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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979
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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 001. 1979-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2560.

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(1979-04). Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2560

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Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979 - File 001, 1979-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2581/show/2560.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, Vol. 3, No. 7, April 1979
Contributor
  • Murray, John
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date April 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript free! .____GAY AUSTI ~-----.JI april 1979 ol. 3 Ma~ch on Washingto Set for October PHILADELPHIA - Some 300 lesbians and gay men repre enting organizations from across the country met in Phila­delphia February 24th and 25th to lay plans for the national gay march on Washington proposed last summer by slain gay leader Harvey Milk. The march has been et for Sunday, October 14th, three months after the July 4th date Milk originally uggcsted. The Philadelphia meeting began with something less than a consensus, not only on the nature of the march and its <late but on whether a march should be held at all. Several large gay-rights organization , including the National Gay Ta k Force, had already declined to participate in the conference. And delegate teve ·ndean of Gay Rights National Lobby in Washington argued against the event on the grounds that it wouldn't help the effort to obtain Federal gay-right legi lation. Washing­ton, D .. activi t ·rank Kameny ex­pr d the eneral cepticism of several gay a tivist in the apital wh n h to d the delegate , "If I was assured that there would be enough people at the march, l'd support it. But I'm not sure that would happen.,, But Wendy Levine of the San Fran­cisco Ad Hoc Committee on the March on Washington disagreed. She read to the deleg<ites the results of a nationwide survey which showed support for a march in the early fall o 1979 with political issues as the primary focus. And Brandy Moore of San Franci co argued, "Gay Freedom parades show us that we can draw people to ether in these numbers in support of our rights.'' The vote of 106 in favor and 56 against was greeted with applause. "This effort is a quantum leap forward for the gay-rights movement," Rita Goldberger of San Francisco declared. But Steve Shiflett, president of the Hou ton Gay Political Caucu , was not convinced. "Just because the vote happened doc n't mean the march will happen," he said. Houston repre enta­tivc we e critical f the d e et for Continued on page 18. Delegates vote to march on Washington. by JOHN MURRAY TGTF Won't Seek Repeal of 21.06 There i not going to be a bill intro­duced in this legislative session to re­peal section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. It seems that the Board of Dir­ectors of the Txas Gay Task Force has decided, based on a January 23rd letter from their legislative consultant Karol Phelan, that it would not be in the best interest of the gay community to introduce such a bill at this time. Originally there was concern among members of the Board about the possible negative effects of pu hing for repeal in that it might inspire the introduction of more repressive legi - lation or even a strengthening of current penalties. The Board was also aware that this was an issue of major concern to the gay community and that an introduction of a bill to repeal was expected of the lobbying effort. Facing the reality of the slim chance such a ALGPC Endorses, Delays The Austin Lesbian/Gay Political Caucus voted at its March 18 meeting to support the International Day of Action for Reproductive Freedom sche­duled for March 31. The day of action, planned ·last summer at a conference of European, Latin American, Afri­can and North American women, is for the purpose of demonstrating support for the right to safe birth control and abortion and an end to forced sterilization. In other action, ALGP voted to table a motion by co-chair Steve Thom­as to withhold endorsement of the National Gay March on Washington scheduled for October 14 of this year, until the members knew more about the event and about the organization planning it. (See article, this issue.) The motion stemmed from a steering decl n to opp~~ 'e march as planned by a conference in Philadelphia on February 24 and 25 and to call for a second conference. In explaining the steering commit­tee decision, Thomas said the Phila­delphia conference was dominated by delegates from San Francisco and ew York while other regions of the country were inadequately represented. He claimed more time was needed to pre­pare for a ..successful march and that a march that failed to draw enough participants would be a serious set­back for the gay community. Concerning the coming elections, the chair announced the steering com­mittee's decision not to endor e city council candidates. On a motion from the floor ALGPC voted to donate $25.00 to a lesbian custody defense fund. Individual dona­tion from member measure would have for success, the Board decided to seek the introduction of a bill but not to enthusiastically encourage its adoption. TGTF legislative lobbyist Bettie aylor pointed out to me that he felt this original decision ~s unwi e for two reasons. She indicated that it would be essentially the throwing away (and wasting of a political favor that could possibly be of vital importance in the event of the introduction of even more repre ive legislation. As Continued on pa e 2. House Bill Would by DAVID MORRIS Ban Popper. Representative Tony Polumbo of Houston has introduced a bill to make it illegal to sell or offer to sell "any substance that contains any quantity of butyl nitrite or isobutyl nitrite," known popularly as "poppers.'' The proposed legislation would add a section to the Controlled Substance Act making it a Class C misdemeanor, punishable by a fine up to 200, to seJl the substance, but makes no men­tion of pos ession or manufacture. NormaJly, sale, po session or manu­facture of substance on any of sev­eral lists contained in the A t is pro­hibited by law except when licen ed, as in the case of prescription drugs. Any substance may be added to the official Controlled Sub tance li ts at the discretion of the Director of Pub­lic Health after a public hearing but it is not clear whether Polumbo's bill adds poppers to the list. Currently, the sale of poppers is prohibited by federal food and drug See relat ~d a tic~e, pag.~ 7. regulation onl.. if the seller speci­fies the ub tance is intended to be used as a drug. Popper are generally old as "room deodorizers or 'liq­uid incense. ' The state Controlled Sub tance Act is more effective than food and drug regulations. Butyl nitrite can be sold only by pre cription in Georgia and has been hanned outright in onnecticut. Polumbo bill (HB907) is pre - ently in a subcommitte of the House Criminal Jurispruden e Committee. If passed by the full Hou e and the en- . ate, the law would ta ·e effect ptem-ber I, 1979V Gay Austin staff: John Murray ____________ Managing Editor David Morris ews Editor Phil Conard Advertising Manager Contributors and Columnists: Stan Bear, Phil Conard, Lars Eighner, Wayde Frey, Dennis Haney, John Harrison, Joseph Kelly, Ron Moss, Marian Phillips, Bob Prewitt, Gary Reese, Georg Stoj­cevic, Steve Thomas, Michelle Williams Gay Austin is published monthly by Gay Community Services of the University YMCA/YWCA, 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. Opinions expressed in Gay Austin are those of the writer or editor and not necessarily those of Gay Community Services, the University YMCA/YWCA, or the advertisers. The publi- GAY AUSTIN cation herein of any person's name, portrait, or photograph is not an indication of that person's sexual orientation. All contents copyright 1979 by Gay Austin. Material may be reprinted without prior permission if credit is given to Gay Austin. Gay Austin is distributed free at many local businesses. Sub­scriptions are available at $6.00 per year. The Coordinators of Gay Community Services include: Carr Strong General Coordinator John Murray Publication Coordinator Bob Prewitt Office and Peer Counseling Coordinator Gary Reese Media Coordinator Phil Conard Finance Coordinator Paul Guttery Speakers Bureau Coordinator \/QI. 3, l 10. 7 TGTF .. Continued from page 1. examples of the types . of legislation that the lobbying effort is currently up against, she mentioned a bill to bar gay teachers from public class­rooms (which has since died in commit­tee), Senator Mengden's bill to bar same sex dancing, drag, entertaining in drag, and a wide range of other activities defined as obscene from on-premise alcoholic beverage estab­lishments, and a bill introduced by Representative Polumbo that would add butyl nitrite (poppers) to the Texas Controlled Substances Act. She was also very concerned with the possibility of irreparably damaging the career of one of our few supporters in the Lcgislacure. It seems that it is much easier for our legislators to oppose repressive legislation aimed at the gay community, which is usually interpreted as a civil rights issue, than it is to act­ively seek the repeal of existing discrim­inatory legislation such as 21.06, which is currently seen as advocating and/or approving the homosexual lifestyle. She added, however, that Rcprc enta­tive Sam Hudson had indicated that he would be willing to introduce a bill to repeal 21.06 hut had hccn di cuuratied from doing o. Karol Phelan, in her re pon e to the originaJ decision to ~eek a repeal mea­sure, ha wriucn in pan 1ha1 1hc ··T F must face the 1eality that the 111 la-ture ha , tn the pa t. ' 11 fit to pa, di criminatory lcgt. latilln anJ to puh­lllll£! E~..:~-~-..J!;...l 1icly mock efforts to repeal Section Human Rights Festival, 1978 Upcoming GCS Events HUMA RIGHTS FESTIVAL Gay Community Services and the Austin Lesbian/Gay Political Caucus will sponsor an Arts and Crafts Show combined with the Second Annual Break­fast for Human Rights. Both events will be held on Auditorium Shores on May 26. Live entertainment will augment the many artists displaying and selling their work. The Breakfast wilJ follow the pattern of last year's Festival. Com­plete details will be in next month's Gay Austin. Artists interested in setting up a booth should contact the GCS office at 477-6699. COSTUME DA CE A D DRAG SHOW Gay Community Services will sponsor an all-out drag show to determine the King/Queen of Austin drag. Following the show will be the first GCS Cos­tume Dance. These events are planned for early May at a downtown location. All people, male and female, interested in participating in the Drag Show are encouraged to enter. Applicant hould have one number prepared, roughly ten minutes in length. GCS will provide both lighting and <;0und. Exact date and location will be announced in next month's Gay Austin . .......................................................................................................................................................... DR G SHOW E TRY BL K 'ame: ___________________ Phonc: _____ _ Stage name =----------------- ddre =---------------City:. ______ zip:-- Special need . ... u•••UUIUU• ................. -........................................................ nn........................ ••••••••••••·•·••••·••••·••••••••••••• .... • • .... .. • ~- )> ••••• •~ '1 . 21.06 of the Texas Penal Cmk. With this prevailing mood, asking a nlL'mhcr to make a token gesture to the gay community by merely intro<.lucing a repeal measure i ludicrous." She al o urged the education of the Legislature as to the needs of the gay community and also the education of the gay community on the "existing political environment and the importance of timing" in the legislative effort.V '? ? q ? 1 ? ~ 9 • • • ? ~ . '") • ..:> • ' '1. ? ·Questions? q_ 'l. ? '? ') .? ~ ·1 ;) f''1. ,,,. ? • 'l ? • '? ? • GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES / t HOTLINE , ? • 477-6699 ' vol. 3, i10. 7 GAY AUSTIN apriJ 1979 3 Broadcasters Seek Lesbian, Gay Advice by GARY REESE On March 14, representatives of the gay community met for the first time with panels of Al!stin broadcasters in an i:!ffort to determine how the commu­nity's needs may best be met. Federal Communications Commi­sion requirements have recently been expanded to require that minorities other than ethnic groups be consulted by broadcasters. The broadcasters must a certain community needs in order to fulfill their public service function under FCC guidelines: (Sec Gay Austin, February, 1979.) " ~ ach station has the responsibil­ity of dctem1ining the c needs and has to ju tify its performance to the FCC when its license comes up for re­newal," explained Woody Egger, one of the community representatives and a board member of the Texas Gay Task Force. "The local hroadca ter have decided that, instead of doing thi on their own, they would set up panel Documentation Sought IIO STO Rcpre ~entative of the Am ri an ivil Lib rtie nion, the Political A ocintion t f pani h peak­in' Organization , the l louston Gay Politicnl aucu , and four law firms ar a sembling documentation of harass­mcn t and bmtality by II oust on police again t gay people, Chicanos, and Black . The evidence will be pre en ted to the U.S. Civil Right Commi sion at it hearings in I lou ton this spring. The hearings result from a long list of allegations of police brutality in I louston. B st known is the case of J osc Campos Torres who drowned when police beat him and threw him in a bayou in 1977.