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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
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The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 001. 1973-07. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2946.

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(1973-07). The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2946

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973 - File 001, 1973-07, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2967/show/2946.

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Title The Nuntius & Our Community, Vol. 4, No. 7, July 1973
Contributor
  • Frank, Phil
Date July 1973
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 28912012
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript tlz,e <3vuNcr1us VQUME 4 NO. 7 ---------------F'O-UR- Y-EA-R-S O-F- SE-R-VICE TO THE GAY COMMUNITY After The Fire by Bil Rushton Associated Press reporter Eric Newhouse stood nervously on the front steps of the Metropolitan Community Church Monday afternoon, wringing his hands and grimacing as he asked whom he could inter­view about the fire at the Up Stairs Bar the night before. Members of the fire-stricken congregation eyed Newhouse withequal,ifsomewhat dazed and wearied, reserve. After staying up all night together, after con­tacting frien<)s and relatives of two dozen dead and missing (including their own minister, the Rev. Wil­liam Larson, the much-photographed body burned in the Chartres Street window), they found Monday's news coverage turned largely on the indelicate phrase "hang-out for homosexuals." They found their trag­edy compounded by an unprecedented Police De­partment statement in an equally unprecedented article in the Monday States-Item that alleged that "thieves" hung out with those helpless homosexuals, all of them trapped together in a burning hell on a Sunday afternoon that left their charred bodies "stacked like pancakes." . But Newhouse persisted, worming his way into the faded turquoise double-parlor of the shotgun double near Coliseum Square that MCC calls its New Orleans home. Under a faded religious print over the mantle, seated on two aluminum and green plastic lawn chairs facing the rest of the occupants of { IJ ., .. .. ,, the room, Newhouse /tad his interview with Courtney Craighead, senior deacon of the MCC congregation and one of the surviving escapees of Sunday's blaze. "Well, what kind of a man was he," opened New­house, probing for the real stcry about William Lar­son, deceased clergyman of the only Christian de­nomination in this country tha! dares openly minis­ · ter to gay people. "Well," began Craighead, "he believed in freedom and love, because he wanted the right of the indivi­dual to make his own choice." Deacon Craighead's remembrances continued for a sentence or two before Newhouse broke in for another question- "What was he doing at the bar?" Suddenly aware he had stepped a bit too fa r, Ne.whouse lamely retreated: "Had he made arrange­ments to go see friends?" Craighead recoiled: "Oh .. . ," he paused. "I don't know ... . " The interview didn't last much longer, because soon WWL was also knocldng at the door. There was a noticeable increase in tension. No cameras inside, please, pleaded Craighead. (One survivor had already lost his job as a result of the inflammatory publicity.) And please, no film or snapshots of our memorial service at St. George's Episcopal Church later that evening, either. The con­gregation, its friends, and mourning lovers would pre­fer to remember their dead with no further damage or losses .. . . " JULY 1~- air ••• • • • Monday morning, in one of the bars along Iberville Street that caters to hustlers and sailors and an occa­sional conventioneer, a drunk and tattooed witness of the fire has just hustled me for a whiskey and coke. "Once again we've been used," he muttered, tottering on his bar stool and staring wet-eyed at the tourist throngs crowding the glass-strewn and blood­ied sidewalks of Iberville at the Chartres Street cor­ner. "That's okay," he snarled, "it's just faggot• that's dead." He turned, slowly: "Gay people just got ripped off for 45 lives." And then, a bit more angrily, look­ing toward the crowds again, "You can go into any goddam place and find a ho-mo-sexual." He fumbled with the State,-ltem page open to the burned body in the window, moving it back and forth in front of himself as if the picture might suddenly change or go away. "He caught the windowsill on fire." Looking up at me again: "The smell of that flesh .... " And pausing, lobking down again, pulling up at his shirt. "I've been stabbed," he pointed, "and shot," he pointed again, "and you can outrun those mothers. 8ut you can't outrun flames." He slumped over the bar again, gripping his whis­key almost enough to break the glass. "Hey . . . look ... ," he began anew, leaning near. to P"R• 4 I I l .. - > - [GAY PRIDE WEEK] 1000 EMBOSSED BUSINESS CARDS $8.95 4615 Mt. Vernon 524-5612 Chris and her lover Rob, wro- Dallas te the City Council patitioning them to march in the Parade on behalf of the nation's second lar­gest minority. A gay youth read the patition to the Council Mon­QUALITY PRINTING GAY PRIDE PARADE 73 Leaders, participants and spectators termed Dallas' second Gay Pride Parade a success. Everyone had a great time; there was no violence; and the demand for Equal Civil Rights was strongly presented. However, there were dis-appointments. More participants had been expected because of last year's triumph, but there were only 200 marchers as compared to last year's 300. Some felt the "novelty" had worn off. Last year's marchers had proven it could be done, even in .Dallas. So where was the challengii? Others felt the small turnout was due to the "ever-present apathy·" in the gay community. Despite the heroic efforts of parade chairwoman Chris McKee. the news media gave very little space to the affair. (Tne news media has yet to realize that one out of every terr citizens are gay.) day, June 25th. The Council voted black arm bands in reverence. to accept the patition without com-ment-- but none marched--which Last year, many gays stan~­hardly came as a surprise to the ing on the sidewalk, found their nation'-s second largest minority• guts ~nd joined their gay brothers But despite the small turnout and sisters marching in the stre­of participants and spectators, the et. This year, for some funny par_a~e. and all the Gay \Yeekend reason, they marched on the side­activities ,were successful m every walk abreast with the parade. It way.' . was explained that sympathizers The Parade route was twice (both straight and gay) were re­the length and the marchers ~t- luctant to join the throng in the retcl\ed foe eight long blocks with street which only attests once considerably more cars and floats more 'to Dallas' suppressive anti­than last year: A lavendar dra- gay atmosphere. gon bearing the wo,rds "Dragon of The march came on the fourth Discrimination' ' snllke-dan:e anniVersary. of the "Stonewall Ri­down the street. Cars and banners ot." This occured when police rou­carried bold signs proclaiming tinely raided a small bar in Green­" gay love and proua of it" and wich Village in Manhatten. Gays, protesting bias against gays in for once dared to fight back. hiring and housing. There were The barricaded the police inside, ·many more sigqs and banners. defended themselves when more Some read •·•we ·Demand an End police reinforcements _ar~ived, to Employment Discrimination A- rallied around the mcident, gainst Gays," "l'mNotPrejudiced and have been marching in cities · "I Still Like Heterosexuals,'"'Les across the nation every since. bian- Mothers Demand the Right to Will there be a Gay Pride Retain Custody of their Children" ParadeIII? That depends . A "Vice Squad, Get The Hell out whole bunch more gays had better of My Bedroom," "Nine States start doing their share, or those Have Consenting Adult Laws, Why who are active will get real tired, Not Texas?" -and "Homosexuality: real quick. Nine states have pas­Neither Sin nor Sickness." sed "consenting-adult-in private" Last · year, the Dallas City· Council kicked up a fuss and tried in vain to stop the parade. The news media picked it up; played . it really big, and thousands came downtown to see real live_ homo­sexuals. This year the City Co­uncil did not object to the _Parade A wreath, in memory of those permit, and newspapers, radi6a.pd · died in the New Orleans fire, was TV gave on\y limited· spa<:e to· . donated by Abilene and was car­the news releases the Cir.cle of ried just behind the flag leading Friends sent them. the par_ade. Many marchers wore laws. It would be a shame to stop now. After the parade disbanded, many marchers and their sidewalk allies quickly rushed to Flag Pole Hill to share their sandwiches and drinks, joys and triurnjlhs with WANT TO DO SOMETHING TO BETTERYOUR LIFE AND HELP YOUR GAY BROTHERS AND SISTERS AT THE SAME TIME? DO SOMETHING! DON'T JUST COMPLAIN ABOUT DISCRIMINATION. JOIN THE Circle of Friends TEXAS' OLDEST HOMOPHILE ORGANIZATION AND SPONSORS OF DALLAS' ANNUAL GAY PRIDE PARADE ALL MEN & WOMEN (OVER 18) WELCOME. TO MEET NEW FRIENDS AND ENJOY GAY ACTIVITY, MAIL THIS COUPON TODAY: I am interested in learning more about the CIRCLE OF FRIENDS and how I can expand my social life while helping others. Please send me a brochure. Enclosed is $1. 00 to help pay for postage, printing, and a small contribution to social justice. - - Name ______________ Age __ _ Address __________________ _ Ci ty _____________ State _____ _ Zip _______________ Phone ____ _ Page 2 each other. Three policement on horseback watched t!te fun f~o~ a distance. When invited to JOID the picnic, they declined. . After a couple of hours, when it be.­came apparent that whatever it was they expected to occur, would­n't they galloped away. The J?ra­gon of Discrimination was auctio~­ed off for almost $20.00. This money will be used for a future event to advance gay equal rights. Tired hot and happy gays par­ticula~ ly enjoyed the two hugh barrols of beer donated by Stu­dio 9. THE TEDDY BEAR'S FOLLIES The day came to a climax with the Metropolitan Commun~ty Church Thespain Player's premier performance at the Enchore, one of the cities most popular bars. The program consisted of 18 ai:ts and was enjoyed because of _its variety --serious numbe~s, pie­in- the-face comedy, magic acts, intrepretive dances, and for a finalle The Varsity Five doing a frantic Charleston. The most ex­pressed comment was how "diffe­rent" from the usual entertainment found in gay bars, in that in­stead of men impersonating women all the time, this show mostly featured men as men. About $200 was collected ·at the door. The show had to be stopped three times to sweep mon­ev from the stage ~d the ownen of the Enchore contributed $50.00. All these monies went to help pay for the church's badly-needed air-conditioning system. The show brought in enough so that when added to other monie& mem­bers had worked so hard for, the goal was reached, and the church will be air-conditioned be­fore this paper comes off the press. A cast of 15 dedicated per­formers practiced mightily to make the show a smash, but spe­cial thanks must go to Scott, who not only performed, but directed and MC ed the show. GAY PRIDE WEEKEND COMES TO A CLOSE Out of town guests were from Houston, Austin, El Paso, Waco, Galveston, and Abilene. Others came form Missouri, Kansas, Ok­lahoma, Arizona, Arkansas San Antonio, Wichita Falls, College Station, and Florida. Manygrabed their swim suits and romped in the waters of Queen's Point, a small sandy beach gays have been leaving Dallas to return to been claiming for more than a de­cade. By early afternoon, many gays began leaving Dallas to return to their homes. Those who could stay, endured Texas' heat to attend the MCC's special Memorial Ser­vice for those killed in the Fire at New Orlena at New Orleans. Reverend Ri­chard Vincent gave a beautiful service. So many old friendships were renewed, and so many new friend­ships were made that parting was difficult and often tearful. As we embraced for the last time, we whispered "next year" . New York This past Sunday, I went to the Christopher Street Liberation Day Gay March with a group of my friends. Thousands of beau­tiful people turned out for it. I'd go as far as to say it was the best yet, except fdr one ma­jor problem, which I'll come to later. My firends and I arrived on time, and the march started on schedule. Four different streets