SPENDING some really def ightfu I even• ings of late recovering from the rigours of the day in the new Baths of Houston, MR. FRIZBY. It's so GOOD to be able to relax in such com· lortoble surroundings with such attentive folk any night of the week, luv! And it's so much more convenient than a prowl through the bars in search of relaxation which so frequently eludes one, and you know it. And since it's a private membership club, all nice and legal, luv, not just ANYONE can rush in. Keeps it cozy, luv. Very cozy. And we know you'll like it. We do. NON THAT A CERTAIN person has supposedly left town after so much oral activity, luv, we wonder if sabotage and target practise will cease locally. Not that we assume a connexion for one moment, luv, but it will be interesting to see . ... T.l's nf ial lus FREE DANCING FRE\ :::::/OURS 2:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m FRIDA' YS & SATIU RDAYS I I I :00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m. Free Beer Bust 5:30 Sundays 526-9368 And dear BIG LYNN is olive and well on d work ng at GB International Club, thank you. He' II be doing other clubby things soon, too, luv, and don't forget we told you first! The "Cherry" he was to hove hod - rotted - some foolishness about the lease. THAT TACKY HOT DOG EMPORIUM llcross the street from The Entree' hos let it be known that they DON'T I ike Gays and keep your damn cars off their lot at at night! Well, we don't like their attitude or their food, luv, and plan to take our business elsewhere. (That means we won't trade with them, luv. And we suggest that nobody else does, either.) La. JUST A BIG THANK YOU to that dear boy, frequent columnist for this journal, rocconteur and long-hair enthusiast, Scotty, for in­.- oducing us to a fabulous magazine, "AFTER DARK" with all its morvy articles and astoundingly lovely pictures of some of the most gorgeous moles seen this side of a Marine recruiting station- Merci, cherie! And regards to all your helpail friends. AND SPEAK ing FINALLY of molesting minor boys, we understand a local num­ber is planning to stand for election as Governor. Now THAT ought to be a hoot! Although we suppose his arrest record for the above­hinted- at crime hos fang since been mysteriously lost by the police department. 1967 was an awkward year, luv. Especially in the Fall. If the picture above re• minds you of someone you know or have seen then your guess is right. This is really Iva {"Mother") Dorana. Known to many of us only as "Mother" because she is and hos been to so many in the gay community. She makes her home in Dallas but "camps out" behind the bar at Ron sue' s every day. ''Hello Mather" 19 I opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE LETTERS to the EDITOR Phil Frank The Nuntius Houston, Texas Dear Friend: Los Angeles 6, California June 21, 1971 It was indeed a pleasure to meet you and other mem­bers of your staff during our recent visit to Houston. Later in the evening we had several hours with the Rev. Billy Hudson and a number of others, so that our visit to your city was very helpful in my being able to bring back to our Board here a report of Houston developments. Enclosed are a few recent notices o f activities here at ONE. Our June Lecture I missed but am informed it was very much worthwhile. ON E's contmumg aim is to help people to better understand themselves and others, the goal being better balanced, happier lives for all concerned. This em­phatically is the motivation of our unique European Tours. No other organization has successfully conducted such, so far as we can learn. Certainly, none planned as are ONE's to bring about better understanding between American and European homophiles, as well as having a wonderful fun trip. And is that not the important point always, to balance the fun with the substantial and help to break up the image the public has ( as well as many Gays themselves) that being Gay means nothing more than a shallow whirl of giddy fun happen­ings and lots of sex? HADRIANS PATIO CLUB Members admitted free Out-of-town Guest $1.00 SWIMMING POOL-INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (HWY 91 LEOPARD AGNES !HWY. 44) FULL KITCHEN-serving STEAKS and SEA FOOD 6000 Agnes (Hwy .4.4) I Phone-88.4-0058 I Corpus Christi, Tex. INTRODUCING - - - OUR BUSINESS FRIENDS Want to meet new people with the same interests and pastimes you enjoy? Tom Friend Box 55541 Houston, Texas 77055 Phone 464-0052 after 6 P.M. and week-ends Please send me more information about your introductory service for gay people. Print Name _________________ _ Address _________________ _ City _________ _ State ______ _ I hereby certify that I am 21 years old or older: Signed: ___-_-_ _______________ Our second recent Art Show is founded upon the same basis and is ONR's main contribution to Gay Pride Week, something quite unlike anything the other groups are doing. We shall also participate in the Parade, but hope to make our part distinctively in the tone ONE represents, though this will not be easy to do in the midst of so much carnival