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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
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Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 001. 1978-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2691.

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(1978-08). Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2691

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978 - File 001, 1978-08, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2704/show/2691.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 2, No. 10, August 1978
Contributor
  • Kay, Kelly
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date August 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript a auslin . vol. 2, no.10 au ust 1978 -2= --___ c;ay austin GAY AUSTIN is the monthly publication of Gay Community Services . The advertisements signify that the following businesses sup­port the work of the organization. Patron­ize these establishments and, above all else, let the people know that you appre­ciate their equal, open-hearted support. ADULT BOOKSTORES All American News Stallion Bookstore BARS Austin Country New Apartment Private Cellar BODY AWARENESS Safari Growth Studio COIN SHOP Capital Coin LAWYERS Legal Clinic PAINTERS Company Dave's Painting RESTAURANTS The Old Pecan Street Cafe 2532 Guadalupe 478-0222 706 East 6th 477-0148 705 Red River 472-0418 2828 Rio Grande 478-0224 709 East 6th 477-0387 2004~ Guadalupe 472-6828 3004 Guadalupe 472-1676 501 West 12th 478-9332 442-1290 314 East 6th 478-2491 DEADLINE for submissions to GAY AUSTIN's Sep­tember issue is August 23 . Contributions should be mailed or delivered to the Gay Com­munity Services offices at: 2330 Guadalupe, l7 Austin, Tx . 78705 LETTERS should also be sent to this address. CAPITAL COIN COMPANY 3(D'.j &.~DALI.ff 472-1676 AA EXTENSIVE COl.ilCTIOO OF mms AND QJ~ ru SflRY FIU1 JU o.{R TIE mn ALSO BUY I NG ANT I QLES AND ALL GOLD 2Cf4 DISCOlM" 00 OOLD JEWELRY AND COIN SUPPLIES WITH THIS AIJ, _contents_ San Francisco Dreamin' Travel Notes by Scott Lind Illustrations by David Dole . . ...... 6 VIEWPOINT 100,000 Wimmin March for ERA in DC By Amme Hogan .... ...... . .•..... . .. 3 Stepping out .. . and out ... and out By Calvin Uoucet ......... .. .... .•. 4 NEWS Kinsey Issues New Report on Homosexuality ...... ...... •. ...... 11 Austin Briefs .. .... ...... ........... ••... S State Briefs .......... .......... , . .. ..... S National Briefs ... ...... ...... . ....•..... International Briefs .•••..... •....... •.. 10 Calendar ................ ... ....... ..•. .. 1 2 STAFF EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS David Dole Ammc llogan AllVIJRTISING REPRESl:t\TATIVI. Kelly Kay Scott Lind Harvey Neville Art ,\ferris ~EWSHRIEFS arc taken in part from The Advocate , community news releases anJ The New York Tir.1es. nm OPl~IO~S expressed herein are those of the writer or editor, and not necessarily those of Gay Community Services nor the advertisers. GAY AUSTI~ is published by Gay Community Services of the University Y, 2330 Guada­lupe, Austin , Tx . , 78705. The coordinators of Gay Community Services are: Art Morris Trov Stokes (vacant) (vac:int) Bruce Alcksander Kelly Kay General Coordinator Finance Coordinator Office Coordinator Speakers Rureau Coordin-ator Media Coordinator Publications Coordinator • viewpoint 100,000 wimmin march for ERA By AMME HOGAN From across the nation we descended upon Washington, D.C.; Sunday, July 9, the day before Congress was to meet. Many wimmin would be staying on for lobbying efforts. But on Sunday few of us were thinking of lobbying. We were too busy being amazed at the power of 100,000 wimmin, gathered to­gether for the ERA. I say wimmin generically, of course . Men attended. On the bus I rode, the breakdown of who-was-what went: three men -- one of whom was straight, two non-lesbian wimmin, 4o dykes. On• womon was not yet out, but neither was I at age 16. Certainly, she got an education in wimmin caring for and about each other; which is not to say any­thing particularly graphic occurred. Or maybe I wasn't looking. We rolled into Washington at an absurd hour on Sunday morning, after about 36 hours in transit. Staying at the Church of the Pil­grims, we renamed it. "The Waylaid Pilgrims," and marched in to face our rickety bunk beds . Some of us ran for the showers, where we thought, "42 wimmin per one shower, three men per one shower." And was that nice gay ~an surprised to find several vimmin in the men's room? Only a little; he stripped down und showered just like a real dyke. When we were awakened too soon the same morning, it was time to go to the Mall and assemble. Texas was toward the back of the line, of course . Some Dallas wimmin had per­mission to carry a sign that said "Dallas Dykes Demand Democracy," with the letters e-r-a in "democracy" emphasized. A womon vho said she vas a gay from California came up and asked us if we were going to carry that sign. "Of course," ve said. One does not get permission for a sign and then not carry it. "Everyone froo California is upset about it. We're gay and we don't want to march behind a sign that says 'dykes.'" "Oh," we said. "You don't want us to carry it?" "Dykes shouldn't be before the ERA. Why, you didn't even write out ERA. This is an ERA march, not a dyke march . " You will im~ediately note the number of politically incorrect things in this dialo­gue. Besides the obvious exaggeration of "everyone from California" being upset , no­tice the womon is gay , not lesbian, identi­fied. Need I say more about the need for wimmin to have a separate identity from men? Perhaps the end or this episode will explain. "You're gonna carry it anyway?" We nodded. The gay vomon jumped the womon who vas holding the sign. In the following flurry, our sign vas torn. The ''gay" looked pleased as tried to hurry avay. Always slov, yours truly vas just about ready to get involved and somehow managed to trip on the womon. Uo matter the slowness; our "gay" was squarely vhopped with a pocket instamatic across the brow. She got angry again and tried to jump me (and I'm not