\l with one representative from every TV and radio station sitting on each panel." Initial inquiries about gays being included in the interview pro­cess were made by Carr Strong, gen­eral coordinator of Gay Community Services, and Troy Stokes, former GCS media coordinator. Egger and Mary Ann Ed wards of Women space held interview with the two separate panels of broadcasters. "I told them that we needed to be able to speak to our own members of the community and to enlighten the community at large,'' Egger explained. He said that he identified three areas that require attention. "We need to be able to get public ervice announce­ments aired, to get on interview and talk hows, and also to have some kind of program of our own.'' Such a pro­gram, Egger added, would be aired at a regularly scheduled time and would be produced and moderated by gays. "In the past we've only gotten on talk shows and interviews in response to challenge from people like Anita Bryant or Reverend O'Chester. Or, Women's Caucus Endorses Candidates AUSTI The Au tin Women' Politi­cal Caucus, at their Mar h _Qth Candi­date Forum, ha decided to endorse the following candidates in the up­coming City Council elections: place 3 Rick Ream; place 4, Richard Good­man: place 5, John Trevino; place 6, Jimmy Snell. There was no endorse­ment in place 1 and 2, and no endorse­ment for Mayor. Of the eleven issues the Caucus considered to be of concern to the City ouncil and the people of Austin, all four of the candidates endorsed responded favorably to the addition of sexual orientation to the existing Fair Housing OrdinanceV Put the Texan in the right hands ... because it ends up 1• 0 yours. Tom KESSLER paid pol1t1cctl _ad ~- , Editor when a nationally known gay spokes­person ha · come through town." The local gay community' need have not been served until we can get broad­casting time in our own right Egger explained. The lack of minority membership in gay organizations is another problem which could be ameliorated through in-rea ed local access to broadcasting channels. .. As of thi time we have restricted access to those communi­tie - Black, Chi ano, and the young gay coming out who have no way of getting in touch with other their age who are having the SaJT!C difficulties." v Demonstrator Pat Cramer has suggestion. Gay men and le bian \'ere among dcm n trntor at the LBJ Librar} la t 1arch I to greet William oor of the Coors Brewery, who \\a there to participat in a confcrcn con .. the new partner hip bet\\ ccn bu ine " and government." The Coor Brc\ ·ry i being boy­cotted by homo e uaL and many other grou1 for it allegedly raci t, homophobic and anti-labor practi e . At the conference, Coor pla d the blame for mi. tru t of bi• bu inc on public ignorance and mi under landing. "The Daily Texan needs more coverage of events relevant to the Austin Lesbian/Gay community; exposing violations of the civil rights of all human beings." -Charlie Rose VOTE APRIL 4th • I 4 april 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'OI. 3, 110. 7 Gay Legal Conference Held Nat'l Gay Law in the Future by KELLY KAY NEW YORK - Three hundred gay lawyers, law students and others in­terested in the legal profession parti­cipated in a national conference enti­tled "Law and the Fight for Gay Rights" held March l 0 - 11 on the campus of ew York University. Sponsored by Lesbian and Gay Law Students of the ew York University School of Law and the Rutgers Gay Caucus, in conjunction with the Lamb­da Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc., the conference focussed on the gay lawyer's role in the struggle for recognition of gay people's civil rights. Most of the conference's activity took place in a series of workshops, which covered topics as varied as child custody, immigrevion, and criminal proceedings. A proposal to form a gay bar asso­ciation was considered by the confer­ence, which voted to postpone the action until an assessment of the need for such an organization could be made. Participants did vote to hold similar conferences on an annual basis, and several persons suggested that the next one be held in the South. ewly elected ew York Attorney General Robert Abrams delivered the conference keynote address, in which he reaffirmed 0 his "commitment to ad­vance the causes of gay people in the courts." The New York attorney general expressed an understanding of gays' problems vis-a-vis the law far above that of his Texan counterparts. Discussion during the workshops centered on strategies for increasing the legal protection currently afforded gays by the law. Wayne Dynes, President of the New York Gay Academic Union, pointed out that although gays have made definite legal advances, judges often ignore prior pro-gay-rights court judg­ments and most policemen are still prejudiced against homosexuals. Dynes was joined by many, including Tess Siegel, a straight New York lawyer who boasted that she has never lost a gay client's case, in voicing the need to educate the public in order to dispel the many myths about homosexuality. John Ward, a Boston attorney and Executive Director of Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders, warned law­yers representing gay clients to avoid defenses which are just as homophobic as the laws gays are fighting. He gave the example of the lawyer who def­ended his client - a divorced gay psy­chiatrist with five children - by saying, "This man's not a degenerate, he's a daddy." Jane Trichter, a current city council­member of ew York City who began her political career as a pro-abortion I DIVIDUAL & RELATIONAL COUNSELING Andrew Fono 2004112 GUADALUPE 472-7690 French Cuisine, Courtyard, & Bar. Open 11 a.m. until midnight Bakery open Fridays & Saturdays until 2 a.m. ~14 East 6th St. lobbyist, discussed lobbying as a strat­egy for securing gay rights. Referring to her involvement in the unsuccess­ful attempt to pass a New York City gay rights package, Trichter said that it is important that there be a close working relationship between the spon­sors of any gay rights bill and as broad a spectrum as possible of the gay com­munity. Steve Endean, Executive Director of Gay Rights National Lobby in Wash­ington, D.C., agreed with Trichter that the weakest part of the gay movement is its community organization. Endean explained that no lobbyist can be effective without "a constituency net· work" organized to support his eff osts. For example, he said, an organization called Christian Voice - which fights against gay rights, abortion, affinnative action, etc. - can mobilize I 00,000 members to contact their legislators when an important issue or vote comes before Congress. Endean said that gays must be organized to the point that they can apply just as much or more pressure on their legislators. Trich ter encouraged gays to run their own candidates for elected offices when possible, even if success seems unlikely. She said that even lost campaigns are productive, because they build the candidate's name recognition and cred­ibility, as well as mobilize support and raise issues.V University Bans Gay Group WASHINGTON, D.C. - Invoking the "moral teachings of the Catholic Church," the Georgetown University administration has overturned a student government decision to grant official campus recognition to Gay People of Georgetown, a tudent organization. The administration said that "while the University supports and cherishes the individual lives and rights of its students it will not subsidize thi cause. Such an endorsement would be inappropriate for a Catholic uni­versity. ' With little opposition, the George­town Student Senate had upheld a decision by the Student Activities ,. CAPITAL COIN COMPANY 3004 Guadalupe WASHING TON, D.C. - A bill to pro­hibit discrimination on the basis of sex­ual orientation in housing, employment, and public accomodations has been introduced in the U.S. House of Repre­sentatives but probably will not re­ceive a hearing in the Education and Labor Committee or the Judiciary Committee to which it has been re­ferred. The measure, co-sponsored by representatives Henry Waxman (D.­Calif.) and Theodore Weiss (D.-NY) is not matched by a corresponding bill in the Senate. Lobbyist Steve Endean. Similar attempts in past years have met similar fates. No gay-rights bill has ever been introduced in the Senate and none of the bills introduced in the House has ever received a hearing. Steve Endean of the Gay Rights ational Lobby say F deral la protecting le bians and gay men should not be expected s on. " Anyone who believes in a quick effort - even five years - is fooling themselves," he says. "It could be as much as IO to IS years before we get a bill." Endean believes hearings on gay-rights bills shouldn't be held until grass-roots support has been developed, probably within an­other three yearsV Commission to recognize the group. "The tudents arc bchin'd us," a local gay activist said. "The students are willing to listen to people who arc different from them; the student arc willing to radically confirm our basic human rights ... If there is any part of the university that needs to be educated ... it is the administ ra­tion.'' V 472-1676 kt extensive collecticn of OOlliS and SUPPLIES OOLD .ThVJElRY FIDM AIL OVER 'lliE IDRLD also buying antiques and all gold 20% discount on gold jewelry and coin supplies wi. th this ad. voJ. 3. 11 . -I GAY AUSTIN 5 Letters Editors' Note: We are providing this space for letters from our readers for feedback, comments, and announcements of interest to the lesbian and gay commun­ity in the hope that an effective forum is established. Coors boycott sti II· To the Editors: 't·-.. A few weeks ago William Coors was in town for a seminar sponsored by the LBJ School, the Graduate School of Business, and the Institute of Con­structive Capitalism. The University of Texas Employees Union in coopera­tion with other groups picketed and leafleted that meeting. NoW Coo.rs .has a full page ad in The Adv.ocst' ing us to "check it out" ror"_·qurselfit. If you do check it out you Will Jjn<l that the owners of Coors 'are ·~'?(~~J good and pure as they claim.' .tl!eiP'~er is. The workers did not "vc~ · 2 - 1 against the union. Coors br.oke the strike; it broke the union. It fired all of those on strike;_ it replaced the strikers with scabs. Coors stalled and finally the election was held with the scab v tin 1 out the union. ~e strike is over. We lost. The b9ycott is not over. The AFI.,CIO is continuing the boycott. Coors continues its usual ways. In their Advocate ad, they admit that they require polygraph tests. They humiliate their workers. They attempt to control the private lives of their employee . Check it out - read the ad yourself. oars continues to be a major cornerstone of tho e rightwing groups who continue to attack unions, the ·RA, gay-rights - anything that might help bring a decent life to the vast majority of Americans. · The purpos-e of the conference at the LBJ School was to hring Coors into the dominant business coalition that now rules America. If the "Coors" of America continue to be successful in their attacks on unions. gays, women, minorities, the poor, then these forces will become the new "center'' of American politics. We cannot allow this. No one - lesbian, gay, worker - no one should ever willingly parti­cipate in his/her own oppression. Please do not be bought out by ads. Do continue to boycott Coors. Shelly Caldwell President James Kieke Executive Vice-President University of Texas Employees Union TFT, AFT,. AFL-CIO Box 8182 UT Station Austin, Texas 78712 Laments closing of theater Editor: Austin's fir t and only all-male movie theater closed its doors on Wednesday, March 7, 1979. Financial difficulties were believed to be the reason the three partners closed the Cinema ollies Club. I, for one, really enjoyed those Jack Wrangler films. Austin finally had a gay porn theater of its very own! Here's hoping the owners can get some other investors to buy up their lease and reopen the theater. We in Austin deserve our own gay movie house. It's a disappointment to all of us involved in the venture right now. May the situation improve for the better real soon, so all of us can see our favor­ite gay porn stars on the big screen once again. Wayde Frey Austin, 3-14-79 I . Lesbians Charge Police Harassment SAN FRANCISCO - Support is grow­ing for two lesbians who have charged the San. Francisco police with harass· ment in an incident outside a women's bar in late January. The women say police handcuffed and beat them out­side the bar and later abused them Buy physically and verbally at two differ­ent police stations. They were event­ually charged with resisting arrest, public drunkenness and failure to identify themselves. Wages Due Lesbians, a San Fran­cisco organization, has asked Mayor Diane Feinstein to take action against the officers involved in the incident and to issue a public statement repri­manding them, and has demanded that charges against the women b dropped. v Gay Austin Classirieds Exile in Holland Gay Man ~ Flees U.S. 