atmos­phere. Incidentally, a large exhibit of fine figure photography from Dallas will be a major unit in the Art Show we are sett­ing up. We are e ntering Nuntius on our mailing /isl and hope you will put us on your exchange mailing list so that we can keep in touch with Houston happenings. Also, that we can keep in touch with you directly and be of service to each other as all responsible groups should do. Sincerely yours, W. Dorr Legg, Director Dear Mr. Legg, It was with great pleasure that we were included in your tour of this area. We here in Houston feel that we are fast becoming one of the leading centers of activity in the southwest United States for advancing understanding of the Gay citizen. Much hos already been done, much more lies ahead. We contratulote ONE on their profound contribution to this human understanding during the past several years. The NUNTIUS wishes to assist ONE in the coming years. Phil Frank Houston May 18, 1971 Dear Phil, Again happen to receive a copy of your newspaper. Could be better, could be worse. Me? I am a personnel man with desires lo help. Me? I am AC-DC, a bi. Well educated, worldly, travel­ed a bit, seen some of it, not all. My s uggestion. We cannot employ men even with obvious talents, skills, abilities unless I hey play it straight at the plant and o ffice. "They" place me in trouble if I s ugg est employing one. Can you tell them to play it " all tl,e way s traight'' and that "on the job" is no place for pick ups? Then I am on the carpet for employing one of "those". I cannot help them get some of those good paying spots unless they keep it buttoned up when working. My story, you asked? No, you didn't, but ii you read on you will hear. Started age seven with the big boy next door, a teen ager. l complied or got whipped. Quickly learned to like it. Have seduced, been seduced, and yes, raped! Left for a /loner, but got to the doctor and avoided the sherill. Have had thin/ls happen that you would not believe in a paper-back book. One lover, who had left me, almost killed in an accident, asked for me on his death bed, to his parents and sister, all straight! The doc told me to hold his hand, chased all others out and he made it. Fiction? No, really. Drama in the real is more than fiction any day. This queen would have liked to have had ONE man and then lo lake CARE of him in ALL ways, wash, cook, sew and all. The suburban house, dishes and all - one man. But fate did not run it that way. The glamour of youth is long gone, but the wealth of memories, the wonderful people live on. But oh the many hours of loneliness and tears. The hurts linger loo. Keep up your efforts, ii is needed by so many souls. Name with-held - Dear Nome, Us too! Boston, Mass. Dear Mr. Frank, l want to thank you and your friends for helping make my vacation a success. By the mere fact that you felt you didn't have to "entertain" me was a compliment. J usl sitting and watching a group of friends working together on something they all love and believe in is inspri­ing. After being in Houston for a week, meeting people and making friends (not a pun) l am more relaxed but no less confused as to what l want to do. More important to me than that is the fact that l am more contented lo let things happen spontaneously. This does not mean l will not move to Houston, rather it means that if l do it will not be as planned as l had thought and l will be much happier to do it "a'la bingo". Thank you again for letting me be your friend and thank everyone else for making my trip to Houston a real "trip" lam not likely lo forget. May God bless and keep you beautiful people beaut­iful. [ remain Dear Clinton, Always a friend, Clinton Your move is Houston's gain. Phi I Fr9nk Dear Phil, Saigon, Vietnam June 22, 1971 For ages l have intended to write to you but, s; much has happened that l would not know where to begin. [ finished my dog /jromming course in Houston, and l opened my shop in New Orleans. Much to my surprise it was doing quite we/I when my ex-boss from Saigon wrote me a letter asking me to come back lo Vietnam, so here [ am. l am sure that l told you that l had finished a lour of duty here when I ne I you in Houston. A friend of mine from Houston sent me your latest copy of the NUNTIUS, which, l might add, l greatly enjoyed. Of course being on a defense contract, one must be constantly careful what the others see. But you know me we// enough lo know that l am pretty independent. When this tour is over (and we don't know how long our contract is lasting as it seems pretty indefinite), l plan on returning lo New Orleans to open a /jroom shop for doggies in conjunction with a grooming school. Also, my sister and l plan to raise show poodles for sale. Those are my ambitions now, and l might say my main reason for returning to Saigon to sm::ure the necessary capital. Even though this is supposed lo be where the action is, l wouldn't be here otherwise. Needless to say, the troop withdrawal has had its al/eel on the city life in Saigon. There are less and less Americans - I should say fewer - and it is quite