even a Dallas dyke), but was led away by a huge Dallas dyke dou\ling as a parade marshall. Instincts tell me I was right . Suspecting as I do that she was sent to see who-vould­respond- r.ow, certainly I responded cor­rectly. But a lingering doubt that she may have meant what she said , makes my mental picture of hov funny we must have looked go away. A fev minutes passed as we stared in dismay at our sign, now in two parts. A womon from Georgia came up and offered a couple ot , Band-Aida. Immediately, the little stickies appeared from everywhere, and our sign vent in the parade with us. The !ine of vimmin stretched from the Capi­tol down Constitution Avenue, back to the Washington Monument and halfway up the Mall. The wimmin at the front of the march could be seen arriving at the Capitol before we started moving. That's almost two miles ot wall-to-wall wimmin. We marched inrows of 24 across (or is that abreast?); chanted up Constitution Avenue; cheered the vimmin speaking at the Capitol. Media reports on numbers varied, but with 24 across no estima~e should have been as low as 50,000 (reported in the Statesman). They had only to count rows. Most of the (male) reporters did not want to believe that 100,000 vimmin vould leave jobs, nomes and travel long distances to march for the ERA . You better believe it. And when the speakers, to a womon, told o~ our disenchantment with tais system, with this society which vill not allov wimmin to be human -- the vimmin spoke of revolution, and the wimmin who were listening agreed. Congress better listen. F' LIVE LOVE LEARN ~ &GROW ~ Learn about our unique collection of lotions, oils, vibrators, incense, sponges, loofahs, and creams. Grow through an assortment of books on sexual enrichment, body aLUOreness, ~ and massage. fi~A~ Customer Parking at J ~ 1;.:'~.:" ~~~'::.. 22nd & San Antoruo~· A"~ 0."°"' ~. I~'"'.'.:.:..::•) 200411 G-...... ... .,.,..._ T«,,.. 7S'llk\ (512)-4'2~ 4 Gay Austin August, 1978 Stepping out By CALVIN DOUCET (Editor's note: The following address was given June 24 in Wooldridge Park during Gay Freedom Week.) While we must never slacken in our efforts to achieve equal justice, equal rights and equal privileges un­der the Constitution and its ensuing laws -- which as taxpayers, voters, workers, producers, consumers, and citizens of the United States of America we are en­titled to -- we must not forget that however much we share in common with every other non-gay citizen we are, nevertheless, different. And because we are different we have different -- or perhaps additional -- responsibilities. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to teach in schools -- though that is a fierce and primal battle. Having gay people as teachers of the young is a great privilege any society has the honored benefit of; the non-gay majority of our society must be brought to under­stand our participation in its educational systems affirmatively, that they need not fear or destroy, but should nurture and praise our involvement. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to participate (once appropriate­ly qualified) in any profession, trade, occupation, avocation, art or science that any other citizen has the right and privilege to -- although that is a battle that, as courageous women and men become more and more voluntarily viRible as lesbians and gay men in their public life, we will have to fight more strenuously than I suspect any of us now rcaliie. Our battle is not merely whether or not we have, for instance, the right to live where we wish and with whom we wish; to associate publicly or privately with whomever we wish; to go wherever we wish; and to do all this openly and visibly and as lovingly as we wish; without fear of economic, legal, personal or social reprisal, or religious and political persecu­tion; and without being cowered ~y accusations of "flaunting" behavior -- although this is a battle all of us by being here 1n this park today acknowledge participation in. ,..-------PAINTlllS Nl!DED:-------- Do you need the services d a ~of ess1 ona\ P.a.inter but a.re ~t off ttf t rru~ht o1 a.. sweet-taJKinQ con­t ad:or a.nd a. trew of hornop\)~k akoholics sP.rayinq. \JOU\ fumiluTe? Th en e<rll us. We"ve been h1 t t\e business four ~ears a-nd specia\ize in commercia.\ remodelin9 df\d f\ne interiors. Gay owned a.no operated. )Ja,v e,SPClint\n_~ 11- 't2.-1l90~ .... " '\ .· . • • • and out ... Rather, the fundamental struggle of which all these battles are subsumed is towards an alteration of consciousness which will transform the character and function of our culture . Indeed, we are a threat to the social, philosophical, theological and cosmic order which Anita Bryant, Phyllis Schafley, Jessie Helms, John Briggs and others tenaciously cling to. We are participants in a revolution of morals, in per­ception and behavior which renders them to history the way Copernicus and Galileo rendered flat-earthers and geocentricists to history. And we can expect sim­iliar harsh resistance. In our most radical, in our llK>St significant natures, we arc -- and must visibly and vocally be so -- equal companions to the feminist, to the holistic, to the cooperative and to the human rights movements. We participate in redefining what it is to be a man, what it is to be a woman, what it is to be human in an interdependent and non-exploitative planetary en­vironment. And our greatest and presently most historical re­sponsibility is in becoming visible: for our own self's sake and dignity, as well as for the grea~er societal good. As we have stepped out of our original closets, we step lnto larger closets which we again must move out of, and stepping, with each opened door, into greater freedom, into greater self-esteem, into greater know­ledge of whom we really are collectively and indivi­dually: The more visible we are to the world, the more visible we are to ourselves. The more visible we arc to ourselves the more visible we are in the world . And as we see ourselves with greater clarity, the greater clarity we bring to transfonuing the oppres­sive and intolerate conditions of our own and of· everyone else'b, lives. ' JheOld f>Ceeaafne st.. French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 8 a.m. until 2 at night. 