Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979
File 015
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 015. 1979-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1979-04). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 015. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2574

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 015, 1979-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2574.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date April 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14april 1979 Gay Austin vol. 3, no. 7 by G. P. Stojcevic A Queer Kind of Death by George Baxt - St. Martins Press paperback, $4.95 When this book first made its appearance in the rather paranoid atmosphere of the pre-stonewall, pre-gay lib year of 1966, it received a fair amount of critical acclaim as a mystery novel. The strong undercurrents and the fact that the detective and main characters were gay was played down or simply not mentioned at all. Now revived in a quality paperback format, the book is once again getting some attention, and not as just another mystery. A Queer Kind of Death is filled with all types of extremely complex and well-delineated characters. The plot, that of the murder of an actor-model- hustler-blackmaiier in his bath by electrocution, evolves through varied interplay by the various people that were either victimized by him or who inhabited his world. Two characters are the main focus and it is through their eyes, their actions, that the events unfold. Seth Piro, a young writer in his early thirties, former lover and roommate of the victim, is a key suspect. In an attempt to clear himself and come to a better understanding of his life he decides to write a novel about the life of the victim. In the process of finding out all the facts, the other characters react strongly, with fear, panic, and hostility. The possible motives and suspects mount up quickly. Enter Pharaoh Love, a black New York City police detective. He questions everyone and opens many closets, and during the course of his investigation begins to fall in love with his number-one suspect. The pieces begin to fall in place and a most tangled web is woven. The conclusion of the book is a beautiful knockout punch that was surprising, yet totally believable. Suffice it to say. it is one of the most unusual and interesting cocktail parties you will have the occasion to attend, George Baxt has given us a universe that is morally bankrupt, peopled with selfish, bitching, wounded, savage, and loving creatures that are both completely alien and familiar at the same time. His New York City is a nerve- jangling paranoid nightmare that (lows like some dark, garbage-strewn river under the very core of our souls. You hate the victim, yet he is no worse than any of the living. Even Pharaoh Love and Seth Piro have their own ends, their own needs, and both scheme and plot to serve them. Murder is the obvious crime, its solution the obvious concluding point of the book, but Baxt has given us and left us with much more than that. This is a book that should be read over again. Even at the first reading it will gnaw at you, grate, jar, offend, make you feel a little less complacent with the world, with yourself. Whether you are gay or straight, a mystery fan or not, this book should not be missed. by John Harrison. Lavender Culture. Karla Jay and Allen Young, editors. Jove/HBJ, 1979. $2.50. Although I am unacquainted with Jay and Young's previous editorial endeavors (Out of the Closet, After You're Out), having now read Lavender Culture I will certainly take time to read them. Presenting on equal footings writings by both gay women and men, the book is divided into more than 40 short essays and articles with topics ranging from "Forum on Sado-Masochism" to "The Cleveland Bar Scene in the Forties," from "Images of Gays in Rock Music" to "Aging Is a State of Mind." Two quotes give some sense of the scope of the book. The first is from Ian Young's Gay Sunshine article called "The Poetry of Male Love": A sense of the past, or of its own past, is infinitely valuable to any group that feels the need to define itself and to create or develop a sense of community. A knowledge of gay history and culture, and especially of gay literature, is worthwhile not only to put the larger questions of cultural development in their right perspective, but to help individuals now to realize themselves, to see, and to act. It is precisely this lack of community sense that keeps so many of us in the closet, that leaves so many of us to be exploited by straight society. A viable sense of community is initiated by strong interest in gay literature and thought. The other quote carries this sense of community to the theater. From Don Shewey's article "Theater: Gays in the Marketplace vs. Gays for Themselves," a comment from playwright Doric Wilson: When I first started the theater, the first response from people was, "Gay has nothing to do with my art, gay is what I do when I get to bed." It seems to me as long as we define ourselves only sexually, then we are also going to have a slight puritanism about sex and so a slight dismissal of any public statement of our gayness. This definition of homosexuality, apart from what one does in bed, is beautifully expressed in many of the lesbian articles in the book. The double sexual repression entailed in being a woman and a lesbian has led many women further along the activist path than their gay brothers. For some indication of Karla Jay's "community sense," from her article "No Man's Land": Where there are enough lesbians in any given town or city, women have usually tried to build alternatives [to gay bars] . . . The advantage [of coffee houses, rap groups, or consciousness-raising groups] over the bars is that one's primary purpose in the bar, however masked, is usually to cruise, and that underlying assumption reduces us to sex objects and often fills the air with tension. No one volume can pretend to encapsulate the total range of gay thought in the 1970's but Lavender Culture is enjoyable reading, finely edited, well representing a variety ofthe gay experience in American today V
File Name uhlib_5962538_v003_n007_014_ac.jpg