off Central Park West, from 61st to 64th, were filled with people of every description; drags, dykes, gays, priests, a drag nun, a dyke horse, gay dogs, clowns, blacks, whites, chinese, oldsters, young­sters long-hairs, short-hairs, no hairs. Everywhere I looked were balloons, banners, flags, and fea-the rs. It was a colorful, gay sch­morgasboard. As each different group joined the march, Central Park West reverberated with more and louder chants. ' 'Two-Four Six-Eight-Gay Is Good-Gay Is Great" " Three­Five- Seven-Nine Lesbians Are Mighty Fine" "Masturbate And Smash The State" "Hi-Ho-Hey­Hey- Try It Once The Other Way" Believe me, those apartment dwel­lers knew we were around. The column proceeded fairly quickly to Columbus Circle, a round it and then down 7th Avenue, paus­ing only at various intersections to let loads of curious cars and buses through. I'm sure we could have caused quite a traffic jam if we had wanted to, but that Publication of the name or pbotograph of any per$on or organization in articles or advertising i~ T)ie. NUNT.IUS ts not to be construed as any indication .of the, ..sex1.,0J ouentotion of such person or 05gonizatlc,,n. JOIN WITH YOUR BROTHERS & SISTERS IN CHRISTIAN LOVE. WORSHIP TOGETHER AT THE METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH NEAREST TO YOU. MCC IS A CHURCH OPEN TO ALL PEOPLE WITH A SPECIAL MINISTRY TO THE GAY COMMUNITY. GOD DOES LOVE YOU! DALLAS: Metropolitan Community Church of Dallas 3834 Ross Avenue. Dallas. Tx 75204 Phone: (214) 826-0291 Sunday Services: 11:00 AM and 7:30 PM Pastor: Rev. Richard Vincent FI. W<JI.TH: Agape Metropolitan Community Church P.O. Box 26063• Ft. Worth• Tx 76116 Sunday Services: 2800 Purington, Ft. Worth 7:30 PM Interim Pastor: Rev. David Carden For information regarding other areas, contact the nearest MCC office. Page 3 ,. A Window In The orange Glow from 1 "See if you can't find out something about my friend Leon for me. Uhh, he's about 28 or 29, and he's from Florida, and he has a missing finger." He grabbed my hand. "And I was going to the Up Stairs with him yes­terday, but some guy offered to buy me a drink on the way, so I didn't go." He squeezed his eyes as tight as his fist, making one enormous tear that trailed down his still unshaven cheek. "Leon was the kind of guy that if he only had $3 left, he'd buy you a beer." He looked at his whiskey again, and then back at me: "Leon, he was a hell of a nice guy." • • • Sunday afternoon at the Up Stairs was much like Sunday afternoon at any of the Quarter's two dozen­or- so other gay bars. An afternoon for quiet friends and cheap beer and conversation not necessarily cen­tered on cruising for tricks. In the mid-Quarter gay bars on Bourbon Street ating," Fosberg recalls, naming perished frien~ and regulars from the bar who had occasionally ~lped her with the technical or acting duties for her free theatricals around town. "It was more like-a social center than just another place for drinking." (For her remembrances of the Up Stairs, seep. 7,) On Sunday last, the arched opening between the main bar and the second room was festooned with Fourth of July decorations, in place to publicize the forthcoming festivities. The bar was its usual clutter of leftover Mardi Gras streamers and Christmas deco­rations, oriental lanterns and cardboard/plastic whis­key advertising displays, Burt Reynolds poste,s, and· campy fountains gurgling in several corners-all of it in a big, dimly-lit room muffled with red-flocked vel­vet wallpaper and carpets-with a white baby grand piano-bar commanding one corner where the Marriott Hotel's featured pianist David Gary was guesting for fun. · and surrounding gay restaurants, it's the "beautiful people" gays with their bow ties and bloody Marys and maybe brunch squeezed in somewhere in between. On Rampart Street, it's countless refugees from small Southern towns, middle-aged hairdressers and decora­tors who can't make it here and can't go home, re­past ing off buffet spreads like you'll only find else­• vhere on Southern Baptist picnics. And on Iberville Street. it's the hastlers and their johns staggering in lrom the night before, carousing at only a slightly subdued key. Except for the Up Stairs on Iberville. Since it first opened in November of 1969 (after being sold by re­tiring Wanda Long, who moved to San Bernardino), the Up Stairs set out to give Iberville Street a new kind of anchor. A small community of regulars grew up around it, and their Sunday beer busts for a dollar would draw a motley crowd of tolerant and community-seeking men and occasional women. When the Metropolitan Community Church wanted tc, organize its first mis­sion there, the Up Stairs let it meet in the "third room" out back that escaped serious damage in Sun­day's blaze. When Courier Theater Critic Suzanne Fosberg's Public Theater presentations at Audubon Park were rained out or sent on the road, the Up Stairs lent her the same facilities they had used for the annual Easter bonnet contest or the Halloween drag show or the "nellydrama" cabaret productions for which the third room's tiny stage was originally built. "The productions ranged from awful to fascin- Shortly after two customers were asked to leave, an unidentified patron, thinking he smelled gasoline fumes, opened the steel fire-door opening into the main bar from the stairway. The fumes ignited, and someone yelled "fire." Bartender "Buddy" Rasmussem yelled, "C'mon, follow me" as the lights went out, leading an estimat­ed 25 to 50 people to safety through the third floor room-whose similar steel fire-door would have been j routinely locked had Rasmussen not been there. I As Rasmussen's escapees were filing out, the stools, at the bar were still standing in the orange glow gath- , ering around the stairwell. A window by the piano-bat. had been pried open, admitting light and the promise • of a safe escape out the three windows facing Chartres Street for those who still remained. But suddenly the ; ceiling, the decorations, and the carpet exploded. • was not our purpose, that day. A dyke band not far behind us, provided great rhythym for marching, including, as we reached Times Square, ''Give my regards to Broadway" " Hail, Hail, The Gangs' All Here," and other goodies. At one point on 7th Avenue, on the balcony of a highrise apart­ment building, a woman was mo­tioning to us and pointing to a large, green parrot perched on her wrist, proclaiming that the bird was gay. In a few moments, whole blocks of the march were chanting, "Free Gay Bird-Free Gay Bird." You would have loved it. Moving right along, we passed an abortion demonstration, for as well as against. It was a real meeting of worlds. An under­standing ROAR went up every­where. More of "Masturbate and Smash the State" was heard, then on our merry way. Further down the avenue, (a true high poi!it in my day) were three guys wear­ing what some refer to as ra­dical drag, posing in fron of the di cal drag, posing in front of the Veterans Administration Building. They were dressed in WAC uniforms. They had a Lambda on the sleeve and the cap and gra great old-lady corrective -type shoes on their big feet-the shoes purposely too small. Their facial make-up was a riot, the wigs in the Andrews-Sisters-Act, heav­enly. The one in the middle, had a bugle and a long Fu-Man­Chu moustache. The guard on the door at the Veterans Adminis­tration Building just looked on in utter horror. He'll never be the same. Page 4 same. Thousands upon thousands lined rthe streets all the way down 7th/ Washington Square. Some hung out of their apartment windows., car windows, bus windows, truck windows, store windows, and cer­tainly, a lot of closet windows. More chants went up-"Off the sidewalks-into the streets" "Out of the hotels-into the Streets." We went on and on. As we neared Washington Squa­re, the excitement in the air was unbelievable. At that moment in time, all of Greenwich · Village, at least, was gay. Everyone filed into the famous old park, where some of the parade marshalls, who had been there all morning setting up a huge stage in front of the grand arch, and thousands of others, were already waiting. It was now about 3;30. We had been parading since Noon, and welcomed the chance to rest our weary bones. As the different contingents from all the different cities arrived, they were announ­ced, and their banners and flags placed on and around the stage for all to see. GAA of New York­of Philadelphia-of Washington, G LF, LFL, STAR, Queens Libe­ration, Mattachine, Baughters of Bilitis, MCC. They all checked. in. At about 3:45, the programs' M.C., Vito Russo, announced that the festivities would begin exactly at 4 o'clock, as scheduled. The people from the press settled themselves down in front behind cameras started rolling, and the show began. Phil, I, like so many of my gay brothers and sisters am not particularly Politically oriented. Imagine our joy when it was an-nounced that the show would not consist primarily of political spe­eches, but rather would entertain all of us. To kick off the program, Bar­bara Gittings, a famous Lesbian Speaker from Philadelphis, spoke to the assembled mass about free­dom, rights, and happiness. She really got everyone on their feet .with her statement directed to, "All the closet cases. Rest easy, my friends," she said, "with what we're doing here today, the hinges on your closet door will be well­oiled!" Following Ms. Gittings, we heard from that well-known gay activist from California, Morris Kight; one of the oldest living gay revolutionaries. Mr. Kight Folk on the West Coast, and gave us food for thought with his talk about pred about prejudice and discrimination in the past, and how we were "never, never to let it happen again". He was very well re­ceived. The show went on with vari­ous male and female entertainers singing about gay love, gay free- DAUGHTERS OF BILITIS Dall as Chapter 11,e Nation's Oldest Lesbian Organization Consciousness Raising - Educational Projects - BY AND FOR WOMEN JOIN US - First and Third Fridays Each Month Be a part of the Scene -- Cal I (214) 824-0770 or BOX 59"" DALLAS, TEX 75222 Those still in the first bar, many of them tipsy from two hours of the afternoon's beer bust, panicked and rushed the Chartres Street windows, chasing the light, some of them spilling out into the street, but most of them crushed against each other in sixteen minutes of plastic-fed firestorm. It took the Fire Department-headquartered at Central Station just two blocks away-less than two minutes to reach the scene, just two minutes more to hit fouHlarm status with the disaster, and just twelve minutes more to put the blaze "under control" (mean­ing contained, with no more chance of spread). The bodies were neither seen nor suspected until after it was all over. • • • There come, of course, the inevitable questions of "why?" The answers ranged from the irresponsible to the fatalistic to the deeply angry. Channel 8 News Director Alec Gifford went on the air Monday night with his answer, the media's worst indiscretion since Gifford's own performance at the Howard Johnson's tragedy: a ''vigilante" group had anonymously phoned him, he said, to declare "war" on the local gay community. The callers nam­ed themselves after a cheap movie, Black Mamma, White Mam ma, Gifford said, declaring that they were seeking revenge for prior homosexual attacks upon their persons anc! that they had maps of their future plans. The Police Department immediately repudiated Gifford's "scoop" the following day, but as of then they offered no new clues of their own. Meanwhile, Lawrence Raybourne-a sometime Iber­ville Street bartender and practicing astrologer- had quickly computed a "chart' on the ill-fated bar, seek­ing lus answers there. " I've never seen a chart this strongly afflicted," he said afterwards, pointing out the way the planets were grou!"