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South Texas Community News, Vol. 3, No. 13, August 2, 1979
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 3, No. 13, August 2, 1979 - File 001. 1979-08-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 9, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2531/show/2514.

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(1979-08-02). South Texas Community News, Vol. 3, No. 13, August 2, 1979 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2531/show/2514

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 3, No. 13, August 2, 1979 - File 001, 1979-08-02, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 9, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2531/show/2514.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 3, No. 13, August 2, 1979
Publisher Gay Community News
Date August 2, 1979
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript A Gay Who Took By Jo1eph B. Boker Anita's 1Cure' Miami II A nlta Would Rather Cure Than Fight," the headline blared. Just when the jokes about Our Lady or Dade County were beginning to fade , .. Sleeping one night with Anita Is enough to turn apyone gay") Anita Bryant Green was offering up a new challenge: She was going to open counselirig centers to "cure" homosexuals. But bow was she going to do it? Shock treatment? Aversion therapy? Religious brainwashing? The joy of guilt? Take three straight pills and call me in the morning? As a professional journalist, I wanted to find out. As a gay man, I had to find out. Little did I know then that Anita Bryant and her counseling center would touch me in ways I thought I could no longer be touched, raise issues I thought I bad long ago dispelled and confront me with the question of questions: If I could, wouldn't I really want to be straight? I thought I had answered that question nearly eight years ago back in the Midwest. Priests, counselors, psychologists - the whole bit. When it was I 'First of all, you ore not a homosexual,' he said, 'There's no such thing' over, I had to accept the fact that I was a homosexual For some reason, I was physically attracted to males. There were far worse things to be, and I decided I could and would live with my sexual identity. But things started to change the last year. Maybe It was the pressures of the double Ufe so many homosexuals lead. The fear of losing my job or not being promoted because I was gay. The fear of r ejection if family and friends found out. I bad come somewhat out or my doset, but certainly not entirely A pleasant voice answered the telephone. I explained I wanted to set up an appointment to see th~ Rev Da,1d Re:ifroe, the 37-year-0ld Baptist minister wno ts the l..rector of Bryant's counseling center 1n Miami Beach. Renfroe had been counseling homosexuals for the past ten years and worked with criminals in Dallas and Birmingham. Criminals? I fumed. But hbould have guessed. Bryant had said In her Playboy magazine article that she thought all homosexuals should be sent· to prison to be "straightened out." Obviously, neither Bryant or Renfroe bad ever been inside a prison. Renfroe came on the line, and an appointment was set up. He said be only asked one thing of prospective cllents - that they agree to a minimum of five counseling sessions. I agreed, not mentioning that I was also a journalist. Entering the offices that housed Anita Bryant Ministries, I was immediately aware of her presence. The walls were covered with pictures and posters of Anita promoting Florida orange Julee, plaques and citations thanking her for fighting homosexuills and newspaper clippings about ber crusade. A ball-dozen of{lce workers were busily answering telephones and typing letters. The counseling center was sharing facllltlt.. with the headquarters of the Anita Bryant empire. It was from these offices that her husband, Bob Green, managed her career, where volunteers sent out thousands of letters warning the world about homosexuals and asking for donations. I stood alone Inside the door of the offices before anybody noticed me. I felt like a leper .. A friendly woman broke lnlo my daydream. It was the beginning of something I never expected. Not once was I ever going td be made to feel uncomfortable by the men and women working In Bryant's offices. David Renfroe turned out to be equally cordial, and I was ushered Into a small front office. We made small talk at first, and then Renfroe explained the purpose of Anita Bryant Ministries, its goals and operating methods. The counseling sessions were to be private, flexible and I could control what we talked about. I would pay $25 per hour' a figure mutually an1ved at and based upon my salary. Renfroe had said earlier there would be no charge If I couldn't afford to pay. Renfroe explained that more than 2000 homosexuals bad called or written Bryant for help In the past year, and that was the main reason she decided to open the center. Another one would open soon in Hollywood, Fla., and, depending.on contributions and community support, they hoped to expand into other major cities with large gay populations. As expected, Renfroe asked why I was at the center. I explained I was a homosexual and I was beglnnlng to have doubts about the gay Ufe style. I asked If I could be happier if I shed my homosexual waY!,. - roru1iderln2. of course, It v-as possible. . ·------- ~:-., .~ ·--- ----~ - -·- "Definitely, If you really want to," Renfroe assured me. "But first of all, I have to tell you that you are not a homosexual. 'fhere Is no such thing. You are merely practicing homosexuality. God created only two sexes." Renfroe said God created man and woman to complement each other, and that I would never be complete and fulfilled until I experienced the love of a woman. "That ls_God's plan," he said. "But even If you don't believe the religious and moral reasons against homosexuality, you should still be able to see It Is biologically wrong. You don't 11ave the right parts to 'be' with another man.•· Renfroe explained that the phrase "gay lifestyle" was one of the world's cruelest hoaxes. "Whoever coined that term must have had a sick mind and a bad sense of humor," he said. "What is gay about a life of rejection, depression, loneliness and hostility? .. I argued that a gay lifestyle didn't have to be that way; that those emotions were brought on by a society which wouldn't let a person be who be or she \Vas or let them llve their life the way they had to or wanted to. Renfroe calmly replied that I had been led to believe the greatest lle Of the gay movement - that homosexuality Is just as natW111 to some people as heterosexuality Is to others. He said people were not born with homosexual tendencies. "Such a drive Is not related to the glands, genes or hormones," he said, "but Is learned bellavior that usually starta early In Ufe and affecta an Individual'• total llfe and thinking process." My first session lasted nearly three hours. Driving home on Interstate 95 at Its lane-cllanglng and born· blowing worst, Rentroe's nongay reasons kept going through my mind: loneliness, promiscuity, deceit, guilt, alienation from God, strong tendency toward selfishness, rejection, difficulty maintaining lasting relationships, difficulty with self-acceptance, Increased social pressure, Increased hostility, vuinerablllty to sadism and masochism, constant threat of aging, poor health and an early death, and greater vulnerability to depression and suicide. Was that the kind of life I was living? Was tbat my future? How could Renfroe stereotype all gay people Uke that? I knew I wasn't like that, and neither were the homosexuals I knew. Sure, we have problems in our Uves, but were they any different than those of straight men and women 1 Still, I needed someone to talk to. Cont.Page 14 Page2 Community News NEWS AT A GLANCE FBI eyes violation of gay civil rights SAN F RANCISCO (AP) -.The FBI says It is looking Into allegations that the police violated the ciVll ~ts of patrons at a tavern cater!Dg to homosexuals when they charged through the door of the establishment beating occupants following the City Hall r!Ots. . The report is &ltJlected to be completedl>y mid-August. Clements seen ~ one-termer HARLINGEN (AP) - The only Texas Democrat to lose a gubernatorial race to a Republican in more than a century predicted Friday that the man who beat blm will serve only one term. But former Te:xas Attorney General John Hill would not say if he will try to unseat Gov. Bill Clements in the next election. "I really don't know," Hill said during a vacation trip here. "Mrs. Hill and I talked about that some while we've been down here in the Valley. I listen to the people down here and get their advice. They're encouraging us to continue.11 But HUI, who is now in private law practice, said it is too early to make a decision on whether to run. "We've decided we'll wait unW after t he presidential election of 1980 and then some time In 1981 we'll make the final decision," Hill said. "! sWl have definite Interests In state government." Hill gave Clements low marks for the governor's performance during the recent legislative session. He termed Clements' actions "anti-education, anti· consumer and anti-taxpayer." "He made a lot of pledges to people concenung lowering their taxes ... that was his big point in our race. He campaigned very actively on the fact that he was going to give a billion dollars back to the taxpayers. That he was going to cut off the heads of 25,000 employees - lop them off the pa)Tolls. Now, of course, that hasn't happened," bill said. · Suicide Seen In Jail Death HENDERSON (UPI) - The body of a Rusk County jail inmate already sentenced to life imprisonment was found in his cell Tuesday with both wrists slashed and authorities be­lieve he committed suicide. Officials said the hody of Dennis Lee France, in his late 20s. was found at 2:30 p.m. The last time he was seen alive was around noon. Same Room! TskTsk! PEKING (UPI) - Honeymoon­ers are back in China and finding that once prudish tourist hotels no longer keep newlyweds in separate rooms. The official New China News Agency said Wednesday tha t honeymoons, once branded as a "bourgeoi:. way of life," are now cons idered acceptable again and 700 couples have flocked to the ramed lakeside city of Hangzhou since spring. " Before we came we were prepared ror the worst," said a young man with his 25-year-old bride, "such as having to sleep separately in rooms for single men and women. We are so sur­prised to !ind special service ror honeymooners." The young man. a policeman.