noticeable on the streets. Also, there is the constant harassment by the Vietnamese and MP's., not /jay wise just otherwise. Of course, the military has their purges every so often and it /jets a bit frustrating, but I still am glad that I came back. After I left Houston, I had intended lo write; but you knCM> how easy it is to have good intentions. The moment that I received a copy of your paper, l sat down al this type­writer and wrote. I fell that I had put it off enough. Dear Cecil, Sincerely Cecil Thanks for the letter and am looking forward to your return visit to Houston. Phil Frank IIPOLLO NEWS COMPLETE LINE OF ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 515½ E. Houston St. San Antonio, Tex. 21 • ~~~.rn [f)ii\00~ il~~ii\ i100~ CO\IING AITRACTIONS "DESIRES OF THE DEVIL" Voodoo power over a young man forces him into a life of sexual bondage. "NIGHT OF SUBMISSION" For those who dug " Boys in Cholns", here's one that's even hotter! Lots of sex, S&M and brutality. "BLACK & BLUE" "THE COLLECTION-" Sizzling documentary about the soda-masochistic scene in California. A man kidnops bays and keeps them captive like onimals in o cage. Filmed on location, where it happens, as it happens. Hot for the squeamish! Lots of sex, sadism and suspense. •hill•• ■ ■1111 MEN LE.4RN TO H,.; A "MODEL MAN" Fuhion ,._,;119 Phot09fa,,l,y Television S.lf/mp,_, Ml!W CLASS STARTS THIS MONTH CALL FOR IMTl!RVIIW - CAU.-521-2652 412 WISlNIIMD-77006 YOUR ZODIAC PREDICTS WHEN IN DALLAS, DON'T FOLLOW THE STRAIGHT ... £££££ MORE FUN AHEAD £££££ I-•---► FOLLOW THE DETOUR SIGN · · · · · r DETOUR Dallas' Newest GAY Scene ( open salon) LOUNGE (formally GALLERY I/ J •7•i•e ~ & e,ddy Roem £££££ 3113 LIVE OAK ST. DALLAS, TEXAS 823-0846 22 •'TRAD•N TIIICKs•• ,_ ..........1.N.a.A.M..'.O.C..A.T.I. .......... .. "-fa/ ..... , ....... 11e C-lfJ ....... - write ._ 7..S, L .. ~ .. c.llhnlie9IIGIM. SKIPPl!R'S GUYS GUIDI!. There are guidH fa bars, guidH fa organ­izations. Why not a guide to the guys themHlvH? That's what the all-new SKIPPER'S GUYS GUIDE is--a useful, informative booklet that includH ads fr om over 175 great guys who ore looking for correspond­ents, friends--and action! If you're over 21 and looking for the same, ordr your copy of SKIPPER'S Gl.Jl")E today. Send $3 and siotement of age to: Skipper's Guides, Box 92, Danville, Kentucky 40-442. All copiH Hnt by first-doss moil. SECRET MAIL Receiving and forwarding service available for letters, pockogH etc. Discretion assured. Write Morton Service, P. 0 . Box 35986, Dallas 75235 for details. Mention Nuntius. AIR CONDITIONING SPECIALIST John Moore - 24 hour service - 52~1947. FCR RENT - 1 bedroom u~firnished apartment in colony. Convenient to everything. Gay owned; all Gay in building. Phone 524-.5612 anytime. PART T~E HELP WANTED - Clean-cut salesman wanted. Your choice of hours in evenings and/ or week-ends. We will be a non-profit organization working with the needy, people with adjusting problems, the underpriveledged, the Gay people and almost anyone who needs our help. Car and ex­perience not necessary. Good commission. Call Robert Strom in the evenings - Room 617 - Phone No. 224-9.501. Have A Real Delight "DIAL · A · MODEL TONIGHT" (415) 86~3331 SAN FRANCISCO'S ORIGINAL all aale maclel agan~y af the wHt. 7 yrs. & going strong Handsome - Masculine - Endowed Discrete - PERSONABLE Leom about l,ow we got our fabulous reputation! Learn and view some of our excellent young m-,! Write, stat• ing your age and include $3 to cover cost. D AM I ENTERPRISES P. 0. BOX 14121 Son Francisco, Co. 94114 P .S. If you forget our number, look us up in the yellow page of the S.F. telephone directory. YES! We do travel . . . . . . . . . . .. DIAL - A - MODEL (415) 86~3331 PLUMBING REPAIR - Complete plumbing service - anytime - any­where . .Coll A. J. Davis - 621-1944. COCK RING$ - 8,ochure $1.00 A TASTE OF LEATHER Box ~-N Son Francisco 94101 SECRET ARY - Part·time, accurate typist, some dictation, apperonce, age, unimportant. Dependabi I ity imperative. Referances required. Cranks need not bother. Telephone after l pm for appointment. DIXIE DISTRIBUTING COMPANY " JUKE BOXES, POOL TABLES, AMUSEMENT GAMES CIGARETTE, CANDY and ALL VENDING MACHINES ~- 4~:,½ BELLAIRE BLVD. II Houston, Tex. Phone 668-0913 THE FOLLOWING SPACE IS DONATED TO THE CHURCH OF MONTROSE IN THE INTREST OF THE HOUSTON HOMOPHILE COMMUNITY. THE VIEWS ARE EXCLUSIVELY THOSE OF THIS CHURCH. ~ 528-8808 OPEN - 4 p.m. 'til 2 a.m. ---.. ,,..~ Hairdressers Speciality Mondays I to 4 DRAFT BEER 25( SHOWTIME Fri. - Sat. & Sun. Amateur Nite Wed. at 9:00 23 - - --- -THE HIJQ/E Private Club (Membership available) Large Dance Floor HOUSTON'S MOST UNIQUE DANCE CLUB JSJS West/Jeimer at Jonell PAUL STEWART - Host GENE HOWLE - Owner MARK WILLIAMSON - Head Bartender GEORGE ELROD - Bartender PHONE 622-5942 or 622-9149 Afterhours 2 a.m. 'til 4 a.m. Friday t Saturda) ~ Rev. Dr. 11:i.lly Hmson, Pastor JERRY ROSS - Bartender LYNN GAREY - Doorman OPEN EVERY EVENING 7 p.m. 