!d at right angles into four corners of the 12-sectioned circle. Raybourne said that dangers involving fire , death, and destruction were indicated-and suggested that the rape-murder at LSU'·IO and new violence in Northern Ireland How The Media saw It How did the local news media handle the first major tragedy involving New Orleans' usually un­mentionable homosexual community? Though more deaths were involved in this tragedy than in the Ra ult Center fire and the Howard John­son's fire and shootout, local coverage was compara­tively subdued-except for an occasional outburst of tasteless sensationalism. Initial accounts avoided the word "homosexual" altogether. But by Monday morn­ing Channel 6 was calling the bar a hangout for homo­sexuals, and by Monday afternoon the Sta1e,-llcm had identified the Up Stairs as a hangout for "thieves" and homosexuals. With almost 24 hours to prepare the story (and gay staff members who should know better} , the S1a1e,-/1em's indiscretion was inexcusable. The police offictat quoted m the Stales-Item saying that homosexuals carry no identification later-apolo­gized to gay community leaders, saying he meant that the "transient" lifestyles of many of the bar's patrons might make identification difficult. (As identification on those bodies was also burned beyond recognition, the entire issue was spurious.) For all the uproar, the Srale.,-ltem '., attention span had lapsed by Wednesday. when the story stayed off page 1 until the "final"; the r? ped LSUNO coed's fun­eral and biography received their maudlin play whil•• the 29 d•3:I gays were merely stacked in unknt,wn lists The story was front page in the Time,-Picn_yune and Doily Record for thre~ straight days, and banner DR headlines for two. All editorfals cl:~c 1ssed only fire laws. The television media's worst reporting job was Alec Gifford's discredi1ed "scoop" Monda} night about an alleged terrorist plot Had Gifford checked out his crank call Defore broadcastmg it, he might have found at least one serious flaw in the claim that his callers were victims of homosexual "attacks." Any prison authority, for exarple, could have told Gifford that gay people usually are the victims of those attacks rather than the perpetrators. Strong social disapproval o_f homosexuality-defined by psy­chiatrists as "homophobia"- usually sanctions such anti-homosexual attacks. Had Gifford been seriously interested in any alleged conspiracies, he might have probed the coincidence that the fourth Sunday in ' June (this year the 23rd} is the traditional aMiver­sary of the Christopher Street riots in New York City that started the Gay Liberation Movement. Television also failed the local community in the announcements of the hastily-planned memorial services for the victims Monday night at St. George's Episcopal Church. After the Metropolitan Communi­ty Church insisted that television cameras not be per­mitted at the service in order to protect mourners' privacy, the local channels apparently decided to ig­nore the services completely. By Tuesday, coverage of the disaster had begun to regain some measure of balance and composure again. For the fi r•: lime, the word "gay" came into use, in a T-1' sidebar stor; A'ld, curiously enough, the two most sympathe1ic accounts of the week emerged from the only two women reporters assign­ed to the story. Sharon Swindall's account of a visit to the headquarters of the Metropoliian Community Church in the Tuesday /laily liernrd sought an hon­est explanation of gay community fears of media and community misrepresentation and misinterpre­tation. WWL's Rosemary James, whose Monday inter­views had made her the least-feared daily media per­son at t~c gay 1eaders' Tuesday press conference, went on the air Tuesday night with a story quietlv emphasizing the purely ordinar} and common mor­tality of those who died at the Up Stairs and reporting fo, the first time the crippled children's benefit planned there for June 30 that lltlW will not be held. dom, spr id. nighLs. special gu.~s. spe('til gals, and happinc."'~; ai! .accomp.rnicd on guitar. \ ito Hus so. the M.C . and ,Jean DcVente, the Lt•sbian ·Grand M;irshall' of the parndr introduced the various acts, along with assorted announ­cem. nts m-between certain!, 1>as lovely, very pretty, and ver~ quiet. The audience, though a bit con­fused, qi1ieted down and the show went on. Suddently, Sylvi., was on stage, fighting furiousl_y with the Grand :'>farshall. still tQ ing to get to the microphone. ]';ow, from all over the park came shouts of "Let her speak!" along with. '·Who's that freak'?" "Is it a bo~- At this point, there was quitc a lot of commotion on stage. Som,• kind of tussle was going on bl' hind the huge amplifiers. It seems that Syhia, a well-lrnown tram vestite from STAH, (Street Trans­vestites Action Revolution) wa~ trying to get to the microphone. She was stopped by parade mar shalls and sent back into the au­dienc<'. The show went on, bu not without another interruption from S) !via, this time trying to scale the front of the stage, onl) to be beaten bad b) marshalls, all of whom you must understand, were gay. By this time a large portion of the audience knew some­thing was wrong, and wanted to know what it was. Well, I wanted to know too. Once again, Sylvia was defeated and the show went on, amidst the bedlam from the audience. Look­ing around. I noticed Sylvia hadn't given up. Hair disheveled, jump­suit torn, she was organizing a "flying-wedge" of people f om STAR. to push their wa,\ up thl' stage-side ,amp. Parade mar hhalls, were sitting up ard down the whole Length of the ramp, and were very surprised when the charge started It looked as if Sylvia might succeed in her climb, but. in a flash, like Zevs atop \fount Olym pus, the Grand Marshall appeared at the head of the ramp, pointing her finger and be llowing, "STAY!" And stay they did, The mar­shalls linked arms and beat back the attack. ART fflAT Ll\'ESI Thb is what proud OWrWTS and admlh"f'I of Ray Houston'• art 1-,e u ~ most aocunte way of Mllt-ribins this h"tl0y Hritin& art, and rightly .,. nw lnnt ~ of muculinlty to bt found in phy­siq~ art today Our aim ts to pttlfflt rib tutf' and dignity t~ malr body at its most eu-ltfn, and beautiful. Art to be displl)-cd u what it ii. ART, not the usual ·putic· tY(N' of ct:rtoons o«tted by to many and called ~~ r~-~ ~ \=:::i~:!:~r ==.k :;~,i'~ti ~ 1i!~ ':,::~ I le ft my front row seat, and made my way around to the side of the stage. As I was doing this, more entertabment wa s being quickly brought on stage to keep things going. Dur ing the per­formance of this group, Sylvia t r ied twice again, unsuccessfully t ried twice again , unsuccessfully to rea ch the microphone . T he audience was beginning to s tir. Shortly after the group fini s ­hed, the MC decided to clue people in on what wa s going on. "lt seems, " he said, " that Sylvia, a member of STAR, was objecting that the re were no transvestites on stage to r epresent them." "quite the contrary," Vito said " for right here on our stage we have the bea utiful Bebe Scarpi." Bebe stood up for a bow. She More mus i c. Mor e interrup­tions from Sylvia . More people from the audience scr eaming for her to be heard. Little squa bles breaking out everywhe r e. P eople taking sides. Another fight near the stage ramp. This time a few people really hurt, kicked and beaten on the ground. It was everything I could do to protect myself. I was in a state of shock. All I could keep shouting to the people fighting was, " You' re all gay! You're all gay! Stop !" use• plain pitte uE pt.pet', u Sona u your sfgnat1u-e is on it. Cwtom art from ynor favorire photo. price on req~. What could ~ more pct'IOn&I than an original oil painting of that special ~ p,,lnled by Mr. Houston. KHSt•iN RT 3 BOX 399, BRENHAM, TEXAS 77133 NT IIG-•TUIS IC .. OW C&•Tlf'llll T•AT I ..... OYl:I U TCAII 01' AGC, , f•-1onJ11at!.!ilIAGc:IOWP1'NTTOU■ OSD&a .. lix ..._. in a 8 X 10 • r,.oo 0 1 Add six post1&• Enc .... ,.._ ... , (caih, CMdi,M.O.)" All_._.. t.'C ;;:;.,...__._. fit11 ;._ -.1. Fo ... :--~--.. - ::-,":"..'..,._,,. "_'~_~~_~_;::_:.: :- a.,. ---""-- Finally , having no other choice the officials on stage announced Page 5 the orr1 cial s on stage announced he, "'ere going to letS~·lvia speak. It took quite a "'hile to settle the large audience down. People were \ery confused. Sylvia. teary­eyed, mascara running. took the microphone and, finally, had her say. She explained thal this Chris­topher Street Liberation Day was the result of the riots at the Stone­wall. That at these riots, drag queens were very inslumental in accomplishing what v;as finally accomplished. That this fact was never mentioned by the "new" gay libbers. That they were al­ways putting drag down, when, in reality, drags are men too. She went on to talk about STAR how it helped street Kids in pri­son- ho"' she had been in prison, been beaten, raped, and and de­graded unbelievably. How STAR was one of the few organizations to do any of this. And why, why she wanted to know , did the rest of the gay world constantly put them down? Needless to say. the audience was in an uproar. A number of dykes were threatening drag queens, but her guys were oushing Studi 48 17 BRYAN Al flf ZHUGH 214 1231441 Page 6 queen~ around. It was getting entirely too .scary. Sylvia was screamini: "What does it matter what you wear? Isn't all this about freedom?" All sorts of obscenities were being shout4d all around at this pornt. I suddenly realized that not only the gay press, but cer­tainly all the straight press were taking note of all of this, and I felt embarrassed for the whole movement. Still crying, hoarse from all her screaming, Sylvia collapsed in a sobbing heap on stage, and had to be carried off. More scream­ing and tussling throughout the audience. More music was an­nounced, but it was only listened to half-heartedly. There was something wrong, something that needed to be settled. Was Syl­via right'? Was she telling the truth? If not. why the hassle in letting her speak? Was it that she was too reactionary'? The crowd wanted answers. Now, it was announced, we were going to hear from the 'other side.' A speaker from the Lesbian Free­dom League had something to say. Peoole quieted down and listened. WONDERING The young girl explained the po­sition of L.1-'.L.; that they felt that drag was aput-down of women. Plain and simple. This was met with all kinds of shouts from the audience , until the M.C. BEGGED EVERYONE TO LISTEN ALL SIDES OF ANY ARGlJMENT. Well Phil, this was it. The young lady went on speak­ing. Suddenly, as if from now­here, a vision appeared at the rear of the stage. It was Lee Brewster, patron saint of New Yorks' Drag queens, head of Queens Liberation, and Editor of Drag Magazine. Resplendent in an emerald-green gown, with a gold sequin crown, (a queens' crown. I'm sure) she glided toward center stage, followed by an enormous Queens Liberation banner, carried by members of her group. The girl at the microphone did not see this right away, and went on speaking, thinking the ri sing cheer she heard was for her. But then, the vision was upon her. She simply stopped talking, and walked off. Trying to save face, the M.C. rushed forward and introduced Lee WHAT ro DO ? I 0 Dallas THEY'RE AH GOING TO Brewster. Beginning quietly, Lee spoke bluntly, honestly. He spote of the shock and hurt he felt having witnessed what was done to Sylvia and the others, his amaze­ment to see gays beating ga_ys. - ( cr01 is < say to I begi and som doru frea appl ges Gitt heir I Lee eno· Lee yell her; audi l didr one wer up, m01 peo: nan stil ''Le Mid son WOI an~ wa tin yo Ge Ma did of pal re Crying now, and removing her crown, (my use of both pronouns is on purpose) Lee went on to say that Queens Lib also had tried to help all gays from the very beginning, only to be forgotten and laughed at. That, to hear some gay people; anyone who donned a dress was some kind of freak. That live and let live never applied to drags. That the hin­ges of the closet door Barbara Gittings referred to were also being oiled by her tears. Openly crying and shaking now, Lee announced that he had had enough. Wishing Gay Lib goodbye, Lee turned, gathered up the large yellow and green Queens Li­beration banner, heaved it into the audience, and stormed off. Efforts to settle the crowd down didn't do much good, it was not one of our prouder moments. Sides were taken, tempers were flaring up, people were leaving. Some more entertainment appeared, but people were still walking out. Then, a miracle. The only name that could hold any crowd still. Over the loudspeaker came, "Ladies and Gentlemen, Bette. Midler!" Hooray! A wonderful songstress from the "outside" world. And people said she was anti-gay. Phooey! She was here wasn't she ? Bettes' opening line was, "When you're asked how you are, don't just say fine, say Getting Better!" Then, with Barry Marilow at the grand piano, she did her incredible rendition of "Friends". Washington Square will never be the same. The park rocked. Bette, all henna hair, tied-up red blouse, black toreador pants, flailing arms, andthatMidler smi­ler, made the speaker system cli­max. But once certainly wasn't enough for her fans. More! More! They screamed. Okay! She