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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
File 005
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 005. 1978-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2695.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-08). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2695

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 005, 1978-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2695.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date August 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript Gay Austin August, 1978 Stepping out... and out... By CALVIN DOUCET (Editor's note: The following address was given June 24 in Wooldridge Park, during Gay Freedom Week.) While we must never slacken in our efforts to achieve equal justice, equal rights and equal privileges under the Constitution and its ensuing laws — which as taxpayers, voters, workers, producers, consumers, and citizens of the United States of .America we are entitled to — we must not forget that however much we share in common with every other non-gay citizen we are, nevertheless, different. And because we are different we have different — or perhaps additional — responsibilities. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to teach in schools — though that is a fierce and primal battle. Having gay people as teachers of the young is a great privilege any society has the honored benefit of; the non-gay majority of our society must be brought to understand our participation in its educational systems affirmatively, that they need not fear or destroy, but should nurture and praise our involvement. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to participate (once appropriately qualified) in any profession, trade, occupation, avocation, art or science that any other citizen has the right and privilege to — although that is a battle that, as courageous women and men become more and more voluntarily visible as lesbians and gay men in their public life, we will have to fight more strenuously than I suspect any of us now realize. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to live where we wish and with whom we wish; to associate publicly or privately with whomever we wish; to go wherever we wish; and to do all this openly and visibly and as lovingly as we wish; without fear of economic, legal, personal or social reprisal, or religious and political persecution; and without being cowered by accusations of "flaunting" behavior -- although this is a battle all of us by being here in this park today acknowledge participation in. -PAINTERS NEEDEDI- Po you need the services d a professional painter but are put ott Dy the thought of a. sweet-ts™ coir t/ador and a. crew of homophcfoic alcoholics spraymq \iou\ furniture.^ Then call) us. We\e been mtwe business four \irns M specialize in cornmeml reTnodelinq and fine interiors. J. . Gay owned aj\d operated. Rather, the fundamental struggle of which all these battles are subsumed is towards an alteration of consciousness which will transform the character and function of our culture. Indeed, we are a threat to the social, philosophical, theological and cosmic order which Anita Bryant, Phyllis Schafley, Jessie Helms, John Briggs and others tenaciously cling to. We are participants in a revolution of morals, in perception and behavior which renders them to history the way Copernicus and Galileo rendered flat-earthers and geocentricists to history. .And we can expect sim- iliar harsh resistance. In our most radical, in our most significant natures, we are — and must visibly and vocally be so — equal companions to the feminist, to the holistic, to the cooperative and to the human rights movements. We participate in redefining what it is to be a man, what it is to be a woman, what it is to be human in an interdependent and non-exploitative planetary environment . And our greatest and presently most historical responsibility is in becoming visible: for our own self's sake and dignity, as well as for the greater societal good. As we have stepped out of our original closets, we step into larger closets which we again must move out of, and stepping, with each opened door, into greater freedom, into greater self-esteem, into greater knowledge of whom we really are collectively and individually: The more visible we are to the world, the more visible we are to ourselves. The more visible we are to ourselves the more visible we are in the world. And as we see ourselves with greater clarity, the greater clarity we bring to transforming the oppressive and intolerate conditions of our own, and of - everyone else's, lives. French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 8 a.m. until 2 at night 314 East 6th St.
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