'til 2 a.m. Th:cee months in Houston! Hours of endless worlc, efforts, contacts, in our attempt ix> acquire building facilities for our Church of Montrose Sanctua-cy & hane. We have been busy scouting, searching, and seeking for an adequate space here in the Mont rose district ••• even consulting real tors. with our need, vision, and hope. Handicapped by the costs of lease rentals and lack of support and funds 1'£i. th .,,hich to worlc it leaves the Dini shy in states of pe:rplexi ty and wonde:cnent of WHAT 00 ·HE DO NOi/? Shall we relinquish the task we set out to do here in Houston that God sent us for? Is there really enough interest among the Houston gay community for a Church to warrant our continued efforts ar.d stay? These and other thought provoking questions we ask onrs elves. WE ARE CUNVINCED TRAT THERE IS SUF.FICIEN'l' INI'EREST, A DIRE 1'1EEID, AND 'l'liAT THE COJ,:'rINUANCE OF OUR ZB'FORT IS WARRA.Nl'ED ! Al though there are times when we feel like we 1ve come to the prove:roial "end of the rope" si tuat::.on, we are prayerfully "tying a knot in the er.d of that :rope and holding on!" Readers of "The ~untius" are aware of our arrangements last month to use tempora-cy facilities at the YMCA & YWCA. t o conduct services & begin building our Church. ••• that the facili -cy had been engaged and paymer.t made two weeks in advar.ce of our service •••• handbill announcements of the service printed at a considerable expense •••• and then, at the last minute we l/i, were infonned that t~ere "is no room in the Inn" ; excuses were given; cancellations made; am we were hopelessly left w.i. thout a facility to operate merely because our mi.rri. s t:ey and interests are primarily directed to t he gay community of Houston. It is such Orgarri.zations as these, under the disguise of Christian Enterpri ses, who with their prejudisms c1.nd discriminatory practices, have diminished interest in professing Chri s ti.an Churches of today and brought with it a decline in meeting att endance. AARC picketed the YMCA t o voice cur disapproval of their unchristian tacti.cs • •• their insul t to the entire gey community! I'm convinced that the lord Jesus Christ himself, if applying for a rri.ghts lodging at t:t.e Y"!ilCA in person, woul d be de :rl.ed l odging and admittance. 'rhey would r.ot recognize Him, know Rim, a nd because of H:l.o dress, r.ianners, minority cause ••• • I 1m of the opi~on t heir reactions 11·ould be to "tar, feather, and run him out of t o,vn on a rail!" God for{,ive & help these "whit ened sepulche r:;; fuE of dead men• s bones • •• h;ypocri tes who nay and do not • •• bl::.nd leaders of the blind ! 11 opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE 'l'here are always harassments, hu:rdles, i:.dversi ties that aey rd"Ii.ster, leader, or group must encounter in the establishment of a Churcr, or orgar.ization. Aey new progre.m·goes through three stages, namely, lJ ridicule, 2; discussion, & 3) adoption. Truth has to fight its way into the world! Misunderstandings of persons, places, intent & purposes, are also often deterrents in the building up of aey wrthy cause. Hima.n:cyr it seems such a weakness in us all to be !doubting Themas", skeptical, sto.nd-offish, unconcl tted, critical! Yet ,Ii t hout flri th "18 1o not :.-emove mountains or please God. Va. thout vision we perish. And it talces no speed.al bre.ins or talents to be critical of a person, place, or program. We are all prone to be super-cri tic-.al of other:. ••• yet make allo;oances quickly for ourselves. ·,le all love ourself, not w:i. thstanding our faults, and it v-ould behoove us all to love others in like manner. People are flll11zy'. We all know that. But what• s not funny about peo:ple is the unconcerned, uncommitted, complacent attitudes marry often talce toward their O?Jn welfare, safety, securi \y ••• • or who wi tbhold mercy, compassion, interest in the.t of others. People get wrapped up and fuss over little unimportant things, but can be surprisingly nonchalant and curiously fatalistic about gri.-n iss:ies or major dec::i.sions that will ultimately affect their state of happiness, r::.ghts, deotirti.es! Ko gey person needs a "crystal ball" to gaze in to see what the sor:ry plight it has been for homosexuals of the past ••• and the slightest amount of intelligence will provide solemn reality that unless we as individuals and gay comrmmiti.es: rally arotmd our own causes, provide so:.ind & sane answers to our particular problems:, our future will remain blighted ·,ti th gloom and over-shadowed w:i. th continued persecutions and injustices. Homosexuals are not irresponsible individuals ••• e.t least no more so than a stm:ight society ••• a?K'. I am persuaded that tr.e gay community of Houston 13 V'ITAILY HllliHBSTED IN THE CHURCH OF MOHTROSE AND OUR EFFORI'S IN THEIR BEHALF. :••••••••••••••••••••••••••TEAR OUT .... .