sang her famous opening number again, and thn and then literally disappeared. Again cries of More! abounded, but, alas, she really was gone. Quickly, the next act was brought on. Chris Robison and his Many Hand Band kept the crowd sway­ing with some great hard rock. The tall, blonde, attractive singer let everyohe know what he and his music were about with his open­ing number, "Looking for a Boy." The songs that followed got people up and dancing. I thought this was a good sigh, a sign that we could all still "Be together". But what's this? More confusion on stage? Now waht? Chris Robison wants to sn Chris Robison wants to sing some more songs for us and Vito Russo won't let him. Says there's no more time. Other acts to bring on. Says it's after six. What's this for? The singer is chasing the MC around the stage still playing his guitar, trying to sing into the microphone Vito is holding. The audience started hollering for more, and he was allowed to sing one more number. Another band was beginning to set up. I had had my fill of everything. I left. Perhaps I had seen too much I wasn't sup­posed tol posed to. Perhaps not enough. As I left the park, assorted gays and straights approached me, as they had been doing all day, to ask me about what I was wear- FOREIGN CAR SERVICE 5415 Fannin at Cillumet FREE ESTIMATES on body work and repair Foreign Car Specialist -~-~ ~ . ------ 528 8392 Hours 6 A.M. to 10 P.M. Love and Peace, Henri David ing. I realize now that these peo­ple needed an answer, a label for me. I answered that I put on what I felt like wearing that morn­ing that there was no political or sexual significance to my attire. And why did there have to be? P.S. No one could answer that. ThP.v tried. Won't we ever learn? New Texas Penal Code NOT A QUESTION Of SIZE The old penal code was 117 years old and badly in need of revision. The new penal code is little better. According to the Texas Ob­server, June 15, 1973: "The new code reclassifies crimes into three categories of felonies and three categories of misdemeanors. Punishment for Class A misde­meanor is a fine not to exceed $2,000 and/or a year in jail; Class B, $1,000 and/or 180 days: Class C, $200 fine with no jail time." Under the new code, homosex­uality is still a crime but it is a SKINNY NO NO In revising the Texas Penal Code, the House choose to include "public nudity" in the disor:derly conduct section and the Senate agreed to the amendment. "This would make it illegal for a person to appear stark nekkid in a public place," said Don Carness of Aus­tin. Over laughter, whistling, hoo­haws, catcalls and right-ons, Car­ness described the "deplorable" situation at Hippie Hollow the other skinny dipping spots. He con­tinued, "We have a problem in my district. A lot of young people who enjoy going completely nude have been doing so around Lake • Travis. They can be observed from peoμle's private property. ~ven Class C misdemeanor rather than a 15 year felony. Heterosexual acts done in private by consenting adults are no longer a matter of concern in the new penal code. In plainer words: the revision makes oral and/or anal inter­course legal for heterosexuals, but illegal for gays. And they call this justice? We would prefer to think what's sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. (Yet even today, it is not uncommon to meet gay people who insist that homo­sexuals are not oppressed.) NO churches." Carness quoted an Austin minister who said children riding home on the school bus had sighted naked people cavorting on the lake shore. He then told of his secretary's embarresment when she and some friends had gone boating over the weekend. As they cruised into a secluded cove, eight unclothed men who had been sitting on a rock lept io their feet and on a rock lept to their feet , started jumping up and down and started jumping up and down and waving at them. The house members loved it. One even asked for directions to Hippie Hollow. (For those readers who have not Page 7 -, I' - · ··-t > 11:;~;~H:fiii!it!'Hiif.if?tt;-'°''~ -;'"ll,''u;=u;~,,;~•·•,, ,i·,--;··· '~, ;;•:\•~t,t:1;:i;•::~;;~~~•~m.; •~:•,~nil! f I r f 1 ~ \I f f I 1 f I rr===========- at the threshold of adolescence before he has had any chance to explore alternatives and make a choice. He does not so much de­cide to stay as he does not decide to leave." enjoyed swimminl!: in the nude at Hippie Hollow, let this writer (who has) quickly explaine that the cove is very secluded and dif - ficult to reach. It can't be seen from the road, nor can it be seen from private property. A boating party might accidently happen upon it but from that distance, just how much "ould be seen? It's not a question of beauty How to avoid making decisions Walter Kaufmann, writing in • PSYCHOLOGY TODAY advises tho~e. fearful of making their own dec1s1ons to consider religion. For "Religion says: Do this and don't do that! Or: Thou shall, and thou shalt not. Instead of inviting us to evaluate alternative standards it gives us norms and tells us ho~ to apply them. Religions have also evolved traditions that shield us from situations in which tragic choices might become inevitable. The most obvious illustration is monasticism, which requires one great decision - - to renounce the ~reedom to make major decisions rn the future . Those who become monks or nuns no longer need face such fateful decisions as how to live, what to do, and what to believe. As a rule, a person does not even decide to submit to the authority of religion. He is born into the fold and then confirmed Advice Young Gays Gay young men and women who can't or don' t wish to attend the traditional four year college, for financial or other reasons, might do well to consider vocational or technical training as an alter­native. Why? Very simply. In the decade ahead it is predicted that nearly three-quarters ofall annual job opportunities will not require a college degree. But most job openings will require some sort of vocational or technical training beyond high school. This may be on-the-job training, special job pre-training programs, or vocat­ional school programs. Most em­ployers tend to favor vocational school training over on-the-job training. Of course, the purpose of college is to develop the whole person, not merely to prepare one to "bring home the bacon."Butthose with traditional college degrees are now realizing the importance of more practical skills. When compared with the standard col­lege programs, vocational and technical training programs are short and less expensive. Federal grants, scholarships and Joans are available for vocational training. There are more than 11,000 bus­iness, trade, and technical schools in America. These schools usual­ly require a high school diploma, but special arrangements can be made to waive this requirement. Good News for Gays The Gay Movement is 23 year& old. It started out with a mere handful of Gay citizens fearfully meeting in a private home in Los Angeles in 1950. Thus Mattachine Society was born. Most Gays in those days, who could have helped, instead hoo-hawed. "They won't last six months." "Who are they kidding? You'll never get a bunch of Queens to unite on anything." They'll never give us Gay kids a break. No, I'll just sit quietly and take my chances, thank you." :::>espite this, the movement man­aged to plod along. After Mat­tachine, came the first Gay pub­lication, ONE MAGAZINE. Almost immediately, the United States Post Office tried to suppress it. ONE dared to sue. While many Queens were sitting on their butts laughing at ONE's audacity, ONE won! Illinois became the first state to pass a consenting-adults law in 1961. (Eight others have since done so.) Slowly magazines be­came aware of us. Then movies and TV. The media found that we were "profitable." (My, weren't there a lot of us.) The first Gay newspaper, THE ADVOCATE, came into being. Troy Perry, a man who publicly and proudly admits to being gay, founded the Metropolitan Community Church. Imagine! Again, the Queens said, "A bunch of fairies playing church." "I don't need to go to church to cruise." But the gay church be­came the fastest growing church in America. • In June 1969, the police ripped their drawers, so to speak. They made another ho-hum/routine/il­legal raid on a tiny insignificant bar in New York's Village. Fin­ally, enough Gays were made mad enough to do something. Something they'd never done before. They fought back. And won! They con­fronted Mayor Lindsey. And won! Hence we now have a Gay National Holiday with parades in the major cities of our country. Of what importance is this?Well, straights can no longer pretend we don't exist. They may not like us, but they know we are here and don't intend to poof-disappear. But more important, it proves to everyone that Gays ARE uniting - - and what ever happened to those little fairies in 1950 who cried, "They won't last six months"? The Movement is like a stream moving towards the sea, the same civil rights that everyone else enjoys. It was stagnant, but it's becoming a roaring torrent. Now comes perhaps the best news in the 23-year struggle. Stra­ights are joining our fight. Read the following carefully. It may be a milestone in Gay History. Dear People: I have recently been appointed as the director of the new American Civil Liberties Union National pro­ject on Sexual Privacy. The pur­pose of the project is to coor­dinate a national effort to remove all laws which proscribe private consensual sexual activity among adults and to eliminate discrim- 612 HADLEY - - HOUSTON Page 8 inatory practices wtuch now from the existence of such laws. I am writing to you at this time in the hope of acquainting you with our project and enlisting your as­sistance and cooperation as a group informed and interested in this area of the law. As you know in most states young people peaceably living in com­munes, hippies, homosexuals, pro­stitutes, marrieds and singles are subjected to selective enforcement of the criminal statutes which ban adultery, fornication, sodomy and other private consensual activities between adults. Although it is true that these criminal statutes are infrequently enforced because it is difficult to do so, it is imperative that they be eradicated as they are used as the primary justifi­cation for the pervasive denial of equal employment, housing, public accommodations and governmental benefits and tights to homosexuals. Of course these laws are used as a thin veneer for societal dis - . approval of differing modes of sex­ual orientation and life styles. Unfortunately, the disapproval is often based on widespread ignor­ance of homosexual motivations· and activities. Prostitutes, too, suffer unequal enforcement of the laws because of society's disap­proval. The police employ crim­inal "solicitation" and "loitering" statutes as well as improper har­to ensnare both homosexuals and prostitutes because of the difficulty encountered in discovering and prosecuting their truly private sexual activities. We believe the time if partic­ularly ripe to challenge these laws and patterns of discrimination as a result of a combination of the recent landmark extension of the constitutional right to privacy by the Supreme Court in the abortion decisions, the recent surfacing of homosexuals who arewillingtoas­sert their rights, and the relatively new concurrent emerging tol­erance in society. erance in society. In view of the general problems and developments in the area the following priorities have been identified for the project: 1) Removing criminal sanctions against consensual sexual acts be­tween adults in private through use of litigation and legislation. Lit-igation includes filing of affirm­a. tive class action suits as well as defense of those actually prosecut­ed for violation of the statutes. 2) Eliminating public and private employment discrimination aga­inst homosexuals through litigation legislation and public education. 3) Eliminating discrimination aga­inst homosexuals in public housing and accommodations. 4) Decriminalizing prostitution. 