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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
File 004
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 004. 1978-04-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2401.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1978-04-20). South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2401

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 004, 1978-04-20, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2401.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
Date April 20, 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript *1 Page 3 Community News NEWS AT A GLANCE Only minor battles remain Sunday. April 16.1978 Houston Chronicle Gays find European climate more liberal BY ROBERT MUSEL United Press International LONDON—Queen Victoria was definitely not amused. In fact she refused absolutely to believe the extraordinary claims her advisers were making — that there were women in the world who loved other women rather than men. As her diaries attest, the Queen's healthy interest in sex ran* in only one direction, and Prince Albert must have been the hardest-working consort in Europe. Her Imperial Majesty consequently did not choose to accept that there was any possible alternative. So it was in Britain — according to the Campaign for Homosexual Equality — that relations between males were until recent years a matter for prosecution (and persecution) while lesbians were free to conduct themselves with each other as they wished, subject only to the laws of public decency. After all, had not the great Queen-Empress herself denied their existence? It was in Victoria's reign that one of her wittiest subjects, Oscar Wilde, went to jail for dalliance with a young man. He called it poetically "the love that dares not speak its name." That was long ago. These days homosexual love not only speaks its name, it often shouts it. Gay clubs, magazines, welfare organizations and pressure groups make certain all over western Europe that everyone knows gays demand the same rights and privileges accorded heterosexuals. And in most places they either have them or are approaching the desired standard, though many minor bat- ties remain to be won. In Amsterdam, once the European capital of the gay movement, a spokesman for the Culture and Relaxation Center, which has 5,000 gay members, estimated that 20 percent of landlords still reject known gays and 30 per Judge issues DA suspension PALESTINE, Texas (AP) — East Texas Dist. Atty. Billy Ray Green has been ordered suspended from office. State Dist. Court Judge Donald Canon-osaereil •*«*' shs- , pension Monday pending a trial on the merits of a petition to. remove Green Tfcat_ petitiom'was"fneb*T^Anderson I County attorney Alex Namer. Green is appealing both his public- lewdness conviction and an ensuing disbarment, but said he would begin removing personal belongings frem ,his office within .the next few days, fie said-he ■iiil¥riigm Carroll's order ultimately, would be overturned*. ., j j Green's district includes'; Anderson, Henderson and Houston Counties. Kansas Acting To Turn 'Wet' TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Kansas Legislature took sn historic step toward giving state citizens a measure of liquor by the drink Thursday night when the Senate concurred in a House j- amendrrieiU to a bill al- ■ lowing restaurants to serve mixed drinks. Thai sent the bill to Gov. Robert F. Bennett. Songwriter dies SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — George C. Cory, 55, who wrote the the music for "1 Left My Heart in San Francisco," has been found dead of a drug overdose in his luxurious apartment. Mamie dedicates hospital Mamie Eisenhower helped dedicate an JU million addition in Phoenix, Ariz., to the Eisenhower Memorial Hospital named for her late husband, former President Dwlgnt D. Eisenhower. Built in 1971, the hospital sits on land donated by Bab H*pe and his wife, Delores, who live here. Hope was master of ceremonies at the dedication. Accompanying the 81-year-old Mrs. Eisenhower was her grandson, D-nrld Eisenhower, and his wife, Julie, daughter of former President Riehanf Nixon. Guests included Gov. Ed- mud G. Brewa Jr. and Walter Anuen- berg, former United States ambassador to Great Britain. Female 'first' Col. Margaret A. Brewer has been named by President Carter to become the first woman genera! in the. Marine Corps. She will be the Marines' director of information. Warning planned for pain killer - WASHINGTON (AP) — The government plans to order manufacturers of the most widely used prescription pain killer to warn physicians the drug should not bef, taken with alcohol, tranquilizers or other depressants. A spokesman for the Food and Drug Administra- tioh said Monday the warnings will be required on package inserts accompanying Darvon and similar products containing the generic drug propoxyphene. The brand name product is maniuactured by Eli Lilly Aj^, Co., which recently added the warning to its labels, but the FDA's order also will apply to Worms that produce generic versions of the drug. Uikes.make trouble in North Dakota? GRAND FORKS, N.D. (AP) - Governors of Minnesota ancWJorth; Dakota are meeting to discuss complaints that dikes built by Minnesota farmers in the Red River Valley are increasing flood problems in the "- North Dakota part of the valley. 