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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
File 008
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 008. 1978-04-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-04-20). South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 008. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2405

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 008, 1978-04-20, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
Date April 20, 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript Page7 vNimmonity News The night the sheriff called, there was some shock for Dan's family. But for Dan it was very much like hearing the second shoe drop. He'd already heard that Lynn and John might in some way be tangled in a drug investigation. The tip, he revealed, came from a man who told him, "There's a guy in police intelligence around the shop who likes to brag and said he'd seen some confidential file that your son is under surveillance by the narcotics squad." Dan called John and Lynn into his office. "Some people told me you may be fooling around with some things you ought not to be," he said. "If you are, you better quit it If you're not, if s good advice anyhow." "Dad, we're not;" they said. And Dan believed them. Signs of suspicion A few weeks later, the senator's administrative assistant noticed that a photographer had been hanging around the building where Scarborough has his legislative office and his businesses. Both Lynn and John work there for their dad's companies, ■"I called the undersheriff, John Nelson, and told him I'd heard my children may be under suspicion of some kind," the senator said. "I told him I was interested in finding out if there was any substance to the rumor and if there was, I'd bring my kids down to the state attorney's office right then. I wasn't interested in squashing anything. I told him I'd rather keep my kids out of trouble than get them out of trouble. He said he'd let me know." Nelson never did, he said. And the kids again said they were doing nothing wrong. And Dan believed them. Even after the arrest, Dan believed in their innocence. Dan's wife, Virginia, also felt something was wrong about the charges after she talked with Lynn. "I know this child very, very well, and I know she's innocent," Mrs. Scarborough said. "I can't believe that she could look me straight in the eye and say, 'I love you' and 'not to worn/ and 'I've done nothing wrong' if it wasn't the truth." But the state and federal governments say there's a strong case, that if s not just a group of young people experimenting with cocaine. Capt John McCormick, head ofthe Duval County sheriffs vice squad, said: "When you get into certain quantities, such as ounces, you are not talking \ about personal use. And when you find arrangements for picking up and transporting and collecting, and seize ringleaders with three pounds of cocaine. I z Excepting film star Linda Blair, the 33 indicted were just "ordinary people." you have more than a- casual deal. You have a ring." Robert Ginley, head of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Jacksonville office, said state and federal agents discovered the extent of the network through court-approved telephone wiretaps. He said the central figures were George "Eddie" Mangum, 25, of Jacksonville; Garland Wade Atkinson, 28, and Andrew Inglet, 24, both of Houston, Tex. What were the roles of Lynn Scarborough and Linda Blair? McCormick and Ginley were guarded about details, but Ginley said, "Lynn Scarborough has been out to Houston. She stayed with Atkinson, As for Linda, Blair, she made a deal to buy three ounces of cocaine." Blair came for funeral Any connection between Lynn and Linda Blair seems to have been coincidental. Linda Blair came to Jacksonville in late October for the funeral of Ronnie Van Zant, lead singer of the Lynyrd Skynyrd rock group, who was killed in a plane crash. Lynn, one of the band members' girlfriend, had gone to pick up Linda as a favor. That apparently is the only contact the two ever had. Of the four Scarborough children, Lynn is the one things always seem to happen to. Vickie, 22, who is now married and has a home on the Scarborough property, and Karen, 18, are described as outgoing and clownish "tike their dad." John and Lynn tend to be quieter, reserved, like their mother. All four, said Mrs. Scarborough, were average students at Nathan B. Forest High School. John was well-regarded as an athlete. He married young, has a 3-year- old son and supposedly is patching up his broken marriage. Despite her reserve, Lynn was elected president of the senior girls' class. "When she was a toddler," said Mrs. Scarborough, "she had serious eye surgery. Then we almost lost her when she had spinal meningitis at the age of 12. If something bad could happen, it would usually happen to Lynn." On the insistence of their lawyer, neither John nor Lynn would speak of what had happened. Neither, so far as could be determined, shows any evidence of sudden or unusual affluence, as might be expected of people involved with a ring dealing in a substance that costs 10 times more than gold. John Scarborough, who works for his dad, has a base pay of $1000 a month, plus commissions. If 1978 is a good year, he may gross $15,000. Lynn gets $700 a ' month as a secretary in her father's business. She lives at home. "On a Wednesday before payday they'd be borrowi ng $4 or $5 gas money from me," said Mrs. Scarborough. Invisible profits Even one of the alleged ringleaders, Mangum, shows little evidence of money. He lives in a small ramshackle house off a dirt road. What if evidence shows John and Lynn were criminally involved? "What do you do if you find out if s not like they told you?" Dan said. "You don't give up on them, you don't quit on them, you don't love them any less. Man, you suck it up and go do the best you can." , He said John had worried about the impact this might have on the business, and even on Dan's political career. "That worried John because he calls on heads of companies. I told him not to worry," Dan said. "As for my business, I've been making my income public since running for state office. My last return shows I'm worth about half a million dollars. Now, I began 20 years ago come June with $500 and three little kids. If need be, I can do it again." There were hints from some of the lawmen that Senator Scarborough might not like to hear whafs on the wiretap tapes. Did that mean there could be something damaging? No, they said. Embarrassing? Maybe. "There's nothing I can think of that would do that to me," the senator said. "No way. There Is nothing that troubles me. I sleep at the foot of the cross." Virginia smiled wanly at Dan. As she looked at the embers glowing in the fireplace, she said, somewhat wistfully: "I somehow think that this isn't happening, that none of this is real, that I'll wake up and find out that all of it, every little bit, has been just a bad dream."!■> Slavery Charge Hits Landlady NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey woman was accused Thursday of enslaving residents in her Trenton boarding home and using violence to force them to work for her and to perform sex acts. A federal grand jury made the accusations in a nine-count indictment against Jean Douglas, 40, proprietor of the Douglas Boarding Home, which was opened in December 1971 and closed in May 1976 when a local bank foreclosed on the mortgage. Mrs. Douglas was charged with involuntary servitude, a little-used federal law dating back to the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. The grand jury said Mrs. Douglas held seven boarders prisoner in her boarding home and forced two boarders to go to her Willingboro home to work as her private slaves. It said one resident was held in slavery from October 1972 uhUl her death in November 1975. Two of Mrs. Douglas' boarders were induced into slavery at a Bristol, Pa., facility after the Trenton home closed, the grand jury said. The Bristol home closed in August 1976. The grand jury also said a female resident of the Trenton home was forced to perform sexual intercourse with male boarders. Federal authorities said Mrs. Douglas used "intimidation, violence and imprisonment" to keep residents at her home, but they would not elaborate. If convicted on all charges against ber, Mrs. Douglas could be sentenced to a maximum 45 years in prison and fined $45,000. Mrs. Douglas was a defendant in a 1975 civil suit brought by one of the residents, who said she escaped from enslavement at Mrs. Douglas' private residence. The 64-year-old resident, whose blind husband died at the Trenton facility, was awarded a $60,000 judgment against Mrs. Douglas, according to her attorney, Dennis Brotman. Brotman, formerly of the Trenton Legal Services, said his client charged in her suit that she had been beaten, forced to work and her welfare checks taken and forged. Brotman said his client, who had a heart condition, also was forced to sit in an unheated garage at the Willingboro home in the winter.'
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