­said he and his wife will have used 80 percent or their monthly wages tor the honeymoon . Woman squirts soap on porno_ In the spirit of carry Nation busting up saloons wtth bet trusty ax, Boston bas a modem-day crusader whose morta enemy ls not alcohol, but pornography. Mayor hit by insults Chicago Mayor Jaoo Byrne says an angry protest by former Mayor Michael Bilandic and his wile over the removal or their police bodyguards was "unfortunate." "I think there's nothing more to say· about It," Byrne said Wednesday. "It was unfortunate for everybody." The mayor was posing for photographs Saturday during a block party In the BUandics' Bridgeport neighborhood when Mrs. Bilandlc, shaking her fist, approached th~ mayor. "How dare you do this, how dare you do this? What arc you trying to do to my baby?"' Bilandlc then approached and. holding his Infant son Michael J r. up, shouted at the mayor. "Do you steep nights? Can you sleep after what you've done?" Mrs. Byrne defeated Bilandic in a Democratic primary this year. The police bodyguards at the Bila ndlcs· home were removed recently and the Bilandlcs accused Byrne of "political vindictiveness." Acting Police Superintendent Sam Nolan said it was his decision to remove the guards. Star's Dome Suieide Site LEWISBORO, N.Y. (UPI) - The common-law wife of Rolling Stone guitarist Keith Richard was arrested on weapons charges Saturday following the apparent suicide of a 17-year-old youth in the master bedroom of the 12- room W•stchester home she and Richard share. Police arrested Anita Pallen­berg, 37, an Italian citizen. after responding to a telephone call re­porting the shooting at Richard's $250,000 estate at 10:35 p.m. Friday. The woman was released on $500 bail Saturday morning, but she was required to surrender her passport. A state police investigator said Richard was in Paris at the time of the shooting. No legal fees for Marvin LOS ANGELES (AP) - A Superior Court judge says Lee Marvin won't have to pay $500,000 In legal fees sought by the attorney who r epresented the actor's former live-in lover during the celebrated Marvin vs. Marvin case. Judge Arthur Marshall also said Thursday that he would not reconsider his decision that awarded fl04,000 to Michelle Triola Marvin. Attorneys for both sides said they are considering appeals. ·the district attorney is still probing perjury allegations against the actor. Marshall expressed concern about the perjury probe, but said even if Marvin had lied on the witness stand, the outcome of the trial would be no difrercnt. And Marcia Womongokl's usual weapon is not an ax, but a bottle or dlsbwashlng liquid or a maridng pen. with which she defaces rnagmlnes. books and billboards she finds offensive. She also once used a .22- callber rifle earlier this month to shoot out a window of a bookstore. She got a year's probation for thal "I won't tolerate porn," said Mrs. Womongold who believes that hardcore pornography . and even magazines like Playboy Incite men to rape. So she marches Into "adult" bookstores and squlrtS gooey dlshwashlng fluid on publications she finds lewd " All over the city, wherever I happen to be, I trash It," she said. "Afterwards, I feel a tremendous sense of freedom and joy and relief." Also, she admits, "I'm too radical for most people." But Elaine Noble, a former state legislator who is now on the staff of Mayor Kevin H. White, said, "I t.hi.nl< she has guts. We're going to have to give her a mayor's citation." World's Biggest Chump By his own admission Senator John Briggs is now the "world's bigge~t chump." Briggs told an interviewer in September that Prop 6 would either make him "America's newest and biggest folk hero or th!l world's biggest chu.mp.'' . Ah, out of the mouths of babes come ... Connally backs gay rights Republican presidential hopeful loha B. Celmally said Friday in San Francisco tha t homosexuals should be given full protection of American laws. "They're human beings, entitled to the protection of the laws of this country." the 6Z.year­old former Texas governor said. "They are entitled to the same treatment and protection of their rights as everyone else." Connally made the remarks before speaking to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Volunteers to inject killer with drug BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The Idaho Board of Corrections has decided that t~ volunteers wW inject condemned killer David Osborn with a lethal drug If the state goes through with his scheduled Aug. 20 execution. Osborn, 30, of Slatersville, Utah, pleaded guilty to a charge of first-<legree munter In the beating and shooting death last Halloween of Charlotte Car~ a Pocatello waitress. She bad been shot five times, three times in the bead, authorities said. Osborn's death sentence is under automatic re,~ew by the State Supreme Court and that prob;lbly m1>ans the Aug. 20 date wW be "Bk aside." . If he dies by injection, It would be the first such execution in the United States. Tlte Idaho Legislature changed the state's method of execution from hanging to lethal injection during its last session. "'°""" .I,,t.,'.s.. .s till no dice from $100.000 to $150.000 for her Atlanttc City, NJ.,'-- by P.ntho.,.. 1"'9~, Mn.. Anthony lloftglovannl NfvMcl .... deal allowlng l'enthouH to UH her property for -!no construct!-. Although thwarlM In their efforts to buy..._ Bongiovanni ..,....ny, ..._ future casino ope....-a continue c-tructlon on th,.. sldft of .... flouH. - AP LaHrphoto. 1920s star, author dies HOLLYWOOD (AP) - Corinne Griffith. lhc 1920s screen star who later achieved fame as an author. income tax abolitionist and real c~atc tycoon. has died at St. John's Ho5-pital in Santa Monica. Nicknamed "the Orchid of the Screen ... Miss G riflith &tarred ill hUCh fi.bns as "The Garden of ~Alen" and "Lillies or the Field." She made her last film. "Paradise Alley," in 19"8. Texan wowsD.C. Delbert Mcclinton, a Fort Worth nattve, brought his rolling blues music to a Washington, D.C, nightspot last week and drew enthusiastic responses from local critics. The Washington Star said: "Delbert McClinton's version of Southern blues reminds the listener Of a raunchy sensual visit to a steamy Texas bar. McCllnton, a little known but rt.sing member of the group of Texas honky-tankers who blur the lines between blues, country and soul, last night turned the cool Cellar Door Into a little piece of the Lone Star State.n The Washington Post's criUc wrote: "Delbert McClinton 'is the Ty Cobb Of Texas beer-bar R&B. He haS taken a generally bit-<>r-miss field and run over the opposition roughshod - spikes up - producing a far more sophistleated idiom in the process." Pa11e 3 Community New.!. SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - A man facing murd.er charges in the shooting 'death of the 1974 Academy Awards streaker escaped from an unlocked holding cell Thursday, police said. after the escape of Maurice Keenan, about 28, who was arrested with two companions at San Francisco International Airport on Tuesday. of Justice shortly after 9 a.m. The trio were charged in the slaying of gay milltant Robert Ope~ 39, during a robbery attempt at Opel's erotic art gallery-apartment Sunday. Opel streaked across the stage during An all-points bulletin was issued moments Sheriff Eugene Brown said Keenan escaped from the cell in the Hall Knight may not show for trial· BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP) - Indiana University basketball Coacb Bobby Kni.ltllt says his much-publicized fracas witli a Puerto Rican policeman at the Pan Am games was "a setup pure and simple." ' ln an Interview in Tuesday's Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, Knight said, "someone wanted to create an incident, and they did it. You can't believe what some of the witnesses swore to in court." Krugllt, who coached tbe United States team to a gold medal in tbe just· completed games, said he may not retW1l to Puerto Rico for his Aug. 22 trial for assaulting a Puerto Rican policeman Jose DeSilva, who was oll-<luty when the. confrontation developed, arrested Kni)(ht alter the two argued during a Sunilay mornmg practice session fwo weeks ago. Krugllt is free on $500 bond. "l have not made any arrangement to fly back," said Knight. "I don't know what will transpire between now and then. Rent-a-witness "Beating the Puerto Rican basketball team is a lot easier than beating their court system. As I listened to the testimony, I thought a primar; occupation in Puerto Rico was probably 'Rent-a-witness.· "There were actually sworn statements from the policeman and two 'witnesses' that I hit him as hard as I could with a closed fist alter coming at him from two steps away, and while he was looking down at notes he was making on a notepad," Kni.ltllt said. The coach sa:!d the focal district attorney refused to accept K~t's counter·charges against Desilva. 'But be accepted everytlung his witnesses said against me. That's their vers10n o! justice. "I really didn't Jut that man at all." Knijlht said DeSilva kept waving his hand 1n his lace and Ius tinr.erttp poked Kmght m the eye. 'I reacted inStinctively, put my hand on his cheek, pushed him back and stepped away," he said. Knight's version of the inrnlent was supported by former Oluo State basketball coach Fred Taylor, who managed the U.S. team. No punch thrown "No; he really didn't hit anybody .. Taylor said. "I remeinber tlunking al the time, 'If you're gomg to touch lum at all, why don't you iust bust tum one· but he didn't. · "I don't want to sound paranoid abo:it this Uung, but some or what happen"G down there was reaJJy strange. You couldn't wnte fiction to match 1f" Kmght also said Tomas Herrera. thr Cuban player who slugged Kentucky's Kyle Macy and fractured his jaw, did so deliberately. The blow finished Macy for the games. Disappointed Kmght said he was disappointed by the U.S games committee's response to the Macy incident and his own problems. · Earlier 1n the day, at Lexington, KY., Krught presented Macy, who had retW1led early from the games to have surgery, with his gold medal. As Macv looped the medal around Ius neck the coach turned the medallion. ' ''We're gonna turn it around where 1t doesn't show Puerto Rico," said Knight. the Academy Awards a nal.Jonal television ceremony in 1974, before audience. 'Pep Pill' Ban Proposed WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Food and Drug Administration Mon· day proposed a ban on using am­phetamines to lose weight, saying the "pep pills" help little in dieting and can cause severe addiction. If the proposal goes into effect, the Justice Department could order amphetamine production slashed by 80 to 90 percent - roughly the proportion used in dieting. "FDA bas concluded that am­phetamines continue to be abused at a rate substantially higher than that for other drugs used in the treat· ment or obesity," the FDA said. The agency said amphetamines "present a severe risk of dependence and harmful effects" even though "alternative drugs are available that have equal effectiveness." Piranhas Sold As Pets LONDON (UPI) - Chris Hud­son, who sold snails as pets and owned what the Guinness Book of Records is about to list as the world's biggest snai l, said Tues­day he has a new idea. He's selling pi ranhas for pets. .. They're absolntr•ly adorable when they're young," he said. "I've sold 500 of them already ... Hudson, 24, said he has im· ported 2.000 of the flesh-eating fish that he claims despite their man-eating reputation "make ideal pets." In tanks kept at room temperature. he said, they grow w only 3 or 4 inches in length, eliminating danger from minia­turr- Jaws. Lovellq Carver Dirksen, the widow of Sen. Everett Dirksen, R.-111., died of cancer in a Wa1hington hospital Monday. Lucie Arnaz, cn1oymg an ice cream cone on Time!t Square, marked her 28th birthday Tues­day. Lucie, starring on Broadway in the musical, "They're Playing Our Song," received congratula­tory phone calls from mom and dad Lucy and Desi and other members of her family. Big Business Slo"\Vly Adopting No Gay Bias Policies A survey of s'.