~, 0 .C..:. THIS COUPON ENTITLES YOU TO TWO FREE KISSES OR A DRINK OF YOUR CHOICE FOR 29¢ AT THE CANDY STORE 3014 THROCKMORTON DALLAS, TEXAS ( PRESENT THIS COUPON ) ... ::, 0 "<' .U.J. :••••••••••••"••••••••••• TEAR OUT ••••••••••••••••• .. •••••••= 25 \ 26 a - HOUSTON'S NEWEST - - - 3400 TRAVIS at FRANCIS 528-9772 OPEN 8 p.m. - 2 a.m. BEER !JUST --- Sundays 8 to 10 ---pool ta/J/es on t/Je /Ja/cony -=- hosts - JOHN & BILL The misunderstandings of the past; failures of previous groups; the w:rong-doiqr of those on whom we relied & trusted; and the "hurdles" and problems we presently face in building our Church of 14ontrose, does not wanant. a "giving up"! Def ea ti.sm is an attitude far more prevalent among ma.ey sometimes than coumge. It is much easier to give up ••• to accept the status quo ••• to be regimented by custom ••• than to know what is right for us and fight for it. Ka.ey a good program bas failed because it lacked depth, perception, or was full of shallow echemes ••••• or, rore likely than not, because of attitude!'! of defeatiSi!I. There are actually lists of reasons why a person or group program ~ fail, fall short of their fulfillment, but I am convinced that the underlying reason for all reasons is "defeatism & lack of COUJ:8€e". '.i.'he~mcything is A not always dete:cnined by its popularity. Most everything tr,.at is hooourable & right had hQIJ"ble beginnings, endlU'ed misunderstandings and opposition, fought its -.a;y- into existence. I sincerely pray, hope, trust, that the gay community of Houston ••• together ".'Ii th the mim.st-cy and dreams of a "Chu...-ch of Montrose" will not succumb to the "cti.smal D1 s" •••• delay,, discontent, denial, destruction, depression, all of which adds up to 'discouragement• which creates a lack of heart and leaves us with "nothingness". 'i'he gay person, ,just as nth the straight, were bo:cn to win! :If we have individual faith, personal canrni ttment to the r.ri.nist:cy- & Church, anticipate, plan, believe ••• we will not be far f:rorn our objectives! The gay communi 1;y of Houston needs a church that will be on the go ••• in the know ••• prov.i.ding the nseds of the spiritual life of their community. THE cm,'RCH OF YOl1.rROSE IS THAT CHURCH! opening soon on the Houston scene TIIE PET SHOPPE TIME TO REIID 3110 S. Shephe"rd 528-8950 BOOKS and MAGAZINES --- For All Ages --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ OPEN 7 a.m. -- 2 a.m. ROSllllE NEWSTIIND 1402 Texas Ave. 226-8020 ALL ADULT BOOKS and MAGAZINES MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ MINI THEATRE $2.00 OPEN 8:30 a.m. -- 11 p.m. N. HOUSTON NEWS 8718 Jenson Dr. 691-8411 FINEST ADULT READING ON THE NORTH SIDE MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ OPEN 11 a.m. -- 9 p.m. MAIN ST. NEWS 4418 S. Main St. 528-7142 BOOKS and MAGAZINES --- For All Ages --- MOVIE ARCADE FREE PARKING OPEN 9 a.m. -- 10 p.m. ROSllllE'S TOO 900 Preston ( on the Square) 226-7534 ALL ADULT BOOKS AND MAGAZINES -···· MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ ----- OPEN 8 a.m. --12 p.m. EIIST END NEWS 7114 Lawndale 926-0325 FINEST ADULT READING ON THE EAST SIDE MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ OPEN II a.m. -- 6 p.m. Visit Houston's Finest Full Line and-All Adult Newstands at the above locations. fj'~ --- 27 \ .. 28 PIIRIS IIDULT THEIITRE find BOOK STORE THE MOST COMPLETE ADULT BOOK STORE IN TOWN. --- MOVIE ARCADE 25¢ --- 810 Austin St. Waco, Tex. Publicotoon of the no- or photograph of any person or organization on articles or odv"rttsing in The NlJNT IUS is not to be construed as ony .indication of tt-e sexi-ol orientation of such p1.:son o, o,gdiflizat,on. - il though the Church of Montrose 11:i.ll be cha.~ered and under the auspices of A.A.LC., Incorporated, as a "mother Church" for the national Organization, w are nevertheless incorporating the Church of Jlontrose in the State of Te:zas and will be acqul.ring a tax exempt certificate for the benefit of contributors & donors t.o the cause. '!'here are those gay persons in Houston who no doubt could well afford sizeable d.onations to our Church cause, others more limited in their gi'Ving, but if e..-e:i:;r. gay person alone would do their part, large or small, we would not lack funds in our program effort for you. We are going to ask the gay be.rs and business of Houston to pledge weekly donations to the cause, receipt them, and which will be tax deductible. Several have already made cormni ttmenta. As qul.ckly as possible we will be calling upon all proprietors to acquaint ourselves with thaa and solicit their pledged interests. We are for them and I am sure they will be for us. I know, too, that every gay person will do their part. BY THI.S WE WILL BE ABLE TO ACQ.UIRE A BUILDIID ••• FOO IQ!IB CHURCH ••• AND BRI]G uro EXISTEI(!E THIS NEEJED PROOIW4. All incomes & disbursements of funds will be oonscienctiously recorded ••• books maintained for inspection. •• and printed monthly in the Nuntius. The Church & ministry needs your support i.f we are to build and do God• s v.o rlc here. In the meantime the mini.st_:i:;r remains actively busy with rr:any writings, 00rt8spomences, contacts, counseling sessions, pmyers for God to "supply our eve:z:r need. •• both our's & your1s ••• according to lfi.s riches in glory by Christ Jesus." We love Houston. ••• the gay comrnuni