31 A Eosr 6rh Sr. news HCC DEDICATES MISSION CHURCH, INSTALLS INTERIM PASTOR Metropolitan C0Dm1unity Church of Austin will cele­brate a landmark event in its history Aug. 6 when the mission church dedicates its building and in­stalls its interim pastor. Jeff Bishop, approved for licensing as UFMCC minister by the South-Central District of UFMCC at its meeting in Houston in May, has served as worship coordinator of the Austin congregation since April . Bishop will serve as interim pastor until the congregation is granted chartered church status, at which time the U¥MCC bylaws will require a new issuance of a call to min isl ry, c i th er to Bbhop or to another MCC minister. The R~v. Don Eastman. District assistant co-ordinator and pastor of the Dallas MCC, will officiate at hoch ceremonies during the regular service of worship be­ginning at noon. The South-Central District includes <'tmgregat ions in Texns, Lousiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma imd sou them Missouri. Formal dedication of the building at 614 E. 6th St. ls one st••p in the locnl congregation's development from study group to mission status. The church planR to submit its application for full charter member­ship in UFMCC when the national church's Board of Elders meets in Los Angeles in late August or early September. Since Bishop's arrival at UFMCC Austin, the church hos undertaken m.1jor expansion of its activity ro inclu~~ a variety of educational and social events. The congregation hos also accelerated its efforts to 1mprovv Its building, which has been renovated com­plclt> ly In the Inst six monrhs .ind now is air con­ditioned In Its sanctuary and office area. MCCA worship services are conducted every Sunday at noon and 7:30 p.m. Christ ion cducot ion clnsst>s now in progress are "Romo exuality 11nd th•• Bible," Tuesdays; "I ;1m Some­body: a Christian Search for Identity and Self-Ac­ceptance," Wcdnesdnys: and "Survey of thC' New Testa­ment." Thursdays. All classes meet at 7: JO p.m. MCCA sodal activities include a 7:30 p.m.-to-midnight Games Night on Fridays (dominoes, cards, board games, movies, refrcRhments) and pot luck suppers every other Saturday evening. Bi hop indicates the other Snturday nights arc cur­rC'nt ly open but will be filled in the near future. The Board of Directors of the Austin Church also has approved establishment of a Deacon's fund to be used for human assistance nnd support programs in Austin. "MCCA hi growing and seeking to expand its activities to our brothers .:md sisters in Austin." Bishop soys. "The doors of this houst> of the lord are open to nll. Tho~~ whu never have attcndrd or have not attended in some time nre particulnrly invited to ~nrship with us and LC• join us In our f1'l lowship." The church al>Jo has a small bookstore with a number nf items available including mnny publications of recent authorship concerning homosexuality and Ameri­can society ond homosexuality and the Bible, as well as Because He Lives, a musical album of religious songs produced by MCCR, Houston. August, 1978 Gay Austin 5 texas ... TEXAS WOMEN'S POLITICAL CAUCUS TO MEET The annual convention of the Texas Women's Poli­tical Caucus will be held in Brownsville, August 11-13. The Women's Caucus of the Texas Cay Ta!ltk Force will sponsor a Hos pitality Center in Room 101 of the convention hotel, Ft. Brown. TGTF has taken out an ad in the TWPC Convention program commending the cnucus for th~. past efforts in the legislature on 0ur behalf . CIVILIAN PREPARING FOR SEX CHANGE SUES KELLY AIR FORCE BASE SUPERIORS A cl vil isn Kelly Air Force Base worker preparing for a sex-change operation filed a civil-rights suit in San Antonio against his supervisors for refusing to let him dress in women's clothing. Dorthy J. Parker, who changed his name from Ray-mond 1,loyd Parker, said in the suit that the decision by Kelly officials has caused him severe mental an­gu: I c:h. GAY PUBLICATION DENIED TRADEMARK GAYSWEEK. a publication from New York City, in June received word from the Patent and Trademark Office of the U.S. Department of Coim:iercc that they have rejected .GAYSWEEK's application to register the propo ed tradt'mark because the name fo; "immor-al or !.candnlou"." GAYSWEEK intends to challenge the decision. TFWU Support fbei. .. 2 oolor allk....,..n sa.oo plu• tax wom€n ·s PQ€SS "'-f.;t 12th .;r au.;tin tf.JA.; -i;-..-i3 1~121 47(> 038Q Red Ri-.r~• rr­UNJON BUG eUk.__...t - 100,, _t_ T eair t, vari et) al eolo,., 14.00 p lu• t ax -----.-....-....·...·....-....-... ·---­ By ~COTT LlllD 5.\11 FM.•tlSCO A.• Jmc 26, 1rca 8• P• Y DAY PU.A 1 arrived he.r• ttifl night t:>..-fore lh• J:me .ZS gay par ade going by vay of Hl~y 1 up t ~ C'OS&t. meet log along the vay two frimdly lovers !roe Ontario. Al I trATtlltd on Highway 280 bordering th• city pro· per, [ bt:t•'° to fitcl a aur&tn, exhlluatton you c.an­not tcoglne uolc~tt you. your•elf. have alito en­croached on thi1 vorld'1 boundartea. I felt •• if t were on tl:IC't vrrc~ or aomethlag "pecial. for the :1:cuin1 of San Franchco 1 already Md int~rnalii~d looa beforo I hit Au1ttn, Hy bca<hbathln& in San Diego -- all the IMl\Y thou•­and1 of young peuplo jamming the ahorelin@. not to mcnt ion Lu Jolla -- and e1'pcdic lt>n~ inside LA wen• only tt·.e prelude to vho.t I expected to be a typ~ of cltuxtng tn S"n Fr1ncl11co. Thi• clo11f"r t c.,ine1 to seeing, trona" dh1tlln<.'tt, downtown, fhf' aiore meRning and mood tn~trib••d lt11elf in my he.urt. For. I !l'lt, l ""'''" 11bout to trnter th• hnJ or freedom, ltmitltss po!Oibilltic_,, vhtrt'! rtny hu in clrcu l.htanc~ con bc­riad• or dhce>•ored. Thei lfoly Lftnd, thl--. <Jpect.11 heaven, Ji1 • t "'OIDC Iles ahe•d. and with qulckenln& speed I rC".achcd t~f' apot where I vle1o1ed for the ftr' t tlM th objt'Ct of my uptratton• or montil 'I ' drea enJ plannln&!!-· B"fore st pping, t er :'!Std the Colden CatC' Bridge. l had ftnal .. y arrl••d lhC' next d117, 5unday, va~ tbl" gay parade. If vou re- San Fran.cisco dreamin' \ -=!