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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
File 011
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 011. 1978-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2701.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-08). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 011. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2701

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 011, 1978-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2701.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date August 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript August, 1978 Gay Austin New report on homosexuality NEW YORK - A major new study on homosexuality concludes that many homosexual men and women lead stable lives without frenetic sexual activity and that some are considerably happier and better adjusted than heterosexuals as a whole. According to one of its authors, Dr. Alan Bell of the Institute for Sex Research at Indiana University, the study's findings contradict stereotypes about homosexuals. He said the study shows that "homosexuality Is not ipso facto pathological and that all homosexuals cannot be lumped together." Rather, Bell and his coauthor, Dr. Martin Weisberg^ found that there were at least five types of homosexuals, each with a different set of behavioral patterns. While some resemble the popular stereotype of unhappy, unstable and highly promiscuous people, the authors said, others are more like ordinary married heterosexuals. The new study represents the most comprehensive look at the social and psychological adjustment of homosexuals . It is the first time. Bell said in an interview, that a truly diverse sample of homosexuals has been studied, that homosexuals have been compared with one another and that typeSof homosexuals have been compared with heterosexuals. Most previous studies focused on special groups of homosexuals, such as those undergoing psychotherapy, men in prisons and members of homophile organizations. The findings are to be published on Aug. 28 by Simon and Schuster in a book called "Homosexualities," which is the product of a study begun in 1968 with a $278,000 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health- The new study focuses not on the incidence of homosexual behavior — a subject on which Dr. Alfred Kinsey, who founded the Institute for Sex Research, reported 30 years ago — but rather on the relationship of sexual activity to a wide variety of social and psychological characteristics. To examine these relationships, 979 homosexual men and women living in the San Francisco Bay area were interviewed. The subjects were culled from among 5,000 people who indicated a willingness to participate in the study. Those interviewed included people recruited in homosexual bars and steam baths, at public and private places where homosexual "pickups" were often made and through homosexual organizations, personal contacts, mailing lists and public advertising. "WE did not just draw subjects from the 'lavender ghetto,' where everyone is free and open about his homosexuality. Many of our respondents are highly covert, and it took a long time to convince some of them to participate in the study," Bell said. He added that the sample of homosexuals interviewed could not be said to represent homosexuals generally, but that the study included substantial numbers of all types of homosexuals. The homosexuals were interviewed in person in 1970. In addition, 477 heterosexuals drawn from a random sample of the San Francisco Bay area residents weie questioned. From the data, the authors categorized homosexuals into the following types: — Closed couples, those living in quasi-marriages characterized by self-acceptance, contentment and a high degree of sexual fidelity. Those relationships tended to be long-standing and to reflect a strong emotional commitment and a stable sharing of household responsibilities. As a group, the closed couples scored higher on happiness measures than the heterosexuals, the researchers said. — Open couples, those living as partners but with a fair amount of outside sexual activity. These couples tended to be less emotionally* attached and dependent oi one another, according to the study. — Functionals, those who were sexually highly active and free-wheeling, comparable in behavior to "swinging singles" among heterosexuals. They were more likely to report feelings of exuberance than the heterosexuals interviewed, the researchers said. — Dysfunctionals, those who were also highly active sexually but who reported regrets about being homosexual and said that they had sexual problems. — Asexuals, those who were more secretive and have more regrets about their homosexuality, were less sexually active and less exclusively homosexual. Together with the dysfunctional group, the researchers said, asexuals reported less self-acceptance and more loneliness than other homosexuals and than heterosexuals. In general, homosexual men resembled heterosexual men in their reports of good physical health and feelings of happiness at the time of the questioning. However, in response to psychological questions, the homosexual men indicated that they felt "less self-accepting and more lonely, depressed and tense than did the heterosexual men," the authors reported. The homosexual men were also more likely to have considered or attempted suicide and to have sought help for an emotional problem. The homosexual women, on the other hand, differed little from heterosexual women in many aspects of 'heir psychological adjustment. But as a group they irijn'ted less current happiness, less self-esteem and Tore suicidal thoughts that the heterosexual u Ttiei.. The -jutlr rs concluded that "homosexual adults who have come to terms with their homosexuality, who do not regret their sexual orientation, and who can function effectively sexually and socially, are no more distressed psychologically than are heterosexual men and women." They said that it was primarily the dysfunctionals and asexuals who were less w(- 1 off psychologically than heterosexuals, "but here are certainly equivalent groups among heterosexuals. " Nonetheless, the researchers did report characteristics of some homosexuals that are likely to become subjects of controversy. For example, the authors 'ported, nearly half of white homosexual males and ine-third of the black homosexual males interviewed said that they had had at least 500 different sexual partners. More than half had had more than 20 sexual f^tners in the year before the interview. About two-thirds of the men had contracted a venereal disease at least once. Among the homosexual women, most had had fewer than 10 female sexual partners, and more than thr<e- fourths were involved in a relatively stable relationship with another woman at the rime of the interview. However, the majority of homosexual men said that they had never.had sex with minors or with prostitutes. The authors contend that heterosexuals are far more likely than homosexuals to seduce minors or to make objectionable sexual advances. — New York Times News Service
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