ty here. We are here to serve, to help, to be your friend. Interested persons in the Chruch, or t hose needing counsel & help, TIIB.Y contact_ me by writing Bev. Dr. ll:il]Jr Hudson, 1126 Bertheq. # 6, Houston, ~s 77006 ••• or by phoIJ:i.ng "The Nuntius" 524-5612, laavi~ their name &: phone n1J11ber ••• or how t hey may be contactea_. am we will get in touch as quickly as possible. I wish to take this opportimi ty to express rey humble gratitude and thanks 1!o Phil Frank, Owner & Edi tor of ''The Nuntius" for his loyal interest for the gay communi. ty, this mini st~, the Church of Montrose, his unselfish time & efforts for our cause here, and the space he has been dona.ting in the paper .for our ,ronc. ·.r:be entire Nuntius Staff has been wonde:cful and for this we 88,3" "thank you" ••• it is appreciated! Also, 198 are deeply appreciative of the .friendship and assistance given us by the management of the l!alt:ree1 Lotlllge •••• Pete, Bob, Joe, and others there. Then to "'l!ed" ••• Houston•s own Kr. Friab;y •••• for his interest & loyalty in our progmm and work. God bless all of you! I'm most arucious to personally meet and become acquainted with other Owner• s of gay businesses here, irrli vi duals in the gay communi iv', and equally sure they too will respond in frlentlship and assistance to that which God has committed to our trust. here •••• in be:!1a.lf of gay community interests. Our love, prayers, blessings to the gay citizens of Houston! When in Dallas-Visit ~OO~~~~lI ~001r 1f[}i]~~ Tr~OO 2100 Elm St. 747-2688 ~~~'-,rulkf!lelJ' ~J in atklJ μ,. .,/nlainnu,,,I ART CINEMA Houston's Only 'the original' Art Cinema ½ Block East of 6100 Kirby Dr. IN UNIVERSITY VILLAGE 518-8186 Private Club for your undistruhed viewing pleasure (years membership $1.00) OPEN ALL NIGHT AARC PRIMARY PURPOSE The specific and primary purpose for which this organization is formed is for: 1. Tt:e dissemination of the Christian religion both local and/ or national. 2. To engage in and carry on, all kinds of Home and Foreign' missionary work, and all forms of Christian en­deavor. 3. To license and ordain elders, teachers and religious counselors, ministers, priests, evangelists, thereby giving granting, and bestowing upon them each and every ec'. clesiastical power, privilege and authority as Christian clergymen. 4. Establish educational institutions, both academic or theological, under the laws of the state in which such schools, colleges, or seminaries shall be established. 5. To protect a Christian inter-faith fellowship primarily for the homophile community. 6. To sponsor, supervise, and conduct enterprises to promote among religions, the general public, an interest, knowledge, and understanding of homophile behavior, Way of Life, and sexual equality. 7. To aid in the adjustment to religion and society of such persons who may appear to vary from the normal (so­called) moral and social standards, and to aid in the development of a highly ethical, religious, social and moral responsibility in all such persons. 8. To protect, insofar as possible, these people from undue discrimination. 9. To sponsor, supervise and conduct medical, social, social hygi~ne, pathological and therapeutic research of every kind and description and to publish the results of such research as widely as possible. 10. To establish branches of the organization 11. To publish literature compatible to the objectives and interests of this organization, to publicize information not only by printed means but also radio, television, speakers bureaus, stage presentation and all other means of communication deemed helpful toward the realization of the afore stated purposes/ activities of this organization. 12. To organize and establish other institutions in the furtherance and objectives of the organization deemed helpful. NO ONE MAY BE A MEMBER OF AARC WHO: 1. Does not believe in God. 2. Who is a member of any organization or activity purported by intent or philosophy to overthrow the government of the United States. 3. Who excessively uses alcoholic beverages or is an habitual drunkard. 4. Who uses drugs illegally. 5. Who uses coercion, force, violence in personal or minority group causes. 6. Who solicits minors for sexual purposes. 7. Who engages in the use of public houses (toilets, parks, etc.) for sexual activities and performances of­fensive to public respect and interests. 8. W,10 engages in excessive promiscuous conduct. 9. Who will not loyally uphold and support the intent, purposes, objectives, and projects of this organization. 'PHE ABOVE INDICATED RESTRICTIONS FOR MEMBERSHIP IN AARC IS NOT TO BE MISCON­STRUED TO MEAN THAT SUCH PERSONS WOULD BE UNWELCOME AT OUR CHRISTIAN ENDEAVORS AND MEETINGS, FOR THE VERY NATURE OF OUR INTENT AND PURPOSE IS TO HELP ANYONE WITH SPECIAL PROBLEMS OR OTHERWISE. YET OUR MEMBERSHIP MUST CONSIST OF ONLY THOSE PERSONS WHO WILL REFLECT THE BEST INTERESTS OF CHRIST AND OUR ORGANIZATION, BE GUIDED BY ETHICAL CODES OF CONDUCT AND MORAL RESPONSIBILITIES BOTH TO THEMSELVES AND TOWARD OTHERS. Taken from articles of incorporation - AARC. opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE \ Houston,s Only North Side Club Tk QARAVAN 0 PEN - 11 a.m. 