>me of the largest corporations in the country seems to indicate that an increasing num­ber of farge businesses are adopting policies of non-discrimination against gay persons in their employ. Results from a survey by the National Gay Task Force of the "Fortune 500" list show that some of the best known and largest firms in the nation have either officially adopted non-discrimina­tion policies or have indicated a willingness to go on record as not discriminating against gays. <The "500" are the largest businesses in the nation as listed by Fortune magazine.) • Out of the five hundred corpora­tions to whom the NGTF mailed the survey requesting information on their employment policies about gays 121 firms responded that they do not discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation. Among those who have adopted non·discrimination policies are the nation's largest corporate employer, American Telephone & Telegraph Company; the world's largest bank, the Bank of America; the world's largest corporation, General Motors; and many of the world's largest oil companies, including Exxon, Mobil, and Gulf Oil. The NGTF says that the 121 corporations who responded to their survey employ seven million people and have a combined annual revenue of over $600 billion. Jean O'Leary, co-executive direc­tor of the NGTF, said she was "greatly heartened" by the results of the survey and compared it to a similar study in 1975 which drew only twelve responses from many of the same corporations. O'Leary credited the nation.al -~- attention drawn by the gay rights movement in the last two years for much of the change in attitudes by corporate employers. The passage of legislation in more than forty American cities banning discrimination in employ­ment on the basis of sexual orienta· tion has also played a part in the changing attitudes of the nation's business titans, O'Leary says. For example, a large national firm operating both in San Fran· cisco, which has banned discrimina· tion against gays, and in St. Louis, which does not have such an ordinance, would in effect have to have two employment policies, a practice which most national com­panies which to avoid. Companies which have gone to court asking that local ordinances banning discrimination against gays not be applied to them have been singularly unsuccessful, as Pacific Telephone found out during its lengthy battle with the San Fran­cisco ·based Pr!de Foundation. Jn the Pacific Telephone case lawyers for the giant company arg11ed unsuccessfully in court that thei could not be forced to adopt an anti·discrimination policy by the City of San Francisco because they were a national rather than 1ust simply local employer. The court rejected that plea and held that PT&T was indeed subject to the San Francisco ordinance. O'Leary of the National Gay Task Force, said that organ.ization will shortly begin another phase of theiremployementprojectbysurvey· ing .the leading companies in a number of fields, such as insurance, banking, transportation, and utilities. Glynis Johns, 55, who won a Tony Award In 1973 for "A Little Night Music," retums to Broad­way next season playing a woma·n of 80. Colin Higgins' comedy with music, "Harold and Maude," is about the relatlona be· tween a youth of 19 and a woman of 80 and was first produced In FHnce In 1972. The part of the youth has not been cast. Bianca Hits Roadblock LONDON (UPI) - A judge Monday ruled English courts have jurisdiction in the divorce case of Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger. putting a legal road­block in Bianca .Jagger's efforts to divorce her husband in the United States. The decision, which came after seven days of private hear­ings. caused problems because a California judge ruled last May U.S. courts have jurisdiction in the case. Jagger's wife, Blanca. wants the case heard in Los Angeles be­cause divorce settlements for women generally are higher in the United States. Jagger has been fighting to keep the case in London. "I have come to the conclusion that on the halance of fairness and also convenience. the pro­ceedings should continue in the Family Di,·ision of the High Court in London," said the Bnt1sh judge who h~ard the case in Lon­don The 1udge, however. said Mrs. Jagger could take the case to the English Court of Appeal. The case in California has been delayed since May pending the English court's ruling on jurisdiction. Carol Burnett. 43, drops her eomlc talents again to star id "The Tenth Month,• a 90-mlnuto! CB& television movie about a pregnant, inmarrled, mlddle-a&ed wo!I'. n who decides to keep and raise a c~ d. Co-starring In the c "1tempor11ry drama witb B • nett Keith l\1ichell and Dina Merr Glamour, tears Singing star le/led by cancer, di~s in husband's arms Slnger-so~ter Minnie RIJ)erton, known for the Dowers she wore In lier hair and her f974 bit "Loving You," died of cancer Thursday In Los Angeles at age 31. "She died at 10 a.m. in her husband Dick Rudolph's arms," said Kyo Sharee of Capitol Records. "They were listening to a Stevie Wonder tape of a song he had written for her." Ms. Sharee said Miss Riperton, who had a breast removed in 1976, entered Cedars-Sinai Medical Center at the beginning of the week because of an arm Injury at first believed unrelated to cancer. But the cancer h:id spread to her lymphatic system, Ms. Sharee said. Miss Riperton was serving as honorary chairman of the American Cancer Society's 1979 national education crusade, a position she held last year as well. "She was a symbol of hope and courage to many," said Dr. LaSalle D. · Leffall Jr., president of the American Cancer Society. He said that In a H76 appearance on the "Tonight" show, she reassured millions of women that losl.ng a breast need not mean the end of the world "The overriding outlook should be happiness about 6eing alive," she told viewers. A few months later, President Jimmy Carter presented her the cancer society's Courage Award in White House ceremonies. One of eight children in a musically minded Chicago family, Miss Riperton studied opera before turning to pop music wllen she took a MINNIE RIPERTON ". 11ymbol of courage' Job as a receptionist with Chess Records in 1963 at age 14. Soon, sln2in2 with a group called the Gems, She -was singing bacl..'Up to people like Etta James, Johnny Nash, Ramsey Lewis and the Dells. She left the group for another, Rotary Connection. and eventually made a solo debut album. But commercials ~ b~up work were still paying Beatty wins court test A superior court judge has overturned a $185,000 iUI)' award to a former manicurist who contended that a screenplay she wrote in 1971 became the basis for "Shampoo," the highly successful film made by Warren Beatty four years later. Judge James G. Kolts' ruling In Los Angeles Thursday set aside a June 15 decision against screenwriter Robert Towne, Columbia Pictures and Beatty, who co-authored, produced and starred in the film story of the sexual mores of a Los Angeles hair salon. 'Tm hap~y and I know Warren wlll be happy, said a somber-looldng Towne after the judge announced bis decision. "But its tempered by the pain of knowing you'vP. been accused of something you didn l do." ln a 9-3 vote, the jury found the three defendants had breached an implied contract with Bernice Mann of West Los Angeles by not paying her for use of ideas in a screenplay she wrote based on her experiences working in a beauty salon. Actor 'romance' untrue Actor John Gavin, who says he was hurt financially by a newspaper article linking him to the wife of an auto Industry_ executive. has been awarded $28(1,000 by a judge in Detroit against Los Angeles publicist Jay Bernstein. Gavin blamed Bernstein for a syndicated newspaper story linkinS Gavin romantically with Detroit area socialite Dollie Cole. At the time, she was married to General Motors Corp. President· Edward N. Cole, who later died. In a plane crash. The default ju~ent In the 1975 lawsuit was handed down Wednesday STEPHANIE MILL<; •• hectic appearance A Ir .st 50 persons were lnjureo Thu._ -d.Y when a crowd of 1,500 autograph seekers pushed against the plate-glass windows in front- of a Queens, N,Y., record store sponsoring a signing party by singer Stephanie Mills, police said. Pressure from the crowd shattered I he Wllldows apparently after a mounted policeman tried to clear Ole sidewalk in front of The Wiz Record Store. One eyewitness said the fX>liccman and tus hor~e camC> through the crowd "like a bulldozer ~nd cwryone went through the \11mdow." "1t·s a riot A lot of people ha\ • >ie,•n '1w1." said Audrey M.lls. si,1.er of tne lormer strr of the Broadway ~it .. ~~e Wiz" \,me were believed SPriOU: lv L.,)Ured John armcn. Miss "' · · public rc1 .. ·1 ~< spoke "1'.lll said" •be star clad n 1 kn-'1 :h hot pink 1ump.>ult, was w Cf.'lJd trr ugh ttic C"O"' on" st etc'l"r disgui:;ed 2 1 " •ire specU or abou an h1 ur aft(, L'lo glass brok Cra...,ford's Estate Split NEW YORK (UPI) Christina Crawford Koontz and Christopher Crawford, ac­tress Joan Crawford's two adoptive children who were cut out of her will, will divide $55,000 from tile estate under a court settlement reached Friday. Under the agreement, the majority of Miss Crawford's estate, estimated at more than $1 million, will go to a group of charities. Ms. Koontz wrote the best­selling book "Mommie Dear­est" - a chilling account of being a battered child - after her mother died. leaving a will that gave her and her brother nothing "'fo,r reasons which are known to them." Actress Cheryl Ladd has won a preliminary injunction prevent• Ing promoters of an X-rated movie from advertising that the star of the fllm is a "Cheryl Ladd Look-Alike." Tearlu/ Tonto gets his star Jay Silverhecls, known best for his role as Ole Lone Ranger's scout Tonto, has blared another trail by becoming the first American Indian to be honored with a star on Ole Hollywood W aik of Fame. Silverhecls. 59. watch£'d w11h tears streaking his !iigh. "harp cheekbones ·•bun.day as hJS star, the 1,70. h to be dedicated, was unveiled before a crowd of 200. "I am pleased and honored," the actor said in a soft voice Ulat faltered " ith emotion and the apparent effects of a stroke suffered several years ago. "Than!