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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
File 009
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 009. 1973-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-07). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2954

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 009, 1973-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2954.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date July 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript wm~ "^!ff#pf?«?fSW5| rfoil r.n l:ir"J ?;, >f'bf'-j \^4ji.n. j: .ewtj tun h enjoyed swimming in the nude at Hippie Hollow, let this writer (who has) quickly explains that the cove is very secluded and difficult to reach. It can't be seen from the road, nor can it be seen from private property. A boating party might accidently happen upon it but from that distance, just how much would be seen? It's not a question of beauty How to avoid making decisions Walter Kaufmann, writing in - PSYCHOLOGY TODAY advises those fearful of making their own decisions to consider religion. For "Religion says: Do this and don't do that! Or: Thou shall, and thou shalt not. Instead of inviting us to evaluate alternative standards, it gives us norms and tells us how to apply them. Religions have also evolved traditions that shield us from situations in which tragic choices might become inevitable. The most obvious illustration is monasticism, which requires one great decision --to renounce the freedom to make major decisions in the future. Those who become monks or nuns no longer need face such fateful decisions as how to live, what to do, and what to believe. As a rule, a person does not even decide to submit to the authority of religion. He is born into the fold and then confirmed at the threshold of adolescence before he has had any chance to explore alternatives and make a choice. He does not so much decide to stay as he does not decide to leave." Advice Young Gays Gay young men and women who can't or don't wish to attend the traditional four year college, for financial or other reasons, might do well to consider vocational or ; technical training as an alternative. Why? Very simply. In the decade ahead it is predicted that nearly three-quarters of all annual job opportunities will not require a college degree. But most job openings will require some sort of vocational or technical training beyond high school. This may be on-the-job training, special job pre-training programs, or vocational school programs. Most employers tend to favor vocational school training over on-the-job training. Of course, the purpose of college is to develop the whole person, not merely to prepare one to "bring home the bacon." But those with traditional college degrees are now realizing the importance of more practical skills. When compared with the standard college programs, vocational and technical training programs are short and less expensive. Federal grants, scholarships and loans are available for vocational training. There are more than 11,000 business, trade, and technical schools in America. These schools usually require a high school diploma, but special arrangements can be made to waive this requirement. Good News for Gays The Gay Movement is 23 years old. It started out with a mere handful of Gay citizens fearfully meeting in a private home in Los Angeles in 1950. Thus Mattachine Society was born. Most Gays in those days, who could have helped, instead hoo-hawed. "They won't last six months." "Who are they kidding? You'll never get a bunch of Queens to unite on anything." They'll never give us Gay kids a break. No, I'll just sit quietly and take my chances, thank you." Despite this, the movement managed to plod along. After Mattachine, came the first Gay publication, ONE MAGAZINE. Almost immediately, the United States Post Office tried to suppress it. ONE dared to sue. While many Queens were sitting on their butts laughing at ONE's audacity, ONE won! Illinois became the first state to pass a consenting-adults law in 1961. (Eight others have since done so.) Slowly magazines became aware of us. Then movies and TV. The media found that we were "profitable." (My, weren't there a lot of us.) The first Gay newspaper, THE ADVOCATE, came into being. Troy Perry, a man who publicly and proudly admits to being gay, founded the Metropolitan Community Church. Imagine! Again, the Queens said, "A bunch of fairies playing church.'' "I don't need to go to church to cruise." But the gay church became the fastest growing church in America. In June 1969, the police ripped their drawers, so to speak. They made another ho-hum/routine/il- legal raid on a tiny insignificant bar in New York's Village. Finally, enough Gays were made mad enough to do something. Something they'd never done before. They fought back. And won! They confronted Mayor Lindsey. And won! Hence we now have a Gay National Holiday with parades in the major cities of our country. Of whatimportanceisthis?Well, straights can no longer pretend we don't exist. They may not like us, but they know we are here and don't intend to poof-disappear. But more important, it proves to everyone that Gays ARE uniting -- and what ever happened to those little fairies in 1950 who cried, "They won't last six months"? The Movement is like a stream moving towards the sea, the same civil rights that everyone else enjoys. It was stagnant, but it's becoming a roaring torrent. Now comes perhaps the best news in the 23-year struggle. Straights are joining our fight. Read the following carefully. It may be a milestone in Gay History. Dear People: I have recently been appointed as the director of the new American Civil Liberties Union National project on Sexual Privacy. The purpose of the project is to coordinate a national effort to remove all laws which proscribe private consensual sexual activity among adults and to eliminate discrim- Page 8
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