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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1981
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Connections, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1981 - File 007. 1981-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2513/show/2506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-06). Connections, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1981 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2513/show/2506

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1981 - File 007, 1981-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2513/show/2506.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 3, No. 6, June 1981
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Olinger, James K.
Date June 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript CONNECTIONS the need for a deep sharing in love relationships. On the stage this is symbolized by Max putting on his newly killed lover's jacket with with the pink triangle. What followed is certainly the most controversial difference in the two productions. On Broadway. Max jumped onto the electrified fence, defying the Nazis by committing suicide. Here Max goes on doggedly, motivated by his compulsion for self-preservation {mentioned several times in the script) and his finally acknowledged need to declare himself as gay and stand, even though belatedly, beside his lover(5). Certainly the immediate impact of Max's death is stronger, but it's obvious that continuing to live would actually be harder and involve more suffering, probably in vain. I, at least, left Center Stage feeling that Max's "development" was more complete and his tragedy more horrifyingly real. "Pervert throw your cap on the fence." member any words or gestures that were specifically different. I suspect my feelings are rather like what Max must have felt in prison, remembering those earlier and happier days. How much better if there'd been more tenderness and spoken or demonstrated love! Max had to see not only the young Nazi but two other lovers killed (how much of it his fault?) before recognizing Horst (Eric Henshaw) BENT Reviewed by Roy Teete The Genesius Players' Production ot Bent at Center Stage was even more moving than the one I saw (and reviewed in these pages) on Broadway a year ago. Seeing the play in New York was such a stunning and devastating experience that I approached the Austin production with some trepidation. Would it have the same deeply disturbing affect? Would the staging and acting be as effective? Yes. to both questions. The most important difference was a sense of exhilaration and pride that it was being performed so effectively here in Austin, Mitch Pileggi's Max seemed somewhat more high-pitched and violent than Richard Cere's. Buy why not? A defensive, guilt-ridden younggay mans life suddenly goes down the drain; why not scream in protest? "Man. was I drunk last night!" is never much of a defense. When its been repeated over and over, and both Max , and his lover Rudy (Michael Timcisko} are sick of the scene, suddenly Wolf, the young Storm Trooper, appears out of the bedroom. When Wolf is shot by his comrades, it signals both personal disas ter for Max and Rudy and the beginning of society's attempted extermination of gays. The similarities between the current American scene (with the arrogant you- follow-my-morality "majority' assuming more social power) and Nazi Germany are hauntingty and frighteningly present. It seems there was a little more demonstration of the love Max and Rudy shared in the NYC production, but I can't re- ' Streets of Berlin, will you miss me?" Greta (Tony Howe) I think I began to feel the difference in the interpretation of Horst's role as Eric Henshaw's shivering in the cold became more pronounced. The script justified it. and it increased tension as the inevitable tragedy approached. The shivering can be linked to a particular problem in the play. How much physical movement should be used in the love scene? David Dukes, who played Horst on Broadway, argued that movement should be minimal, with intense concentration on the words leading to the double orgasm. Henshaw's shivering evolved subtly into the orgasmic movements of The Night of the Long Knives Wolf (David F. Jones) and Gestapo Agent (Gregory Bayless) Director Don Fenner (with beard), cast and crew
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