< you all." _His wile Mary, actor Iron Eyes Cody and comedian JonaUlan Winters were among the spectators who crowded along the ~trcct to watch the ccrcmonv that included trad1hon"1 Indian songs amd dancl'~. SilverhecL~. wcanng a fe2•Jierc~ hC"address, also rccc·,ed an awird fror t 1e Los Ani;t.: es C.tv ( ounc• lor "!us cont 1b_t.01 t ~t \>un rv, t"'• mm:.1llity m t c tc"'urmcnt fo Id .. Pages Community News HUD sexual harassnient coninion, report alleges WASHINGTON (UPI) - Female workers in the De­partment of Housing and Urban Development face widespread sexual harassment by their superiors, ac­cording to an unofficial survey released Friday. The survey found in many cases "the approach is bead-on, and threats of reprisal for failure to 'put out' is the preferred supervisory technique." Many of the women submitted to their superior's sex­ual dema nds in exchange for job advancement, a report on the survey said. The poll was conducted by Al Ripskis, a HUD official and one of Its most persistent internal critics. Ripskis published bis findings in "Impact," bis priva te newsletter. Rep. J ames Hanley, 0-N.Y., chairman of the House Qvil Service Committee, announced Friday bis investi­gations subcommittee would conduct an investigation into Ripskis' findings. Ripskis said he received 63 written responses and 103 telephoned responses to bis questionnaire into sexual harassment at HUD. Ripskis said bis survey found nearly ll percent of the solicitations came from women seeking lesbian relation­ships with a co-worker. The survey, he said, "turned up 63 women respond­ents who have been subjected to coercion or enticement by their boss or by a fellow employee." "Typically the greatest target of pressure for sexual submission" is lower-paid female workers, he said, "whose Immediate male boss indirectly (but not neces­sarily in a subtle manner) promises her quickened ca­reer advancement in exchange for going to bed with him." Of those women who responded to the survey, he said, three out of 10 "give in or cooperate." "Of those who cooperate, 80 percent say making Jove with the boss paid off," he said. Of those who resisted the advances of their bosses, he found, 93 percent reported they have been frooen in their job level or have been given sharply reduced per­formance ratings "as a result of not shacking up with the boss." "Ma ny - some 50 percent - reported that they began getting crummy assignments and dirty work to perform," after they spurned sexual advances. "The ·men were persistent," Ripskis said. "In 37 per­cent of the cases the coercion was of a continuous na­ture, or was repeated several times in 18 percent of the cases." He said " bosses farther up the supervisory hierarchy were responsible for some 25 percent of the sexual har­assment and were generally seen as constituting really 'heavy' pressure, because or the Impressive power they bold." - . . . .. NEW YORK (AP) - A defense attorney i;a,id Tbunday tbat bis client partlcipate«J in at least four Sl!Vage beattngi; in Cel)l;ral Park one ni,gh1 ~ )'el!!' becljllEoe homosexuals had beaten him earlier in the day. "! wouldn't Slij!8esl for a minl!te that beating up lags II' a legitimate summer sport in the city of New York.. " attorney Emesl Rammer true! a jury of nine womeo and t.bree men in Manhatt,an's Supreme Court. when be reblrDe4 Ill the park that rught with a group of his l:rlends and never lntendecl to hurt anyone. Tbe jury WljS ~ to begin deliberating COnspir4C)', as,llllult and ~~against Straw and two ..- youths alter a closing !ilJl!ement from tbe pro&eClltioJI and legal instructions trom JljS(lce Thomas B. Galligan. . . Alter HamnMlr completed bis summat;ion, l!ltQrneys for NLcbo~ Perri, 18, and David Hyman, 19, tlied to discredit the t.esUmooy of tbe two partlcipanljl in tbe attacks who bad r...l'.1".1"...l'...l'...l'"""_,,._,,..l"_,,._,,.""".I",~ ~ Commun;ty News-Aust;n-Son Antonio is published every other San Antonio Texas ~ ~ Thursday. Deadline for copy and adds in Monday prior to Thursday ~ publication. Moil all correspondence to P.O. Box 182 Son Antonio S Tex. 78291- Advertising rotes ore $3.00 per column inch, all odds s must be prepaid. Photo's w ith odds, on additional $2.50 each. We S welcome copy but reserve the right to edit all material submitted s due to space or content. Opinions expressed in articles submitted to ~ ond pubnshed by Community News ore not necessodly the ~ ~ opinions of the Editors or staff, . ~ -~.l"'.l"...1'.l".l".1".1".l".l".l".1".1".l".1.".......-.A WANT ADS HBL? .-IANT.,;D1 ?art- time clean up etc, flexible hours, Phone y;2-4552 John Wherever you are in time of need _ . Na.tional Runaway Switchboard 14-hour,-Toll Free Hotine for Youth 11aoo19n16004 Gays mass for Germany rally FRANKFURT, West Germany (AP) - About 1,000 American and European homosexuals conveged on this central German city Monday to seek ways to fight discrimination against them. The week Jong rally will be anxiously watched by City authorities. "As far as homosexuality goes, West Germany is a very liberal country In tbe legal sense, but tbere remains the dlscrlmlnaUon by society of hom0&exuals in many walks of life," Gerold Hens, spokesman for the Organizers, told The Associated Press during a telephone conversation. An organization made up of homosexual groups throughout West Germany sponsored the international parley. Confidence "We want to be together for a week, exchange e>.-periences and belp gays gain more self-confidence," Hens said. He emphasiz.ed that the mass rally has no set program and no finn aims. Hens said the la!.t such International meeting was in Edinburgh. ScoUand, in 1973. "But all we had planned to do then fizzled out and Just a few personal relationships remained," he said. Rowever, Hammer ll8lcl bis client, Kenneth StAw, 19, was •an 1111gry young man" wbo ba4 smoltec! marijuana, drank beer ~ sniffed paint fumes alt.er what be 1;1114 ba4 J1een an. att.ack oe ~~ homosexuals in t.be ~~ r!ui ~W WU inlltxicaled appeared for tbe I.ion. Among l,be ~ attacked in C.eatraJ park was rortnel' Olympic ice &kating w.mllloo Dick BultDn, who suffered a fradured lil<uJL ~~~~~~~~~~~~- Elizabeth T11ylor leaves the airport al London Wednesday for Washington. Siie was in England to attend· the funeral for her Sft· oad husband, Michael Wilding. "Gays are still being mugged in public places, they sometimes experience difficulties in finding a place to live or to find jo~" Hens sald. He also charged that Unfortunately, our Invitations for Frankfurt went out mainly aimed at male homosexuals, but we hope that females will ***** You know it' s gonna be a bad day when: 1) you wake up, face down on the pavement. 2) You call Suicide Prevention and they ·put you on hold . 3) You see a '60 Minutes' news team waiting in your office. 4) Your birthday cake collapses from the weight of the candles. 5) Your only son tells you he wishes Anita Bryant would mind her own business. 6) You turn on the news and they' re displaying emergency rtiutes out of your city. 7) Your twin sister forgets your birthday. 8) You wake up to discover that your water bed broke, and then you realize that you don't have a water bed. 9) Your horn goes off accidentally, and remains stuck as you follow a group of Hell's Angels down the freeway . SAN ANTONIO GAY SWITCHBOARD (7 P,M, - 11 P,M, 733-7300 733-7742 M.c.c.-s.A. P.O.BOX 12747 SAN ANTONIO, TX. 78212 TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE P.O. BOX 2036 UNIVERSAL CITY, TX. 78148 TEXAS ADVOCACY FUND P,O.BOX 91 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78767 LAMBDA ALCOHOL ANONYMOUS (GAY) 822- 0712 227-71 64 ~~ &bey deny IL• ~~re~ lo a ques&ion. WE KNOW sui•;E vlf~ \IH(.; COULD us;,; YOUrl Hi'..LPI Last week one o~ our Uommunity, Ron Mhite,was burned out of his Apt, and los~ every thing but the clothes on his back, In the past Ron has been one of the first to come forward when some one else was in need, Now would be a good time for us to shaw him our appreciatio, Any cne who has anythi1¥,they wi sh t o give can do so by calling Jim Lewey, ,.,,c,c. or myself , Gene Evans, COMMUNITY SERVICES DIRECTORY AUSTIN GAY SWITCHBOARD HOLY TRINITY CHURCH 408 w. 23rd. M.c.c. 614 6th TEXAS ADVOCACY FUND P,O,BOX 91 AUSTIN, TEXAS 78767 477-6699 •74-1655 ·Pas• 6 ~@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @ @ @@ B @@ @ ~ ~ I@ • @ SanAntonio'sNewestMen'sHealthSpa -~ 0' w· I ~ ~' ~ @ ~~ @ ~ @ ~ @ @ @ ii LUE i @ @ ~ @ @ @ i WAT-ER i ~ ~ @ @ @ @ i Whirlpool Weightl'oom SunDeck 5 .PA. i @ Sauna @ @ @ @ and much much more ~ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ ~ • @ @ @ @ @ @ I . @ @ @ ~ ~ @ @ ~ @ @ @ ~ @ ~ @ ~ @ @ BLUE WATER SPA @ @ @ @ @ @ 3107 Broadway @ @ @ @ PHONE 822-8074 @ ['i3 Continental Spa Membership Cards Honored 1§1 @@ ttttttz11111z11ttttttttll tttltlt ,,,,,,, ***Z*ZZ****ZZIZZ*l*IZZZ . @@ @ •• -. ~ @ @@ HI TREE BOOKSTORE @@ @ @ @ 3107'12 Broadway @ @ @ @ @ @ ~ @ ~ @ @ @ ~@ @ @ @ For That Little Bit Extra @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ Latest Publications @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ ~@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@~@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@~ MA:r,L'TtQs. ?ml~J:.E'l"l1a TC A.,._?'RIEN!). HERE'S HOi:!. 1. fold in hal! lenght ·..rise. 2. fold into t's J. the address blank below should be one side. 4. staple together 5. afix stamp, address and mail. 3113H dlWlS Xl:l,jy c ! ·: __ ·x.t ·+uv ~ l'1lZ1 xoa ·o "d o+ u.rn+aH METROPOLITAN COMMJNITY CHURCH OF SAN ANTONIO, INC. BI-MJN'll!LY NEll!LETTFl!-SUPPLF.MalT TO SOUTH TEXAS COMMUNITY NE\o.5. This newsletter is made possible through the time and effort of members of K:CSA and other interested persons. Articles and other assistance is always welco111e. Clur sincere thanks to those who help produce this newsletter. I I • • I • I I • = - METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF SAN ANTONIO WELCOMES YOU WORSHIP IN SONG 2:15 PM WORSHIP 2:30 PM 227-7164 Meeting in but not associated with the Unitarian Church 807 Beryl MCC Events Sunday Afternnon Worship Services •••• 2:15 PM at the First Unitarian Church located at 807 .Beryl. For more inf'o call our church office •••• 227-7164 Tuesday Evenings Rap Group ••••••••••• 7:00 PM at the Horizon House, located at 8610 Jones-Maltsburger (Parkridge Shopping Center) Last Friday of every month •••••••••• 7:00 PM POT LUCK DINNER, no charge, bring a food dish of your choice, located at the Horizon House. Counseling Services available •••••• anytime call I;!CCSA church office at 227-7164 ABOUT AB.5ENTEES! I became very concerned about the chur<:h 's absentee• and decided to check up o~ sonic or them. This is what I found out! The 0 . Kuional Family said they would probably be back llOmetime next month. -Once a month ia 1¥erage for them. · Mr. and M111. Faint Hearted have given up again. They can not r<olize that it takes matt enthusiasm and interest on everyone ~s p1rt to keep going in the winter time. The Plez R. Seekers were of{ on a trip and got home just a little too late to come. Mrs. N. E. Scwie did not have • clean thing lo wear. I i;aw her on the way to work the next day. The Spincl.,,.Sisters had someone to drop in 1t church tim•. They just could not tell tlwm that they were on their way to church. The Weather Watchen said the thunder was too loud. MiBe Hattie Go Home ju•t had to see her folks. I unde...tand that i.he liad not be<n home einee Lt•t weekend! Mr. and Mrs. T. V. Addict and childcen could not miss a •r•r i.I Sunday tet.·vision program. ,Mr. Lukr Warm seems to be unconcerned about his Christiau re-spon~thilitv to be a good steward or his IAlenlB. . Mr. Spv. Motk ju•I did not ftel like romin,;. Ahout the only time some people df'cide ,,, h1• f,itl1ful to tfw f.,lrd'!it work is whe-n tlley grt r1·ady to dif> and tht n it is too late! M:'C NEEDS YOU EVERY SUNDAY FOR CHRIST'S SAKE - ANOTHER BENEFIT .! THOUGHTS When we think of God's love for us and Jesus' command to us to l ove God and our neighbor, it is disquiet ing to think of the con· cept of evil and sin. Yet , unfortunate as it is, evil and sin are both realities. Both words passed the lips of our Divine Savior while He was on Earth as our teacher. Were it not so , the awful sacrifice of Jesus, made in love for us, offering us the hope of salvation, wou ld not have been necessary. What then is sin? Since Jesus' twofo ld co111Uand to us is to l o,·e, it is logical to assume that sin must involve the negation c' f love - a denial or partial denial of His command to love. God did no t leave us in the dark about what acti ons He considers a denial of love. Before the New Covenant of love, God handed the La~ of Moses on Haunt Sinai in the form of the Ten Commandments. When J esus came; to us, He explained these Commandments, in terms of l ove while giving us concrete examples of what He meant . Many t i mes He used parables to help us understand. But Jesus is a loving Taskmaster, His principles, if fully implemented, make profound psychological and sociological sense. There are times when living up to them require Se-Jere self-disci­pline, but it's worth it, if not for ourselves, f or whose .. benefit J esus taught these things, then for Him who laid Hi s life in love for us. His teachings are in the Gospels. Read, Study, Jhink, Vnders tand and then ACT - LOVE! "Ye are my friends, if you do whatsoever I command you." <John 15 :14) . . Hadden Wells SISTERS I I_• _I I • I I • = = How Can I Say THANKS o:ne y ec.r r:. 