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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
File 007
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 007. 1978-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2697.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-08). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2697

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 007, 1978-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2697.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date August 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript San Francisco dreamin' By SCOTT LIND SAN FRANCISCO AND THE GAY DAY PARADE June 26, circa 8:00 p.m.: I arrived here the night before the June 25 gay parade going by way of Highway I up the coast, meeting along the way two friendly lovers from Ontario. As I travelled on Highway 280 bordering the per, I began to feel a surging exhilaration not imagine unless you, yourself, have also encroached on this world's boundaries. I felt as if I were on the verge of something special, for the meaning of San Francisco I already had internalized long before I left Austin. My beachbathing in San Diego — all the many thousands of young people jamming the shoreline, not to ition La Jolla only the prelude t< climaxing in San F seeing, from a dis and mood inscribed I was about to ent possibiliti and expeditions : what I expected to 1 ncis< The :lo: I I type ce, downtown, the more meaning tself in my heart. For, I felt, the land of freedom, limitless any human circumstance can be discovered. The Holy Land, this special heaven, just some miles ahead, and with quickening speed I reached the spot where I viewed for the first time the object of my aspirations of months' dreams and plannlngs. Before stopping, I crossed the Golden Gate Bridge. I had finally arrived. member, Anita had countered gays' calling for a celebration with her call for prayer and fasting. On this day, thousands of conservative churches preached sermons on homosexual infiltration and the liberal ones, by and large, remained totally silent. So much with dependable allies. We have to do it ourselves. imply celehrating But in this city, 240,000 strong I thousands marching, chanting o their presence. Unless you, yo parade or the one the year before, you simply imagine the reality of seeing before your very startled eyes, miles of spectators, a whole downtown area comprised of people like you in one signi ficant respect. And, at the parade's end, after having winded down Market St., at Brooks Hall with its ornate green dome in the United Nations Plaza, the gathering of all to witness two bands, one of w. men and the other of men, making music, attractivel; gay- July 4, Independence Day: I stand gazing out a third-story bay window of a house situated on one of this city's highest hills. A stretch of brightening, dawning blue skies contrasts with settled black-gray fog clouds, and firsi glows bathe houses of hills below and beyond. I could be looking upon some Mediterranean Spanish town, the type favored in tourist posters, but the view here is real, and not much Spanish and very cosmopolitan and compacted despite the breadth, lend for the viewer at least that particular air. the Danno, a new-found friend ; ■ open, then shut cli i Quebec, his eyes He arrived at this city some months ago from Montreal, and he has grant, me his hospitality and his bed. He recognized me as traveller, and since I am not unattractive and sinci I had betrayed some wit and daring, the initial bar riers vanished the night of one of my revisits to Black and Blue. Neither he nor I have yet slept. 1 kiss and caress him, and he responds. So far, I have spent week and two days. The i day, Sunday, the gay parade. If you : i week in San Francisco, no, a , I am not at all sorry to be of Austin. I face the inevitability of having to leave this heaven, but I push that idea aside and gaze out again at what the rising sun and newly rolling fog clouds, appearing over the western hills and flowing downwards, are doing to this remarkable world. Presently, this luxuriance of sight satiates me. I shall go to the kitchen and write a How nice it is, on Independence Day, not to have to see even one American flag. America is out there, and San Francisco is thankfully here, a world totally apart. To have to return to America, to leave San Francisco, is a paining thought. But meanwhile I shall enjoy and return to Danno.and sleep. Here I wish time could last forever. What a strange sight it is to see leather people board buses to Castro Street, a strange hut extremely interesting sight. And to see all the other people, strong in their un— icy of experience, and warm and casual. And the hundreds, nay, the thousands, putting up with high rents and simple food for the pleasure of relating in absolute confidence and assurance in the goodness of life itself. Say some to me: Don t overestimate San Francisco. It's Mecca, but different if you live here." Oh, I know that, but would any of those beautiful souls leave in order to live in Houston? I doubt it very July 9: [ am taking one last view of San francisco from Saus- ilito across the Golden Gate. I confess that I feel an immense sadness upon leaving her. I confess my soul weeps. But I shall return to you, dear city of hills and white-gleaming face. Now I journey upward and hope to make Portland via the Redwood Highway ON THE WAY TO VANCOUVER July 11, 6:00 p.m.: This morning around 3:00 a.m. 1 reached Portland. I rapidly met a guy named Jesse C. Scott, a model whose picture has appeared in American Airlines ads. He August., 197S disparaging remarks people make about hustlers or models gaining their livelihood for their services, but people like Jesse pay and pay and pay for every monetary reward they receive. These people are exceptionally strong and exceptionally weak: strong for enduring whatever slight to their dignity their benefactor throws out in addition to his money; and exceptionally weak for having traded their freedom for this inhibiting security. Jesse was thrown out of the house by his adoptive parents at the age of 13. He rapidly learned that 'tis better, much better, to hustle than to starve. With his earned money, he went to one of the two best modelling schools in the country and graduated. Though with his early success — signified by the picture the Airlines ad paid for — he could certainly have gone farther, made a good living in New York or wherever he has settled for this life. This man has written him into his sizeable will, but he could just as easily write him out once he gets tired of him. Jesse doesn't seen to care anymore to hold on to that money, for now he snaps back at his primary benefactor, and today will cut his hair in the style shown in his pictures. Perhaps he will return to modelling. 1 a-n at Timberline Lodge at the snowline of Mt. Hood. 1 shall go onward to Seattle. ■ontinucd on page 8 llustrations by David Dole
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