'Justice' BOSTO , - Gay Community Nelvs of Boston reports that Richard Bearse, who fled from the courtroom during his trial on charges of "intent to rape" a 14-year-old youth, is now in Holland. The Fitchburg, Massachusetts barber was accused of sitting naked in a dark­ened sauna with the youth for 20 minutes and of massaging his neck, shoulders and stomach. o genital contact solidtation or sexual conver­sation wa alleged and the youth made no objection to Bcarse's actions. The youth }).ad inquired aoout using the barber shop's sauna while Bearse cut his hair and had accepted Bearse's invitation to join him in it. After a trial in which the judge showed what observers described as bizarre behavior and blatant prejudice against the defendant, Bearse disap­peared from the courtroom while the jury was considering its verdict. The offense he was charged with could result in a life sentence and the pro­secutor assured Bearse he would be sentenced to 10 to 15 years without probation. The Sexual Reform Institute of Holland and the Werkgrupp Pedophilie have provided Bearse with lodging, financial upport and two lawyers. Dutch police and immigration offi­cials have assured him he will not be extradited and have given him per­mission to remain in the country for at least three months. The case has been widely publicized in Holland and supporters have pro­tested at the U.S. Embassy. Frank Torey of the Dutch Spartacus Organ­intion commented, .. Living in Holland, where sexual education is light-years :ihead of where it is in the English­speaking world, it is easy to overlook the significance of what is happening in Boston. But we won't." Bearse is now working with a coa­lition of Dutch gay and youth groups who are trying to help 14-year-old Bubba tayes of Mississippi, recently sentenced to 48 years in an adult prison, without the possibility of probation for his first conviction of participation in a robbery. ''I've learned ho important political action is · Bearse said. "The boy in m case was abused by the trial as much as I was, and Bubba is abused. All u:s. •justice' knows how to do is abuse minors and those adults who relate to them. V Brydon to Head NGTF N tW YORK - Charles F. Brydon, a 40-year-old insurance executive who is currently co-chair of the ,ational Gay Task Force Board of Directors, has been named to replace Dr. Bruce Voeller as co-executive director of NGTF. Voeller resigned in October. As an army captain Brydon erved in Germany, Korea and Vietnam in the '60s and became a gay civil rights activist in the '70s. He joined the NGTF Board of Director in 1976. The new director hopes to build greater grass-roots support for GTF. •'The task force has only I 0 000 members out of an estimated _Q million gay people in the .S., ' he said. He also urged TGTF to build alliances beyond those already establish d with ' feminist organizations. "Gay group , need to make connections with bla k civil right group , su h a the 'AACP, and with the labor movement, ' h said. Brydon say pa t gay civil rights efforts have shown that "we can gain allies in the civic and politi al leader-hip.'' Hebelieve that th gay right movement cannot afford t alien te the con ervativc who believe in pri a Y and who under tands th t it i wrong to discriminate .. , Brydon will assume office on April 9. ·- . " ~ .. Charles Brydon. 6 apriI 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'Ol. 3, r10. 7 Gay Couple Sues INS LOS ANGELES - A gay couple claim­ing to be legally married has filed suit against the Immigration and Natural­ization Service to prevent deportation of one of the partners. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court by American Civil Liberties Union lawyers, results from the INS's refusal to grant prefer­ential resident alien visa to Anthony Sullivan, an Australian citizen, as the spouse of Richard Adams, a citizen of this country. In its initial decision, the INS told the pair, "You have failed to estab­lish that a bona fide marital relation- Brazilian Press Supports Lampiao SAO PAOLO, BRAZIL - The Brazilian Press Association, the journalists' union, and a number of artistic and cultural groups have rallied to the defense of Lampitio, Brazil's first serious gay pub­lication, since the Brazilian military dictatorship issued subpoenas against the paper's editorial collective last September (see Gay Austin, March 1979.) A coalition called the Permanent Commission for the Defense of Free­dom of Expression characterized the subpoenas and other government threats against the paper as "one more attack on freedom of expression" and called charges of "offending morality and propriety" a "subterfuge for censor­ship." The legal action against the paper is based on the Press Law passed by the military government when it took power in 1964. Journalists for at least four non-gay publications who have written articles on homosexuality are also currently under investigation for alleged violations of the same provisions of the law.V ship can exist between two faggots." A later ruling claimed a gay male spouse "cannot function as a wife by assuming female duties and obligations inherent in the marital relationship." The lawsuit claims the INS decision violates constitutional guarantees of equal protection. The ruling is at least the second instance of discrimination against homo­sexuals since the INS told representa­tives of the National Gay Task Force last year that they would end the practice. (See Gay Austin, March, 1979.)V Gay Couple Adopts Child SAN FRANCISCO - For what is be­lieved to be the first time in history, a court has granted an openly gay couple the right to adopt a child. On January 12 a Los Angeles Superior Court judge approved the adoption of 23-month­old Robert David by Reverend Jim Dykes of the Metropolitan Community Church and his spouse, Albert Lanny Dykes, a physician. Since there is no legal recognition of gay couples under California law, Dr. Dykes is the official parent while Rev. Dykes is the child's guardian. It is officially considered a single­parent adoption.V Youth Counselor Acquitted HOUSTO - A fonner counselor for a half-way house for runaways in Hou­ston was found not guilty of sexual mis­conduct after the alleged victim, who was also the state's chief witness, ad­mitted he had lied in a similar trial against another counselor at the same half-way house last December. The 16-year-old youth told the jury police had grilled and rehearsed him before his testimony in the earlier trial, which also resulted in acquittal. The two trials resul ted from a state­ment made by the youth during an investigation by what is known locally as the "chicken-hawk squad" of the Houston Police Department. Two other counselors from the half-way hou e who were also charged have not yet been brought to trial. Assistant District ttorney Brian R.ains, who admits he knew of the perjury, refused to explain his pro ecu­ting the second defendant. Defen e attorney Larry Watts accused the Distri t ttomey' office of ''knowing u e of perjured te timony in vi lati n of the c n n f ethi .'' I r Lesbian Relationship Grounds for Alimony Cut ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA - A Minne­sota District Court judge has ruled that a woman's stable lesbian rela­tionship is sufficient grounds for the termination of alimony payments from her ex-husband. After a divorce agree­ment made in 1972 which required alimony "until such time as she re­marries or dies," the ex-husband took the woman to court to stop alimony when he discovered she was involved Arson Suspected in Gay Commune Fire WOLF CREEK, OREGON - Arson is suspected in the fire which destroyed the farmhouse of a small commune of gay men here last January 12. The commune, at which the gay men's journal RFD was published until re­cently, has been the target of haras - ment and vandalism for the past year and last fall townspeople exprc cd concern when two boys, aged three and seven, moved to the farm to be raised there. The local sheriff found two unu ed Molotov cocktails and an empty gaso­line can near the ite of the fire. There were no injurie · but damage was estimated at 30,000. o arre ts in a relationship with another woman. Although it is not believed the de· cision will establish important legal precedent, Jean O'Leary of the National Gay Task Force considers it significant. "I think the judge is right," O'Leary said. "If this is a stable relationship, it certainly is the equivalent of a marriage situation ... We could solve all these problems just by legalizing homosexual marriages." V TV Evangelist Dropped for Anti-Gay Sermon DALLAS - Dallas television station WFAA - TV has discontinued its weekly broadcasts by evangelist James Robison because of a sermon he delivered in late February in which he called the gay movement ''despicable'' and "a perversion of the highest order." Station manager David Lane said he believed the ermon violated the Federal Communications Commission's Fairness Doctrine. ''I should he able to say what' in my head and in the Bible ." Robison aid. "I'll alway preach that home - are expected.V sexuality i a in ." V Demonstators Attacked EW YORK - A group of 50 gay and lesbian demonstrators at the office of ' a Queens City Councillor was attacked by several dozen teenagers who threw eggs, fruit, and bottles at them and yelled, "Get out of our neighborhood" and "Castrate gay men." Witnesses say the eight or ten police on the scene escorted demonstrators to safety when they had finished , but made no attempt to stop the attack. Joyce Hunter, a member of Lesbians Rising, said, "In all the years I've been demonstration, I've never encountered 706L6 .. ltreet anything as vicious as this . . . It wa really dangerou .'' She said the demon­strators "didn't expect a nice crowd, but we didn't expect the violence either. The police encouraged their behavior, but we kept our cool." The demonstration was organized by the Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Rights against Queen_ City Councillor Thomas J. Man ton for his consistent opposition to gay rights. Hunter says the activists will return. "We have to demonstrate in the area again because many of us live in the district," she said.V A.UITIX. TSXA.S I I ' • r' f ! • "' ) I \ , ' , I • .. . . ' - vol. 3, 110. 7 .GAY AUSTIN april 1979 7 POPPERS a gui~e for consumers "Poppers" is the common name for the drug butyl nitrite. Well known in the gay community, it is sold in small bottles or in mesh-covered crushable vials in most adult bookstores, many headshops, and by mail order. Butyl may not' legally be sold for human consumption, so each of these dozens of brand-name products is sold as "liquid incense" or "room deodorizer" or "scent." This is ironic because few people find the smell entirely pleasing. Butyl nitrite is very similar to the medical drug amyl nitrite. Both arc some­times incorrectly called nitrates and one manufacturer labels his!foduct with a complex chemical name which, nonetheless, translates into buty rite. Differ­ences in effect between butyl (the incense) and amyl (the pres ription drug) would seem to be minimal. More reports of minor side effects are encountered with butyl, but these may be the result of impurities which do not occur in pharmaceutically controlled amyl. The nitrites arc strong vasodilators. Blood ves.cls in the body are not rigid pipes, but arc more like a system of valves capable of being opened or closed. When the vessels are opened (dilated), blood may rush through them more freely; if this happens in the face it is called blushing. With most people, vaso­dilation occurs over most of the body surface when they approach orgasm, resulting in the well-known sexual flush. Medically, nitrites arc used to treat angina pectoris. When the arteries which supply blood to the heart become narrowed by the deposit of sediment on the inside walls - the way hot-water pipes are narrowed in hard-water areas - they arc no longer capable of delivering maximum blood supply to the heart. This may not bother a person engaged in quiet activities, but in heavier activity or in excitement, the heart's demand for blood may increase beyond the diseased arteries' ability to supply it. The result is severe pain in the chest: angina pcc­toris. itrite have the ability to dilate these blood vessels temporarily and so reverse the situation of insufficient blood supply to the heart. by LARS EIGHNER If the artery becomes completely blocked. hO\ t:vcr, then part of the heart tissue is bound to die. Thi is called myocardial mfar th n - or heart attack - and the possibility of its happening is why no 01h.: . hould attempt to treat che t pains with nitrites except under clo c medical supcrvi. ion. The folks who niff butyl nitrite in book tore and di os, of cour e. do not have angina pectoris. They sniff it for the rush. · Recreational u e of nitrites seem to be i lakd to thrc factor . First, nitrites produce a strong. hot. tlu hing cnsation imilar to the flush which accompanic sexual activity. Many men identify thi en·ation a cxual, al­though not as many women expericnt:c i L in tJ1i, wa . Variation of the cffc t accompany many kind of heavy activity uch a fighting. weightlifting. and other athletic endeavor. Secondly, popper arc believed t be aphrodi ia . Almo t every p ycho­activc drug has at one time or another b1.:cn thought to in ·r1.:a e .c ·ual drive or ability. But the primary place of c. ual arou al in human beings i not between the leg ; it i between the car . Virtually anything. will innea drive and ability if the user believe it will. 