1:.go a t my fir s t ::cc r: Elrvice , o.fter taking colll'.".iunion , I attempted to kiss the p erson f.iving it, and completely n i EEed J I mE'an I ended up o::iooching hot air. i/as I ever embarraoe d f But a smile and a lovin~ hand lai d g ently afains t my cheek, l et me know t hat eve>rything v1as okay. Hov; c an I cay thanks? ''hortly a fter I cane to ~: an Antonio, I was res i dent a t an i nr·ti ­tv. tion c"f'finit r-ly not notPd for i t s f ri en dliness to fay p err ons . I had 1'.'!'i tten ou r p c.st or , askin,o: for a r erson al v i sit . I t v1asn•t very long until one cay i \';as c ~'.lle d to the lobby , and there was J i m L ewey, ["mil i n;· 2J.l over the> pl a c e . ~:udc'. enl y I v:a::- no lon,-:;:rr al on e . Fow can I r'a:v tho.~kf'? · :~c.ny 1;imer.:: , 2.;:d. i n r:ic.ny r·ays , ! c.y T . __ rir0\-er.. hfr1::el f to b ea coocl friend . In fii c cute, -::--c ··()od Cr,ec are so ntnProus I Douldn ' t cv€:r?. ~::now \'Jhr:e to ·oe::::in. ~:ow ct ... n I ~ ay tfJ.:;.nks? AS ~in~cuiration leadrr, r~en I ' ve been ,':"V_i l ty of 11 dro. f:~inr. it11 Gene haw tern there ~ivinn me the "let~- nave it" cLc:nal . · ?here are ::-o n2ny othfrc • , .'tevc> , .C:d , Glen, :ra:rry , Jutch, Georec, '.'he.r an , l .c,, I,in da ( I ve c ert<:,.i n: y :·ni c' ed her l ntel y) and. so -:.::...n:v othflrs . If I :iir·[·ed n 2.nin ;- yov. , '"'l e ai? e for~i vr ::ie . You r ee, I really don 't ~~!10\N ho\'.' to f'a;-l thank2 . 'You •1i :'.'ht v1ondf'r ·;:h;y this c ort of thi ng l·:101.i.l d be i n a ne1·1slett f'r • . : el l , God :~novis I heve not b E' en shy i n de clc.ring ~y c ri ti c i r~c , ::iy r-.r:;: c>r, rte . And I doubt t r.at vou •re r.ny c:. flc>r E'nt . c~nct ' t ill \'i f' C.r f' Chri r·ticnF , ·~rn 't we? ]or t~1nt re&son , I ' !~ do in~ '"'ublicly , i n :.1rint, 1.i1r.t I bel i eve \'•e --1~.l chov.ld C:.o r~ore of ten, and. t;1'1.t:::: f. c.yin1~: n I lovr you II. '"W-'I HH" z. --L1 l"Y\ -The Chi Rho The Greek letters Chi and Rho (say: kai-rowJ are the first two letters of the name of Christ as it is written in the Greek language, XPllTOl. When the two letters are put together to form a monogram, they become a symbol which reminds us of Christ. It is an abbreviated way of writing the name of Christ. It is something like writing our own init ials in stead of writing out our full name. Christians all through the ages have used this monogram to show tha t they believe in Chris t. It is found as early as the s econd century in inscriptions in, the ca tacombs, and it has been in use ever since that time. There are several ways that the monogram of the name of Christ can be written. Only the two most popu­lar ways are shown h ere. The Chi nho symbol is often used on the walls in par­ish churches. WhctlH'r it is on the wall, a vestment, or anything d se, it means that this place or this thing is marked with the name of Christ and belongs to Him. The Alpha Omega The firs t let ter of thP Greek alphabe t is called Alpha, and the last IPtter. Ornegn. ThesP two letters used singly or put together to form a monogram remind us of Gnd who is First lwcduse there is no Cod before I Jim, and Lust because tbere is no Cod aft:'r !111n. God ll11nsdf said: " I r1m thr Alpha iJnc.I the Omego. the lwginning and the encl, \.Vho i!; and \vhn wHs an·<l \\tho 1s coming. thf• /\!mighty." (1\poc. 1 :18) These two letters ore a symbol of Christ in "hoP1 cre­ation began nnd hy whom it will end. In early Ch ristian symholism. the Alplw and tht• Omcgu were plitr.ed on Pach side of the cross. TIH• idea embodied in this sym­bol is <>xpresscd in the /\pocalypse: "I am the first and the last and the Living One. I was <lead. and behold, I am living evermore." (/\poc. 1:18) Somctim,·s the two lett ern were put with in the halo around the head of Chri' t. Often, in nu r own dav. it will be found ran'l'd on the frnnt of lhc alta1 in au~ churches. Used in any of I these ways, the symbol sugges ts the truth tha t God is without beginning and without end. li•·d·. Ft>r year!-', :1t:c,~1 il v •. .- t •· t·J· ·:t\ t!:~ I'· de· It JS ~oo n as l gc~ ...! •• ·li!l•; 1;,1;t. .·n0 ·1hovt 1:-; .. : .. round tu lt . C\.u 11 ou: .J ~\d kt.'CP 1r hand~; a nd \ i>u w1H haw: ·1t1 •1.on.~ troaiJ le gcrti?1g .. 11 tho:;~ extr as dotu~. tor :. ou' vt> fm<.il1y got .~ " ' round tu it". x CHt Pl RHO CHURCH ETIQUETTE What would you think of a church where people whisper~d and giggled throughout the service? Would you think that the people were ser ious about worshipping God? I doubt that you would. Yet every Sunda~ I see and hei:i-r things disturbing the service. Not everymne i s i;ruil ty of beinf. a distraction. Mos~ people . know how to conduct themselves during a s ervict For tho ~ e who are simply not aware of good church etiquette, I hG.VC' listed ~ome guide­linPs to follow in or der to pr ovi de for con­centration on God . The prelude i E not a soci al hour ~ It is a time of auiet meo.i t a ti on and preparati on for worship . ·rr ayerf are a time set a::::.i de f or you to t clk • • •• with God • ••• and no one else . The s ermon i ~ a timP set aside for the Pastor to t alk t o you e.bout God • • • r ather than a time for you to find out about your neighbor' s cocial activities the night before . The of­f PrinR i s a t i me of giving • •• • and t hio in­cludes your attf'ntion. :.:edi t a ticn i s a t i me for you to t hink wi th God . Communion i s a tine for your special cor'.lr.iunion with God, and if you're doing jus t that , there shouldn't be any time f or cormnunication with someone el se . It i s all co very simple . People go to church to talk wi th God . The church pro­vi des a social hour aftf'r s ervic f' s for people to tal k with each other. Let u :o all r emember we are here to v,on:.hi· God and le e u s do jus t that i n a rev er ent manner and with a consciour;ness for other s . God •·1ill love you for it! (The Palm Leaflet , !•ov. 78, , Earl tlill e1) OOOOOOJOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXKlOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ~----T--h-in-k- I-t- O-v-e-r- -,. God made lhe- aun-i.t c\ves. God made the moon-it givtt. God made t hf' stars-thf'y sivt. God m11.dt t he a ir - it 1h.·e5. God made t he clouds- they rive. God made the earth- it 1i.vea. God made t he trees-they cive. God made t he- nowen-the-y give. God m•de the fowls-they 1ive. God made man - He . ., ~-----------------· MCCSA BUILD:CNG FUND -so~o ~R CJ l!:ncl osed i s my contribut i on I or ~---- CtHere is my monthly p.Ledge of S ____ _ i::J'.1.'his i s an anonymous gi:ft. c:1Pleas e keep my name/address CO!H'ID!!.'l'l'i'.LAL but add me t o your mail ing l ist 'c:JPlease mail me a statement ~or tax pur poses NAMi'.: ----------------- H•L Pl ADJRESS 1' HONE ~------------- ALL D".'.NA'l'H..'Nf AlL 'l'fu'\. DWUCTABLJ:: 1-'LEAS.t> MAKE ALL t;HECKS AfiD r.10N~Y OHD.l;!;H::: ORD~RS ~AYABLE ~O : ro .c.c.S.A. Inc. ~.c.c.::;.A. Inc. ~~G'rS . ?inancia2 record:. o ~ tr:.e ~hurch may be revie~ed on request. A~l inouiries ca~1 51 2/227-7'. ~k :cia i l to: J .o. Box l. '[14'( '. an ;,,ntonio , ·rx. 'fo2.L2 .... . .. NIOVING RAP HORIZON MCC-::an Antonio hac for· somE' time bE'en holdinc. a Tut' sday HitEl Rap f essio~ e.t. the FriPndl.y Club Room. and we havt> {;I'own in many ways. In growing we often find oursPlVt'I having to move in directions we never bPfOl'E' drPamed possipie ••••• and so it is with our rap .groups. WP have a new location, thE' Horizon House ,located at 8610 Jones Mal tsbf!:- gt>r. (Just inside Loop 410, in the Parkridge Shoppin.'.: Qenter) To say thE' lrast, thf! ta HOUSE facilities arEl nice •••• air conditioning, carpeting •••• a lovely decor which is very spacious. On July 31st our rap will be on Trensexualism •••••• we will havP a small panel of female to mal f! and malP to ff!male persons as ?Ur guests. These persons have taken the time out of their lives to come ~d eh~.re 'Y'~th. us. We do hope you will join Uv •••••• beg1nn1ng at 7:00 FM. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: MCCSA CHUP.CH OFFICE AT 227-7164 DEAR BUDDY: On b!'.!IH1lr of ~·iCCSA a nd mysel f I 1:1ould .!. i '<e to extend au:- sinc?re thanks ;, nd ap­pr-:? cic:Cion fnr the f r ee use of your fncil i t i e s at The i- rinndly ;_oungc ; Pven supplyi ng utili t ies nt no ch~rge ~ o r our Tuo s day · ite ~e~ 3ess ion s . Cec~use of yot1r J£ncrosity we hBve Deon ah le to r28Ch out to n~ny in ~he Jay ::om'·1uni ty Lil~!: ue coul :-1 'lo t :iuve wiLhout your aid , ~z h~ve recently bsPn ablo to loc ate a ~are cEntrally located facility, close to ch~rch and with more pnrkinn space , ror a no~in i l fee that has air conditioning . ' iope f ully we will be ab l e to utilize this for · so·ce other '•uch needet! church ~unctioris Again, t~8nk you f or the nany nonths of - u port w~ich you 1:1i.!.l ingly and f r ee l y geve to the ~CC Rap Sessions . If we can even be o~ se r vi ce to you, please do not hesitate to call on us , "od "less YOU , Yours in Chri st , Rev , Jim r ewey i'iCC San ;,ntonio PAGE 11 Commanhy Newa Alamo Country; To REPEAT a bit of advice, SOME day some people we know hAY learn the difference between 'wrecking' the straights, and just plain making an ASS of themselves! Promised NOT to mention any thing about 'helium heels', ~onder Hull he knows if it is peppermint hot lube, STRANGE place for taste buds! Welcome back to S.A.to ~.r E,,,,,,,, FuIU"._y 1 the old town dont sound quite so 'backward' which brings up a point, AGAIN! Sounding down on San Antonio doesnt make any body appear more 'worldly' etc, Just stupid. Again l say s imply that rather than run your mouth and PRuVi your ignorance, $1J9.00 and an hour and fourty minutes air time will get you to fairy-land and as far as I'm concerned, dont let the door hit you in t he ass on the way out! L,G, DONT worry about it, his mouth has never worked right. »Ir J . ALSO returned to our fair city this >1eek, Told you Houston -.as a third rate L.A. Vanessa Redgrave, whose controversial support of the Palestine Liberation Organization has drawn criticism from members of the American Jewish community, will make her American television debut as a Jewish musician and concentration camp victim in a CBS drama this fall. RAQUEi. WELCH Raquel will i get serious At 38, Raquel Welch is finally getting serious - dramatically that is. After dallying tn such httllatlons as "Mother, Jugs and Speed," the actress is taking on her first heavyweight role in NBC's "The Legend of Wall<s Far Woman." Playing a tough Indian woman. Our hat's off to Betty Naylor, our very AllLE voice in Austin, She has shown us all what grim determination can do, She die' her home w:>rk and she did it well. She in turn won the respect of the Texas Legislature and from here on the task will become easier with each step, HV~ , let's get behind her an:i give her m1r suppor·;, she's already prov<:d what Sttl!. can dol - heavyweight role Welch is due to go before the cameras this week. NBC will ab· the flick during November, a serious penod for ratings. ~.ufLer patch , next tliing yo1.4 know, it'll be to the bod;; shcp to get yc.ur t.eeth re-set after a family 'discussion' ••• ,.,.,.,, Jamr,r• i.. is easy to find these d.ay::, just 10.,;ate !.he: neare:.