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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
File 011
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 011. 1973-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3218.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-08). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 011. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3218

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 011, 1973-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3218.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date August 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript FROM PAGE 1 dences that the Movement has gone much farther than the real situation warrants. Those of us who work within the Movement's borders could easily delude ourselves into thinking that the Movement press, the little meetings we attend, the crowded drag balls, and the congratulations we offer one another represents socially substantial clout and muscle. When the beast stirs - - and it takes a catastrophe like New Orleans to give us a fleeting glimpse of the social forces lying there just below the surface -- have we in the Movement given much thought to how we propose to cope with it? Are zaps and chaining ourselves to the table legs in city halls much of an answer? Do costumes in the style of Dali and little gender fuck games with beards and earrings show us what to do? The sad fact seems to be that too many of us are busy doing our "own thing" to give very much time to studying where we are going and what we are after. Yet, if we neglect the long range view if we neglect the long range of things we find ourselves hit every so often with crises and catastrophes of one kind of another (and there will be others, we can be sure) without much idea of re- be sure) without much idea of sponse? Highly charged rhetoric and the joining of hands in some sort of an emotional binge have a tendency to give momentary release while letting the deeper feelings of commitments just fizzle away. The victims of the fire will have lost their lives to no effect at all unless more of us wake up, in fear if you want to call it that, that the Movement either means business and the sort of dedication that makes us willing to sacrifice and give up much for the common good, or else we shall all be in danger of the beast each time it becomes arroused. And can anyone be so naive as to suppose that Society is going to just roll over and play dead because some Movement leader talks loud on a TV show? The world isn't like that, nor is the sort of strength and power we need gained by such methods. How, then is it to be gained? That is the answer we should all be striving to come up with, an enterprise most people find either boring or incomprehensible. However, not to make the effort is something that can be neglected at our own peril. ONE has always been irrevocable committed to looking behind and beyond external appearances and the events of the day to causes, and the events of the day to cause: tendencies and the shape of things to come. It has always been the feeling at ONE that to do otherwise would be to ..shirk respon- sibifirles. Looking aYfHe whole New Orleans situation in perspective it is disquiting to ask how many are even attempting to think about the broader implications- of the tragedy and what those of us in the Movement ought to be doing and can do about events of that sort. --WDL As of this date, there have been no more deaths from the fire, but one sister and several brothers remain in Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in very serious condition, and needing a heavy supply of blood transfusions. Families took care of most burials, sometimes, wanting no contact with the Gay Community, but four were buried close together, with a bronze plaque noting the concern of the national Gay Community. Additional memorial services and fund-raising events have been held in several places. During this crisic the NUNTIUS contacted Paul Landroneau of the Pathology Department, Charity Hospital, New Orleans and was told "WE DO NOT NEED ANY BLOOD AT CHARITY HOSPITAL -- WE HAVE PLENTY." CORLL MURDERS Young Lutherans Host Gay Minister S. Harbers Gay minister, Tom Maurer speaking to 200 persons attending the Lutheran Youth meeting in Houston, told the meeting that what people do in private ' 'is their own business if they are comfortable with it.' I feel very good about my sexuality and my experiences," he told the group. The title of the discussion group was "Physiological Basis ofSex." The group was made up of mostly teen agers from all over the United States. The Rev. Maurer is a lecturer in the Sexuality program at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He is a United Church of Christ minister and lives in Minneapolis. He began by speaking of the ing to repress their sexuality. According to Maurer a child reaches sexuality at the age of 12. Because of parental pressures the child is forced to hold back until he is married or moves away from Pag* 10 home. Healso statedthatmostsex- ual problems are mental rather than physical. Maurer feels that churches "have treated sex like a necessary but unfortunate fact of life." The Lutheran Church gathering of over 20,000 young people here in Houston has drawn people from all over the nation. All three sections of the Lutheran church were represented. The quality of the young people was refreshingly honest. Beside the beauty of character the evidence of the overall group was one of clean cut American children with a healthy attitude toward the Gays present to hear Maurer speak. As one reporter put it "the Young Lutherans might have been actors, hired .by the Old Lutherans to present a good front." It seems from my contact with them that they are what they seem to be outstanding young people. Ed. Note: Mr. Honeywell is from San Antonio and was asked to write on the Gay Community Services Branch of the San Antonio Free Clinic for the NUNTIUS. by Ed Honeywell — The Dean Corll murders have put terror into the hearts of Houston Gays. Gays are the natural victims of every crank and madman who comes along. Houston exists in a climate of ignorance of and oppression of healthy homosexual expression. It offers no means for young homosexuals to come to grips with their sexual identity and makes them prey to men such as Corll. Twenty-three plus no telling how ...