3rd indictment for Peron A Buenos Aires, Argentina, federal judge Thursday handed down the third indictment to be brought against former president Isabel Peron, this time on charges of abusing her presidential powers. The latest order for preventive arrest was handed down by Judge Gnill- ermo Rivarola based on a decree signed by Peron turning over a downtown building used by the Interior Ministry to her own Justicialista Party. Peron, who is being held a prisoner in a bouse at the Azopardo Naval Base 180 miles south of Buenos Aires, has already been indioted on charges of fraudulent use of state charity funds. Commander Whitehead dies Commander Edward Whitehead, retired chairman of Schweppes U.S.A. Ltd. whose familiar beard and Ay English demeanor helped sell his company's tonic water to Americans, has died in England, the company announced in New York Monday. He was 69. Whitehead, who died Sunday in Pelersfield, England, became known in the United States through television commercials and other advertisements which made him a personifaction of the mixer. Stunt JUer killed Frank Taihnan, about 59, a veteran Hollywood stunt flier who flew every type of aircraft from World War I biplanes to supersonic jets, was killed in the crash of his twin-engine plane in the Santa Ana Mountains near Irvine, Calif., it was reported Sunday. Tallman was seriously injured in 1974 in the crash of a World War I biplane he was flying in a scene for the movie, "the Great Waldo Pepper." He had been a flier since the age 16. He was a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy in World Warn Syphilis among gays decreases AUSTIN (AP) — Thirty-seven percent of Texas men who were treated for syphilis last year reported homosexual contacts as the source of the disease, the -Estate Health Department said. This was 3 percent below the 1976 figure. The department attributed the $7 percent rate to its venreal disease information campaign among homosexuals and said the rate should not be taken as an indication of the number of homosexuals in the state cent of employers do the same. The situation is different in Soviet Russia where (for-' getting the much-honored Tchaikovsky and others of his inclination) the Sexologies! Center of the Leningrad Health Department as recently as 1974 listed homosexuality as "a serious disease." There's a five-year jail sentence for relations even between consenting males, though in the Soviet Union as in the west, lesbians can love "free of charge," as a Soviet lawyer put it. Since the general emancipation of gays in the 1960s, Amsterdam, despite its pioneering, has not maintained its lead. The new gay capital is Zurich, a fact that does not seem in accord with the staid stereotype of the Swiss. And other cities are quickly catching up. A study of the gay situation in Europe produced the following summary: Any country that, like France, has so many homosexual greats (Andre Gideetal) is bound to treat the subject casually, and that is the case. Gay candidates campaigned in the recent election for the right to marry, lesbian candidates argued for what they called lesbian rights. Homosexuality as such is not punishable under French law. In the Netherlands, homosexuality was legal only for consenting adults of 21 until 1971, when the law was changed to bring it into line with the heterosexual law permitting relations with consenting minors of 16 and up. The Swiss penal code also makes no mention of homosexuality, though corruption of persons under 16 is a crime. Zurich, Basel and other Swiss German towns have many gay clubs for both sexes and Geneva has a number of gay bars and at least one leading lesbian hangout. Although many Italians still consider them a joke, homosexuals In Italy have attained a degree of social acceptance that would have seemed inconceivable 20 years ago. There are no specific laws against homosexuals in Italy, but police can charge them with obscene acts in-a public place or corrupting minors. Austria has 41 declared meeting places for gays — bars, restaurants, coffee houses, and sauna baths. Vienna leads the nation with 12 of the spots. Since a revision of the law in 1971, homosexual relations between men over 18 are not a crime, nor are relations between consenting juveniles. Corruption of a minor by an adult carries a one- to five-year, jail term. There is no law relating to women. Scandinavian homosexuals concede the climate is as. liberal for them as anything outside of Amsterdam or Zurich, but they still feel they are subject to restrictions. In Sweden, gays cannot get home loans or marry. The Swedish Parliament had a committee that investigated the gay situation with a view to eliminating discrimination, and, as a result of its report, the homosexual age of consent was reduced to 15 — the same as for heterosexuals. The homosexual age of consent in Denmark is also 15. A lengthy study of the situation by the newspaper Exlra- bladet concluded the Danish public has become accustomed to homosexuals and accepts them apathetically. Norway's homosexuals are also more or less accepted by the public and have had their own associations since 1948 to defend and extend their rights. One of the few restrictions on them is that they cannot marry. Britain has handled homosexuality as it has treated almost every other social change in its history. First there is the shock! horror! sensation! phase featured in the more spectacular newspapers. Once that wears off, common sense takes over. Homosexual relations were once a crime but now are acceptable between consenting adults over 21. The gays are demanding that the age of consent be dropped to 16, the age for heterosexual relations. Lesbians in Britain want the right to marry, and to emphasize the point some of them have borne children by artificial insemination. Their chances are not rated highly, but that's because of the social climate — not because the great-gre3t-granddaughter of the disbelieving Victoria sits on the throne. EXPRESS-NEWS—Saturday, April 15, 1978 Bishops Label Gay Acts Sinful NEW YORK (AP) — The Standing Conference of . Orthodox Bishops says "persons who embrace homosexual lifestyles are not qualified to teachchil- dren Or act as spiritual leaders." In a. resolution adopted at their spring meeting, bishops heading Eastern Orthodox churches totalling 5 million American members said secular pressures seek to establish homosexual -lifestyles ■ as being of equal worth to marriage. Although offering, sympathy-and pastoral assistance to those with homosexual conditions beyond their control, the bishops said Scripture and church tradition condemn "voluntary homosexual acts as: sinful."
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