>t 1-.uT TU.:<! Who's :singing lie;htly all over towr., dum-de-d0-land of ~ky blue waters, Neu::: from Aus"t.J.r; has ~.t that : •• c. !'rem ~.rl,G, went !'ishints, and v1lb.i ca1..;ght hini! ~ell .J.C. that's Olio. way to get a pro:1.otior., Heavens! SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Tbe comptroller or Spokane'!; Roman Catllollc: Diocese says be nearly "fell off bis chair" when be learned tbat all Ill priests covered on a group medlcaf policy now bave to pay 31 cents a month extra - for maternity benefits. Tbe pdests are required to pay because a U.S. Sapreme Court an~ dlsc~tlon ruling mandates tbat employetll lloldlng a group medical policy covering 15 or more workers mast pay for matemlty benefits ror au employees, the same coverage as ror any other IDness. "It would bave to be a doable A.i..Sv frcm Austin ,.,H,C, comes the following1 1J~oS ????????? A,C, D,G, Telney-weney Cri,;::o, Th" .Jark Green Jolly Giant , ALL declare they are doing ~ust fir.e and in there s0;'·"' pl>tce they mer.tioned being of scur.d mlnd( I never said ~ AGR.iwW witl". any of thix) but that Crisco insists he IS TIRBD, D, C, got in trouble wl.th yo1.4-!mow-i.ho,,,,,, (told hiir1 not tc Hoss around) A.C. 's Celel:ate( SOi'.i body should check ·:>ut ,.,0 nda.y ' s) and George is just green,(that's what the P.EST of them think) I'm not going to bring up the Princes Panties••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • miracle,• saJd tbe Rev. TheGdorlc f)e.Jong. diocesan comptroller, In a jocalar moed. A note from Gypc;y -~cmtained the follo11ing: Dont look, You 11'.ight see. Dont listen. Tou might hear. Dont think, You might learn. Dor.t walk. You might stumble, Dent run. You might fall, Dont l!ve, You ;-;::.GHT die! GOLD SILVER ©®~rn@ ~ dl~W~~rnw MEXICAN U.S. CANADIAN San Antonio Flea Market 1428 Austin Hiway BUY GAY : ..... ~ ..... 1.j'::: ~.1 TUA~ by Ren 1·.oss SELL Space 57 TRADE Affrimation/Gay ... ormons United is now in Te';tas, The group is open to all active, inactive, 3nd former Latter-Day Saints and friencs, ~. eetings are held weekly in Dallas,. Houston, and Austin. Chapt~r meetings are held bi-month ly alternating from city to city, For further information about Afi'rll .. ,ATIG!> you ma;r write P,C, .!lox .50952 Dallas Texas 7.52.50 or contact the following branch leaders: In Dallas, jteve 214-52g..9641 In Houston Jerel 71J-449-21•JJ In Austin Ron 512-44)-4100 More gas line' forecast WASHINGTOI\ (AP) - ~;nNgy Department ~!fict:l!s said Monday that althnugh supptie< have impro,·ed. long gasoiu ·; U.ne~: could rei.W1l later this )'Car •· "First or all a priest woald bave to bave a baby, and Ulen - because of tile ~y vows - It would bave to be an "lmmacahde Cenceptton. • Blae Cross representative BW Baker, when contacted, added: "As a mauer or fact, a groap or nuns In Seattle Is llavlng the same problem.• Holden· will give eulogy Actor William Holden will deliver the eulogy Tuesday at Beverly Hills, Calif., funeral services for his longtime friend and co-worker, George Seaton, an Academy Award· winning screenwtiter and director. The 68-year-old Seaton, who had suffered from cancer for two years. died tn his sleep at his home Saturday. Seaton, who spent 40 years in show bUSiness, had his biggest success recently as wtiter and director of "Airport" for producer Ross Hunter in 1969. Dalla5 ~ountry club reiect~ •. nembership bid by Charlie Prid~ Charley Pride, the country-musk star, Uves In an1,1 ... ves Dallas. but this week, be says, he's feeUcg "pretty bad about some people" there. Aft.er having played golf sieveral times with ~ at the Royal Oaks Country Club, he bad been urged by them to apply for membership. He says be sent in an application wt1b a $8,000 check for bis Initiation fee, and was assured "infonnally" that be would be accepted. Now, however, Pride has received >I letter from the Royal Oaks membership committt>e indicating that his bid for membership bad been vetoed by at least four persons. "They gave no reason, but the only one I can think or is that I'm blac~~ Killings Predicted By Gays NI\\' YOl<K (l I'll - Lt'adt•rs in New York's g~:y r11m mu111t .\' predh.'1- l'd Thursday that hornosrxua:s would be kilk<J liecau>c of the lit\'"' rPfu~a! to halt the filming of "Cruising," a mouL' al)Out homosex­ual murdL•rs. ·'ThC'r<' will he kill­ing~ ... :-aid Arthur Ut.'11. a promin('nt gay leader and :1 culumini~t for th(' Village Voice. "The filin ~,·ill increase th~ ho~tilif.'· tO\~.:ard g:.,·s and gin' peoplP idc-as rm hov.. • h> act out tha' hos1ilit\·" · · 1 t ·makes 1wopll' think it' ~ good to go out and kil! guv people to put thrm out of tlwir misery." said Ron Al­hrim. a :;pokrsman for th-~· <::"tlalit'ion for l .t'S­hihn :'md Gay High ls. <.rn umhrt'll<t org:.rnizntion of ~8 gay groups in tht· cit.'·. Thl• mo' it' !->t<ir:-. .\I Pacino as .i dt•t1·c:tin• \•.·hn i~ a~~ign<'d lo inq·s~ igatt' LJ ">t·rip~ of killing-.;. in which ga\~ an..- siabbl'd nm! discov· f"rs hnmO!-t:X"U<Jl f(•ndt•n· Cil'S in l:imst>IL G.i~· right\ gnHtps aski·d l\·L.i~·or Edv,rnrd Koch \\lNinPsd.:t\' io \\ ithdraw the shooting 1wrmit for thP film. \V<•d1wsda~· ni~· ht th<'~· marched on a (,n•t·n· wld1 V1 ll;1gp 11u.\· lwr. whl'n' tin- film is bl·ing shot. 0111• pn111.·='"·l•1r \\·;i:- c11argt~d \\ ith kicking a pulin• offic1·r in llH' groin wl11h: 1hf' rop \•.:;,1~ arrt•sting hi111 r11r sta ..... hing tlw tir<·:-; ul il pillroi car. Koch rdust'<I tu \\!I h· draw the permit I ht1rs· da~. :,i.1> ing that rt•\ ok· ing it 011 lht• !-'ruund. nf ...,cript c1Jnlt.11: '\' 11uld ..... im~I~ ht• u n ... vr..,!iip PAG.li: 12 ;;;. CommnnJty News · Maaashi Sada, wn- of a hit song that pral ... femlni- obedlonco and subsorvionco, Is being angrily attackocl by women'• llbbors in Japan. Tho rocord, "Your Lord and Master Proclaims,'' Is ratM thrid on tho Japa,_o top ten dnpit. feminist complaints tho song Is a throwback to distant clays when a wJap-anese woman •xpoctocl to ... aslcwotomon. fi'llERI' NEWS 6724 SAN PEDRO I Open 10am-4am SAN ANTONIO'S HOTTEST BOOKSTORE leather goods' magazines rubber goods books peeps (also visit Galleria News at 513 E. Houston and our Head Shop at 6726 San Pedro) GOLD SILVER ®®m~i~ C2i cllm~~~mw MEXICAN U.S. CANADIAN San Antonio Flea Market 1428 Austin Hiway Space 57 BUY SELL TRADE Brion Faulkner, left, ond Roy Boll ore !wo members of on experimental unit of the Dellos police force who ore potroling problem oreos on their bik.,s. They hove o hord lime concealing their handguns ond wolkie-lolkies under their shorts ond polo shirts but there is usuolly o police squod cor neorby for oid. 1959: The Way They Were Millions Don't File U.S. Tax Returns Russell Wolden. candidate for Mayor. last-minute Democrat and longtime County Assessor. fired off his smear campaign October 7th in the San Francisco Proves.1·. a neighborhood throw­away paper. Under the headline: ··sex Del'io1es .Hoke S.F. Heod­quor/ ers ", Wolden sounded a rallying call for sexual vigilantes. Aquiver with McCarthyish moral indignation, he charged incum­bent Mayor George Christopher with providing so hospitable an atmosphere in San Francisco for ·homosexuals that "the national organization of homosexuals in this country- the Mattachine Society- had fled its original but less friendly Los Angeles home to Christopher's "open city"'. and San Francisco was consequently overrun by pervert hordes preying on defenseless normal boys and men. Under Christopher's "bene­ficial climate". Wolden said. the number of bars, steambaths. nightclubs. theatres and hotels catering to homosexuals had climbed to a shocking 27! United Prus International The government is losing billions of dolla"rs each year because many Amer­icans neglect to file income tax re­turns and then avoid detection by tax collectors, a congressional study re­leased yesterday showed. In 1972, the latest year for which detailed statistics were available, about 5 million wage-earners-many in lower-income brackets-avoided payments of $2 billion in income taxes because they failed to send returns to the Internal Revenue Service and never were caught, according to the study by the General Accounting Of· !ice. GAO officials said that figure is probably conservative and that the number of nonfilers has grown consid· erably since then to about 6 million­or 8 percent of all persons required to file returns. The GAO. which acts as the watch· dog branch of Congress. was critical of IRS enforcement policies, saying several actions were required to strengthen methods for detecting this "subtCrranean" ircome and closin~ the "delinquency gap." Otherwise, GAO officials said, the entire structure of the U.S. voluntary tax system may be endangered. "\\"e are very C'Oncerned," said GAO e)\e<.~utive Richard Foi.:el. WILD BILLS BOOKSHOPPE ''See the best in the West'' (at Our Reasearch Store) All New Theatre in Sound and Color with double features changed weekly The Best in adult magazines, films, video-cassettes and toys. 613 W. 29th St. Austin 477-0534 25c peep shows with clean and spacious booths New Movies Weekly All this and more at Our Two Locations OPEN 24 HRS. 8552 Reasearch Blvd. (on Rt. 183) Austin 453-9335 - One 1. Page 13 Community News ANITA SAYS, Fonda .branded 'traitor' 'MY WORLD IS CRUMBLING' The Gay Teachers initiative in California has further frus­trated Bryant's campaign against the "militant homosexual" who she says is destroying America and her personal life. All of this, Bryant contends, has damaged her health, caused her children to be harassed. reduce her family in­come drastically and is prob­ably going to cost her the Florida Citrus Commission orange juice account in 1979. The national publicity afforded Bryant has caused "my world to crumble" as she can no longer "go out and play some tennis or water ski - do a lot of things. I haven't been able to lead anything like a normal life for any sustained period for two years." She believes that history "will (because of the almost total abomination of the entertain­ment industry and the media) picture me as some kind of witch who was out to do away with the homosexuals. But if it were to come from almighty God. if that were possible, I think it would be a totallv io:iM:ii;~· different thing." Anita Bryant MIAMI - Singer/activist Anita Bryant still lives with her family here in a 23-room man­sion at Miami Beach, but out­side of fundamentalist religious circles. her popularity has been waning for some time. Some have compared her isolation with that of Richard Nixon at San Clemente. FRIEN DLY s Bryant is convinced that she is a maligned martyr. She is alternately angry, confused, and stunned by the treatment ~he has received. She urges, The reaction has been a real rude awakening for me and I guess it affected me very deeply. There hasn't been any area of our individual lives or our family's life that hasn't been touched." The singer is currently send­ing out pleas to "fight the mili­tant homosexuals" through her new "Protect America's Child­ren" organization. Her appear­ances before religious rallies are continuing but infrequent. Bryant does not take any blame for her present state, nor does she place the blame on 533-5049 3 P.M.