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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
File 007
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 007. 1973-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2952.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1973-07). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2952

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 007, 1973-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2952.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date July 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript the officials on stage announced they were going to let Sylvia speak. It took quite a while to settle the large audience down. People were very confused. Sylvia, teary- eyed, mascara running, took the microphone and, finally, had her say. She explained thai this Christopher Street Liberation Day was the result of the riots at the Stonewall. That at these riots, drag queens were very inslumental in accomplishing what "vas finally accomplished. That this fact was never mentioned by the "new" gay libbers. That they were always putting drag down, when, in reality, drags are men too. She went on to talk about STAR how it helped street Kids in prison-how she had been in prison, been beaten, raped, and and degraded unbelievably. How STAR was one of the few organizations to do any of this. And why, why she wanted to know, did the rest of the gay world constantly put them down? Needless to say, the audience was in an uproar. A number of dykes were threatening drag queens, but her guys were pushing Studi * 81J ID.AII Al FI.ZmiGH 214 1231(47 queens around. It was getting entirely too _scary. Sylvia was screaming "What does it matter what you wear? Isn't all this about freedom?" All sorts of obscenities were being shout4d all around at this point. I suddenly realized that not only the gay press, but certainly all the straight press were taking note of all of this, and I felt embarrassed for the whole movement. Still crying, hoarse from all her screaming, Sylvia collapsed in a sobbing heap on stage, and had to be carried off. More screaming and tussling throughout the audience. More music was announced, but it was only listened to half-heartedly. There was something wrong, something that needed to be settled. Was Sylvia right? Was she telling the truth? If not, why the hassle in letting her speak? Was it that she was too reactionary? The crowd wanted answers. Now, it was announced, we were going to hear from the'other side.' A speaker from the Lesbian Freedom League had something to say. People quieted down and listened. The young girl explained the position of L.F.L.; that they felt that drag was aput-down of women. Plain and simple. This was met with all kinds of shouts from the audience , until the MX. BEGGED EVERYONE TO LISTEN ALL SIDES OF ANY ARGUMENT. Well Phil, this was it. The young lady went on speaking. Suddenly, as if from nowhere, a vision appeared at the rear of the stage. It was Lee Brewster, patron saint of New Yorks' Drag queens, head of Queens Liberation, and Editor of Drag Magazine. Resplendent in an emerald-green gown, with a gold sequin crown, (a queens' crown, I'm sure) she glided toward center stage, followed by an enormous Queens Liberation banner, carried by members of her group. The girl at the microphone did not see this right away, and went on speaking, thinking the ri sing cheer she heard was for her. But then, the vision was upon her. She simply stopped talking, and walked off. Trying to save face, the M.C. rushed forward and introduced Lee Brewster. Beginning quietly, Lee spoke bluntly, honestly. He spoke of the shock and hurt he felt having witnessed what was done to Sylvia and the others, his amazement to see gays beating gays. WONDERING WHAT 10 00? Dallas THEY'RE All SOIifi 10 .V^V %* %\y W* «^str- ■s %\N ,%N • \\V W* U>Op$jJ Page 6
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