'til 2 a.m. Pool - Happy Hour - daily 4 to 6 A" Beer - Set-ups & Wine 20¢ There is much you can do alone. But there· is no limit to what a group ~~ . bq\' Sl/-Olf N~ can accomplish, wo1rking together! JO off Hwy 75 - TIDWELL Exit - t,44•Si~I CHURCH Of MONTROSE NEEDS YOUR HELP TO SERVE YOU BETTER HELP US BUILD WE NEED YOUR: ► INTEREST ► PARTICIPATION ► TALENTS ► DONATIONS • un w "ff'OO!i. EYE.SMlD> KA>Gl!K F"OI JNDATION FOR IJS opening soon on the Houston scene THE PET SHOPPE ..... ··- . ._;..,, KAMEHY SPEAKS A. Oh, you are refering fo the pol ifical campaign. In my case, of course, came from the Gay community and in Washington I hove the sup­port in general of the whole Gay community as for os I can see w ifh a very few exceptions. However as the campaign got going it was run on the level where I got a good deal of support in terms of moral support and encouragement from people all over ths city. Sotho! for example now that the campaign is over, I am known through the city, so that when I walk down the streets, strangers come up and say "Hello" or if I sit in a restaurant people come over; their general reaction is congradulations on the campaign and "Sorry that I did not win and a hope that I will remain in politics because you are needed'.' The financial support came largely, almost entirely, from the Gay com mun ify. We ran a major fund raising campaign all over the coun­try and funds came in from every where from chonge right on up to several hund­red dollars in checks. We had a few an11eles who gave sizeable sums, some of the bar owners, one of the bath owners and many in the intermediate range. Q. I would I ike to osk you what sacrifices you mode on a personal level, what type of job did you have to five up, was there any harrasment or anyfh ing at a II of th is type? A. Do you mean during the campaign? Q. Yes, during the campaign. A. There was no harassment of any type, again we did not know what to expect of all. There were a couple and only a couple of nasty letters, considering all of the others an the other side they don't really amount to much ond other than that no harrasment of ony kind. The major sacrafice was simply one of time. Once you get going on th is you are I iterly in it 24 hours a day, you get up of 8 in the morning and get going, and have your public appearances, radio and tele­vision appearances and pres·s conferences and staff meet­ings and campaigning in the bars and the streets and everywhere else and it takes you right through until 2 in the morning, and then you are off the next morning for another busy day. Q. As the first announced homosexual candidate, whot do you feel were the benne­fits of your campaign to the Gay community? A. I use the word politiciz• ing and I feel very much that it was the start to politicize our community. When a group of people are pers i sfently, shunted inot the sideline, when they are not part of of what is going on, when they ore not part of the ma in• stream of life, of the com• munity nor of society, they tend fo think of themselves in those terms and not being part of things, that is the establishment, there is the government, there are people who decree things and do things and you do want to have a part of this. You tend to think of your self that way and then not that way and it takes same doing to bring a commun ify of people who of people who are accustom ta thinking of themselves that way as being potentialy and ultimately actually apart of what is going on. I feel that the campaign served fo stop the machinery of the establishment; to begin the politicizing of our community; and to bring the Gays back into the main­stream of general I ife. Q. _ During the campaign, you ran as a7' i7tdependent, but what were your political affilations before your becoming an independent candidate? A. All of my life I have been a resolute political indepen­dent. My votes at one time "' another in the years that I have been voting, my X's have gone completely across the ballot in terms of parties and affiliations. Q. This has a tendency to happen with people that are informed on what things are going on. A. I never had a formal party membership in any party. Q. I not iced that quite a few "long hairs" have attended the meeting today have you had th is type of furn out in Washington also, and if so would you like to comment on it. A. It depends, what if any­thing you mean by the term "long hair" beside the narrow denotive sense of length of hair. Our campaign staff consisted of people of every possible range and variety in type. At our campaign dances, we had several major dances in our campaign headquarters, were attended by people ' . l ' LAREDO BOOK MIIRT I THE MOST COMPLETE ADULT BOOK STORE IN TOWN ! ! ! --- MOVIE ARCADE 254 --- 901 Santa Ursla dressed in everything from coots, vests, and ties on down to the most informal dress in every possible way. Our theme was personal freedom and we really meant it. Q. Where do