^ny mr.ro ym|ng mun ha"^ dipt! in Houston because citizens of this city had rather ignore the socio-sexual plight of homosexual young men and force them into the streets rather than admit they exist. Now is the time for gays and straights to band together and demand social justice for gays in this city. They must demand equal protection of the law for the young, for gays who are the natural prey of such monsters as Corll is painted to be, and especially for adolescent homosexuals. These young men must be the last to die in Houston under the hand of those who hate homosexuals! As I write, the body count is uncertain. Community, what is it? In San Antonio, it is one thing, in Houston another; for every city there comes a time of challenge when it either acts in concert in behalf of common concerns or forfeits the right to be thought of as a community. Houston, I believe, faces such a challenge now. Those of us who are gay must ask ourselves, - HOW LONG WILL WE CONTINUE TQ ENDURE ABUSE, MOLESTATION, PAIN AND DEATH AND MASSACRE IN TEXAS BEFORE WE JOIN TOGETHER WITH THE UNPREJUDICED, SANE ELEMENTS OF OUR COMMUNITIES to change the climate of opinion which encourages every fool and madman to think of us as his rightful victim? San Antonio and Houston are very much alike in many ways. Most notable, perhaps, among the gay population, is the fear of job reprisal. So long as times are good (i.e. no gay has been murdered recently) the bars provide all most gays are interested in. When times get bad, it is too late to look for alternatives - the now defunct Montrose Gaze, perhaps, perhaps volunteering to write for, soliciting ads for or helping to produce (with money or time and skills) the NUNTIUS, BUT GAYS ARE MORE AFRAID TO LOSE THEIR LIVING THAN THEIR LIFE, apparently. The straight and gay communities of Houston need now more than ever to join in combatting prejudice and witch-hunting. In San Antonio, the Gay Com- cert with the San Antonio Free Clinic (molded after the Haight- Ashbury Clinic) tomeetgay crisis, to form gay community, to free gay life-styles, to improve straight opinion of gays. To meet these goals, director Carmine Botto and volunteers have set up a gay hotline for crisis rap and referral called the GAY SWITCHBOARD; have held a number of workshops and human- growth sessions; have started a newsletter; have set up a night for gay V.D. examination and treatment at the free clinic;offer speakers and workshops for straight groups; meet regularly for rapping and consciousness-raising. The GAY SWITCHBOARD NO. in SAN ANTONIO IS 1-512-733- 7300; the switchboard is open from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m. and is staffed by gays. The line offers crisis guidance, referrals for life-problems. Friday night I was talking to Brian, a bartender at a Houston Gay Bar. He said the entire conversation in the place that night had revolved around the murders. Speculation was -- were the boys gay? Was their murder gay? One thing had emerged; certainly no gay person could feel safe in a community where young men could be enticed and then murdered wholesale! Brian seemed to think that gays might be blamed for murders in which they were the most logical victims, but he thought about all the witch-hunting he has seen for twenty years behind the bar and changed his mind. "Maybe we ought to fight this thing!" he concluded. Homosexuals, 'Swingers' (Houston Chronicle) --. "There are conservatively estimated, 100, 000 homosexuals and 14,000 'swingers' in Houston," say a husband-wife team who teach a human sexuality course at South Texas Junior College. Drs. Jerome and Ruth Sherman, who both have Ph.Ds. from the University of Houston, spoke at a River Oaks Rotary meeting at the Briar Club Tuesday. The Shermans said the homosexual figure (which includes lesbians) was made after talking to members involved in homosexual organizations here and to city officials. The "Swingers," or mate swappers, estimate was made from total membership of three local "swinger" clubs. People do not actually swap mates at these clubs, but make contact for parties elsewhere, the Shermans said. The sex educators said homosexuals usually group in large cities, so Houston's growth - - significantly its corporate boom - - may account for this large number. Although some neighborhoods are supposedly known as gay areas, they said homosexuals are scattered throughout the city. There are 28 bars in Houston that serve as gay meeting places, the Shermans said. The Shermans dealt mostly with different lifestyles, social attitudes and misconceptions of homosexuality. Homosexuals, male and female, do not always fit the common stereotype, they said. They are in most walks of life. Some aremar- PAGE 12
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