>er, Anita had countC"red ,gays' calltng for a cele­bration with bcr call for pray<r and fa11lni1. On thh day, tbOu• a.nds ot conaervat i•• c.hurcbc..s pre.ach"'11 aer moo.s on homosexual tnfUtrotloo aod the llbC"ral oou:. by and large, reulnod tot1lly "'11\:IH, So much vith dependable •111cs. We hlivo to do it ouuelvu •• But lo thb c.Jty, 240.000 •trong ca• out to yf..-.,, thr thousands marching. chanting or ~haply Ct>lebrat ing their pres~c•. Col••• you. yo-.&r,.eU. ha•~ h-fl•n thia parade or tho ono the yea• boforo. you -- lcply cannot tna&lnc the rcnl lty o' "'u•lng bl•fC"rc your Vl•ry ,tartlcd eye!'. m.tlc• of ~P•etotora. • whole dovn· tovn area compri~"d of p"'upl~ like you in on ... slgnt­fi( anl rcspet:l. And, Ht the puraJe' oi l~nd. after hi:•ing viudtd Jown H..rkt'!l St.. at Brook• HHll vtch It"' orniilV gnum dnnw ln tlw tnltuJ N.1Lio11K Plata. tht: gathering of •ll tu w1t1h:I' two bllnds. on~ of \o'(1- m1o1n &ind th,. uth••r of 1i.n, .aklnJI, u,.1<'. allracttvt•ly guy. July 4, lndcpcndrnce 0.1v l stand g.itJng out a tld rd·"ltory h.iy 'Window o( .1 house ,,ituated on one of thi!! tty'' hi&hc ·H hillf!. A atrutch ot brighlcntna,, da1;mln& bluo ~ k.ic • coo­trD~ t"' with ·H~ttlcd bldi.:k-gray fog d utl"', and ftt"\r glow• bathe hou• • of hill• below and beyond. l cot.1ld bv looki 1 upon ~ o i;.g 'WdltorrAIHtan S~nt•h c.ovn. t e t.yp v r d l pofll r , but the v • .., here 1• ;f.mi•h and very .,,.aopol ti11n "'Pi' t,r.: dt , lend for t t at p rtl lor r. so tar. l havo apont a vc t.. ti:i 4':3~ Franctaco, no, a vf'~.t and two Wtye, und 1 am not at "l t sorry to b<" here instead of Au1tln. I face thr tn1 vltabflity of having to leave thll h•.iven. but l pu1h that S.dea aside and g&ze out .pg.al, nt W.1t th~ rising liUl1 and newly rolllng fog c.loud1, appeortn& ovor the wc1tcrn hllla and Clowln& downv.arda, Aro do1aa to thh re­Mrk. able world. Pn·»cntly, thla luxurin.nce of 11lghc ••tiat.•• ... t at.all go lo the kite.hen Wld wrltc a while.. Huw nicr It Is, on lndflprnd1•n' t'I l>.-ty, not lo h.tv., lo Rt!t~ evrn onf"< Amt9tican £Ing. Amrdl"A t-. out thrrf'! 1 aod San rranclaco h l)Hlnk!ully her• , A world totally apart. lo huve to rulurn to ~·r l1'4• , to ltuivt• Sun Fran~t11<"0, ha p1tnlnK lhcn11{ht. Rul 111,•anwhfle l eh.all •nJoy ooJ rctut"n LO Dann\) 111J •lci.:v. Ht:rt1 'Wiah time could l 1St fot\!Vllr. WhJ.t a otr:mgu aiKht lt • t sec licnthcr ptoph: 'l ard buaea to Cawl ro Street, a etrangc but extremely lntttro•tina. •l&ht. And to 1ee all the other p'1'oplo. 1trons 111 their un-ty of Pxpertenc , and war• und canual. And the hun­dr< tdt, nay, th thousando, putting up with ~1&h rent• and 11 ple food for the pleos r• ot relating in abso­lute nftdC'ncic and aasurance I 1 tta• ' -odnt•aa of lt e itself. Say SOiie to 11e: "Don't ovC"rt"stimate San Fr.nci1co. It's Mecu., but different 1f you Uv" horo." Oh, 1 know that, but vould any of those bc.autlful •oul• luve in order to liv@ in Houston? I doubt It very acrioualy. July 9: I am taking one last vi~ of San frn.nctS('O from Snus­tltto across thei Cold•n G.at«"". I c nf••• that I f••l an ii.ens~ sadnr:.sa upon lt•.aving hPr. 1 con(<"e& II)' eoul werp~. But 1 shall rPturn to you, df"l'lr ctty of hills •nd whfr•-gl•am1ng '-"•· N()V I journ•Y upward and '1ope to aake Port land vh the ICtodwood Hfchvay tonf-ght. ON TH~ WAY ro VANCOUVER July 11. 6:00 P·"·: This l'!M)rning around l:OO a.11. l reach~d Portl.Jnd. 1 r.'lpidly mPt a guy nmn<"d J('Rfir C. S1 ntt. a mud~l whosP pictur<' hn"' app~.ut'd In Am-"'rknn J\trltnee .od•. llit shoYed lllf' around town. thc-n took. ~ to tho home of onP o( hte thr«-f" rn1g.,r d.1ddt1•,;, I do11 1t c.ur whi1H \U~UH, 191ti ... ..J t ti 7 dfaparaxtax r .. markJO peoplt- makP 1ttw\br i:l1.1Arll'rt or model• getntog their liv.-lthood for thf'tr p;Prvt<"t"8, but Jk.""Oph: Ulu.' Jt.>a» ... p.ay and psy and pay for CVf'ry llOflNary reward they r..-ceiv•. Tbeteo people ar• ex­cept !00111 y atroo3 and except ioaally weak: •trong for ondurtng vhatevPr alight to tht"tr dignity tb*lr bene­factor throv• out 1a. additioo to bi& 90-tH;ry; •nd ex­ct" pt ioo•lly l.l~ak for having traded their fr•edo= for this lnhlbltiog security. JP:S!lf'! vaa chrown out of the bous• by hi• adoptive pa.r~nte at th~ •ae of 13. He rapidly learn" that 'th· bette-r, -..ch better~ to hunl• than to 1t1rve. With ht1 earoed 1100ey. he! vent to one of tbl" two be-et llOd~lUog "chool• in the country and graduated. Though "11th hfs early aucc•ss -- signified by the pteturo the Airl ioea ad paid for -- ht' C'ould cer­utnly bave goae farth-:r, •de a good I tvtng in N~ York or ~hert"ver he hai. swttlf>d for this lift. Thts nnn b31 written hie into hie •h~able vlll. but he could just as easily write hi• out ontP Iott" &<"ts t Jrrd of Ma. Jfi'tS• <!o"sn 't see11 to care anymore to hold on ro tbu ll)('.'lnt"y 1 for now he in&ps back At ht!'i prim.'lry f\enefaC'­tor. and today wlll cut hts hstr in the style •hovn In hltl ptccurew. Perhaps h~ 1Jfll return to 1DOdc:lUng. ' ,,. .at Timh~rllne Lodgr '" tht• enowlin<" of Mt. Ho\)J. I Nh41 I go onward to s .. atr 111. mt inucJ on pag<' 8 all ~trat1ons by David Dole 8 Gay Austin August, 1978 continued from page i VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA July 12 : Today is my birthday. I am 24, a good age to live. I have yet to worrv about the possibility of non-exis­tent wrinkles. But how quickly time moves! July 15: Ah , Vancouver. how I fold my heart to you. Wreck Beach directly behind the University of R.C., where one may sunbathe nude and venture into the waters and smoke some recreational weed and meet and relate. And all your other beaches. And a few mile~ north, High­way l weaves on the landward side of the forested cliffs and down below the islands and channels of an incredible deep blue offward and rich forested growth to snow-packed summits. Horseshoe Bay and its ferries which lead you through the waters and about the is­lands to wherever in the late evening fog or day-sun you wish to go. July 16: Last night, l snt myself at a picnic table over­looking the waters surrounding Stanley Park. On three sides the harbour waters. The sun at about 10:00 p.m. began its slow descent, that orange gold goblet. 