'itritc· do not directly cau men to have erections. The many report of thi: eff cct an be c plained b ' the mental association of the u e of the drug with c ual activit '. Finall , nitrite. usually cause a en ation of lighthcad dn to their vasodilator effects. The blood vc .els in thr bod c:on ·titulc a clo t:d container. A strong va odilator cau c the blood c.: cl to op 11 up. which amounts to making the container much larger. If a ·ontain r 0 1 larger. th pressure of the cnclo e<l fluid gets lower, o nitrit ·an udJ nl rcdu c blood pressure. When blood pres ure g c down. there ma n lt be .ufficicnt force for enough blood to overcome gravity and get to the brain. Temporary drop in blood pres ure arc comna 11 and normal; they account for the e'l ation of faintness that people omctimc~ . p ricn · when tand- Continued on page 16. DOING IN DOWNTOW austin's official approach to revitalization On December 8, 1977, the Austin City Council instructed the City Manager to prepare an economic development plan for Downtown. Thi stud · recently approved hy the Council, proposes a set of "development strategic de igncd to halt the economic and physical deterioration of Central Austin." Alth u 1h the goals and objectives of the study arc desirable, the strategics for achieving them fail to break with the specious comfort of wi hes, familiar upcr tition , and oversimplifications; they relate only minimally to the real world and ignore the need for effective physical planning to create a continuou net\ ork of afe, lively and intcre ting streets which foster public contad and enc uragc a var­iety of commerce, cultural opportunities and culture . The primary goal of the plan is to insure the fiscal heal th of the City. 111is is a worthy goal which, in keeping with safe, lively, and interesting trect can be achieved through the encouragement of private entrepreneur hip and mall­business activity. Commendably, the plan recognizes these method , but al 0 propo e that the city .. a sist with land assembly" for large. inglc-u c d vclop­mcnts (office towers). Land assembly is objectionable becau e. to in urc diver­sity, an area mu t . ervc more than one, and preferably more than two, primary uses. These uses must insure the presence of people who go outdoors on differ­ent schedules and who arc in the area for different purpo·cs. Office tower do not meet this criterion. Further bank and offi e tower by function lack a spread of people throughout the day (one of the main current problems). and thus replace old stagnation with new. 1o t u11furtunatc, the mea urc of succc sunder the new plan is increased tax-ba c revenues (money generated from a higher tax a sc sment of land and building' ; thu the down­town problem ha bccorn~ a problem not in social theory, communll or p '· chology, but in bookkecpmg. Downtown cea e to become a human creation and become a commodity._ Its. achievements are not to be ju<lg d by ar hitec­tural beauty, cultural insp1rat10n and hurnan asso iation but by cconc mic productivity, taxable re ou1ce , and fiscal succe . Urban id olo 'Y ha be ome by PHILLIP CO ARD business idcolog}. Downtown Austin has th<.: potential to become a \\ 11-hakmc d. dhcr ilicd and exciting di tril.'.l. Wid chokr and riLh opprn H.mit) i. the 1 ur1 o ol ·itic .. Sixth Street i Ii cl. !ar~1 cly b \trtue of 1t. ~real cull •ct1on of rn.tll dun nt . This diver i ty not the bank tm\CT. or City Hall ha made D m11 t )\ 1 \lhr;mt and exciting. The current cit) plan for Do\l.nto\\11 rcdevdopm nt ha h t t••l t 111 tJ1i fact. Thi L It mo. t tragic Ila\\ it 111pha 1~ on cconomiudl~ i;,I le ma. culture. •'Bars. porno1•raphi · hol>kstor and othe1 nu1 anc · land u c ·an 1k' lound along part of C"ong1 c en u and • i. th . t rcct. Allhou11L th \. u . .., ,!H' not numcrou they and the patron the) attract act to de tro. \\hate\ ·1 wholesom environment the\ idnit) might othcrn I l po l' :· ''Strategics for the l·conomk R1.:v1t:tl11a11011 of Cl:ntr~I u. ti11.'· p. M). It i unfortunate that the Council dw. r to i idudc tl11 pa1~1~ 1:q h tk : 11 puhli oppo ition voiced at the hearing. Then 111clu 1011 <I it hov. ,1 I IP· found mi under ·tanding of the purpo :ind putcnt ial of th<.: Do llh '' 11 ,111.:a. for the ·'nut ance" land u e and their pat1011 . ''l'll. Ill\ on. 1 th .'11 t omcwhcrc bet\ ccn !\1r. Pc p 1· and the A lult ~tP1c. Jlil' '' ,, · t.il Ii h-ment arc the only bu me c tha cep th t1c1.:t acti\l' (.111 I lhll I< 1 .• tfl:. relatively rime-free. and 111tc1c till!..' rncnt)·lllur ltt1u1 1.:HI~ d.1~. \\lr.11 m.1k1.. Si thStrcct uc.:ccsful1 It diverit t\\ellt\·lousholll all;1\. Bel0te following their plan I<: I 1. tl1 City C<11m 11. '1011 I h1L·1" a\\.t~ from their p cudo c1cncc of dty plannrng and e amine JU "h.rt Illa th1. real \\orlc.1 lick. Copic of .. Strate 0 1e for the I ·onomi · Rcvitali1.at1011 'I ( l'lllta may he obtained from the Planning D partm nt or by calling 477-C- 11. l mand a copy (they hesitate ll giv them reely · your ta · dollar I ai 1 for it l r · duction."\i' 8 apriJ 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'Ol. 3, r1 . 7 CIT~ by Bob Prewitt The only thing certain about the 5 lst Annual Acedemy Awards, to be tele­vised April 9, is that Jason Robards will not win a third consecutive Oscar for Best Supporting Actor. Robards, who pocketed awards for his performances in All the President's Men (1976) and Julia (1977) has not been nominated this year, which suits me just fine. Last year he "spoiled" what would have been an ·otherWise perfect scorecard for me. I correctly predicted the winners in all the major categories (Best Picture, Director, and performances) - except Supporting . Actor, for which I chose the redoubtable Alec Guinness. Oh well. Considering the number of surprises the Academy provides each year, I guess I should be satisfied with five out of six. This year, choosing winners seems even more precarious. In almost every category there are legitimate reasons for picking a number of nominees to win. o single film would seem to be a clear favorite, though very typically one movie will end up bagging most of the major awards. Still, look for at least one minor upset, and perhaps a major one or two. There are too many intangible_ factors at work to expect otherwise. Frankly, I'll be quite happy if I pick three of the top six categories correctly this year. Best Supporting Actor. The biggest urprise here is the incomprehensible omission of veteran character actor Robert Morley, who maivelously redefined gluttony in Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? It appears that the film's overall mediocrity spoiled his chances. Had he been nominated, my choice would have been much more difficult. As it is, the prediction isn't all that nerve-racking. Richard Farnsworth gave an affecting performance in Comes A Horseman, but the film was ignored by the public, and he stands little chance. Two of the nominees mentioned most often, Bruce Dern (Coming Home) and Christopher Walken (The Deer Hunter) will in my estimation walk away from the Dorothy Chandler pavilion empty-handed. Dem is a competent actor, and yes it's true he's not received enough attention for his work. In this film his portrayal of the volatile Vietnam veteran left behind by life in America was quite engaging. But it's a perfonnance too similar to others he's given in the past (did anyone see Black Sunday?), and one grows weary of repetition ob­scure or otherwise. Dern will receive a healthy vote, many for sentimental reasons, but it shouldn't carry him over. Walken, on the other hand, has had no trouble with publicity, and he hasn't been working in films that long. AU his interviews and photo essays had me geared for the supporting performance of the year. It's true Walken is good in The Deer Hunter, but frankly 1 was more impressed by John Savage, and my gut feeling is the Academy will not let hype completely guide their vote. Jack Warden was wonderful as the L.A. Rams trainer in Heaven Can Wait. Ifs a tribute of no small stature that Warden upstaged his funny, bumblin(T co-star, Charles Grodin, with a nomination. ( Grodin had received more pre­nomination publicity than had Warden. Still, Warden's "light comedy" role . undoubtedly will be overshadowed by the heavy duty performances he's forced to compete with. My pick to win, with little hesitation, is John Hurt ( fidnight Express , the British actor who so overwhelmed with his subtle, yet devastating performance as the drug-riddled Max. The vote will be close, with Walken and Dern not far behind, but Hurt should pull it out, and it's an honor richly de· erved. 705 RED RIVER 47i-0418 Best Supporting Actress. Probably the most difficult category to predict. Still, it's essentially a four-way race. Penelope Milford (Coming Home), ·as b st I can remember, was all right, but I had totally forgotten her performance by the time nominations were released, and was surprised to see her name. Where is Kelly Bishop, so affecting as Jill Clayburgh's best friend in An Unmarried Woman? Or even Diane Keaton for Interiors? At any rate, I don't expect the Academy to remember Milford any better than I do, especially considering her competition. To pick the winner from the remaining four one might as well draw straws . Although it's certainly possible that Dyan Cannon (Heaven Can Wait) will win in an upset, I really can't choose her. The competition's too strong. How­ever, should the Academy decide to give nearly every award in ight to the light, frothy comedy (which could very well happen, given the current "let's· not-deal-with-it'' mood of the country), her chances would increase dramatic­ally. Cannon is ble sed with a marvlous gift for comedy and an exquisite sense of timing, but something tells me this just isn't her year. No doubt there will be others. That leaves three nominees, and rny choice is based solely on intuition - not a bad criterion when the Oscars are the concern. All three women - Maggie Smith (Califomia Suite}, Maureen Stapleton (Interiors), and Meryl Streep (The Deer l/unter) - are spectacular. Smith and Stapleton are in a similar po ition, having been nominated several times before (Smith won the 0 car for Be t Actress in 1969 for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie; Stapleton ha · never won in two supporting nominations). In fact, my choice was more dif­ficult before I saw Strcep's perfom1ance; both Smith and Stapleton are c tab­lished veterans and Academy favorites. 1 had just about decided to go with Stapleton on a hunch when The Deer Hunter finally got to town, and merci­fully forced my decision another direction: in a sizable surprise, Meryl Streep will win the award. It's not often that a nominee wins the first time around, but it's not unheard of, either (Diane Keaton did it just last year). And Streep's performance is ab olutelyfascinating, one of the many marvels of The Deer Hunter. Still, a lot depends on how the member hip reacts to The Deer Hu11ter as a whole; if it turns away from the Vietnam epic in other categories, it will probably turn away from Streep as well. I say this probably won't happen, but if it does, and Smith, Stapleton or Cannon win instead, 1 won't be upset in the least. Best Actress. Another tough one. Ellen Burstyn (Same Time, Next Year) nabbed the nomination I thought might go to Marybeth Hurt (Interiors) or Melanie Mayron (Girlfriends). Burstyn is quite good as Doris, one-half of the affectionate, if adulterous, pair of lovers originally created for the stage. And he is an Academy favorite of sorts, having won Best Actress in 1974 for Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore. But as a whole Same Time, Next Year is uneven, and with the strong performances of her peers, Burstyn has to be considered a long-shot. I really was not impres ed with Jane Fonda in Coming lfome, and do not expect her to win. Her portrayal was too bland, and at the same time too man­nered and self-conscious. Also working against her, Coming Home was relea ed early in the year, a very real factor indeed; the Academy, it has often been said, has a short memory. She could win a "sympathy award" for losing to Keaton last year, but that, too, seems unlikely. Once again the choice comes down to three: Geraldine Page (Interiors , Jill Clayburgh (An Unmarried Woman), and Ingrid Berman (Autumn Sonata). Page was brilliant in Interiors, and may have the most expre ivc face in movies today. She also has been nominated several times before. But her part was rel­atively small, and Interiors received mixed reviews; these could be crucial. Based purely on performance, I believe Clayburgh should win. She met the challenge of a large and demanding role, displaying a wide range of emotions with great power and control. But Bergman will win. As the distraught, emo­tionally impotent mother in "Sonata," she was wonderfully convincing, but this in itself would not be enough for her to win the 0 car over Clayburgh. The heer force of sentimentality will make the difference, and I do not say thi di paragingly. Bergman is one of the mot magnetic, important stars in Hollywo d hi tory. If she wins, he will own four Oscar , more than any other performer. And ince "Sonata" may in fact be Bergman' la t major work, who could really blame the Academy? If ·he doc n't win, it will be a mild, an<l perhaps melancholy, surprise. Best Actor. I feel the least comfortable predicting here, becau e I haven't een two f the film repre ented : The Buddy llolly Story (Gary Bu ey) and The Boys from Brazil Laurence Olivier). Still, I have some confidence. I have seen Bu ey before (in Straight Time, particularly) and know he i taJented and powerful. Still, a a newcomer among the nominee hi chance dimini h significantly. Olivier's nomination was the one major surpri e this year, and Brad Davis ( fie/night Expre s) de rve an apology. I can't hc]p but b Ii ve Olivier wa honored for the ninth time out of re pcct for hi long mu triou career rather than for hi performance in "Brazil" (both the film and Olivier have received mixed reviews). In either case he i no heir apparent to the 0 car. Continued on page 16. v'OI. 3, 110. 