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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
File 007
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 007. 1978-04-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-04-20). South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2404

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 007, 1978-04-20, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2404.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
Date April 20, 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript Page6 Common'** News The Houston Post APRIL 16,1978 JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Just befpre Christmas, Dan Scarborough, the senior state senator from northeast Florida, was entertaining some friends in his family's sprawling ranch-style home. He was in fine fettle. In another two days, there would be a big party to celebrate the Scarboroughs' 25th wedding anniversary. He had a dose-knit family. His telephone and communications businesses were thriving. He'd gotten 77 percent of the vote in the last election. Some friends thought the 45-year- old Democrat would surely make it to the governor's mansion one day—and then, maybe, even Washington. At 11:30 p.m., he was called to the telephone. It was Sheriff Dale Carson. "Senator, I got some bad news for you," the sheriff said. "What is it, Sheriff?" Dan asked. "I've got a warrant for your son and daughter's arrest." He was told that his daughter Lynn, 20, and son John, 24, were involved with an alleged cocaine ring. Lynn was named in four counts of conspiracy to commit a felony, John in one count. A trial is expected this spring. The alleged ring included Linda Blair, the 18-year-old actress who was possessed by the devil in the film The Exorcist. Except for her, however, not a single person arrested fit the image usu- . ally associated with the superjet, "fast- lane" set 'Cadillac of drugs' Called the "Cadillac of drugs," cocaine through the years has been for those who could easily spend $1500 to $2000 for an ounce—especially celebrity artists, writers and performers like Louise "Mary Hartman" Lasser, rock star Gregg Allman and Tommy Rettig, who was the child star in Lassie. Vivid descriptions exist of fantastic parties where the precious stuff was set out like sugar in bowls. A promising earfeer for Florida Slate Sen. Dan Scarborough (I) may have been nipped by the' arrest o'Ji Iris daughter Lynn land son lohn(r) 'fori part in -alleged cocaine ring. One Family's Battle Against Cocaine by Bernard Gavzer Elite users of the past included Queen Victoria, Pope Leo XIII, Robert Louis Stevenson, Sarah Bernhardt, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sig- mund Freud, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Errol Ffynn. Cocaine—also called "coke," "C," "snow" and "toot"—is a white powder that when ingested (usually by inhalation) produces a sensation of welt-being and seems to overcome . fatigue, hunger and thirst. Its most potent attraction is its alleged power as an aphrodisiac . Frequent inhalation can damage nose membranes. The National Institute of Drug Abuse estimates that 1 million Americans use cocaine at least once a month. It all begins with the coca bush, which grows on the slopes of the Andes Mountains. The leaves are picked and processed into powder, which is moved along smuggleis' routes from South and Latin America toward the U.S. Banned here, it wholesales for as much as $45,000 a kilo as it enters the Miami' area, America's cocaine gateway. The Jacksonville case casts cocaine in a new light. The people involved are not celebrities, rich or remarkably accomplished. They are, in fact, the people of Anytown, U.S.A. Of the 33 indicted, only two were in their 30's; the rest, in their 20's and teens. They included a diver, a marine dealer, a dog handler, a college student, a typist, a meat cutter, a shipfitter, a laborer, a broker-trainee, a City of Jacksonville Beach employee, an electrician, a car salesman, a truck driver, a busboy, a carpenter, a secretary, a printer, a talent agency employee. The case demonstrates that cocaine has reached America's ordinary people, raising a possibility that many families .like the Scar- boroughs may find themselves dealing with what Dan Scarborough calls a "nightmare." "There's not a parent of teenage children in Florida today—in America today—who doesn't live in constant fear about kids smoking marijuana or using drugs," he said. "We all of us face the nightmare that these young adventurous people may end up being treated as hardened criminals." Non-addictive but dangerous The penalties for cocaine are very much like those (or heroin. While cocaine is not addictive, the law calls it a dangerous drug. In Florida, conviction on a charge of conspiring to commit a felony can lead to a maximum prison sentence of five years—a frightening prospect for any parent. For the Scarboroughs, there seemed the possibility of another penalty: damage to a premising political career. Dan Scarborough weighed that question. He tucked a_ wad of Red Man chewing tobacco into the right side of his mouth, placed a cowboy-booted foot against a wastebasket, settled in his swivel chair and said: "Ifs possible 1 been hurt. It's possible I been bad hurt." Maybe this cocaine case would be no more threatening to his future than his support of the Equal Rights Amendment or of marijuana decriminalization. Then it became clear that he was thinking more of his son's future than of his own, 'since he hoped that )ohn might follow him into public office. "Now, this is going to be a hell of a cross for him to bear, even though it is clear to me he is as innocent as a glass of milk and a piece of pie," Dan said. All parents'live in constant fear' of drugs
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