'I\Ji­light gleams, that intercessory prayer, like sonorous globed goblets. A hue of tan moist orange red keening behind the west-edged mountains, the low mountain hills dropping into the waters, the bay's end. The tanned cool heat of desert sandy sky red contrasting, setting off blue steepness of pin- hills. Twilight, o chant, that gold goblet circuiting the hills and the boy over-reaching it and passenger cruising ships moored amongst the waters, sun long gone, but not that incredible glow slowly dissipating, and moon al­ready risen hours or days or weeks ago .. . I watch ship lights promenade. I feel com-lete. It is 10:45 p.m. The white sheet in front has altered to a pale, now darker blue. I feel at peace. I shall not forget where I am; I thrust myself to feel. I know I shall eventually return to Vancouver to witness thiq all a ain and this peace. I am seated with t e blu~ sh~c befor c when the t1>0 arri11 . On asks me what 1 am doi.1g with that sheet of paper. They arc lovers from Montreal who had moved to escape the political dilemmas there. We speak on issues, on American and Soviet prop­aganda, and I listen attentively as one tells me hi experiences in a Montreal that once had included him. They are waiting for friends to appear and I have no doubt that I shall be inc1u5ed. It is cool, cold, perhaps, the temperature 55 with the ocean wind streaming. We shiver and watch the IDOVing lights on the waters. Their friends, their straight friends, arrive. We all shiver and say we wish to go and hove a coffee somewhere, but we remain at th~ hay, commenting on the lights and the political situa­tion and the moon's full-moon-shine and a harbor­light- house across the sound bleating and deep throaty calls of ships. I mention that all businesses Ln Canada shoul- be 100 percent Canadian. One of the lovers gives me a suspicious look, then assumes I have not slmply p."lrroted the line and the group discusses the Can."ldian situation. With his friends seated about his stance he points to the sky. There, above u~ all, a thin sheer of wh1te like a maple leaf shimmers. He opens his arms and cries, "O Canada ... ", and again, "O r.anada ..• " and the group basks happily in his words. He turns back at them and says, "Now if the government should start dropping maple leaves over Quebec, you can be sure something is about to hap pen that might not be very pleasant." He turns his face to1.1ard the appari­tion of the leaf and smiles another, "O Canada ... " and rejoins the group. "Besides," his lover informs me, "if Quebec secedes, Canada woald lose such beauty." Looking upon the site of the maple leaf and the people. I wish to alter my circumstances immed­iately. To carry a bottle of wine out and build a fire and watch the sun setting on the beach, ah ... July 17: A sweltering 25 degrees centigrade (77 degrees) hrlngs everyone out to the heach. And especially with tlw strikes going on the heacheR are packed. At Wrecker Beach, I meet a guy. Tonight, we have gone to sec COMING HOME and to hold each other tight with i-ach successive horror. tole walk arm-in-arm on th•• downtown &trects and watch liberals avt!rt their eyes. How we enjoy it! July 18: &his night we sec a mediocre (well, alright) co edv after having toasted over steak and wine. How w nn we ar with rach other, and how beautiful. July 19: I cross th border and return to a monstrous America. I shall slop in San Francisco before leaving the We t Cod t entirely. I shall find means to retuITI. FCC CONSIDERS GAYS A SIGNIFICANT MINORITY TO BE CONSULTED IN Ll C.ENSE RENEWALS The Federal Communications Commission has agreed to propose that leaders of all significant community groups, in a broadcast area, must be interviewed by local broadcasters to meet their community ascertain­ment requirements •.. whether or not such groups ap­pear on the 'checklist' of groups in the Co111111unity Ascertainment Primer. This represents a change from previous policy which required that only those groups on the checklist be contacted, leaving other community leaders to be con­tacted as an option of the individual broadcasters. It is yet to be decided if the burden of seeking out leaders of the gay community wi 11 be placed on broad­casters or whether it will be up to gay organizations to present themselves for ascertainment. The federal Communications Commission has agreed to propose that leaders of all significant community groups in a broadcast area, including leaders of the gay community, must be interviewed by local broad­casters to meet their cormnunity ascertainment re­quirements ... whether or not such groups appear on the checklist of groups in the Community Ascertain­ment Primer. National Gay Task Fore~ cochairpersons Jean O'Leary and Bruce Voeller said, "It was clear from the dis­cussion by FCC that lesbians and gay men were con­sidered by the Commission to be a significant minor­ity in many American communities. FCC has at last recognized our right of access to the public air­ways, on a par with all other major segments of American society. NGTF RECOMMENDED FOR PARTICIPATION IN 1981 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON FAMILIES The National Gay Task Force has been recommended for inclusion on the Advisory Council of the upcoming White House Conference on Families scheduled in 1981. The White House Conference has been the suject of considerable political controversy as to whether lhe conference should rcflect"the actual diversity of Alncrican family I ife or confine itself to the concerns of t rad it Iona l nuclear f amililes." NCTF has recommended Kerry Woodward of Minneapolis be appointed a member of the conference advisory panel and would welcome support for that nomination from religious and family-service groups around the country. It urges local gay groups to attempt to obtain such support. Woodward, an administrator of the Minneapolis Committee for Cay Rights, is a former tea~her and day-care worker, and has served as a delegate to three Democratic-Farm Labor Conventions, and also served as a delegate to the International Women's Year Conference in Houston. Recommendations should be :icnt to: M:... Joan Rattery White House Conference on Families Department of Health, Education, and Welfnrc, Room 541F Hubert llurnphrey Building Washington, D.C. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS VOTE BRYANT. HITLER "PEOPLE WHO HAVE DONE MOST DAMAGE IN WORl.D" The Ladies Hom Journnl uskcd 800 junior and senior high chool students to n me the man and woman who "hav don th most damage in the world." fhe maj­ority cho"e Adolf Hitler and Anita Bryant. Bryant, long with Richard Nixon, also won out in response to the qu stion, "Who makes you angriest?" Asked "lf you could giv a prize for achievement in re- '112ust, 1978 Gay Austin ligion, to which famous person would you give the prize?", the young people named Billy Graham their first choice, while God was their second. 9 What has been termed "the nation's first in-depth survey of an urban gay population, aimed at finding out more than 'bedroom behavior'" is underway in Seattle. Washington Public Information Research Group (WashPIRC), a university of Washington re­search group sponsored by the Associated Students of the University, has mailed 10,000 questionaires containing 100 items asking for information about everything from voting habits to parenting and mar­ital status. WashPIRG is also mailing a different questionaire to a random sampling of 900 business people, industries, physicians, employment agencies and others who might be dealing with gay people as employees or tenants, in order to find out what the impact of the city's gay rights ordinance is . A third survey is designed to measure gay rights en­forcement practices in the approximat~ly 40 cities and counties in the U.S. that have such laws. Re­sponses to the surveys should be available to the media by October. EARTHA KITT DENOUNCES ANITA According to United Press International, entertainer Eartha Kitt has denounced Anita Bryant's anti-homo­c: exual crusade as "dangerous to this COWltry." The news service reported that Kitt told a report­ers" conference: "I think that her attitude for America is a very dangerous one. Oppression of any kind is dangerous to this country. ~ long as we allow this kind of opprc~sion to go on, we are not fulfilling what this country means. That is the main issue: human rights." The news conference was reportedly sponsored by the Gertrude Stein Democratic Club. for which Miss Kitt g~vc a benefit performance. EDITOR IN VIRGINIA PRINTS RAPE VICTIMS' NAMES One of the more controversial stances in recent times is Herman J, Obermayer's decision, as editor and publisher of the Northern Virginia Sun, to pub­lish names, ages and addresses of women who are rape victims. Obermayer's position, printed in The Bulle­tin, which is the journal of the American Society of Newspaper Editors, as well as in his own nevpaper, is that "protecting the accuser's anonymity, while fully identifying the accused, is tantamount to a pre-trial presumption of guilt." In response to critics who say that it is cruel and harsh to im-pose additional pains on innocent victims of crimes, Obennayer repl:les, "Justice is cruel and harsh. A man convicted of rape can go to ~ail for life." Obermayer cites the Supreme Court's decision in Cohn vs. Cox, which protected the right of the press to print names, even in rape cases. Attorney Alan Schlosser of the San Francisco American Civil Liberties Union acknowledges Obermayer's right under the First Amendment, but adds that having the right to do something and deciding whether or not it should be done arc two different things. more ne~s brief~ page 10 !WOMEN/SPACE Is a counseling and lnfor· Marlon center for the women of Austin. It prO:o vides a variety of services for u-omen such • Wlllk·ln counseling, legal and medical and birth· control information, and informal ion abo..­communily resources. WOMEN SPACE _.. coordinates rllp groups and consciousness-rats.; Ing groups Phone 472.JOS3. -- • t • '· lfl Gay Austin August, 1978 PORTLAND TOWN COUNCIL OFFERS GAYS exoP~RTY _ ARBITRATION_SERVICE FOR DISPUTES The Portland (Oregon) Town Council, concerned about how gay couples who are splitting up deal with pro­perty division, is offering the gay conuounity an ar­bitration service. In order to use the service, both parties must agree to submit to arbitration as co­petitioners and agree to decide whether the arbitra­tion is to be advisory and non-binding or binding and enforceable in a court of law. The arbitration is .done by a panel of three people whose names are submitted in advance and agreed on by the petition­ers. One of the arbitrators is an attorney. The fee for the service is based in part on the value of the property in dispute. NYC GAYS, POLICE CLASH IN BASEBALL GAME New Ycrk's finest, the championship Sixth Precinct squad, met the finest athletes of New York's 12-team Metropolitan Community Athletic Association in the first annual Police vs. Gay softball game on Sunday, June JJ. It was a day for symbolic conflicts; an overflow crowd of some 2,000 excited fans cheered the action in Manhattan's Central Park. Despite a suit­ably macho effort and the energetic chcerleading of four costumed pompom boys, the gay all-stars went down in defeat, 12-4. The game's spirit of friendly interchange follows eight months of weekly police-gay coRDDunity dialogues held at the Sixth Precinct station house. Precinct Captain Aron Rosenthal in his printed welcome ex­pressed the hope that "familiarity can breed respect" and said that the goal of the dialogues has been "to help us all see beyond the labels and stereotypes that reduce human beings ~o one-dimensional charac­ters." STATE OFFICIAL IN CALIFORNIA RETRACTS STATEMENT ON HOMOSEXUAL CHILD ABUSERS California's Secretary of State, March Fong Eu, in a speech last March to the state Parent Teacher As­sociation Meeting in Los Angeles, stated, "The police department (of Los Angeles) conservatively estimates that last year alone there were 34,000 cases of child m STIWOI IOOISTGBE 706 L6tt. Street AUSTIX.TBKAS abuse involving sexual activities, 70 percent of which were homosexual in nature." Her statement, based upon the testimony of LA police Lieutenant Donald La­Guardia before the California Senate Select Connnittee on Children and Youth last year, horrified gay people in the state. Supervisor Harvey Milk, an elected