7 GAY AUSTIN apriJ 19799 V~NYl~SMS by Dennis Haney DISCO BITS AND PIECES Prelude Records has a hot album release called .. Fire Night Dance" by the Peter Jaequcs Band. Both the title cut and .. Walking on Music" are receiving heavy play which should make this LP one of the year's biggest and best. No, that's not a new disco song by the Emotions you're hearing, but, rather. Alton McClain and Destiny doing the ultimate rip-off with ''It Must Be Love." Village People strike again with "In the Navy" from the forthcoming album "Go West." Casablanca, meanwhile, has raised the list price of their previous albums from $7 .98 to $8.98, making Village People the first group to have their entire catalog raised all at once. Capitol Records has finally started releasing more commercial twelve-inch single . Three worth noting arc A Taste of Honey's classic "Boogie Oogie Oogic," Desmond Child and Rouge's "Our Love is Insane,'' and Gonzalez' "Haven't Stopped Dancing Yet." Although Herbie Mann's "Superman" is doing well, the original version by Celi Bee is infinitely superior. Both are currently available as twelve-inch singles. Melba Moore follows up her successful rendition of the Bee qees' "You Stepped Into my Life ," with a new disco single entitled "Pick Me Up, I'll Dance." Additional disco singles worth noting are Carrie Lucas· "Dance ith You," the Bombers' 0 (Everybody) Get Dancin' " and remixed versions of Celi Bee's "Fly Me On the Wings of Love" and Cher's "Take Mc Home." Donna Summer is currently in the studio at work on a new album with producers Giorgio Moroder and Pete Bellote. Meanwhile, she has become one of only seven female solo vocalists to top both the pop single and album charts simultaneously. The Queen of Disco continues to reign! "Bang a Gong" is the latest rock song to be redone disco style, this time by a group calling themselves Witch Queen. Other recent remakes have included Led Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven" and Del Shannon's old rock and roll hit .. Runaway." Meanwhile, the Beach Boys are the latest to try their hand at disco with a new twelve-inch release entitled "Here Comes the Night.'' Sylvester has a hot new twelve-ince single out called "I (Who Have No­thing)" from his new album "Stars." Portions of the LP were co-produced with Cerrone. Linda Clifford's new album titled "Let Me Be Your Woman" has been re­leased and features a sizzling disco version of "Bridge Over Troubled Water." From the Jady who gave us "Runaway Love" and "If My Friends Could See Me Now," this one should be dynamite. Madleen Kane, who scored well last year with "Rough Diamond," is back on the chart with "Forbidden Love" from the forthcoming album "Cheri." Vicki Sue Robinson returns to the scene with the release of her new disco single "Nighttime Fantasy." Remebered best for "Tum the Beat Around" and "Hold Tight,'' she should score well with this latest outing, featured in the upcom~ng film Noctuma. "V Andersons' Illusions is back for one week only Tue•.- Sat. a:oo pm April 3-8 Set. & Sun. 2:00 pm 4th & Lavaca 4'78-4538 o r 4'78 -7844 c hlldren'• NEW RECORD COMP ANY RELEASES GAY ALBUM Aboveground Records, a new record company based in Philadelphia, has just announced the release of its first album, GAY AME GAME, featuring singer/songwriter Tom Wilson. Wilson, who accompanies himself on piano, has appeared at coffeehouses, bars, and conferences in Philadelphia and New York. On the record he is backed up by a small group of instrumentalists. GAY NAME GAME is the album's title song and there are twelve others ranging from humor and satire to quiet ballads. Writing about his appearance at The Glines in ew York, Gay Community News (Boston) called Wilson "the surprise hit of the evening ... the gay version of Tom Lehrer, with a little Randy ewman thrown in ... " Philadelphia's Drummer, applauding an eppearance at the University of Pennsylvania, called Wilson "wry, engaging" and .. appealing." At a recent statewide conference in Pennsylvania Gay Era was ••com­pletely charmed by his songs and demeanor after dinner. ' The album will be available at gay bookstores and specialty shops and can be ordered directly from Aboveground Records, Box 2131, Philadelphia, PA 19103. ($7 .00 plus 50 cents postage and handling; Pennsylvania residents add 6% sales tax.) ''We're a gay company," according to a spokesperson from Aboveground, ''so it's appropriate that our first offering is an upbeat, upfront gay album. We plan to record other gay artists in the near future.'' "V THE STUDE TS' • School Supp/Ms - all • C.lculators & Ty,,.wrl • Alt & EnglnHrlng Su • lf«:ord• ' r.,,., • SIJonlng Good1 f • .w..lry & Clau Rings I •a.,,.,., Book• • ,__-=--t Store !..~ !t=•:' :.:o:R ec~rs •..•. io & Television elt1• & Texa Souvenirs H t• Shop :, cial & ltlall Order " ,,, to make• purchHe with VISA or ltla:stercharge? ,,, to ttart • Co-Op tlm• payment plan? If you have any of th ... needs; come by the Co-Op and give us a chance to M lp. The University Co-Op, a Texas tradlt on s nee 1896. We want to be your atore. -~ 476-7211 2248 Guadalupe ,_ - - """"'.c 00 ,_ Photo notes ,I -Photos by Joseph Kelly 12 apriJ 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'OI. 3, r10. 7 by Georg Stojcevic For most of us the kitchen is a place filled with the memories of good food and good times. However, it seems whenever we attempt to recreate that good food in our own kitchens the results are a mixture of chaos, bedlam, and severe heartburn. It is the intent of this column to Jead you through the culinary battlefield and help you to achieve the basic sense that will enable you to prepare and enjoy food that is edible, reasonably inexpensive, and relatively hassle-free. The recipes that I will pass on to you are not very fancy; I'll leave the Cordon Bleu to those souls with more time, money, and nerves. Whether your kitchen is large enough for a game of rugby or smaller than a breadbox, a few things remain the same. In the pots and pans department you should have some kind of kettle or large pot, at least a couple of gallons worth, and a few medium and small saucepans, a skillet, and perhaps a tea kettle. This basic set is a must if you want to rise above the prepared/tinned/ frozen neofood syndrome. Lay in some spices - garlic, cayenne (red pepper), basil, oregano, chili, curry, thyme, as well as good old salt and pepper. These basics can give a dish that borders on the mediocre a push into the divine. Don't forget a few utensils - wooden spoons, slotted spoons, spatula, wire whip (cool it you fetishists) and perhaps a good strainer. With these varied implements of destruction you should be ab]e to launch a fair-sized culinary catastrophe. Now that you have a vague idea of what a kitchen is all about let us get into the more practical side of things. The recipes that 1'11 be sending your way in this column are all laid out with simplicity in mind, and after you get the hang of each one, please vary, experiment. Cooking can be an art form as well as a whole bunch of fun.V :~:::~:::~=~=----~-=~=~~:::::·--"-··----, l quart milk l stick margarine or butter 2 cups water 5 slices cooked bacon Salt and a generous amount of pepper Combine above ingredients and cook tiH potatoes are well done. Stir often to prevent scorching. Use ]ow heat. Very good with hefty sandwiches and beer. ~ .......................................................................................................................................................... , Bean Soup Southside Style 2 qts. water ~lb. bacon or ham, chopped 2 onions chopped 4 potatoes cubed 4 carrots sliced Salt and pepper 1 lb. Northern or pea beans soaked overnight and rinsed Combine an of above and cook till beans are tender, about 2 - .2~ hours. Great with franks or sausage. ,,/~'.~~.::.~.~~ .. ~~~=~HHOOHOOHOHO-MOHOHOHOHOHHOHOHOHOOHOHOHHHHOOHOO-HOOHHHHH_O_HO .. HHHOHHHOHH ___ OOMOOHHHHOHOOOHOHHHOHHHOOHOOHOOHOOOOOHOOHOMOHOOOHOOOHOHHOHOOOHOOHOHHHHHOHHoooooHOOHH-I 111 111 V\;g 't:tble Soup (Minestrone) ~ •tt . water 6 - 8 beef bouillon cubes I cup celery chopped 1 onion chopped in very ~ m 111 pieces 4 - 6 carrots chopped ~ cup parsley chopped 4 tomatoes chopped Dash garlic Let the above come to a boil, then turn down heat and let simmer a couple of hours. At that point. add: 2 cups macaroni I can stewed tomatoes 1 can ~arbanzo beans l can pin to beans Let cook till macaroni is tender, add saJt, pepper, and a UJ:>h lli · .1) cnnc. Have a little crusty bread and enjoy. Farmers Market Vegetable Soup 2 qts. water 6 -8 beef bouillon cubes 1 lb. fresh green beans I lb. fresh peas 5 fresh tomatoes 4 - 5 small zucchini squash 4 med. size potatoes l pkg. frozen corn 1 pkg. frozen Hrna beans 4 carrots Slice and cut up fresh veggies and combine with water and bouillon; let cook for an hour and a half. Add frozen veggies and cook another half hour. Salt and pepper to your taste. A good way to end a long day. Recycled Soup This recipe is a do-it-yourself-as-you-go-along kind of recipe. Just put any­where from 2 to 4 quarts of water in a pot and add leftover beef and bones, pork and bones, etc. Add a bit of onion, salt, pepper, and let boil for a while, like an hour or two. Strain out the bones and debris and add any veggies, pasta, rice you feel like; cook until they arc done. This is also a great place to use up leftover veggies, noodles etc. You can make some really good combinations in this way. Bon appetit. Serbian Hunter Soup This recipe came to me in a drunken stupor. After indulging in a wee trifle too much of slivovitz (the fiery native plum brandy of my homeland, Serbia) I decided a meal with above-average restorative power was caJled for. So I de­vised this number to set me right. It worked and not only will destroy a hang­over, but is downright tasty. Even non-drunks and non-Serbs found it appealing. I qt. water l qt. cheap red wine 6 white onions l pound smoked garlic sausage I small chicken cut up 4 po1atoes 2 cloves fresh garlic 6 comatocs 1 bunch green onions 3 tsp. cayenne 2 tsp. Tabasco l pint tomato juice 2 tsp. basil 5 tsp. black pepper I 1 stalk celery, chopped Salt to taste 1 Combine all of above and cook at least three hours. Invite over some II friends, break a loaf of crusty bread and enjoy. It is spicy and will get your 1............ ........ ...._, ____, ., .......... .._..... •......., ___. ..................... __. ...........................b..l.o..o..d " . .m...o..v..i.n...g.. .a..g..a..i.n.... ....... ____ ·---11-11 .... I HIE IJllllllll ..... , _ ..._ ___ _ . .... 7 ..... c vol. 3, 110. 7 GAY AUSl .. IN a1Jril 191913 BOOK REVIEWS . .. .. by Marian Phillips Iler/and. By Charlotte Perkins Gilman. 