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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
File 009
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 009. 1973-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3216.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-08). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3216

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 009, 1973-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3216.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date August 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript ' CONJUGAL GAY VISIT IN ORGAN? In an attempt to reduce homosexuality within the Oregon prisons, the legislature recently passed a law authorizing conjugal visits. Ironically, however, the new bill passed by the Senate permits one 12-hour visit per month with anyone on the inmates visiting list who is over 18! THE GOOD GRAY POET "In every library throughout the Texas Department of Corrections is a thick volume of poetry titled Leaves of Grass. It is the gospel of America's most perfect singer, lover and believer in the brotherhood of all creatures. It is the quintessence of Walt Whitman: 'Camerado! This is no book; Who touches this, touches a man!' "The volume contains a precious mix of visionary philosophy that focuses white-hot on the hangups of life and death, of the present and the distant future. The author seeks our friendship; he walks the tunnels of our souls hoping to bring light where there is darkness. Through him there can be peace and a solid rapport with life (even in prison)." From A Poet In A Maryland Prison Your Loneliness Tool Into your loneliness I stare Seeing the emptiness there Oh, Yes I have done wrong But as you are home tonight Wonder why for your letter I long. Yes, my friend, I am alone But tonight you are not That young man who curls vour bod--- But what have I? Not even a letter to fill this empty cot. You must be laughing at me For being such a fool To take your letter and feel free When it was just a loneliness tool. When you first wrote You spoke with fear I comforted your brief note And held your friendship near. Now tonight I cry For being such a fool For even as I try I realize I was only just a LONELINESS TOOL! ACLU Joins Slopak Case Larry Slopak, a gay resident of Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem, has filed suit against his parole board for refusing to release him on Parole to Whitman Center. Filing the case on be- half of the Oregon ACLU was Herbert Titus, professor of law at the University of Oregon, and David Jensen, a Eugene, Ore., attorney who has had considerable success defending anti-war demonstrators. The brief was filed in the U. S. District Court for the District of Oregon in Portland. In part, the brief states "that the decision denying release on parole was based in part on the grounds that the plaintiff was thereby denied due process and equal protection of the laws secured to him by the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution." In preparing the brief, the attorneys obtained a copy of the tape transcription of a parole hearing last September 7. A "considerable portion" of that hearing was taken up in discussions of the biblical injunctions against homosexuality and the "incongruity of a former Catholic priest running a running a program for unreconstructed homosexuals," re- fering to our program to which Slopak had applied. The Whitman Center staff aided Slopak in bringing the case to the attention of the Governor's office and the public. They also met with the parole board who admitted that "religious considerations" were partly responsible for the parole denial. Gov. Tom McCall's office has taken a hands off position on the highly publicized case. The governor's legal assistant, Edward Branchfield, former State Supreme Court Justice, stated there were merits to both sides of the case. Slopak had already served five years for a sex offense involving a consensual act with a 14 year old male. The board set his next hearing for 1975. It is reported that the average sentence served for manslaughter in that institution is 2/1/2 years. FEDS HASSLE GAY INMATES Several letters of protest have been sent to authorities of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons alleging harassment of prison inmates John A. Gibbs and Ernest Valenzuela, who have been attempting to seek prison recognition by attempting to form a chapter of the National Gay Prisoners' Coalition in the Leavenworth Penitentiary. Gibbs is on the board of the National group. Last December 10, visitors from the Lawrence College Gay Liberation Front were prevented from visiting him. On Jan. 15, both he and Valenzuela were isolated from the general population by being locked up in their cells. Valenzuela is still in isolation, and both have been threatened with removal to other institutions. On Jan, 30, materials sent to the supervisor of the education department of the prison were returned without comment to Chris Wheeler, director of the National Gay Prisoners' Coalition, who had protested the treatment of the gay inmates. Several letters were sent to the director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, Norman Carlson, through the office of Senator Magnuson. In reply, Carlson stated: "The Bureau of Prisons does not permit the intimidation of any inmates Tiffany Jones - Kitty Key Special Aug. 17 & 18 $150 612 HADLEY HOUSTON Page 8
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