San Francisco city official, wrote to the Secretary of State to protest the figures. Eu met with Milk and his staff, and as a result of the meeting wrote a re­traction and a letter to LA Police Chief Daryl Gates asking for an explanation of the erroneous figures. Gates investigated, and responded in a letter to Eu, that he "has reevaluated the ... figure and concluded that although the estimate was the result of consider­able research, it was not based on hard data. There­fore the estimate is considered speculative in na­ture ~nd will not be used again." international. EUROPEAN COMMISSION OF HUMAN RIGHTS TAKES GAY BRITON'S COMPLAINT AGAINST ENGLAND • • The European Commission of Human Rights, headquar­tered in Strasbourg, has accepted another case from a man challenging laws on homosexuJlity in the Brit­ish Isles. Peter Wells, an English busines.!lman, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison in 1974 for having sex with two 18-year-old men. Wells is claiming that his conviction and imprisonment vio­late three articles of the European Convention on Human Rights. England has signed the convention, and the government admits that its action against Wells was interference with his private life. But, it claims, it was justified under an article that pro­tects the "health and morals" and "protection of tht' rights and freedoms of others." The commission has admitted Well's application. POLICE IN AUSTRALIA CARRY OUT 'MILITARY' RAID AGAINST GAYS CELEBRATING SOLIDARITY On June 24, during "Mardi Gras" celebration of In­ternational Homosexual Solidarity Day, police from the Darlinghurst district of Sydney carried out what an Australian newsletter termed a "mil! tary-style attack. Everyone caught in the middle of this oper­ation ... was in danger of being bashed and/or taken ... into custody. Heterosexuals, whether sympathetic or not, were also detained." The public address sys­tem and truck carrying it were confiscated. According to witnesses, police made a special polnt of brutal­izing the women in the march. When one woman screamed at a police officer, "Let go of my tit," she was charged with using offensive language. After the ar­rests of 54 people, lawyers and doctors who tried to enter the police station to see clients and the in­jured were threatened with charges of trespass. 24 women were confined in a cell designed co be occupied by two people. The Gay Solidarity Group at Sydney University is urging people to send letters to Neville Wran, Pre­mier of New South Wales to request an inquiry into the police violence. The Australian newspaper The Age has conducted a poll that reveals that 57 percent of the public believes that gay people should have the same status under the law as heterosexuals for whom the age of consent is 16. Younger people and those with university educa­tion indicate even stronger support for gay rights. At present, consensual sex for gay people is per­mitted in only two ~Cates and is illegal in all the rest. New report on NEW YORK - A major new !!tudy on homosexuality con­cludes that many homosexual men and women lead stable lives without frenetic sexual activity and that some are considerably happier and better adjusted than heterosexuals as a whole . According to one of its authors, Dr. Alan Bell of the Institute for Sex Research at Indiana University, the study ' s findings contradict stereotypes about homosexuals . He said the study shows that "homosex­uality is not ipso facto pathological and that all homosexuals cannot be lumped together." Rather, Bell and his coauthor, Dr . Martin Weisberg, found that there were at least five types of homo­sexuals , each with a different s.:t of behavioral pat­terns . While some resemble the popular stereotype of unhappy, unstable and highly promiscuous people, the authors said , others are more like ordinary married heterosexuals. The new sLudy represents the most comprehensive look at the social and psychological adjustment of homo­sexuals. It is the first time , Bell said in an in­terview, that a truly diverse sample of homosexual~ has been studied, that homosexuals have been compared wilh one Another and that type:Sof homosexuals have bl'en compared with heterosexuals. Most previou~ srud­ies focused on spl'cial groups of homosexuals, ~uch as those undergoing psychotherapy, men in prisons and members of homophile organizations. The findings are to be published on Aug . 28 by Simon and Scbuster in a hook called "Homosexualities, 11 which is the product of u study begun in 1968 with a $278,000 grant from lhe National Institute of Mental u.-alth. Thl' new study focuses not on the incidence of homo­scxuu 1 hchuvtor -- a subject on which Dr. Alfred Kin­sey, who founded thl' InsLitute for Sex Research, re­ported 10 yl'ure ugo -- but rather on the relation­ship of sexual nctivity to a wide variety of social <1nd psychological chnrnclcristics. To examine thl"'se relationships, 979 homosPxual men nnd women 1 iving in tlw San Francisco Bay area were interviewed . The subjects were culled from among 5,000 people who indicated a willingness to partici­pate in the study. Those interviewed included people recruited in homosexual bars and steam baths, at public and private places where homosexual "pick­ups" were often made and through homosexual organ­izations, personal contacts , mailing lists and pub­lic advertising. "WE did not just draw subjects from the 'lavender ghetto,' where everyone is free and open about his homosexunlity. Many of our respondents are highly covert, and it took a long time to convince some of them to participate in the study, " Bell said. He added that the sample of homosexuals interviewed could not be snid Lo represent homosexuals gener­ally , but that the study included substan'tiol numben1 of nl l typus of homosexuals . The homosexuals were intPrviewed in person in 1970 . ln nddit ion, /j77 heterosexuals drawn from a random sample of lhc San Francisco Bay area residents w1'ic• questioned. From the data, the authors categorized homosexuals into the following types: -- Cloaed couples, those living in quasi-marriages characterized by self-acceptance, contentment and a II hom05exuality high