146 pages. Pantheon. $2.95. I have my prejudices - as indeed who hasn't? - and two of them are that I don't like utopian novels because they bore me, and I do like feminist liter­ature but it depresses me (and well it might.) So when I came across a book whose front cover said Herland: A Lost Ferninine Utopian Novel by Char­lotte Perkins Gilman, I sighed, reminded myself that even reviewing books has its drab moments, and started to slog through it. Slogging was unnecessary: I flew through it instead. When I finished the last page I paused briefly in order to make out a list of people that I wanted to send copies to, and then went back to the beginning and read it all over again. From the first line to the last, lier/and is a jewel of a novel - fast-paced, en­tertaining and thoughtful. Everyone should read it at least once, merely be­cause it's clever, well-written and instructive. For women, however, it is add­itionally recommended that you re'read it on certain specific occasions, to wit: when you start thinking that if one more man patronizes you because of your sex, you're going to punch him in the nose; when you've been ub­jected to a choru of insults, wolf-whistles and obscene suggestions because you choose to walk down the street alone: and finally, when it gets to the point where a man calls from his car, "Hey baby, you need a ride?" and it takes a conscious effort of will for you to refrain from screaming insults and breakin 1 his windshield. Iler/and is medicine for all of these symptoms.guar­anteed to soothe, heal and otherwise repair the abraded nerves which, like the pugilist's broken nose, arc the occupational hazard of the full-time feminist. Gilman's novel (which was serialized in her magazine The Forenmner in 1915, but never reprinted until now) presents us with a country entirely pop­ulated by women and completely cut off from the rest of the world until it is di covered by three (male) explorers. Between them the men show us the two ends and middle of the exist continuum: Jeff is a Southern gentleman who feel that women are weak, helpless darlings with the souls of angels; Terry believes that there are two kinds of women - •'those he wanted and those he didn't," and whose pct theory is that all women love to be ""mas· tcrcd,'' a word which for him encompasses everything from overbearing rude­ne s to rape; and Van (the narrator) repre ents a man of reason - prejudiced, certainly, but willing to change his opinions when faced vith undeniable facts. The emotional atmosphere in lier/and is in striking contra t to that of mo t fcmini t writin) . Feminist literature as a whole i written in a context of phy· sical menace. Women, who are (in general) smaller than men and who are usually given little or no physical training, arc con tantly threatened with violence, either implicit or explicit. We cannot walk out alone at night for fear of as ault and rape. We arc advi cd not to resist a rapist becau c he'll probably be strong enough to murder and/or mutilate us. We need multiple locks on our door and window bccau e we cannot be safe even in our home . The defer­ence men have exacted from women for so many cen turie is due prcci 1 to their ahility to punish us if we don't comply. and although nowadays a threat is frequently disguised as patronage. the violence surfaces quickly enough if a man ts challenged (as almost any uppity feminist can testify.) In Her/and Gilman has shown us a country where. becau e the women out­number the men a million to three, this physical threat is missing, and it is this which makes the novel so relaxing. Terry blusters and threatens, and instead of trembling, the women "'would gather around and watch him as if it was an ex­hibition, politely, but with evident interest." The women are never bitter or scornful, but neither are they intin1idated. The point is driven home at the end of the book when the three men fall in love with, and marry, three women of Herland. Terry's desire to "master" his wife leads him to pull out what in our society is the male trump card - violence. He attempts to rape her, and - but I won't spoil it for you, since to this particular uppity feminist it was the high point of the novel. It leads to a trial in whkh Terry disdains even to defend himself - because, as Van notes, ''in a court in our country he would have been held quite 'within his rights,' of course." Instead, Terry told his judges that they were incapable of understanding a mans needs, a man's desires, a man's point of view. He called them neuters, epicencs, blood­less, sexless creatures. He said they could of course kill him - as so many insects could - but that the · despised them nonetheless. And all those stern grave mothers did not eem to mind his des-pising them, not in the least. · This passage is typical Gilman - unfailingly polite, always grave, but with goodnatured merriment practically bubbling out as she face and deflates the most swollen manifestations of male pride. This repressed laughter take her triumphantly to the finish as the men, about to be expelled from Herland, are requested by their guides not to reveal Herland's existence until the women deem it advisable. Terry, consi tent to the last, refu es, and threatens to bring an expedition and force entry . "TI1en" they said quite calmly, "he must remain an absolute prison-er, always." •'Anesthesia would be kinder," urged Moadine. "And safer," added Zava. "He will promise, 1 think'' said Ellador. And he did. With which agreement we at last left Herland. 'V ~~~~e~e~~e~e~r·~~ Ill B• ec::===iCC:Z:::::Zat=:=::let====J0r:=:==::Jl:I ~ GAY BOOKS ~ ~ PUBLISHED ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ W YORK - St. Martin's Press has announced plans to regularly relea e, in both paperback and hardcover editions, outstanding fiction with gay themes and ettings. Michael Denny, editor for the program and a ociate editor for Christopher Street fagazine, explained the purpose of the proje t: "We need gay fiction for two reasons - one, to strengthen the sen e of elf· identity and two, to develop gay writer and arti t . " St. Martin's ha undertaken the gay fiction program y.rith the reali· zation that gay readers now con titut a major ector of the book-bu 'ing pub­lic, and that there is a la k of ell­wri tten literature available to the e reader relevant to their O'Wll life tyle . The three novel cho. en to inaugur­ate the progran1 are: Dm id at Olil et by Wallace Hamilton· Special Teachers/ Special Boys b. P ter Fi h r and arc Rubin· and A Queer Kind of Death b George Baxt. Publication date : Febru· ary _ , 1 79. Price: 4. paperba k· 10.00 hardcovcr.'\l mc==sa m e s EJ~s a s ~' I ~ e e e e e e Book Reviews continued on next page . • I • • • .-e • f ltl t • '9f I I f 1 I t I ~ , I 14apriJ 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'Ol. 3, r1o. 7 by G. P. Stojcevic A Queer Kind of Death by George Baxt -- St. Martins Press paperback, $4.95 When this book first made its appearance in the rather paranoid atmosphere of the pre-stonewall, pre-gay lib year of 1966, it received a fair amount of crit­ical acclaim as a mystery novel. The strong undercurrents and the fact that the detective and main characters were gay wa played down or simply not men­tioned at all. ow revived in a quality paperback format, the book i once again getting some attention, and not a~ just another mystery. A Queer Kind of Death is filled with all types of extremely complex and well-delineated characters. The plot, that of the murder of an actor-model­hustler- blackmailer in his bath by electrocution, evolves through varied interplay by the various people that were either vi timized by him or who inhabited hi world. Two characters are the main focus and it is through their eye , their actions, that the events unfold. Seth Piro a young writer in his early thirtie , former lover and roommate of the victim is a key uspect. In an attempt to clear himself and come to a better understanding of his life he decide to write a novel about the Jife of the victim. In the process of finding out aII the fact , the other characters react strongly, with fear, panic, and hostility. The pos iblc motives and su pects mount up quickly. Enter Pharaoh Love, a black ew York City police detective. He que tion everyone and opens many clo cts, and during the cour e of his invc tigation begins to fall in love with his number-one suspe t. The piece begin to fall in place and a mo t tangled web is woven. The conclu~ion of the book is a beautiful knockout punch that was sur­pri ing, yet totally believable. ufficc it to say, it is one of the mo t unusual and interesting cocktail partie you will have the occa ion to attend. George Baxt has given us a universe that is morally bankrupt, peopled with elfish, bitching, wounded. savage, and loving creatures that are both completely alien and familiar at the same time. Hi ew York City i a nerve­jangling paranoid nightmare that flows like some dark, garbage- trewn river under the very core of our souls. You hate the victim, yet he is no wor e than any of the living. Even Pharaoh Love and th Piro have their own ends, their own needs, and both scheme and plot to serve them. Murder i the obvious crime, its olution the obvious concluding point of the book, but Baxt has given us and left us with much more than that. Thi is a book that hould be read over again. Even at the first reading it will gnaw at you, grate, jar, offend, make you feel a little less complacent ith the world, with your elf. Whether you are gay or straight, a mystery fan or not, this b ok hould not be mis ed. " by John Harrison. Ltwender Culture. Karla Jay and Allen Young, editors. Jove/HBJ, 1979. $2.50. Although I am unacquainted with Jay and Young's previous editorial endeavors (Out of the Closet, After You 're Out), having now read Lavender Culture I will certainly take time to read them. Presenting on equal footings writings by both gay women and men, the book is divided into more than 40 short essays and articles with topics ranging from "Forum on Sado-Masochi m'' to 'The Cleveland Bar Scene in the Forties," from "Images of Gays in Rock Music" to "Aging ls a State of Mind." Two quote give some ense of the scope of the book. The first is from Ian Young's Gay Sunshine article called "The Poetry of Male Love": A sense of the past, or of its own past, is infinitely valuable to any group that feels the need to define itself and to create or develop a sen c of community. A knowledge of gay history and culture, and especially of gay literature, is worthwhile not only to put the larger questions of cul­tural development in their right perspective, but to help individuals now to realize themselves, to see, and to act. It is precisely this lack of community sense that keeps o many of us in the closet, that leaves so many of us to be exploited by straight society. A viable sense of community is initiated by strong interest in gay literature and thought . The other quote carries thi sen e of community to the theater. From Don Shewcy's article "Theater: Gays in the Marketplace vs. Gay for Them elve ," a comment from playwright Doric Wilson: When I first started the theater, the first re ponsc from people was , "Gay has nothing to do with my art, gay is what I do when I get to bed ." It seems to me as long a we define ourselves only sexually, then we arc also going to have a slight puritani m about sex and so a slight dismi al of any public statement of our gayness. This definition of homosexuality, apart from what one docs in bed, is beautifully expressed in many of the lesbian articles in the book. The double sexual repression entailed in being a woman and a le bian has led many women further along the activist path than their gay brothers. For some indication of Karla Jay's ''community sense," from her article" o Man's Land": Where there are enough le bians in any given town or city, women have usually tried to build alternative [to gay bars] ... The advantage [of coffee houses rap groups, or consciousne s-rnising groups] over the bars is that one's primary purpose in the bar, however masked, is usually to cruise, and that underlying assumption reduces us to sex objects and often fills the air with ten ion. o one volume can pretend to encapsulate the total range of gay thought in the 1970's but Lavender Culture is enjoyable reading, finely edited, well representing a variety of the gay experience in American today:y' 7 vol. 3, 110. 7 Retrospective Dive Scott Lind Retrospective dive crystal sea-shell strands breaking fronds of a froth of waters like Captain Nemo descending below the gloom meeting new enchan tsome sea creatures like octopusses legs capturing one or arms wringing rock upon which one lays his suit so sleek so warm laying it wet upon the rock cliff face ending in a tumble of stone crystal salt surroundings of un melding beating upon the rock whereupon one lays his suit to dry before he falls quite naturally in quite in so he looks up hardly stinging clear pacific waters through the surf swimsuit sleekly folding let no one come far off a boat drifts around the cove a boy points lighthouse set turnings of gulls around its shaft wheeling flowing wheeling bubbles dominion overcome pressure building inside to burst one long burst of air trapped inside gasping lungs - retrospective dive - so breathing out and in quickly so breathing out and in and out one forget lostness of shells clinking amid t hud<lering blazing salt volcanic rock and sand swishing with the waves in late one night a bleat of seaship calls the birds the gulls the birds the gulls call tarshinc clinking bells shadowlcs wind and ilcncc before which one balls must ubmit to it recall without the moon to sec .GAY AUSTIN Night triP - G. P. Stojcevic A young man with hair unkempt, casually at ease - waiting for the bus - day almost spent, light soon passing, the nights beginning - then dancing - letting loose, midnight cruiser in a harlequin parade of bars, faces, bars, lovers moving down quiet streets to hungry rooms where bodies find release and sometimes even love - tongues caress in the darkness, young men, hard men, bodies press, hold, stroke, Asses taut, spread, penetrate - As the night reaches its peak - finds climax before the coming dawn ... apriJ 1979 15 Turning - M. D. Williams 3/78 turning i see, seeing, i know, knowing, i cry out. as the love rushes out leaving only emptine and the fearflow through me leaving nothin g. and in the noth inon i turn to 111 d Ill} elf: turnino on e agarn. 