• the public's rejection of her as a person. Who is responsible? - "the militant homosexual." She / says that homosexuals have so abused her that she is now physically ill and unable to face the world. A sad and isolated woman. 'she now often repeats, "I am not capable of taking that kind of rejection, physically. verbally - the boy­cotting and the threats and all that." 1 ... YOllK TIMB-YICI The California Senate has rejected Gov. Edmund G. Brown Jr.'s nomination of actress Jane Fonda to the State Arts Council. After a debate in which the former antiwar activist was branded a ''traitor" and a "collaborator'' with the North Vietnamese, the senators voted 28 to 5 not to pennit Miss Fonda to serve on the council, which dispenses gran~ to promote the arts. Bob Kunst, the Miami activist who again placed Gay rights before the electorate in another initiative on November 7, be­lieves "she is getting everything she deserves. She is a confused woman who is a major danger to the country because of her fanaticism. However. she has JANE FONDA .•. denied post Sen. Ruben Ayala, a Democrat from Chino who led the fight against the nomination, declared: "She waived her right to serve on appointed commissions when she went to North Vietnam and did her little thing." , also helped the movement be­cause she gives us solidarity, something for us to focus on." 'Sex-slave' beauty Anita & Miss Lillian Split Over Gay Issue Lillian Carter, the President's outspoken mother, now has "absolute disgust" for singer/ activist Anita Bryant. Miss Lillian recently told the Los Angeles Times she was once "crazy about her - the sweet­est little singer - and thought she should have won Miss America that year she didn't." What caused the change in attitude? ... "Now I feel abso­lute disgust for her because of her position against homosexu­als," Miss Lillian responded. She said she has told Bryant that she is wrong and that she should "shut up and mind her own business.·· In an aside. the controversial woman said that she was at Studio 54, New York's famous disco, where she met many "really nice looking men." Later s!'ie discovered "they were all Gav." won't .be extradited British authorities will not extradite fugitive beauty queen Joyce McKinney on kidnapping-for­sex charges, but a U.S. magistrate m Ashville, N.C., has ordered her to undergo psychiatnc tests. Miss McKinney, 28, of Minneapolis, N.C .. was arrested Wednesday on a charge of giving false information to obtain a passport. That charge, according to the FBI, stemmed !rom a British investigation of Miss McKinney for the alleged 1977 kidnapping of a Mormon missionary, Miss McKinney's former boyfriend. Prosecutors said Kirk Anderson, then 21, of Provo, Utah, was taken to a remote cottage and s)lackled to a bed where he was forced to have sex with Miss McKinney. The former Miss Wyoming-USA jumped bail in England and fled to Canada under an assumed name m April 1971l, less than a month before a scheduled court appearance on the kidnapping charges. She lived mostly in the United States until her re­arrest Wednesday, ~'BI agents saicl During her court appearance Thursday, Judge J . Paul Teal reduced bond on the passport charge from $10,000 to $5,000. ~!t~I s~ · ~"6m Dinner and Broadway Show! "Fiddler On The Roof' 5UN MAT Sll SUN. EVE S12 TUE. WED, THUR S13 FRI SIS ~AT $16 Loop 1604 Off San Pedro (follow uTSA Sis-· Tony Award Winning Family Musical (GJ With a Cast of'26 Special Matinee t;>Lunch Wed.Aug.8 .... $11 Wed.Aug. 29 ... $11 RE'iERVATIONS. 494.7793 s A B : t: 1t t 1rmer t VJlue1 ... ~ .... Community Newt I :EXECUTIVE AUSTIN Stephen F. Austin Hotel Basement Level 478-7220 VISA HEA.LTH CLUB Yearly Membership $10.00 ADMISSION: to6P.M. after6 P.M. $4.25 $5.30 STUDENT DISCOUNT $1 .00 off Adm. any time Weekly Rates-6 A.M. to 6 P.M.-Workout Monday thru Fri. $1 0. 00 per week Membership Valid at both Facilities 'SAN ANTONIO 723 Avenue B _225-8807 • Sorry, Massage Not Available! A hour and a ha1f latPr J ,·1· _.; ur t!lr phor.<' feeling bf'ttt"'r I.banks to Jira, a slr.:m~ht ifl('!JJ wh'l h'.id ~orae a very important perso'l 1n ~;;v h~e d1:ring tht"' past year. Hii dMe triendship and :ic1.:ep!a~1ce 'f tr!~ wt-r t?' invaluable. But he had ask•n tee q>u',tion. tuG. "Did I "ant to be s1raight?" l st1!I rc~'cffi't: .1s"cr k A \\tl.:-·k later I wa:.; bar~, in P.eYl_frO<''s oHi<'"' fC'r session nurnber two. Ae '>aitl 1• s:i.id•· 1~! l};~ ff':' ti~:u: peopte say thf>v were oorr. h·· 1nosr:x;. -.1 'lr "':tvi::> ·.J-..:~y-= ~cen h0r10sf'xual. ''Thf' t'."a;;~ic thinp about thl".~f sta1emerH!' i~ not just tbat they arc wrong, he :•t> 1d. t•ll !. 1 .:lt ~i't'>\. r.a W' toe Pfft>i-t t:r unnFC""i.s.:.inh I.ii ::n2 tut"' :f' \. :io h1 ·uev€'~ them n .. oa htetu:rw·"f t!o. ~f·x..:ah:o; HPr.frflC' expl~mPd th:?' ha . .:it~;!.·· . ~l·rl? .. , .' t ·.i.•) causes of homosexuality: a .. predisposition" toward homosexuality and "learned behavior." Several factors can cause a child to grow up with a predisposition toward their own sex. Amon~ them: temperament. inadequate parental relation.<hlps Csmotherin~ or dominant mrtbers and/ or rao;sive or absi>nt fathers). permio;sive childhood t raining. msecurity about sexual identity. childhood sexual trauma, early interest in sex. youthful masturbating or sexual fantasizing, childhood associate' and peer pressure. Renfroe emphasized that a predisposition toward homosexuality was not synonymous with homosexuality. This is where "learned behavior" came in. "As a person's thought~ and acth~ties become more znd more same-sex oriented. be tends to think negatively about the opposite sex. He progresses until bis mind is obsess.!<! with hJs own sex. He can say ·God made m~ gay; but in actuality he made the choice He permitted bis thoughts to drift into homosexual fantasies and experiences:· Renfroe said. He emphasized that "same-sex desires. feelL'lgs. thoughts and actions are reversible." Throughout the week, I gave considerable thought to what Renfroe had >aid. A lot of it seemed to make sense. Several of the predi<posing factors were in my background and I had to admit I wiUingly participated in homosexual activities. But I couldn't help my desires. I certainly didn't put th~m there - no matter what be said At the beginning of meeting number three. Renfroe asked me if I bad ever personally invited Jesus Chnsl into my life as Lord and Savior. That question set the stage for our $e9$iOn. COMPLETE WORK-OUT FACILITIES Private rest area's HOT TUBS, Renfroe explained tbP only way I would evH reverse the homosexuai process was to undergo a change of nature. He said I would net>d outside hdp, which is exactly what Jesus came to give me. HP explained the BibJP ff'ar!w~ th:it whe11 l! pe:-"'on rrceives Christ. be l)e< '~:-:-:.·.._·a partner of the di 11jn<.· nature, h~vmg PSC'opert tht- rorru;,~ion that b JP thi; world through lust. .. kei:froc empha:,ize<i. however, t>iere wer~ other steps to overcqming homosexuallty; I would bavP to face homosexuality as a :iin and r·~mfK'i i1 Driving hack h<,me after our se~sion haf; rn<ie·-~. bac more phampbJcts and pubhracwns to read. 011< hst,:..d 18 st<>ps to 0·1e:-romin& ho:nosexualii:y. it stated: accept Je,us as S>·;ior. be conttnually c0ntrol1Pd by the Holy Soirit. '""lk in the Spirit, admit homosext;.ality is a sin :mfl confE:>i-:s it, face and cc.nfr·~~ ycur basic anger problem, !ove and arcept purself. learn t.o control your mind. than~ God !or you!' sexuality, stop homosexual acts. avoid homosexua: tangout3 a'\d friends. become mvotved in Bible· teaching, become active in a we.·kly Bible >tu:.Jv, virorously seek Christian C'lmpanionship, find 'one or more intimate new friend:;;, glvf' c:ieck-up privil('ges to one of these trlends, believe in God for an unlirnitPd future. prei.ent your b')dy formally w. God and tierom~ a people-helper. Just 18 simple stc:F - and poof, rm straight - I <aid to Jim. But I still wcndered. even if I took the 18 "teps, 'NOuld my desire for men oe replac"d by a desire for w0men? Besides. I felt I was alread~· learllng a Christian life. I be!irre0j h God and h:i1 :i.cccptc>d J<'sus C'l!rist as mv Savloc. I treated my fellow man with .-eope<'t ~nd Jove •md undrrstanding and was not out to i1urt anybc·d~· er f'Jrce my belief~ on any ":it) f'!se. But Jim was thPre wff.h t-J.5 qu~st:on aP,Qin. ·'Dh~ I want to be straight?" And again . i c1...uldn't answer it. The::i Jim inquired: "If you were st!aigbt and I wa• gay. how would you feel about :nt".' ''-'o;~k il make a.'"!y dt!ferf!'nrP m our relationship" l\ Juid you not be rt friend because Anita Bryant; 18 •tcrs say; y:;u shou!dr, ·1 ?" Of course ii W<'Uldn't matter, I replied. I ko<>w tb2t even if I was strai1.~bt, I would still be ot:><>n·m•n<lHl enough to-accept people "'ho are different. At least r booed I wouid be. I just couldr. 't imagine myseil ~'lPr thinking that homosexuatit-1 was WIOl-ig. ''Then why are you questionlng it now?" Jim demanded ... f,ither you truly believP that bomosexua.lity ic; wrong, aga; Js'c. Gud·~ v.;ll, li".'l.rr "'r~l and al! that other stuff - or you don't. ·!'oL c .1:-::·~ •:1~t say jt may not be thf' Jifestyle for ynu. Jr yo•t rto "0\; ~rf: ccppin~ out and not faring up to 1he if=::.ue μi-:a1 i_'- tlw bottom linf·" Session uurnl'er four arrived much too soon. Jinl·s quEStion.~ w1•re stiii pla~uir..e ~ · 1..>. M) Hlir~d v.;,,;") g.•uin~ men-. boggled as !ht: days '41lJrc· ou Scns!np- sometbir;.g, Rer. r:-oe asked •;,rhat wa'; hothfring r.Je. I told J!lll'l I dl<:n 't th::..."lk 1 \H;-..::•:1 n f'r bt' able to say homffieXli.aHt.y was wr~ma. He ~.c:U he c~:<:h 't expert me to say it yet "h«:'lu.CT' l wCJ; ~.rnpp.)(1 ma .perverse :if P style and l~d to tv.;!eve it was atr<>pt.·1tt\,._ ·· for the rest of tl1P '-·~~.. . wu. .. .,P tal.!rnd. ab· ·ut wi10: really was. RPnfrGe ~id that l1l'fl1"5txuali1.y w·J .. •f~ really my proo1em. He urge(! r.':c to look Ge•?!J H':~;ic1~ :nyself and bark into my childhood to di>cov• 1 "hat was at the root of my unhap~iness :Jew "You ar{· merely using homosexuality \O ~omp· ns.'?.'.~ for \jd.jrn f-r.lOtional sc-ars," Renfroe .i::aid We talked for two tinurs, and I returne<1 ~n'PP romplet~Jy spent. Durmg tbe next ~·eek I sprJ a Jct of time alone, soul~searrhing, thinking. !00kint~ 1t f:l) :i~l1 a:ld my llfe and generally 3ust tryi'.1.r, to get my :u..·aJ ba:·k t.ogPthcc. Session number five went smoothly. with •he main topic being "Can a Cl!ristia'l b< 1 !>:"Jmosex>1al'" Definitely not, Renfroe mainramed. ''Netth~r c.1n ap adulterer. liaf-. thief or murcter•T. Thev are alt smn~rc::· be said. 1 cringed. That was Br~ anfs ia\•onte pasSJ.ge. Toward the e'ld of !t.t· nour Ri·'.'!frfl" ;:o51\Pd ....,_E­whP:\.: 1 ~toOO -;nw. \1, e hat1 COr--!f"ie1 '""l1 .:hr fl'~ ~-.e~\ions. ~: t'•.1 ... ~l"U :--·~· .•·~~·i<:i;! J '\·:. ~.,l.! na >'e w .. ~,:t ..,:;1 all we bad taJkPIJ aP.out. ! wo:.!IC ~ave to deride°'"' b~t '1°r bom05ex11aJ!ty w ·}· th ~ee<I e-v1l an{f woe~her c::ou1f' hC('Om·~: strairh! Be· or~ 1Ca\'iug, P.