5) Eliminating police harassment of homosexuals and prostitutes by challenge to the loitering and sol­icitation laws. 6) Protecting the rights of homo-· sexuals to visit and have custody of their natural children. In furtherance of the listed pri­orties the project will endeavor to mount a coordinated national liti­gation and legislation effort against the restrictive laws andpractices; compile and maintain an up-to­date docket of significant past and pending ACLU and non-ACLU cases in the area, which will be circulated to all ACLU affiliates and other interested people and organizations around the country willing to participate in litigation; conduct an investigative survey of the laws anddiscriminatorypract­ices in each jurisdiction; develop case materials, model pleadings and other litiga.tion tools to assist lawyers in litigation of cases; and draft model legislative memoranda for use in affiliate lobbying ef­forts. In furtherance of these goals I hope that you will keep me in­formed for your general activities through your publication and keep me advised of important develop­ments as they occur via mail or phone. I will" keep you on our mailing list. If the address is incorrect or if you would like to designate one person for us to con­tact please write and tell us so. Please feel free to call or write at any time with information as a coordinated effort is of extreme importance. I hope to be hearing from you soon. Marilyn G. Haft Direcror. Sexual Privacy Pro­ject American Civil Liberties Union 22 East 40 Street New York, N.Y. 10016 Delaware has new sex law On July l, 1973, consenting sex­ual relationships, in private, be­tween consenting adults (homo­sexual relationships included) be­came law of the First State of the Union, Delaware. (To me, that is as surprising as if the Southern Baptist Convention were suddenly to advocate the use of heroin.) Nevertheless, it is true. But, a little history first. Delaware has always been the unusual State, insofar as it's stat­utes are concerned. Many years ago, most of the States ~nd Com­monwealths of the Uruon were beginning to formulate laws con­cerning the legal processes of incorporation. Many States and Commonwealths listed a maximum of 26 reasons for which it was legal to incorporate a firm. Dela­ware stood alone in permitting any group of people to incorporate for any reasonable (i.e., not unlawful) purpose. As a consequence, most of the major big businesses today are incorporated in Deleware. One of the first of the major groups to be incorporated in Delaware was the A. I. du Pont-de Nemours Corporation. . Their corporation was followed ,q_uicRly by the then New Ford Motor Co., General Motors, General Foods, etc. Be­lieve it or not, each of these companies maintains a small "home office" in the cities of Wilmington or Dover (the Capitol) for the purpose of maintaining their corporate status. Despite the seeming progres­siveness of Delaware Law, many old pre revolutionary laws were kept on the books. For example, the whipping post law still exists today. If a person breaks parole, steals a car, is convicted-of pick­pocketing, and several other spec­ific offenses, he may be sentenc­ed to, ''twenty lashes with a cat­o- nine-tails, well laid on by a strong man." (If that's your bag, move to Delaware and become a criminal, but, l>e sure of your offense--you may get a lenient judge.) The constitutionality of the above law is being contested under Jf)Ur hostesses Ricci & Rita B91Bllt et•s Cl.BB POOL . DANCING . MIXED DRINKS Open Tuesday throv,h Sunday Spa - 2•• (Closed loftdays l 2385 S. SllfPHERD the provision of the Bill of Rights against "cruel and unusual punish­ment.'' In 1962, Gov. Charles L. Terry (deceased) recognized the confused status of the Delaware Penal.Code. He appointed a commission, con­sisting of 13 attornies-from vari­ous parts of the State and Pro­fessor of Law from the University of Pennsylvania.• The committee was charged with the responsibil­ity of codifying the Dela ware Penal Code. The committee submitted its first revision of the Code to the Governor. Included in the Original Report was: Section 433, p. 236f: "A person is guilty of consensual ·sodomy when he engages·iR deviant sexual intercourse with another person. Is is no defense that the· othei, person consented to the deviant sexual intercourse." Under the section titled, "Definitions" is the statement, "Deviant sexual inter­course includes sexual relations with persons of the same sex." The entire revision of the Penal code was presented to the General. Assembly of the. State of Delaware and w.as roumlly aefeatell due to the vagueness of ·tlie .terms used in the report. A: S"eco{ld and third revision of the Original· :R,e~~rt were prepared, p.resented, And de­feated in the· General Assembly. Meanwhile, Gov. Terry was defeat­ed in the following gubinotorial el­ection and was succeeded by -Gov. Russell Peterson (Republican) . .By that time, a fourth report was introduced to the General Assemb­ly under the title Senate Sub. #1 or S.B. 356 in 19'72 during the second session of the 126th General Assembly. The fourth re­vision was based by the General Assembly and was signed into law by Gov. Peterson. The significant difference between the first and fourth revision of the Delaware Penal Code, insofar as homosex­uals are concerned, was the om­ission of Section 433 altogether. 52& M30 The fourth revision will become ef­fective July 1, 1973. (The reason for the delay in the effective date was due to typographical errors in the printing of the fourth re - vision of the Original Report.) As things standnowinDeleware, the following offenses remain a part of the Penal Code. The follow­ing list is restricted to those of• fenses which might be of concern to homosexuals. Section 761: Sexual Assult. The following is not an .exact quote from Sect. 761. The section reads essentially that a person is guilty of sodomy is he engages in sexual relations with a person of the same sex who is under age 16 if the former is over the age of 20. Exception: If a minor (defined in Delaware as a person who has not reached the age of 20 - - - not 21 as in many States) engages in sex­ual relations with a person no more than 4 years younger or older than himself, no crime has been com­mitted, provided that the act oc­cured in private. For example, if a 16 year old man were to engage in sexual relations with a 13-year ~year old man, no offense has been committed; no investigation may insue; and no court hearing is re­quired. The defendant, in the above case cannot even be arrested. Section 763: Rape. (This section should be self-explanatory as itre­sembles the statutes of -the re­mainder of the States and Com­monwealths of the Union.l.. Section 766:-&,domy_-'-Lk,Jerson is guilty of sodomy if he engages in sexual relations with a person of the same sex who has not consented to such a relationship." Sodomy is a class B felony. Under Definitions: Section 1341: "A person is guilty of lewdness when he does any lewd act in any public place or com­mits any lewd act which he knows is likely to be observed by others Page 9 • who would be affronted or alarm­ed by such acts." (The constitut­ionality of thi!. section is cur­rently under contention. Basically, the argument is based on, "If you don't want to see something, don't look.) Section 1321: Loitering. "A per­son is guilty of loitering when he remains in a public place for the purpose of soliciting sexual re­lations or for the purpose of sol­iciting sexual relations for money and/or other funds." Though the change in Delaware Law would not have been possible without the aid of many people, including our heterosexual broth­ers and sisters, plaudits are es­pecially deserved by Human En­lightenment, Inc. of Dehware (P. 0. Box 863, Wilmington, Del. 19899). H.E. 's current legal act­ivity includes filing a class action suit against the Federal Govern­ment claiming a tax exempt status as a nonpolitical , nonprofitorgan­ization. We as citizens, taxpayers and also human beings remain here in Texas (with her antiquated laws). Ther e is reason to believe that actions by some of our State Gay Organizations are acting for the benefit of changes. The NUNTIUS has endeavered to keep abreast with the actions of these organ­izations and their progress but without their corporation and being a one-man-staff makes it even more difficult. ON THE SOAPBOX Prejudice I Discrimination Among Gays by "Maude" Childers In some bars, we, as members It's true! Gays are prejudiced, and friends of MCC usually get and they discriminate among them- preached at and condemned for selves, and they aren't "camping" what we believe. We believe in when they do. It's one thing to total love, not just partial love. be attacked by the "anti-Gay" We love the mental, physical, and heterosexuals; but to be attacked spiritual aspects of each in-by your own brothers and sicters dividual We are not criticised be- . - - well - - a stab in the back cause we can love each other couldn't be much worse. mentally and physically, but be- How do Gays discriminate be- cause we can love each other cause of prejudice? spiritually as well. We love, re- I'm a member of MCC. I love gardless of race, color, sexual my Church and my religion. I preference, religious affiliation (if also love the bars, and, yes Vir- any), or regardless if you care to ginia, even the baths. Contary to smoke, drink, or how you relate widespread belief --- MCC doesn't sexually. We are not prejudiced preach hellfire and damnation; nor at MCC. do we attack or condemn the bars We don't walk into the bars or or the baths; and yet, as an active baths with a "holier than thou" member in MCC, I go into the attitude; and yet, some people, bars wearing my cross . . . and when they discover that we are then the feeling of love and ac- from MCC, automatically assume ceptance surrounds me . . . we have a "holier than thou" " Well , have you convinced God attitude. When delivering our that He's Gay yet?" Church paper, "The Channel", a "Hey man, don't you KNOW friendly bartender gave us the that you can't be Christian and usual interrogation as to how we Gay?" could possibly be Christian and What is MCC - - - just a bunch Gay. Then after the discussion of queens playing Church?" had everybody's attention - - the "You mean you actually drink stage was set, the lights went on smoke, have sex, and still go to us, and the resident bar personal- Left­Handed a hit off the wall NEW YORK CITY-With five original songs in tis heart (pop­rock) and good color shots of New York City and Woodstock (not the concert, the area around there), Left-Handed gets a bit of story and feeling into its fuck-fest. Church?" ity walked up to me, carressed Harry of D. my leg, and said: "Let's go home sos,~ We follow Ray (Ray Frank), a hip hep-cat, as he hops about the Village in his faded blue denim and into the tearoom off Bank Street. The tearoom scene has the usual sex but also a humorous tinkly sound tr_ack, realistic fum­bling actions, and an antit, ner­vous camera cat(;jling the graffiti Ghost of a Chance is witty, dever sex romp Jaguar Productions' latest release, A Ghosl ,~( a Chance. is a witty film that u~cs an ingenious plot to sock across its sizzling sex interludes. There are plenty of laughs. too. The cast. which hold.