you think we should start here in Houston? A. One of the problems of comming irtto a city on this short of a notice, especially if you are a long di stance away and havn 't had that much comrrunication, is that you don't really have a feel for what the problems are. There are a whi,le variety of different levels to operate of and I think they are com­plementry and supplementry, they are certainly nof mutu­ally exclusive. The first thing that should be done of course is to sit down, get a group of people to sit down and formulate exactly what your problems are in Hous­ton. Some cities for example in Chicago, it is very clear that right neor the top of list if not at it will be prob­lems of relationship with the police department. This applies ta some cities, this "does not apply in other cities. Q. We seem to have here in Houston a workable situation with the police department. As long as we stay within certain guidelines that they set out, we can do what we please, but if we get outside of those, they hove a ten­dency to came down on us. A. Do you agree ta those guide! ines? I mean I am not about ta I ive under guide­lines set out by other people. I wil I set out my own !luide­lines and I will tell the pal ice what they are. If I consider my guidelines resonable and if the police don't, then there is going to be a clash between me and the police and I would rather expect to win if when every• thing is all said and done. Formulate the present guide­lines, if they have not been already for mu I ated and decide whether you really want to I ive under them. If you feel that they are overly restrictive, then you start taking measures to change them starting out with, that is if the police are open to it, confering with them and proceeding from there. Check out the situation on employment. I suspect that the homosexuals in Houston sre not much differ­ent from other cities in that in general one of the prime concerns throughout your working career is "What would happen if my employer finds out?'' Q. What steps could be taken at this time to releive this problem? A. It is one of the primary concerns for most homosex­al s a II over the country. One of the ways to do some­thing about that, do you have onykind of a human relations commission here. Check on your fair employment or your civil rights low and so on. These suggestions that I am makinJI are long slow proceses. They are not the kind of thing that you can change overnight or over quite a number of nights. But try to see what can be done there about beginning to get yourselves included under the protection of those. Private employment in this country is sfi II very much a mater of the perogative of the individual employer. So unfortunately there are sti II a great deal that just is not amen iable to very much of on attack. If an employer does nof I ike people with red hair , he still hos an enormous amount of freedom in just nof hiring them and there is just nothing that con be done. This applies very broadly in this country still, unfortunately and it means that when there is a persistant pattern of discrim­ination of that sort that large sub-communities are in a difficult situation. That is part and partila of the whole question of changing attitudes on a broader basis which means trying to get out in front of a community those people who feel that they can or want to do it. Get themselves an radio and television, spealing appearances, appearances before community groups of various kinds and in the whole slowtiaious and often whole slow tidious and often Laredo, Tex. very depressing, because it seems to be producnig no • seems ta be producing no results, a very depress illg process which has ta be done of simply educating the public in order ta change their attitudes. Q. It sounds like a public relations campaign really. A. That is a very real aspect of what has ta be done. It is by no means the only thing Now the early homaph i le movement before the early 1960's, before I started the Mottachine Society of Washington, was devoted ·· almost exclusively to that. That I feel was a mistake although I can't critize them ta harshly because the whole context was different in those days. But that is one of the necessary directions in which YOU have to ,,.----•• Now of course another thing, there are more militant approaches. If the employer fires somebody, there is always the possiblity of the individual taking him~ ta court, even though he th inks there is very I ittle .,.. chance in winning, there is always a passibil ity if you have a militant group of approaches by them picketing and that sort of th in9.. If a public stir is made anytime some sort of firing happens, the employers who have in the past hod a free hand will begin to feel a lot less free . So there are a large number of things that you can do. 31 \ 32 TO COMMEMORATE THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE uNUNTIUS,', THE STAFF WISHES TO THANK ITS CONTRIBUTORS, READERS, & ADVERTISERS FOR THEIR SUPPORT Drawing by MUSGRAVE
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