<::nfro.., ;.1'-~un~<! --n~ tt·~T he wcuid be 3va\l .. ble any time l \l,.ante~ to talk Ash~· had empha~izf'd rcpP.:itedly durin~ the ~'a~~ ·.a.•eek-:, he sald he hoped l knew that he hate~ my "sin'· rut lo•:t..:1 :·;c . N<• rm not ''t~ured." N<•• Ja I regret ~y t ivt'-\\'C~t"-i expf'n,·1. ·" ;1t .i\.rdt;i Bryan1 M.itjst ... ~es. ! rr:0t so1i~e decent ri,.,0pie who ar~ ~ieo ir~t._'d ;:.r1~~ :;hKs·;:.• :n Hv·Ir r~U'4i..>·. "j l' !Jt~fs .u-id their !uv ,\t {.; ... «:!acct t!"lc.r fr How nan. ·• • .. ~1 they are e;mcmel:1 fearful cf a world arid !1fC"St\lC they an? ig!ior'4 t c'. They wrongly L1.\ist tb.at . all men be hke the:n. Cont., Page 15 I I I 1 J knov. n~u. .. that! w:P never Vt: o;tra.!P'h'"~ •· othr,L' tlurme: my f~··~w('(•k P'{;:e:·wnr>~ CCn~ !:it.::~ ffi': st-1at •T fa r;c.·• : ... ~t :o hec-om" h.!'tf'rtY'..f::'X4nl JUS1... ;1·: cond~;:-!'"'••~4 i:c.:,.~. J<i.!tt}' and '.lli;~:r.~ lO •)e ::.t=-.,,if.r:.L En'D il I were to b-;... . <'OnY'r:('od b\• such r~1.;i. ;o,..:s hr-Ht.- ~~ . r:oy des Ir,_"" \\OtidP'' <. 'J:1'.•i .. .:e- ; ~Aou!:'. ~·,:;1'"'.".": t:"•J er),l;-1\·Pd b\· yui.Jt. But'! ·1:~ :!" •• r1..-. ~x1·:~ E-·-\"·~r.1· (:'f'"IJ)ie WJOt ;1n11"J5•~\'~ • .i;~ •1 _ ~c.. •: ;.- 1:-ii"~· .... r 1- ..... ,11.J h:.:vt' r.e'.·e: v. •• :h!""' ;: .· .. i ·-·:1:.'"' A~ ..• ..: .l1 1." 1 ' . 110 :::t;'t!t~h·. MJ~· ne 1 \;·P·m 'r boJ ~. :~.,·; ~-~~· \ ')i<' ';~·:-r !s 3 :lc,~•~111 e r"<p1.m?til':-J\ '~.:::..·! ·: cc~~ .'-·\~ ":"'.:· .. a !':H..! n-111a. ·;\ ~ l;·_' • · ; • •. f-""ntr-':i. · .,. .-}'Ji;·,, T ,_.'1l J'.°lt :( n-. ·j, '' 0., 1 .'C_~ ta:!·!,-. I t.lf' .•~j (;;·JV. ,k ._; "l ~ •• ( Of "i:" 'Sf~l.:'1_•<, .. ·-··~ OS('t'!/? ~ Baker i'- :1 '"~1rr'r°('f tmr! f'' 1 ;~ .... ;,r ih · Fort l.,.:r:.'it rci:J/( y .. \1!.. Burt Regrets Interview K"49ht trt.ws Servlt• NEW YORK - Mike Douglas conducted an interview with actor Burt Reynolds while aboard the ship Discovery. which is anchored on the Thames River. The chat is part of a series of 90- minute programs being taped in England and Monaco for broadcast on the syndicated Douglas show. beginning in early September. But Reynolds has had second thoughts about some of the things he told Douglas and wants them deleted from the program. Will Douglas comply with the request? That's stilt to be de­cid~ d. Meanwhle, we'll tip you off to some of the things Reynolds told his TV host during the tap-ing session. · "Money doesn't buy happiness," said the actor. ··u buys great hookers - but not happiness." One thing that Reynolds reportedly is sorry he discussed is how much money he makes. He told Mike that he pulls in $3 million per picture and 10 percent of the gross. :~.' 'Minglings' still shock 'X-rated grandmother' MARY AVARA LOOKS AT FILM ••• she's a movie c-or Just when Mary Avara thinks she's seen It all. some porno king comes up with an imaginative mingling of naked anns and legs and Maryland's •JC. rated grandmother" gasps: "Ob my gosh, It's anew way." For 19 years, Mrs. Avant, 69, bas spent several hours a day, five days a week in a darkened room in Baltimore deciding tbe fate of all movies - from Disney to "Deep Throat" - shown in Maryland, the last state in the nation to have a movie censor board. In the past fiscal year, the tll,ree-member Maryland State Board of Censors viewed 454. movies, asking deletloas in 25 and rejecting 20 otben. "We do have people wbo Uke this garbage, but I say let these sickles go down OD The Block (Baltimores adult sex-show area) and Watch them," sald Mrs. Avera. who oonnany watches four movies a day. • CBS diplomatic correspondent Marvin Kalb reportedly is toytng with L'1e td('a of running for the U.S. Senate. A Baltimore t(>levision st.at100 report.c-<J Thurroay that Kalb has talked to prominent D<'m()('raL• m Marylan~ In '"'" tf h~ has a shot at wmr.ing the scat now held by Sen. Charl~s McC. Mathias, a Republican But Kalb tnld the station he ftasn't made up his 1TW1d about runmng for office. Big Apple Next .For Nixon? K!'k9ht New$ Service Despite earlier reports that former President Richard M. Nixon would be buving a $650.- 000 home near his San Clemente estate - which he sold for an undisclosed sum in May - it ap­pears that he will be moving to New York City. " They are not going through with the purchase," a family friend said Monday. "They are moving to be near their chil· dren and grandchildren." The Nixons' daughter and son­in- iaw, Julie and David Eisen- . bower, are planning to move to ; New York, and their other daughter and . son-in-law, Tricia and Ed Cox, are now living In Manhattan. Cab driver found stabbed to death A ~year--0ld taxicab driver was found dead Wednesday, apparently the victim of multiple stab wounds. The victim was identified as James West, who lived at an apartment complex at 119 Jackson Ketler Avenue. "He was wrapped in a sheet and be had what appeared to be several stab wounds to the chest," s.i.!d Homicide Detective Ernie Riojas. "We believe it · is possible he had been dead since Sunday." The detective said there was blood -spattered heavily throughout the apartment. Police were told West was last !leen alive Sunday. When be failed to ~how up for work Wednesday, the cab company called police, who found lhe body at the apartment. Neighbors described the victim as a very nice man who kept to himself Page 16 LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) - FBI documents alleging that mobsters are l>ebind the scene In some of Nevada's famous casinos are reverberating through this town, making gambling figures as nervous as a blackjack S~J:. down to his last Since the documents were made public, state officials have revoked the gaming license of a major Strip resort hotel and scheduled license revocation hearings for two other hotels. They are expected to act against at least one other hotel-casino. In addition, officials have recommended placing the names of four men In the state's Infamous "Black Book," a list of persons prohibited from entering any gaming establishment All the actions stem from the alleged ties of the hotels - or the persons who run them - with persons purported to be organized crime figures In Detroit, Clilcago and Kansas City. The allegations are contained In a 1,088-page FBI affidavit . that was unsealed June 15 In Kansas City. It has Information collected by federal Investigators - using wiretaps, other elecfronlc eavesdropping eqwpment, and Informants - as part of a 111ide-ranglng Investigation by the Justice Department's Organized Crime Strike Force into alleged mob Infiltration of the gambling Industry. The affidaVJt also revealed that some of the reputed mobsters felt they had control over at Las Vegas under mob charges THE ALADDIN HOTEL LOST ITS GAMING UCENSE ••• ordered to 1Nk new owners teast one top Nevaoa official Harry Reid, chairman of the Nevada Gaming Commission, has said federal authorities felt be was the "Mr Clean" referred to · · wiretapped U1 conversations. But Reid has denied any coMection to organlred crone. Hotel executives here and state officials long have feared that federal intervention would result unless they showed they could adequately police the Industry. And they've claimed the industry has been relatively free of mob control since the 1940s and 1950s when Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel and other mobsters ran major casinos. Smet controls, . Incl~ more stringent accoun~ were Instituted Ut the late 1950s and 1960s, a move that helped reduce underworld Influence. A policy change, allowing publicly traded corporations to take over hotel-casinos, also helped. The allegations came as a SUl'llriSe to many here, bu{ not to all. Richard · Bunker appointed In January a5 one of the three members of the Gaming Control Board, the Gaming Commission's investigative and enforcement arm, said it was no shock to him. "rve lived here all my lHe," he ·said. "I'm not naive. It's not a question of being aware. it's a question of the lingering suspicion all the tune." Bunker and other gaming control officials claim fhe FBI was able tn get the evidence because Major hotel loses license it has much broader powers to use electronic eavesdrop{ling than do state garrung authortties. "That's the only way they were able to get that kind of. information," Bunker said. Earlier !!liS 1rumth. the Gaming Comrrusmon revoked the gaming licenses of the Aladdiii Hotel and its two top officers follo1Ning the conviction In Detroit of the hotel corporation on charges that the hotel was illegally controlled by reputed mob figures there. The casino operation has remained open under a state administrator who took over in an agreement worked out between gaming officials and the club's owners. The state has ordered the hotel be sold. A ~posed buyer for the ddln, HMA Inc., withdrew a $135 million offer Thursday, saying its directors had decided not to branch out into the gaming business. HMA operates several Insurance companies from its Jlenver headquarters. The Kansas City affidavit alleges that Joe Agosto, the former producer of the "Foiles Bergere" show at the Tropicana Hote~ was the purported overseer at the club for reputed Kansas City organl7.ed crime figures. Agosto bas denied this accusation. . Gaming officials have hinted they will act against the Tropicana in July after a law takes effect allowing a state­appointed supervisor to run a hotel until allegations against It ar~ clear~up. Black book The board also recommended that Agosto be placed in the Black Book, along with Frank "Lefty" Rosenthal, former entertainment director at Argent Corp.'s Stardust Hotel; Carl Thomas, a long-time Las Vegas casino operator· and Carl DeLuna, who according to the FBI affidavit is the No. 2 man in the Kansas City organized : crtme hier!ll'chy. -· The FBI affidavit included a transcrtpt of a bugged conversation between Thomas and others in which he allegedly explains how cash can be "skimmed" from a casino before it is reported for tax purposes. Thomas alleged scheme involved key persons In the counting room, the falsification or records, and blocldnJ( television cameras useil to watch internal casino operations by standing in front of them. . Ao;(ent, controlled by San f>lego financier Allen R. Glick, operates the stardust and the Fremont Hotel The Gaming Commission has set Julv 20 for a hearing on a Control Board recommendation that gaming licenses for Glick and his corporation be revoked. Another FBI affidavit alleges that Glick is just a figurehead controlled by reputed orgarll2.l!d crime figures in Chicago and that Anthony "Tony the Ant" Spilotro oversees operation of the club for the mob. S~:Iotro, whom the federal government has named as an organiu.'11 crime figure. recently was put in the Black Book I>espite the publicity Bunker and Gov. Bob Lisi both said they felt ' Nevada's gaming image was untarrushed by the alle~atlons. List said be believed the public would wait and see what action the state takes taken before making judgments. He said tiie state "has the ability to deal with these challenges. n Bunker said he felt that "any time you move to clean up your hOuse, your business, your state I think it helps. ' "It shows we're big enough to reallie that probfems do exist, and at ' the same time shows we're big enough to do somethin~ about them, which we re doing.•
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