16apri1 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'OI. 3, r1 . -I PEQfOQMING AQT0 For its mid-March concert, the Austin Symphony joined forces with the Choral Union to present Bach's Mass in B-Minor. It was a wise decision to concentrate an entire program on this choral masterpiece. Bach's Mass is a perfectly proportioned piece of musical architecture, both grand and sublime in expression. The performers assembled under Akiro Endo's direction did honor to this music and to the profound aspects of the liturgical text. That the Choral Union shone brightest should come as no surprise. The sheer size of the choir - almost 150 strong with the women outnumbering the men ahnost two to one - was over three times the force required effec­tively to perform the work. This limited somewhat the dynamic range - things tended to go from loud to louder - and a clear delivery of the contra­puntal texture. But this did not prevent the Choral Union from giving a vivid and inspired performance, particularly in the mid-section of the credo - the "Et incarnatus," "Crucifixus," and the "Et resurrexit." The same could not be said for the four soloists. The tenor and mezzo­soprano in her "Agnus Dei" solo struggled with pitch problems and seemed hard P.r~d just to stay in tune. (Although, in all fairness, Ms. Wilmore's solo "Qui ·s extram P~tris," was the most pleasing of the Missa.) Discord was Pop[Jl?rs ... Continued from page 7.. ing up suddenly. If the drop in blood pressure becomes too severe, the person will faint. Few people do poppers to the point of actually fainting - but many feel a bit intoxicated or unsteady on their feet. All drugs, including poppers, involve certain risks and side effects. The decision to use a drug involves weighing the expected benefits against the risks involved. Some of the risks involved with poppers are what might be termed mechan­ical - they involve the circumstances in which the drug is used. - Butyl nitrite preparations are extremely flammable. This must be consi­dered when poppers are done at a party, where there may be candles or where people are smoking. - Butyl nitrite cannot support life. Only oxygen can do that. Things like getting into a plastic bag with butyl nitrite are extremely foolhardy. - Poppers induce temporary faintness and intoxication. Doing poppers while driving, around dangerous machinery, or where there are lots of hard sharp objects to fall against is decidedly unwise. Poppers can cause undesirable effects including nausea, vomiting, dizziness, fainting, cold sweats, and, most often, headaches. In fact, it is not uncommon to hear only of ill effects: "All it did to me was give me a headache." Adverse effects can be warning signs. Any recurrent or strong adverse effect should be viewed as a message to leave poppers alone. On the other hand, butyl nitrite has received a number of bad raps. Because they are sniffed, poppers are sometimes associated with paint, glue, gasoline, and other petroleum products. While paint and glue are extremely dangerous in­halants, they are in no way related to butyl. Nitrites are not guilty on this charge. There has also been increasing concern about nitrites and nitrates as preser­vatives in food as possible causes of cancer. While this is an open question, the danger would seem to lie in the introduction of the substance into the diges­tive tract. There does not appear to be an association. between inhaling the nitrite vapors and cancer. Butyl, of course, Should never be swallowed. Poppers do not seem to have a potential for physical addiction, although users note that in the course of an evening's use, it takes more and more to get off. Some people report a saturation point at which no additional sniffing produces a high. All drugs, however, have the potential for psychological addiction. This is especially true of sexually related drugs; people tend to substitute the drugs for sex or b<:_lieve they need them in order _to have sex. The feeling of the "need" by GARY REESE not confined to vocalists. In the bass aria, "Et in Spiritum sanctum," the obbli­gati of the oboes broke out into a reedy argument where harmonious collabor· ation should have prevailed. More disappointing than any particulars, however, was conductor Endo s conception of the work. While the pacing never became sluggish - the solemn piety of the Kyrie being nicely rendered - Endo did not offer much variety in his tempi and at times his interpretation threatened to become prolix rather than revelatory. The orchestra was never able to match the sense of exaltation the choir imparted. Nevertheless, for the most part Endo kept the considerable musical forces coherently together and was successful in projecting an overall effect of the spiritual and the monumental if sublimity and intimacy did evade him. Unquestionably, the star "soloist" of the evening - to judge from the applause - was concertmaster Leonard Posner. His accompaniment of the alto aria "Laudcmas te" in the Gloria almost turned it into a violin solo with alto obbligato! Posner drew a strong, sweet string tone which incredibly filled every corner of the auditorium and was a model of sterling, if not entirely self-effacing, instrumental support.V for the drug in certain situations is a sure sign of psychological dependence. While there are no documented cases of death or serious harm from the use of butyl, still there are possible dangers and certain "high-risk'' situations in which it is wisest to avoid it. Because of its strong effect on the cardiovascular system, persons with any ·form of cardiovascular disease would be well advised to avoid nitrites, except when taken under the advice of a physician. This includes persons with angina pectoris, varicose veins, coronary heart disease, hardening of the arteries, and high or low blood pressure. Also, for anyone taking a medication associated with any of these diseases, especially medication for high or low blood pre sure using poppers is just asking for trouble. In theory, poppers could cause a variety of dangerous effects in usceptible individual ranging from stroke to shock. Reports of bad effects from poppers are most common in people who are dehydrated - probably because fluid in the body is a primary means of coping with blood pressure variations. Avoid poppers when drinking alcoholic bever­ages heavily, particularly in the sun, or when taking diuretic medications (wat r pills.) Because poppers open up the blood stream, they may dislodge blood clots and the clots may become lodged in damaging position . Persons with a hi tory of clots or who take anticoagulant medications may find themselves in dire straits if they use poppers. Persons with kidney or liver disease or per n taking other vasodilating or vasoconstricting drugs may be in a high risk group. Persons subject to migraine may find that poppers aggravate their condition. Even if you are not diagnosed as belonging to one of these high-risk group there is always a certain risk involved with any drug. On the other hand, very many people seem to use this drug regularly without apparent ill effects. Legally, butyl is in limbo. Various authorities have attempted to limit its manufacture and sale, but without the force of law they can be ignored with impunity. But if a manufacturer or retailer implies the drug is meant to be inhaled, he may be in violation of numerous food and drug laws - which gener· ally have less teeth than controlled substances acts. If you are going to use butyl, then ome comparison shopping may be in order. Prices of nationally advertised brands may vary by as much as 300 per cent. All of the well-known brands are butyl nitrites - although the chemical names on the labels may vary. Butyl is a fairly unstable chemical, so shopworn bottles may indicate that potency has been lost. Imitations and "bootlegs" are common, as are fly-by-nights which may produce inferior or adulterated products - but it is not neces ary to pay the highest price to get a good as the market has to offer.V r~,­The OLD PECAN STREET SPRING ARTS FESTIVAL uitulization of D< wnt u..m and Sixth Sire ct 1\rea • Held Snlurdoy, ncl Sundny, April J41h an<l 15th from IO J).fll, till du k . (Jn ca • of rahH UI, April 21.sl , nd 22nd.) • LOCOf(•<I Oii lhe sl<lcwalkS o( lhe 200 lhrou~h 700 hl<H k o( HI rorlc Old P ( un sere ·1 mas t SI ·111 Strt·<·O. I ~ol. • So onaceo which i of two (ten o in the the bas ly devc This import inhabit out of This es therefo ly plant Som This past 2 is mor tional .7 E urc, ible are ing ver­at r lots ory dire ner-e in per ical gs" ted d as vol. 3, 110. 7 GAY A USTIN a1 ril 1979 17 AUSTIN l30TANICAL NOTES Some families of flowering plants are easy to recognize and one that is quite prominent in Austin during the spring is the legume family. This is the family to which bluebonnets, peas, beans, mequite trees, red bud trees, soybeans, wisteria and clover all belong. The familial relationship in this otherwise diverse group is most evident in the basic similarity of the flowers. The flowers, which are said to be "papili­onaceous," are bilaterally symmetrical and have five petals: The "standard" which is usually puright and large; two "wings"; and the .. keel" which consists of two petals fused together along one edge and which wraps around the stamens (ten of them) and the pistil. There is a good deal of variation between species in the relative positions of the keel and wings, but almost always the ovary at the base of the pistil looks like a tiny pea or bean. (Of course the ovary eventual­ly develops into a pea or bean or something very similar.) This family is of extreme economic importance not only because it is an important food source but also because of the effects of the bacteria which inhabit nodules on the roots of the legumes. These bacteria take nitrogen (N2) out of the air and convert it into a form (N03) which will dissolve well in water. This essential nutrient is thus available in the soil to other plants. Legumes, therefore, are said to "rejuvenate" the soil in which they grow and are frequent­ly planted in depleted fields to help rebuild the soil. Some members of the Leguminosae are poisonous and/or hallucinogenic. This family has traditionally been called the ''Leguminosae" but during the past 25 years it has also come to be known as the "Fabaceae," a term which is more consistent with the nomenclature guidelines set forth in the Interna­tional Code of Botanical omenclature.V' ELL the NUKE Vote YES on Proposition 2 I i i Vote NO on i Propositions 1,3,&4 I There is still a lot of work that needs to be done PLEASE HELP by volunteering some of your time to answering the phones/working i_n the office/distributing yard signs/or by working door-to-door in your neighbourhood. Contact the Austin Citizens for Economical Energy at 474-9461 as soon as possible. PLEASE VOTE APRIL 7th i I i I I i I i REAL TEXAS BEER 0orNr ti II \v'"~t eueR you \,e HEARD .ABOuT CIS :XS PROBABLY TRU£ • MAIDEN LANE AT GUADALUPE 4-5 1- Cf ll'f AUS T.IN 1Sapri I 1979 GAY AUSTIN vol. 3, 110. - March ... Continued from page 1. the march, claiming they needed more time to organize for it. Chuck Renslow of the Metropolitan Gay Business Association of Chicago agreed with the Houstonians. "I'm push­ing for a 1980 date in order to get prop­erly organized," he said. Differences aside, Shiflett and Ray Hill, also from Houston, later agreed to serve on the interim steering com­mittee for the march. An important decision on the nature of the planning organization was made early in the conference when the delegates accepted a proposal from the women's caucus to assure "complete gender parity throughout its proceed­ings and march preparations leader­ship, publications, paid positions and in all related areas." The vote to require an equal voice for women off set early accusations that the conference would be dominated by men, accusations stemming in part from the letter in­viting organizations to participate in the conference, which encouraged, but did not require, gender parity in the delegations. Since delegates to the conference represented organizations, a dispropor­tionate number of them came from large cities with highly developed gay communities like San Francisco and New York. On the second day the conference was criticized in a propo­sal from the Hinterlands caucus, which consisted of delegates from non-urban and non-coastal areas. Bringing to light antagonisms already glimpsed, they accused the delegates of "cultural and regional imperialism," and "blatant disregard of regional delegates." They moved to delete the word "national' from the march title "until adequate representation of regions is obtained. · Their proposal failed by a vote of 74 to 24. There had been talk before the convention of scuttling it in favor of a later meeting modelled after the International Women's Year Con­vention. in which delegates were Co-chairs Walter Lear and Mariana Hernandez. Cinema ... Continued from page 8. Once again, there are three nominees who could very well win. Warren Beatty (Heaven Can Wait) is an enigmatic, mythified darling in Hollywood· he may overwhelm everybody with his magnetism and exiness, but not with his somnambular performance in this film, his personal brainchild. Once pre­viously nominated, Beatty could steal the award, but I say he won't unles "Heaven" sweeps most of the categories. Don't hold your breath. Jon Voight (Coming Home was a favorite throughout most of the year and may indeed pull it out. His warm ensitive portrayal of a paraplegic Viet­nam vet practically saved the movie. In his favor: he has been nominated before. Working against him: like Fonda, Voight must contend with the Academy's poor memory of springtime films. My_ bet is that Robert De iro (The Deer chosen by regions. But the conference decided the principal orgamzmg structure for the march would be a teering com­mittee who e members would repre­sent every region of the country equal­ly. The rest of the organizing body is to consist of a national board made up of representatives of groups sup­porting the march and a coordinating committee whose members would repre­sent two proposed offices and other committees. The delegates accepted a list of demands for the march, which reads: I. Repeal all anti-lesbian/gay laws. 2. Pass a comprehensive lesbian/gay rights bill in Congres . 