degree of sexual fidelity. Thoqe relation~hips tended to be long-standing and to reflect a strong emotional commitment and a stable sharing of household responsibilities . As a group, the closed coupleG scored higher on happiness measures than the heterosexuals, the researchers said. -- Open couples, those living as partners but with a fair amount of outside sexual activity. These couples tended to be less emotionally attached and dependent o~ one another, according to the study. -- Functionals, those who were sexually highly active and free-whee ling, comparable in behavior to "swing­ing singles" among heterosexuals. ThPy were more likely to report feelings of exuberance than the heteros,.xuals interviewed, the researchers said. -- Dysfunctionals, those who were also highly active sexually but who reported re~reti ahour hP1ng homo­sexual and said that they had sexual problems. -- Asexuals, those who were more secretive and have more regrets about their homosexuality, were less sPxually active and less exclusively homosexual. To­gether with the dysfunctional group, the researchers said, asexuals reported less self-acceptance and more loneliness than other homosexuals and than heterosex­uals. In general, homosexual men resembled heterosexual men in their reports of good physical health and feelings of happiness at the time of the questioning. However, in response to psychological questions, the homosex­ulll men indicated that they felt "less self-accepting and more lonely, depressed and tense than did the heterosexual men," the authors reported . The homo­sexual men were also more likely to have considered or attempted suicide and to have sought help for an emotional problem. 'The homosc.xual women, on the other hand. differed little from heterosexual women in many aspects of t" 1r psychological adjustment.. But as a group they •• "''tPd less current happiness, less self-esteem 1rnrl • orP suicidal thoughts that the heterosexual , n • ..,, . 'Thu .iuth rs condudcd thnt "homosPxual adults who h11v. 'omt to terms with 1 heir homosexu1tlity, who do no1 regr~t their sexual orientation, and who can '•m1rinn effectively sexually and socially, are no m<•rc distressed psycholo~ically than are hetero­sexual men and "1omcn." They said that it was primar­ily the dysfunctionals and asexuals who were less w•· l off psychologically than heterosexuals, "but lwrc are certainly equivalent groups among hetero­" f''Cuals. 11 Nonetheless, the researchers did report characteris­tics of some homosexuals that are likely to becol!le subjects of controversy . For exa111ple, the authors •ported. nearly half of white homosexual males and 'nc-third of the black homosexual males interviewed said that they had had at least 500 different sexual p~1rtners. More than half had had more than 20 sexual r~~tnPrs in the year before the interview. About t WP-thirds of t hf' men had c-ont racted a vPnereal dis­Plf'> e at least once. Among the homo~exual women, most had had fewer th11n l<J f1>m11le sexual partners, and more than thr• e­fourlhR wure involved in a relatively stable relation­ship with anolhcr wom.1'1 at the time of the interview. H1•w1•ver, Lhe majority of homosexual men said that they had never had sex with minors or with prosti­tules. The authors contend chat heterosexuals are f~n· IDOfP likely than homosexuals to Seduce minors Or to make objectionable sexual advances. -- ~ew )ork Times News Service - ,I., calendar weekly ~IO:-JiJAY­SATURDAY llappy Hour at the ~ew Apartment , 4:00 p.m . -8:00 p.m. MONDAY Lambda AA , 209 West 27th , 8:00p.m. Free beer , the New Apartment TUESL>AY Lesbian r ap gr oup (open) , Womenspace , 7 :30 p.m. THURSDAY Showt ime, Aus tin , Country, 10:30 p.m. FRIDAY Womenspace pr ogr ams with discus­s i on ; coffee at i:OO p.m., speakers at 8:00 p.m. ; see weekly Rap gr oup, Gay Communit y Services (open ) , 8:00 p.m . SUNDAY Happy Hour at t he t\ew Apar tme nt , noon- 8:00 p .m. Volleyball sponsored by GCS , Ramsey Park, West 44th at Rose­dale , 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Free keg of beer every second and fourth Sunday (donated by the Private Cellar). Come on out! After Hippy Hollow Hour, free beer and hot dogs, 7:00 p.m., Private Cellar . Metropolitan Community Church services, noon and 7:30 p.m. , 614 East 6th . I ~ · LEGAL SERVICES at reasonable fees I Th• Legal ChnlC c~rgee S15 for your initiel consuttstton •• • - Sion w ith sn attorney There Is no t•m• limit. If you went or need •dd•Uonal -•vie•• w e w ill supply you with a written fee quota ­tion If you don't w••h to go o n w ith• ca- after c on•u ltat lon you are under n o fu rther ot>llgatlon. eUNCONTESTEO D IVORCE (NO PROPERTY OR CHILDREN) S 90 • UNCONTESTED DIVORCE (W ITH PROPERTY OR CHILORENl 150 • UHCoio.nsuo OIVOllCl IWllH l"l!Of'lllTY .. CHI LOHN) 175 •NAME CHANOfi 4S •BANKRUPTCY. INOIVIOUAL 225 • BANKRUP TCY, HUS&ANO ANO W IFE 2 75 • SIMPLE W ILL. INOIVIOUAL 40 • S IMPLE W ILLS . HUSBAND ANO W IFE 80 The legal '"• quotsd above do not include cour t c o ats ~ f- e re tor c ase• flied In Trevis County between June 1, '1978 and ~91110.- 1,19 71. F••• fo r ~I work outside of T r a v• • C ounty w ill be highe r The Leg•I CllnlC a lso a c c epts crlm lnal c a••• end ci vil c •••• not ll•tad above PleaM C811 for an appoint~. No legal advice w l ll b• g iven ove r th• t e leph one. Hours e ·oo-5 0 0 weekdays. Weekend• end e ve nings by ap polntment. Vivia n Mahleb Legat Clinic at 501 W.12th St. Austin, Texas 78701 i...1---- 512-478-9332 _ _ ___._. I 14 16 18 GAY AUSTI~ staff meeting. GCS offi ces, 2330 Guadalupe, 7:30 p.m. GAY CO~DW~ITY SERVICES monthly meeting. 2330 Guadalupe, 8:00 p.m. VD CLINIC sponsored by the State De­partment of Health , Private Cellar, Club Baths and GCS. Free for men and women . Club Austin , 308 W. 16th , 10:00 p .m. to midnight. PCQ Private Cellar Qeslaurant 707 East 6th St Reser vat ions: the 41s-s132 Private cellar ·1ir: tire-.! C 11b 111 \ • ..i 1 n:~~ in re ....~ After hours: 12am-4pm ••• && a•11a-ea ·-·- 2532 Guadalupe ''~o-t llie adt~e man'' the best selection In aclult material ••• Anywhere! __ au usl 1 1978 ______.
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