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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
File 006
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 006. 1973-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3213.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-08). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3213

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973 - File 006, 1973-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/3229/show/3213.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 8, August 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date August 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript lower court, leaving Florida without any law covering forcible sodomy. In its decision the court declared, "It is no longer consonant with constitutional principles of equal protection to continue a criminal sanction against sexual assaults on females and not provide the same criminal sanction where such assaults are made on males." (GAY LIBERATOR) Crackdown in Cuba The Cuban governments's anti- gay policy continues its course. According to a gay brother in Cuba, since the Declaration of the Congress on Education and Culture in 1971, "hundreds of actors and people in general connected with the National Council of Culture have been expelled from their jobs and made to work in restaurants, in the fields, construction, etc." The Congress took as one goal the elimination of homosexuality from Cuban society and called for the removal of gays from all positions of influence in culture and education This policy isnowbeing put into effect. In addition, four new oppressive laws have recently been approved by the Cuban government and are now "being discussed at the pup- ular level." Such "popular discussion" is simply a means for the Cuban government to educate people about new laws and no substantial changes are expected. This is especially so since the dissident groups toward which the new laws are aimed do not dare identify themselvesby speaking out in their own defense. One law makes it a crime, punishable by months of imprisonment, for anyone to "make a public ostentatious display of their pederasty." According to Cuban gays, this can mean anything from wearing one's hair long to walking with an effeminate flair to wearing a flashy shirt. Another law provides one month in jail or a fine to "women who, in the public street, do not maintain the proper modesty." Still another law prohibits unauthorized "congas, comparsas, or other dances of an African character in the public streets." Another law virtually prohibits the practice of Afro-Cuban religions because "they are alien to civilization and decent customs." North Americans may note a familiar pattern here. Theperse- cution and control of gays, women and blacks is as characteristic of this country as of Cuba. Neither is free. And despite claims to the contrary, Cuba is not building socialism. Socialists stand for the fullest possible degree of personal freedom and oppose repressive laws such as these . In Cuba, as here, no one is free until we all are free. (GAY LIBERATOR) And Anna's Ice Cream Parlor — In the Heart of Town Phone 501-253-8630 63 Spring Street Eureka Springs, Arkansas 72632 Psychosurgery Outlawed In Michigan, at least, psychosurgery is now an illegal treatment for involuntarily confined persons. The unanimous decision, handed down by a three- judge panel of Wayne County Circuit Court July 10, is the nation's first legal ruling on brain surgery designed to alter behaviour. As such, it is expected to set a national pe tional precedent for questions of psychosurgery and similar types of human experimentation on prisoners. In its ruling, the court declared that legally adequate consent to psychosurgery is impossible on the part of prisoners. "Involuntarily confined patients cannot reason as equals with the doctors and administrators," the ruling said. Their position is "inherently unequal." The ruling makes frequent references to the Nuremberg Code, which was written in response to similar experiments in Nazi Germany, and to US Constitutional rights of privacy and free speech. "If the First Amendment protects the freedom to express ideas, it necessarily follows that it must protect the freedom to generate ideas." But psychosurgery, which is irreversible, often limits the ability to generate new ideas. "It is more important to protect one's mental processes," the court explained, " "than to protect ev3n plained,"than to protect even the privacy of the marital bed." In response to psychosurgeons who ca who claim their experiments are aimed at curbing social violence, the judges said, "Neurosurgery rightfully should concern itself with medical problems and not the behavior problems of a social etiology." According to Dr. E. Yudash- kin, director of the State Dept. of Mental Health which originally endorsed the proposed psychosur- gical experiments. The state has no plans to appeal the courts decision and is not now conduction any form of "high-risk" experiments. (GAY LIBERATOR) GAY RADIO PROGRAM Gayly Speaking, Detroit's first gay radio program will begin broadcasting Thrusday, Sept. 6. It will be carried weekly on WDET -FM at 12:30 at night. The program will feature a short news and announcement period with the balance of time devoted to a major discussion topic. The topic for the first four programs are the following: Coming Out, Sexism in Straight Society, Sexism Within the Gay Community, and Gay Faci - lities in the Area. The program is being produced by an eight person collective formed earlier this summer. Persons wishing to contribute can contact the collective by calling 823- 3783 or by writing Box 7937 Detroit 48215. (GAY LIBERATOR) NEW BOOK: White Streak on the Coatsteeve ... by Johnny Overshot ^m^JLm^J WITH YOUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS EJRO00. P! FT WORTH: 2800 Purington Sunday Services: 7:30 pm David Carden, Interim Pastor HOUSTON: MCC Study Group 504 Fairview -Call 528-9069 Page 5 .^M
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