~ nothing back in the bare flesh department, is divided between long and languid types and the decidely humpy. The photography of Barry Knight is splendid, and the cockeyed script of Gonon Hall is bouncy. Once again, filmmakers are in• tent on creating a work where sex is part of the whole scene, not just an isolated moment. The more this trend continues, the faster the ripoff artists in the gay nick market wiU disappear. Knight knows what he's doing, and he has a fine sense of erotic design combined with technical know-how. Two scenes in Ghost are autstanding. There's a fantasy romp in a greeny bower that could be out of Fellini or Zeffirelli. The lovers (Roy Clark and Toby Willis) make out handsomely while the camera roams around the foliage like a Peeping Tom. And there's an all• white segment with Tom Winston· and Ralph Martin writhing and slurping on two enormous snow pillows. Knight's trademark of using the overhead shot when the body steam begins to rise is sexciting as all hell. This time out, the prolific Hall has come up with a Blithe Spirit type of yarn. Glen Brock loses a lover in a car accident. Not for too long, however. Couple of years later the astral dude returns to bug his earthly ex-partner. At times, we're never quite certain whether we're watching the ghost in action or someone who looks like the horny ectoplasm. The device makes way for some amusing moR>ents: Jimmy Hughes looking in the lcitchen while his Page 10 on the waUs. · . Ray, nervous, su*}l'ful, but ever-hungry, visits his fqcad, an antique•C\\m-head-sh~er, Larry (Larry Burns). Larry is ~t getting six bricks of tea from Jjis dealer, an innocent country bQy. Bob (Robert Rikas). Bob is a nice hop-headed guy with a chick. Quadrangle! The two gay friends, the tea-dealer, and his chick. There's material here for aex and scenics. The obligatory aex looks like sex in most sex flicks. But the New York scenes and the Woodstock locales have Ral feeling, depth, and the sort of handling we're used to outside of aex films. The slight story-consisting of our watching (hearing) Ray's "feft-handedness" ,( deviousness) via phone caUs to his old antique lbop friend:.lead us on. The end­ing. is lyrical, expected, not melo-dnmatic. , Gay flicks are beginning to pow up. Wasn't it only yesterday ~t ·Gays paid $5 to watch ,some IUY stripJ>ing and twrig a s)low­el'? The two gay guys are hand­M> me and as •dignified as charac­ten in a Dostoyevski novel. . The five ~_!!e OK, bu~j~t _.,_,._ OK. Best effects: Strauss mnsi · LANGUID AND HUMPY. Principals in Barry Knight's latest romp, Ghost of a Chance,~ (from left) Glen during one make-ou_t scene and Brock Jimmy Hughes, Toby Willis, and Roy Clark. Gorton Hall wrote the ghostly comedy. the tinkle-Stuff Mdurmg_ the Stea- , room sequence. us1c 1s by tan lover is getting royally rim.med by scene ·as a mother about to marry around or screwing up a storm, but Finkelstein and {,.ichard !Andon. the invisible man, and another again and worried about her son's he reads dialogue like a ventrilo- Producer-directors Jack Deveau scene where Hughes gets generously reaction. quist's dummy. Since he's got quite and Jaap Penraat have given us the goosed by the ghost. Musical background is soft and a film career going, he ought to first realistic, New York atmo- The ending is an amicable twist. in mood. This deserves applause. So polish up his acting style. sphere this veteran reviewer has The film is sophisticated in what it's many rotten gay flicks are backed The rest of the cast perform well seen in a male skin flick. · saying. The script gives out a nice by soundtracks that have about as enough, but the film belongs to · This reviewer by accident met little message about common sense much relationship to the action as a Knight and Hall. Even the special Larry Burns in the. street the next in sexual matters. Anyone who sees duck's quack has to a Gershwin effects are mischievous. End result day. He said aU the actors used the film is likely to feel pretty good score. is an engaging 105 minutes mixinjl their real names. about the value of honest sex. As Ex-Groovy Guy Hughes is the sex _and fun in a diverting, enter- The times they are a,cbanging! usual, Hall drops in a dramatic star as far as body pulp goes. He's tammg fash ion. For the better . · moment. Gena Powers has a fine wortli looking at when he's standing !. Moriarty · Leo Skir and ball". I can dig honesty; how­ever, I deplore mockery. I said "No.,, "Oh, but", he replied, - "Don't you love me?" I told him: "I don't even know you." "Oh, but don't you love me as a human being?" To which I replied: "yes, I do." "Then why can't we go home and ball?" Well, all I could tell him was: "There isn't really anything that I could say that you want to hear, but I still love you as a human being." Other people in MCC could prob­ably tell you how they have been "tested", ridiculed, or mocked. I feel it's a shame that our brothers and sisters can't accept us as we are. I know fully well what it feels like to be in the minority --- maybe MCC members are really in the minority. But I know what's right for the majority hasn't always been right for me. I'm Gay, Proud, Healthy, and Christian; and, if that's Queer --- yes, I cert­ainly am! Bar owners and those who sup­port MCC regardless if they attend, know that I'm not preaching to them. I'm not treated like an out­cast in every Gay establishment. Maybe someday soon, things will be different. After we removed the prejudice and discrimination out of the remaining heterosexual bigots, then we can rid the same among ourselves. You still don't believe it exists? What about the Gay Pride Parade? I marched proudly with my "I'm not Pre­judiced, I like Heterosexuals" Why did I do it? Because I be­lieve in Gay Liberation. MCC does too! We voted in a Congregational meeting to again participate in the parade. Did our brothers and sist­ers congratulate us because we dared to march? I'm not talking about MCC involvement. I'm re­ferring to ANYONE who had the courage to stand up and say: "yes, I'm Gay and Proud?" Well some of my best friends have stabbed me in the back because of it. I guess they were afraid that Liberation rubs off; and they couldn't afford to be liberated - - - because of their job, family, etc. Well the Pion­eers of any Liberation movement are usually told to "shut up and Don't Get Involved". It would be easier for me to go straight and become an Atheist. OK, for some that's what's right for them --­but it's not right for me. Rev. Perry tells us that MCC will not be destroyed by the Foxes that Breed Discontent in the Gay community; it can only happen in­side the Church . . . among our- ' selves. Well, I believe that. But I also believe that the Gay com­munity can never be destroyed by the Heterosexual community; but we can destroy each other among ourselves. The theme of the Gay Pride Parade last year was: "United We Stand, Divided We Fall" and I'll say amen to that. Censored LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dear Sirs, I am a Senior in high school in a small town in Iowa, and I need help. 1. How do you make your parents realize that being gay is not a sickness, evil or anything wring? 2. How can I meet a guy who is not interested in only a one night stand? 3. How can I develope a lasting relationship with a guy as an equal friend? 4. How can I protect myself from vd/ 5. How can I stay away from a carrier or sadist? I want to meet a guy who is not interested in only himself. Can you help me? J.G. (This is an actual letter addressed to Our Community. I've answered the yough as best I could, but I thought you readers might be in­terested in knowing there are many young people searching for answ­ers that older gays have sought all their lives, sometimes in vain.) Phil Landing. Before going we stopped off at a newly opened club. At the new club we had an enjoyable time and were surprised at the large crowd in attendance. After an hour or so we depart­ed for the Bayou Landing. As we were entering the Landing the cashier at the door asked us if we had been to the new bar. We said we had and he asked how their business was. At this point I jok­ingly said they were doing great, they'll probably put the Bayou out of business." Everyone realiz­ed I was joking and laughed, in­cluding another Bayou employee, but the obese cashier didn't laugh and in his rude manner remarked, "If I wanted shit from you I'd scrape it from your teeth." It seems to me he should have realized if I had licked the new bar so well I wouldn't come to the Landing to spend my money, but unfortunately he does not have that forsight. Anyway, as I pro­tested his vulgar remark he said the door at "his" club swings both ways and to get out. He gave me 11 my money back along with my friends' money. He said "he" Dear Sir, didn't need our business. However Recently I experence~ a rude, two of my friends had gone into uncalled for, brutal mishap at the crowd and it took a few min­Dallas' so-called formostgay club. utes for another friend to find them. If I may I would like to relate Meanwhile I waited outside. As I this ~tory t~ you and your read- was standing outside the door ers rn th~ rn!ere~t that ~e ma! was standing outside the door change this situati~m so it won t waiting for my friends, this crude, occur to anyone again. . . disordered cashier charged out One recent Saturday evening six the door with a night-stick after of us planned on going to the Bayou me. He screamed he wanted us away from "his" club at once and rammed the stick in my side. At that time my friends came out the door and we departed. To me, personally, this was the most uncalled for mishap I've ever experienced at any gay club. I cannot justify the action of the Bayou Landing in their ar­rogant nature. Don't they realize it is our money that keeps them in business? Do they really be­lieve they are doing us a favor by taking our money? If so, I dis­agree. They may not want my money but my feelings are they don't deserve it. Just because they are the largest gay bar in town doesn't mean they have to act as though they're the only one. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Jerry Edwards Garland, Texas Dear Jerry, Letters of this nature are in a way good to have but for the bars and their owners to permit employeed personnel to act this way is unheard of. I would hate to be the one that did it when the owner, Mr. Sisk reads this. Phil, MINI PARK REMODELING Help, Please! I am black, gay, lonely, brokP and in prison. Is there anyone out there who will take time to give me a helping hand? If you have a pen pal column I will be great­ful if you runmeanaddfora while. In the meantime keep on tipping on the gay side. Peace and Gay Love! Henry N. Lucas #B-016630 P. 0. Box 747 Starke, Fla. 32019 12-28-72 Dear Phil, Please reduce the size of our ad to about a 1/4 page. I need to cut down on some of this expense. Thank you, Happy New Year Ron Butler March 28, 1973 ATT: Mr. Phil Frank (Certified - Return Receipt Re­quested) New Gay? Rock Star Page 12 I Dear Sir; We notified you by Jetter and phone in January to discontinue the ad for Hi Kamp. The ad is not up to date and has not been for some time. Please stop the ad now until we can bring the infor­mation up to date. Very truly yours, Dr. Ronald M. Butler Dear Dr. Butler, I am sorry for the misunder Misunderstandings such as this happen, but did it take a bill for you to correct the error. Your account at the Nuntius will be charged off along with the many others that have not paid or paid by NSF checks. Have made every effort to find other correspon­dence and listened to the monotered tape of /ill calls and find nothing other than what is here. By the way, do very much enjoy your restaurant and the show is the finest I have seen anywhere. Phil Frank We Can't Ignore Homosexuality To The Dallas News: The straightforward (but not sensa­tional) tone of the Oct. 6 article, Male Pair Becomes Legally Married, serves io higblight one of society's most press­Ing problems. We may be thankful that homosexuality. is no longer a prohibited copic for discussion. The problem does exist and lt In­volves literally millions of people. We simply cannot ignore it or its effects upon our society. It is particularly unwise for parents to ignore homosexuality since tbey, themselves. dramatically help or hinder the sexual develop1J1ent of their clll1- dren. Studies ind;cate that a prime factor leading to homosexuality relates to the {amily context in which the homosexual grows up. Confusion of parental roles and the dissolution of family structures appear to lie behind this social and moral prob­lem. Parents concerned with the sexual development of their own children should actively seek to strengthen and stabilize the family unit. Although there is no magical cure for homosexuality, strong and stable families provide for the best sexual de­velopment of children. In particular, parents who embrace biblical Christian­ity ought to note the centrality or the family unit in the Scriptures and at­tempt to reflect this emphasis in their own lives. , 'WALT BoAR'RtIT. LETTERS ~- ~ :~ l'" •J:: ~ \: • , _1 ~"' ,-l CHOW MEIN Chinese Foe.cl, Mandarin Style, the sign read. It's been a long time, why not? The waiter guiding me to a seat is not oriental: six feet, gleaming black wavy hair, a smile, long legs moving rhy­thmically, tingling voice: "this corner table, just right for you." Huge pot of tea and tiny cup six pages of menu I'm left alone. My eyes follow the smooth dance­like movements among the tables to and from the kitchen beautiful . . . desirable His eyes meet mine . . . smile ... then beside my table, "Have you decided what you want to eat?" "Yes. Yes, I have." Pad in hand, pen poised, "What Pad in hand, pen poised, "What will you have?" "YOU!" Only a hint of surprise, a sec­ond's hesitation: "I'm not avail­able tonight, not till Tuesday. You see, I go to college and work every night except Tuesday ... it's the only free time. I should rest but . . . if you want me?" "Yes, I do. Now, bring me some­thing in which to drown my disappoint­ment." He called Friday and Saturday and Monday ... then, "Pick me up in front of the Science Lab tomorrow about four . . . I can hardly wait!" Face glowing, eyes talking, hungry lips exploring, strong arms drawing me close: "I usually charge fifty buck an -hour but, for you, I'll make it twenty." "Here;s your clothes. I wouldn't pay you fifty cents!" Laughter. Hands moving over my body . . . a long kiss . . . - "Confucis say, When customer will not pay wise lay will say, this is bargain day." I reach for my clothes. Strong young arms push me back Ul)Ol1 the bed. "I'll pay," he says, while care­fully encircling my erection (which would not obey the mind's command) Gene Harlot (at left} is the lead singer with New York's maddest and most-determined­to- succeed glitter-band, The Harlots of 42nd with six ten dollar bills. Ris eyes find mine, "All I've got. Is it enough?" Street. Gene. who is a leather salesman on I brush them a.way. "Notfor sale!" New York's Wall Street by day, is turning on the low-lifes who hang out in local disco­theques by night with his songs of sado­" Bullshit! Everything's for sale!" masochism and the mainlining of hard drugs. "Did you ever hear of something Gene and the Harlots have their own fan club called LOVE?" and newsletter even though they are a far cry "Yeah, that's the stuff they give from the likes of David Cassidy and Donny away . , . ,, Osmond. Photo by Zachary Freyman. because 1t s not worth paymg for. --- ······· -·-----·· .. .... . ........ ·····-··············· ....... ............... .. .......... - . .................................... .... . ~ ...... s_.,._ .. .:.:. ........ .c ... L.: ... :.1.:.1.:.1:.1•:a:: .: • .••• r... ... l - ... :.:1 ..... .:.:...;.::11 .. :::::.!1 •• ::;.:!.::.1:~:,:: ,:~1t:11 :t1.-:.•·1:·•:.:.-:•• • • • I • •1• , . c• • • July , 18 - 24 For mature adults: a feature length homosexual love story with original music in full color LEH-HANDED Mini Park 2907 M:1111 Ho11,lo11 :i28 :iBB I [U v:r 't.lA..!t..1 !lut-1lli11-t..1 <ilMl"J:t lruunu..t-. U'Wl:t ~il.UW . ·t=_ =,,., --=-=--=,;, ' '= 1, II l'f!OOVUU~V 1\'1Hl1Utll, OIIHCllOIIV EASTMAN A NORTHLAKE PAOOUCTK>N BARRY KNIGHT GORTON HAlL COLOR RELEASED BY JAGUAR COMING JULY 25 FROM BAR R Y KNIGHT ANO GORTON HALL • THE TEAM T H AT B RO UGHT YO U THE EXPERIMENT. ANOTHER FIRST! AN EROTIC MALE COMEDY! HARD ACTION ADULTS ONLY SI L, ',< ""'il l,etwcen 5 & 7 p.ff f "-'c Coffee -, St11dc11t D1sc-uu:1ts OPEN 11 A.M. ' t,I 12 A.M. Page 13 I stuff the ten dollar bills into his jacket pocket. ~s I drive, he protests. "I don't get it. You want me, I want you, but you kick me out." "A very wise man dais: 'Man does not live by bread al­one.'' "Meaning what?" "Unless there is pleasureable participation of mind and spirit physical sensations aren't worth the effort." Two and one half days pass; the phone rings: "I've got to find out about this love business. Confucius says 'Chow Mein be­comes great feast for a hungry man'." "So, you think ch?,w mein and love are synonymous? "Must be . . . what else? . . . some of the best of everything mixed together into a great feast?" What's to say? "So, come pick me up after work tonight. I'll skip school tomorrow ... and, we'll try out the love bit." "I'm not available until Tuesday ... and, skipping school might cost you too much." "Damn you!" (These youngsters know everything and if I weren't so damned bull­headed I'd learn how Chow Mein is made.) W.E.B., 1/17 /73 Mad Capping and Night Capping in Dallas June in Big D has been a month of celebrations - - birthdays etc. Sabra Garth of Ronsue's is one year older along with Sal Al Marie -- Carla you's never know it the way those girls carry on and keep their legs in the air!! Miss Chelsey also had one (birthday that is) and Big Mable -- and that ain't all Big Mable had!! Girl - - what did you try to get that extra large hooter from Louisiana to do to your body? I'm a dummy, but I heard your legs almost never touched down on terra firma. Is that how you got rid of all your fleas??? Still with Big Mable - - she did a dress up bit at Ronsue's on a recent Sunday night show - - and that was a hoot! It's hard to fit a big woman like Mable, but her dressmaker shopped for days at Dallas Tent and Awning and final­ly found enough material - - she was georgeous! That wasoneofthe best shows I've seen for .some long ti.me but what else can be expected f~om Ronsue's. It's time again for Ronsue's annual benefit for underprivile~ed children and that should bnng a large tournout. Last year thl:Y sent 125 children to camp - - this year they will be working with crippled children. It makes me very proud to be a part of a co~­munity that can care about their fellow man. Mother has visited most of the Gay Bar scene this month - - exc~pt for the few places that practice public exhibitions - - on pool tables and in T-rooms etc. If mother ever gets another husband, she'll find a more comfortable place than a pool table to do her numbei_-!!! The Speakeasy - - at new location 5462 Denton Drive cutoff is a beautiful bar, and I understand they're getting tremendous crowds. Go by and say Hi to Buddy and see how you like the pl_a~e. The Glory Hole is the competition a couple of doors away - - good luck to both clubs. The Sundance Kid -- a very nice pleasant little Bar ~ - ne,ar the Ranch at 4117 Maple. Smee I m not a beer drinking woman, I'll have to take a little bottle of Old Charter out some night and have a few! Mother never has a couple-- The Big Mable Family Album is coming up this Saturday at the Villa Fontana - - all live, it should bring about a fun filled evening - - Madame Fertilizer will be making a guest appearance -- she is also MC for Ronsue's Benefit show. You can't keep that girl out of a dress. To Miss Palmer, the Fina ph­last -- I know you've got a new car, a new pinky ring. etc., but you know Mother and Miss Exxon are not married girls, and honey, when they're on Old Charter -­they're a real live hazzard, es­pecially for a married lady! The Entree Nuit sponsored a hot pants contest over the 4th and again Miss Gerry of the Villa was in the running. Honey, it must be embarrassing to lose out to a puss and they weren't even showing a box! Heard it was a hoot! Well don't feel too bad dear -­Mother lost out at Ronsue's pool tournament to Good ole Carol -­and that was for the consolation prize. It wasn't too surprising since Mother only plays pool about twice a year and that is at Ron­sue's pool tournaments. The Bayou Landing had their outing with fried chicken and there was a lot of burned bodies - - from the heat that is - - Heard J. Car­roll and Miss Kaufman made the scene, but Miss Kended up almost drauerless and moneyless at the gay Ramrod -- just tell Mother how you got home honey. I already know your condition. The Lady of the Lake made a flying trip to LA over the holiday, but has returned - - guess we'll have to get together for a few sips, and you can tell all. I want my Care Package from Good O!e George (the bartender at the David in LA) My God, they say, who could forget her! Bertina I know you have a weight pr:Wlem, but it ain't whe_re you told me it was; I have a ~et plan, but it doesn t have tnple servings of veg soup and corn-bread! . . In closing I would like to voice all our concern over the fire in New Orleans. Our hearts went out to the kids who lost their Ii ves and those who had to witness such Ann Landers: AH omosexual' s Suicide· (C., 1173, Field Enterprises Ille.) • ~. Dear Ann Landers: I've got to tell someone before ~tlll)lodi.: Three weeks ago my brother killed himself. He w~Jl.,:bfM· some, intelligent, considerate and a success at wnatlffr,.JJ6. attempted. Jim was two years older tbao me and I enjoY.eill.1118. status of .having the most popular and most attraclivl! lniheP-111 town. In spite of the attention he received he didn't 4ata.:D111ch and did not marry. """~"" Jim put himself through college and spent nearly four~years in the Air Force. He did a tour of duty in Vietnam and 'lbfJldl: When he separated from the Service six months ago he seemed. moody and preoccupied. I couldn't reach him, although I trit!J!IL: several occasions. The day he took his life he mailed a letter to our paren~ Very long letter, in which he revealed that he was a homosexual, depressed unhappy and saw no reason to go on living. He said he had re~d dozens of books on the subject, seen a psychiatrist for an explanation of his homosexuality, and ended up blamini the stormy marriage of my parents. . After 30 years Mom and Dad are still battling. I can l'l!llllll· ber the black eyes and the beatings my mother took when we were children. I recall vividly hiding with Jim, under the bed, and how once, when Jim tried to protect Mom, be got a beating, himself. , Now with Jim's suicide and this letter, Mo~ is on the verge of a nervous breakdown and Dad is just numfl. I don't under­stand any of this. I was very close to my brother, yet I never bad the faintest notion that be was fighli!)g :this battle. Whllt causes homosexuality? Help me, please. I, like Mom, am at the -Breaking Point Dear B.P.: The next letter contains as good an explanation as any I have ever seen. a horror. I know that many prayers were said and that all the gay churches have tried to do some­thing to help these people through their suffering. There it is. Tonight I start on a new project - - Mother is going to open a boarding house! (Mother - "Is this commercial paid for?) Won't that be a hoot -- of course they've come up with a few names to put up in RED neon lights - - like Mother's Whore House etc., well, we'll talk to you next month. Mother of Dallas P.S. Ronsue's benefit ran $500 -­ain't that just great? BLOOD, MOANS: CHARITY SCENE Med T cams Race Tim e Amid Confusion By CLANCY DUBOS A nurse's aide mopped blood off the floor while an intern drew more from the arm of a scorched patient. Doctors In tennis shoes cut dead s k l n off the chest of a middle-aged man who moaned steadily while he was rocking oir his side. . / More adibulances -iirriv• ing with 1$ o r e sl,retchers b e a r i n i mor11 cut a n d burned vJctims-that was the scene at· the Accident Emergen~/room of Charity Hospital \vell into Sunday night. A fire fl a s h e d through a building housing three French Quarter bars several hours earlier on the corner of Iberville and Chartres Sts. Outside in the visiting area friends and families waited, w i t h questions, prayers and scattered bits of information. Confusion seemed to reign, yet tightly woven into th~ mesh of helter-skelter was a delicate pattern - a pattern of doctors , and nurses racing against time to save the lives of fifteen vic­tims whose injuries ranged I from broken fingers to multiple fr a c tu r e s and third degree burns. Nurses d i v id e d themselves into teams. Some g a th e r e d blood, others tried to get names! from those who could talk, and still others checked for vital 1 1 signs of life. I Once every few minutes a nurse or a doctor went out into the main hallway, where other patients from other "less impor­t tanl" accidents patiently await­: ed treatment. One victim, who was able to 'move about somewhat freely and talk, asked for assistance in making a telephone call. His fin- "Naturally, everybody pan­icked. They ran to the windows. My God, I'm so lucky I was the first one out. But it was terri­ble! There were steel bars on the windows and nobody could get through!" He began to sob again. j "My best friend was upstairs on the third floor and I haven't 1 heard from him or seen him. yet!" ! More N ew Orleans Fire ~rP~tUt\[L @U::lF~OO THE ALL NEW Eo [13a ~~lfilU~$ 200' Color Film $16.50 ea. WITH THIS AD BELLAIRE NEWS 5807 Bellaire 665-9711 LARGEST ADULT SECTION IN HOUSTON OUT OF TOWN PAPERS DISCOUNT NEWS 609 loBronch Downtown at TEXAS (across from Gr,,yhound Bus) 126-8852 OPEN TILL 1 A.M. OVER 2000 PUBLICATIONS DISPLAYED FEATURING BOOTH TYPE MOVIE ARCADE MACYINES WITH 24 INCH SCREENS Arson Possibility Is Raised By JOHN LaPLACE and ED ANDERSON" A security guard at the Mar­riott Hotel-located across the street from the buikting--said he heard a hotel guest wanted to burn down the Jemani Bar. No Stranger to New Orleans .. .. 