3. Issue a Presidential executive order banning discrimination based on sexual orientation in the Federal Gov­ernment and in Federally contracted public employment. 4. on-descrimination in lesbian mother and gay father custody cases. 5. Full rights for gay youth, includ­ing revision of the age of consent laws. Gary van Ooteghem, publisher of Houston's Upfront, a gay paper, has been advocating for some time a "human rights" march on the capital which would be organized primarily by homosexuals but would avoid being identified as a gay event. Orig­inally set at May 6, the date was later changed to October 28. Claiming that "Houston human rights activists are the furthest advanced of any in the country," an article in the January 12, 1979 issue of Upfront said that "large numbers of gays would not attend a gay march, but would support the more broad human rights concept." Van Ooteghern's proposal wa ound­ly rejected at the Philadelphia con fer­ence. Unless conflicts evident at the Philadelphia convention grow and de - troy what solidarity exi ts between lesbian and gay men aero the coun­try, we arc likely to witne this year a spectacle never imagined before: a million openly homosexual people on the streets of Washington.'\] Hunter) will take home the Oscar. He ha been growing lowly ince hi cle trifying performance in The Godfather, Part II and the Academy has bee watching clo ely, offering first one Be t Actor nomination (for Taxi Driv and now another. With The Deer Hunter, DeNiro finnly e tablishes him as a major talent and artist. He makes uperb acting appear eff ortle s· h concentration and his ability to communicate with or without word are amazing. J can't help but believe that. m the Academy"s eye hi time ha come Best Picture of J 978. Predicting thi category i always tncky bu in To guess Be t Picture with any hope of ucc , at lea t two thing mu t t considered. First, how narrow is the nominated film 1 · ct and th m Sec nd, how closely does the film reflect the nation' ' tone". ~t i , a the attitude and th mo d of current American iety better pr ~ t d I thi nominated film than the other ? I think the e are important cons1de ation , and they often work together. Annie Hall, for c ample, wa .n a narr film· it dealt with a very fundamental concern in our o iety: the intcrper relationship, and how it work or doe n't work under the pre. ure a prioritie of the scventie . Smee thi i a topic that i relevant and 1mport<U to almost everyone today, it follow that the film al o reflected the "t~~ of America to a substantial degree. Con equcntly it wa n t really urpn tr that Annie Hall won Be t Picture. What about thi year? I'm afraid that Midnight hxpre . which documen the personal ordeal of an Ameri an you th impri onccl in Turkey for drug mu gling, i too narrow a film to win. An Unmarried Woman i not really "narrow it deal with a woman's perspective of love, and coping with change and ne found self-reliance. That is relevant to everyone women and those wh women affect in ome way. Still, the film ha a sort of upper-cla s bia th lessens its overall impact, and it doc n't carry the ocial con ciousne th di tingui hes the other dramas nominated. So I rule it ut. ------------~ ...,_ _______ Coming Home and The Deer Hunter, among tho newly emerging filrn that try to bring the Vietnam War to some ort of meaningful perspective in th American con cience should be considered together for the purpo e of the Be Picture award. Vietnam is not a narrow concern in any ense; though s me o u would rather not think about the war and its consequence , it remain in ou minds, and therefore i relevant in one way or another to all of u . The que tiol is, "If competing alone, which of the two war films would win the award, base< on its ability to deal with the concern most relevantly, skillfully and powe1 fully?" The Deer Hunter would probably come out ahead of Coming Hom It is more ambitious (to some extent Coming llomc is contained within it if not nece sarily more skillful. And, in my mind, it i more powerful, thougl 2 532 Guadalupe ''Sot l/,,e adt1Je man'' the llest selectlon In aclult materlal ••• Anywh r I • f cour e there is room for disagreement here. Still, I believe The Deer Hunte wins out. So that leaves two movies to consider head-to-head: The Deer Hunte and the one comedy nominated Heaven Can Wait. To speak of the latter a narrow" or "irrelevant" i ironicalJy useless· where a light comedy is con cerned, its escapism is precisely what people like about it. Its irrelevance I its relevance, and in this case that's a powerful force indeed. Heaven Can Wal is a lick, dassy daydream, full of wit and gentle sarcasm. So the choice fo Best Picture comes down to two films as different as night and day· there cat be no hazy allegiance. The Academy will swing either to a painfully relevant emotionally purging movie, or to a joyous harmles fairy tale. Whichever wa. the Academy chooses, the decision will influence winners all the way dowt the line. I believe the award will go to The Deer Hunter. But the selection o either film will be an interesting reflection on the times in which we live. Best Director. I don't mess with this one. Twenty-three out of the pa twenty-five years, the Director award has gone to the per on respon ible fo the Best Picture. Since I have picked The Deer Hunter a Best Film, I wouJ( be fooli h not to pick the director of that film, Michael imino. Other picks. Cinematography: est or Almendros, Days of Heaven; Be .__ _______________ ,,, ______________ _. lOesrsiglyin Dal evSocteodre :t o YGoiour,'g iofr oMm oGrordeears,e .M'\]i dnight Express; Original Song, 'Hope •, 110. - paper, has e time a the capital primarily ould avoid vent. Orig­te was later aiming that ctivists are any in the c January t aid that would not u1d support ts concept." wa ound­hia confer-t at the 1crging film pectivc in th e of the Be ughs me o emain in ou The que Ho award base and powc1 ming Hom d within it erful, th ugl Deer Hunte Deer Hunte the latter a medy i coll irrelevance I en Can Wal e choice f ay · there caJ Ully relevant ichever wa. e way dowt selection o live. t of the pa sponsible fo ilm, I woul< \lOl. -' GAY.AUSTIN 19 3/30/79 Red Rider Preservation Society Urban Survival Skill Fair Waterloo Park - 10 am till dusk. CALENDAR OF EVENTS 4/18/79 Harlem Opera 4/01/79 ALGPC Steering Committee Meeting Stokes Building, 3rd floor conference room, 1 pm. 4/4- 6/79 "The Honorable Urashima Taro" Hogg Auditorium, UT Tickets: $3.00/adults, $2.00/students. 4/11/79 GCS Coordinating Council Meeting 2330 Guadalupe, 8 pm. 4/17 /79 DANCE FESTIVAL B. Iden Payne Theatre, UT Tickets: $3.00/adults, $2.00/students. 4/ 17/79 INTERN A TI ON AL PIANO SERIES Janina Fialkowska, Canadian For information phone: 471-5319 4/ 18/79 GCS General Meeting 2330 GuaJalupc, pm. 4/15/79 Medieval Faire Waterloo Park. 12th & Red River 12 pm till Jusk. Admission free. BOWLING CAMPING VOLLEYBALL TABLE TENNIS }f. CAVIT()L CIT"' ATtiL~TIC .ASSUCI Tl()~ ~ MENee~ & NON - MEMBERS ere 1nv1ted to come cut for t- a lex ot f 'Jn with bOd'i SOCIAL & LEAGUE bowling! ~ For more info: ,_... CALL JOHN DOt:CET 472-1718; Billy Frazier 454 •7J87 '- 0 G) G) z G> * TENNIS Covered Dish Socials SWIMMING * GAY MORMONS ORGANUE - Ron Moss Affrimation/Gay Mormons United ha ju t undergone a leader hip change in the state t~f Texas. T!1e roup is open to all active, ina tive an fonner Lattcr-Da~ amt and fnc_nd . M ctings arc held weekly in Dalla , Hou ton and Austm. haptcr meetings are also held once a 111 nth alternating fr 111 city to city. Fer further information about Affrimation, you may write P.O. Box 5095- Dalla , Tcxa 75250 or contact the following branch lead r : in Dalla, call Steve at 214-52 -9641 ·in Houston call Jcrc1 at 713-449-... 4 3· and in Au tit call Ron at 512-443-4 I 00. · I I I I I• I 1 I '' . Hogg Auditorium, UT, pm. For more information phone: 471-5319 4/20/79 AUSTI SYMPHO Y PERFORMA CE Municipal Auditorium, pm. 4/22/79 ALGPC Regular Meeting Location to be announced. For more information phone: Gay Community Services at 477-6699. 4/30/79 T ASHI: Quartet in Performance Paramount Theatre, 8 pm. Tickets: $1.00 & $4.00. GAY AUSTIN needs yo~ i sue ~y ~ ~ue, AY AUSTI has grown steadily since it began as a mimeo­graphed newsletter a few short years ago. With a little help, it can con­tinue to row into the kind of newspaper the Austin gay and lesbian community needs. It can continue to be a uide to the entertainment and cultural events you are looking for. It can become a forum for debate on issues important to our community. And it can become a dependable source of news on events in Austin and beyond that will f t o r i e but tha neve seem to be covered by other news media. Tuu can help. } You can contribute articles, news stories. news tips, letters, poems, photographs, whatever you would like to share with the rest of us. ail your contributions to GAY AUSTIN, 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705, or bring them to the GCS office. 2You can subscribe. Sure, the paper is distributed free in many local businesses but if you aren't a frequent patron of those businesses or if you don't happen to get there before the free copies run out, you may miss something important. And by subscribing, you can help increase the limited budget with which GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES helps you. Do it today! Fill out the coupon below and make a check or money order for $6.oo to GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES and send them to 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, Texas 78705. We will send you GAY AUSTIN in a plain wrapper every month for a year. (.,P ....l..e...a...s...e... .......r...i...n....t......)... ............................................................................... ·n···a···m····e··· ········································································································ ·5·-t·r.·e·e;'t· .. ·a-a:a·r:·e·;;·~· ....................................................................... . O~ll·i''t':;/•;01011~'t';'tO~ll:••HO~li.lpOOllCl~Odl~OIOllllllllHllllllllllllUllUllOHOllOlllUOHllO .~ ...............................................................................G...a...y... ...A.....u...s...t..i..n.... ....s..u...b... ..... 20a1JriJ 1979 GAY AUSTIN v'Ol. 3, r10. 7 GAY AUSTIN. CLASSIFIEDS Gay Austin reaches a very special audience which other Austin newspapers just can't match. To help you communicate with the gay community, we include a Classified section. As an additional service, you can remain anonymous and we will assign a number to your ad, notifying you of all responses. All ads must be submitted and paid for by the publication deadline which is the 15th of each month prior to publication. ---~~~----·---~~- AME ADDRESS -·----------- CITY ZIP TELEPHONE Check one: 0 0 I would like to place a ____ word dassified in the --------- issue of Gay Awnn. 53.00 for 20 words, 10 cents ea.ch addiuonal word. I would like to place an anonymous _ word claSS1fied in the ----- 1SSUe of Gay Awtir.. GCS will keep my name confi· denual and noufy me oi all responses. S..l 00 for _o words, IS cents each additional word. --------! -------! ----------/ --------/ -------/ I 2 3 4 S --------/ -------- ______ , -------/ -------/ 6 7 9 10 ______ , -------! ----·---/ ---------/ -----/ 11 12 13 14 IS --------/ ---------/ -------! -------! -------! 16 17 18 19 20 Additional words: MAIL TiflS FORM TO: GAY COMMUNITI' SERVICES (Classifieds), 2330 Guadalupe, Austin, TX 78705; or drop it off at the GCS office between 6:00 and 10:00 p.m. daily. 'lite Vital Ettergy All the energy we ever need is within ourselves. The will to progress, the initiative to grow. All this and more can be discovered any Saturday at Safari. The body, mind, and sexuality are connections to our own energy source. Safari Saturday's feature a different healing art for getting in touch with your body; Herbal Foot Bath, Hand, Foot, Face Massage and much more. For more information call (512) 472-6828. Open Sat. 11-6 2004 ~ Gu.dalupe Auetin, Te.- 71705 (512) 472-6121 Classifieds rounseling: Micltael C. 1 iencfee, Ph.D., 2813 Rio Grande, 476-5419. The advertisements in Gay Austin signify that these establishments support the work of Gay Community Services. Patronize them and let them know you ap­preciate their support. THE GUIDE TO GAY AUSTIN ADULT BOOKSTORES All American News 2532 Guadalupe 478-0222 Stallion Bookstore 706 East 6th 477-0148 APARTMENT LOCATORS Grace Hall's Apt. Locators 324 S. Congress 472-7201 BARS Austin Country 705 Red River 472-0418 Hollywood (women) 304 w. 4th 472-0018 ew Apartment 2828 Rio Grande 478-0224 Private Cellar 709 East 6th 477-0387 The Tap 606 Maiden Lane 451-9114 BATHS Club Austin Baths 308 w. 16th 476-7986 Executive Health Club Stephen F. Austin Hotel 478-7220 BODY AWARENESS Safari 2004* Guadalupe 472-6828 COIN SHOP Capital Coin Company 3004 Guadalupe 472-1676 COUNSELING Andrew Fono 2004* Guadalupe 472-7690 Michael Menefee, Ph.D. 2813 Rio Grande 476-5419 LEGAL SERVICES Legal Clinic 501 W. 12th 478-9332 REsTAURANT Old Pecan Street Cafe 314 East 6th 478-2491
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