141 Chartres St., another part of the building involved in the blaze. The other bar located in thr building was LaNormandie Bar, 139 Chartres St. Orleans Parish Coroner Dr Carl Rabin, who was ~t thr scene said: "It looked like all the ~pie tried to get to the windows facing Chartres St.rec, .. It was a mass death. "Sor(e of them were burned to 1,,~·botle . . . It lookel bke mass hysteria . . . A m..ss .. Inside the building, Rabin ~a,d the scene was "sickening." He added: "They were j u,, piled up. People in a mass .. one falls, then another falls ... It's just a mass of death." The names of the dead "'erP not immediately available. Firr­men and police, as well as r es­cue workers, toiled into the night in the eerie shadow of kleig lights to remove the bod­ies from the buildin . Page L Another tragedy A number of questions must be answered in the wake of Sunday night's tragic second floor French Quarter fire. The questions have to rlo not only with the fire that took 29 lives but with the future of the city's fiTe prevention effort. First. was the lounge complying with the city's fire regulations and, if so. are those regulations tough enough'/ Burglar bars on tlie windows blocked one avenue of escape and, according to a Fire Department spokesman. "practically all of the l'Ontents (of the building) were flammable - that is. combustible." The bar was built with a suspended ceiling which, according to the ex­pert~. allows an air space to feed ox,vgen to the flames. There was a way out of the up• ~!airs room. other than the stair­well consumed h\' flames, but most patrons apparently couldn't find it. ,\ b a rte n d e r led 20 persons through the passage to safet~-­C'Juld these pen-ans have found the I !1 e escape on their own? I Trere wa, •10 sp irkler s~stem, I '1,• t 11s 1s nol unusJal ;n '\'e\\ Or­lean b1,1ld ngs a'1d, 11: t"e •·ase of th 11Jc•,•tlc <:treet ' nge. s nn k , were n '' rec ,.ured b, Jq,1• \I ,uld a ,pP Kll'r ,,te-i. ,e '-tl\ e1 "c~ i.1 thii:. ·~sc. S 01..Jd ,p ink!~ s, t, s he re_qu r rl Raull Center tragedy, and he re­peated the plea for a strict sprink­ler system requirement in the after­math of the Iberville Street holo• caust. For the future, does the city really know how many business establishments are not complying with fire regulations? Apparently not. Mr. San Salva­dor believes that there are many fire traps that the city does not know about, simply because there are not enough fire inspectors to insure compliance with regulations. It is not possible to follow up on inspections. He believes the city is full of fire hazards that have not been detected. The residents of the city re­act with horror to each new fire t ragedy, but feel ings never seem to translate into act ion. There was an outcry for sprin­kler systems follo·,ing the Rault Center fire. Legislation was intro­duced to require sprinkler systems, at least in passageways offering h,rnce of escape from burning nuild1ngs. T'1e spnrkler hill \\ s gutted. In 1h p!acc the Le1;1slat,11e approved .i reso ut1on .isk r g t H' ,,overnor to app nt a f re a et ,,udy commit tee to fL mula Jeg1slalion for the next ;e,sion. Gov. l clw Edward, H rc •·e IM e 1•~1 br• Q( r•1 ·~011s vc dav ind1 ated i.,- ui,J name l'0n~lt' J\e 1 a c : 11rnttec H " , ,3nv tra· r rd,cs 11111 he rcc1u reel hefore the IIR. BA YOU LANDING 73-74" - B II Kaylo Rct1•Prl l· ,re Su Lou•· J San s.,lv;ic\p• ror ('I{' he e,es SCI. He made 1 ,tr()11<1 1 •t fl)r requ 1 )rl spr1nk, - ) 5 r n s ol'o"111; •he ut v and tlie st 1te clec1Cle to do something norc ab• ut fire pre\'en Fire Tragedy Should Teach Lesson t ,.,, If a flash fire ;n minutes can claim 29 !il'C> in a walk-up Vieux Carre bar. arc there other potential fire traps about the city0 Or will the ghastlmess c' Sunday mght's fire be dimmed by passage of time, accusations and counter• accusations, committee reports and. finally, no solid action to spare a repetition~ :\!agnitude of the fire toll, possi­bly the city's worst, should dictate still another examination of fire pre­vention requirements in the city al­though practically on the heels of investigations growing out of the spectacular Rault Center fire of seven months earlier. If the fire was the work of an arsonist, one of the realities of fire prevention is dealing with deliberate­ly set blazes by planning to reduce their effect in terms of preserving life and property. The hindsight of one hideous oc• casion can be converted to another day's foresight if New Orleans learns a lesson from the tragic Up Stairs bar tragedy. Page 16 ~, PRIVATE BATH CLUB,.._-.-, Houstoti' , , ·.:~r: :-: .. Tuesday - Wedn.esday & Thur~day - $3.00 Friday Saturday & Sunday Visits $5 .00 OPEN 24 hrs. CLOSED MONDAY 523-8840 - - ~ - - Manager Bill Wise PRESENTS ~ark_ 'iwaiii Opening on or about Aug. 1 Dancing Restaurant Patio V.1.P. Room Soon to be Known of Dallas' Gay as the Showplace Community· .dice." .6 .a y Ll. b erat 1· 0nt S.t s Plan lutHeely a. d11d0e, dj utshtiefricea twioans t"oa bsboe-- N • l M • D lieve" gay persons are in the aftona _ OUYntng ay habit of carrying false ldentlfl:I •the victims. cation papers. Will Honor Victims of ~ .~ght said his Los Angeles or- _ "S~ely_ the~e _will be confu-J Orl-na Di---cr .ganization bad received sever.fl s1on m 1dentifymg tile badlyl - """" 'u!lephoned reports from New burned bodies," he said. •Orleanians who said they saw Kight is often cal_Ied the . By CHRIS SEGURA the Rev. Mr. Larsen engulfed in "dean of the Gay Liberation Morris Kight a !<>under of the flames. Movement." .nauonal Gay Liberation Move- Among those coming to New The Rev. Mr. Perry founded ment and president ol the Gay Orleans are the Rev. Mr. Perry the Metropolitan Commuruty Community Services Center in -Kight Morty Manford of th; Church five years ago. Kight J..os Angeles, said a "national Gay 'Activist Alliance of New said he told him he was in­. ilay of mourning for our dead York and others Kight said. spired by a gay man who told br\)thers and sisters" killed in Kight also said bis Los Ange- him in despondency, "Nobody Sunday's catastroplllc French Jes organization had "suspended loves us, ~ven God." Quarter fire would be held next all other service capacities to Asked if he would use the 'Sunday. devote full time to the New Or- event m New Orleans to fur- Jn a telep_hone ~versation1 leans catastrophe." He said ther organize_ sup~rt .~or the with The Times-Picayune the: The Ul)Stairs bar, 604 Iberv11le gay cause, Kight said, . Not at -~v. Troy Perry, pastor of the, St., where the 29 victims were all . . That would be terribly of­. national Metropolitan Communi-1 burned and mangled to death fens1ve . . . instead we will at­Jy Church for gay persons, "was a gay bar." ' tempt to be as l~~ing and belp-wOllld de c I a re the day of Kight replied vehemently to a ful as we can be. mourning "in all gay church- statement by Maj. Henry Mor- STR.J FIU l'AortCTiOH CODE es." ris, chief of detectives of thel -tray Liberation Movement New Orleans Police Depart- ~ contacted in New ment. ~. New York and Los An- ;Morris bad said "We don't j • said national and ~ even know 'these p~pers (found . ~ leaders were flocting to on the bodies of the victims) maOrleans for d>senances._ ~looged to the people we fOIKld •:u,cal leadrs smd a ~rv1ce them on. Some tnieves hung out li4l.1o be held ~Y night at '1ere and you know this was a 1il':- George Episcopal Church, •ueer bar." When in Lake Charles, EVERYONE goes to H MOTHERS PLACE,,. _.St ~Jes Ave:, foc those , Replying, Kight said, "Yes. ,.;.,t 1 e d m the mishap. The t•m terribly sorry the detective l:lllm!li was "loaoed" to the lo- •has made such a prejudicial, c a 1 Metropolitan -Comrnumty ,a;tatement at a time when gay ~ for the service, they 'J)e<>ple all over the nation are in I sai · .mourning over lheir gay broth-J ,:tie p a s t o r. ~f the local oers and sisters. ,chU:ch, ~v. William Lar~, : "And at a time when every­~ r1sbed m tbe blaze, according one needs a little more under- ,,,.-e>t~e:::a:-' s PLACE Phone 433 9103 to-_: eyew1tness lCCOU_nts. Late :Standing. CALL FOR DIRECTIONS ,'Nloilday Orleans Parish Coron- , "We are indeed human beings er's <>ffice employes had not re- ln this society. We're trying to 1eased Larsen's name as one of eliminate that kind Of preju- Old Hwy. 171 ( off Old Town Rd.) Page 17 ''TRAD'N TRICKS" WHITE - LEGALLY MARRIED businessman age 48 wishes to establish contact with same in late thirties to !ale forties for sincere relationship. Exchange recent photo and details . Box 42011, Hous­ton , Texas 77042. SINGING - CLASSICAL PIANO - Professional instruction from a teacher who takes pride in student advancement - 723-3524. PHOTOGRAPHER - - Will shoot anything you can do - or will print and develop your first 2 rolls of film free . Box 23232, Houston, Texas 77028 EL PASO, TEXAS - Gay Liber­ation Forum - P.O. Box 12493, El Paso, Texas 79912. PORNOGRAPHY COLLECTOR - New and old - trade - buy or peruse! JA3-6577 - 8-11 P .M. "HOMES FOR HIPPIES, ETC." - Montrose Area! $60 - $140 payable monthly or weekly! Do your own thing! 524-0574 or 781-8643 NICE LOOKING - clean cut, 24 year old guy looking for discreet relationship w/ same. age 21 -35. Am legally married. P. 0. Box 38252, Houston 77088. Phone, photo or details appreciated. W/M late 30's would like to meet sincere males. Reply Box 10-C, 4615 Mt. Vernon, Houston 77006. Am CONDITIONING - HEATING SPECIALIST For all your Heating and Air Conditioning needs and service - Call T . R. AT AlRLll\E AIRE - 523-9540 Day or Night - Resi­dential or commercial. PLANTS - for your house or apartment at prices you can af­ford - " HORSEAROUND" -- 4613 Mt. Vernon - Houston - - 522-5609 UNFURNISHED HOUSE - 3 BR, 1 Bath, separate garage, fenced back yard, carpeted $150.00 per month - Gulfgate area - Houston. Call 466-4090 anytime. YOUNG, W/M - Blond, blue-eyed­wants to meet other males for relationship. Rick, P. 0. Box 953, Forney, Texas 75126. GAY COMMUNITY COUNSELING SERVICE (Dallas) 826-2192 NEED A FRIEND TO TALK TO? R. Francis Thompson - 4 to 8 p.m. - 529-7052. 26 yr. Old W/M - desires male companion on 2 wk. trip to Flor­ida/ Bahamas / Georgia in Oct. Expenses paid. If you're interest­ed and under 23, send info., photo, and address/ phone to occupant, 4110 Buena Vista #107, Dallas, Texas 75204. YOUNG GUY would like to meet people who like to do other things besides living in the bars etc. 692-2429 days. W /M would like to meet interested sincere discreet gay males. Prefer 35 or older but age is not import­ant. I am 5'8" - brown hair and eyes - 140# and self employed. I'm hoping to contact that one person to share love and all its variances, one who appreciates a home life style. If you are not this person perhaps you know someone who is - - write and include a photo please - - and I will answer all - Box L - 4615 Mt. Vernon, Houston, Texas 77006 STUDIO 9 - DALLAS - for your July 4th holiday pleasure .... EXCLUSIVE SHOWING - - - - AMERICAN CREAM!! Starts June 26 for two very special weeks. MALE MODELS - National fine art photographer needs Houston models for photographic port­folios. Emphasis on nl!{lt, trim build -- ballet or gymnastic ex­perience helpful; but not necess­ary. No p revious mode ling ex­perience required. Applicants pai!i $20 for test photographs , percent­age of portfolio sales if accepted. All art photographs - - no "porno". Apply by sending recent photo­graph, age, telephone and address to PRIMUS PHOTOGRAPHY, P.O. Box 19172, Houston, Texas 77024. All applicants will be contacted. The MCC Thespia•: Players are planning a perfon,:ance monthly. There are tentative plans to play cities in Texas and the Southwest. anyone wishing to audition for thee calling, 521-8299 in Dallas. TV REPAIR - Free home esti­mates by experienced technician. Call 821 -2197, nite or day. - ­Dallas. CENSORED and you don,t even know it Page 18 F I RECRACKER ACROSS DOWN 1. radi ate; shine .2.... yes votes 1. dim 3. 5. Roman garb 4. 7. regard 6. 8. cherished 7. 10. slide 9. 11. smile JO. 13. bab y bed 12. 14, time p eriod 13. 16. plane 15. 17. naked l 6. NUNTIUS PUBLISHED MONTHLY HOUSTON, TEXAS Editor - Phil Frank - -- is good! heaven head cover request pan cover dis cuss d r oop grab wee p d e t e riorate joyfulness Associate Editor - Steve Jonsson Advertising-production/ Bob Cappel! 4615 MT. VERNON HOUSTON; TEXAS 77006 524-5612 ~11,~ ,, ' I I G.A.Y [1; I ~ IS k' l GOOD t. l • ON •] I THE If l 'I FOURTH JC I ~, OP I ,~ JULY 13 I OR ~ I Ir ilY ii, I TIME! ~'I I ----------------------- -----~I SUBSCRIBE TO THE NUNTIUS $4.00 - 12 Issues Classified Advert ising - 10¢ per word ENCLOSED $ _____ _ Nome - -------------- - ----- - -- Address _ City - ------ ---------- ------- Stote - - The NUNTIUS 4615 Mt. Ve rnon Houston, T exos 77006 ____ Zip - --------- Page 19 I .Get it otl,,. ' J $4.00 - 12 lssu;~- · -·-- -··--- · Classified Advert,ising _ 10¢ per word NAadmdree s_s ___________ ·, \ CitY---~-------- .. .,_ ______ ..;. .. state-,------ Zip---- The NUNTIUS 46-1 S Mt. Vernon Houston, Texas 77006 40~ 29 DEAD IN NEW ORLEANS FIRE• New Texas -Laws & You GAY PRIDE/ NY & DALLAS • Skinny DiPf>ing & More inside
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