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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 001. 1978-04-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2398.

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(1978-04-20). South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2398

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978 - File 001, 1978-04-20, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2423/show/2398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 8, April 20, 1978
Date April 20, 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ~l _I ( ;! 11I11111111111I11111111111111111t1111flti11111111111111II1111111111111111111111II11111111111111I1111111111111111t11111111111111IIIf1111111111111tIt1111111 fl I tit 11 11 1 1 111111111I1111111111111111111111111111111111111111f111111111111111111111111111I111111111111111111111f111111111111111111111111111111111I111111I11111 I ti @!J@.l@l@lli~li~Jf~j@ : San Antonio, Texas VOLlJl'.B 2 Nm:ber 8 AP"JT, 20, 1"7'.' : 0 1 11111111111111111111111ti1111II111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111t111 tlllllllltl I I II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ltl 1111t111; r san ~ a._ntonio ..._ ~. Page2 Spite, revenge, competition? Houston Chronicle .;,, ·:: v 5unday. March 26. 1978 Service just Opinions on motives are varied plain 'trashy' for rash of gay community fires HUTCHINSON, Kan. (UPI) - A local man has a surprise for the city Trash Ser­! IY .JJ\f BARl,OW vice. Chroniclr Staff Pl>()IObV Q,w>(I No11ncf' . ChrO•ltCle :st,.fl Gary Nachligal, chagrined over what he calls the city service's trashy habits, waited for the city's annual spring cleanup before springing his surprise. He has left a pile of rubbish at tile street curb in front of his home thitt is about 50 feet long, 4 feet high and 6 feet wide. The pile represents a year's worth of garbage he's stored in a shed behind his home. "About a year ago, I got mad at the city Trash Service;· saiq Nachtigal. "It seemed like they couldn't dump a trash can without getting it all over the yard. "So I quit placing my trash can at the curb. Now they·re going to get it all at once Puerto Rican Speculation continues as to the ongm of fires which destroyed the Silver Bullet. at 1005 Califor-nia. damaged another bar catering to homosex­uals and two apartments in the Montrose area. party splits on statehood Arson mvesllgators are probing a series of unsoJ,·ed fires that have hit a number of llmi>ton bars catering to homosexuals. So Jar no one has been injured in the hres. mostly in the Montrose area. but damages have amounted to thousands of dollars. Opinions on lhe motives for the fires are varied ·fn that part of town.· said L. H. Mi· keska. chief arson investigator of the Houston r'ire Department. "there are so many motives - jealousy. competition. spite and revenge.type fires.·· \i1chms of the fires and gay activists here say they believe the fires may be the work of persons opposed lo the homosex­ual life-style Dan Roberts. co-owner of the Silver Bui· let at 1005 California. which was destroy. ed by fire in February. blames hale campaigns ··we·re the last minority group to hate.·· he said. The mghl of March 8 was the latest spate of such fires. Set afire that night ,.-ere two garage apartments in lhe Mont· rose area. as well as Mary·s Lounge. 1200 Westheimer The fires. which occurred in an 83· minute span. involved either disabling a gas meter and selling il afire. or. in the case of the lounge. selling afire a contain· er holding the gas meter. The fire at the lounge was also the first which occurred dunng business hours. About 30 persons escaped safely from the lounge. which had only damage to a oatio. Other unsolved fir · nclude three al the Second Sun. . estheimer. the scene of ar<on m ~ and 1976. and the Club Steam B~th of Houston al 2205 Fannin on May 25. t977. Mikeska said arson aimed al gay bars h~s been a problem since 1968. al~gh ··there was a slack period from 1 to 1977 ... Currently. eight investigators are ~ working on the fires. he added. Pat Duckett. assistant chief invesliga· tor of the arson squad which has 34 inspec· tors and six supervisors. says that m several of the cases his staff has good leads. While not ruling out some. sort of anti­gay movement behind the hres. Duckett says there may be other motwes. .. 11 does look like an organized eff0.';t 10 get rid of the gays:· Mikeska said. But you might have three fires in that area one mght. set by someone else. There are nnnv d1lterent motive~ There is a hell ot a '1oi of compet1t1on m the g~.Y busmess and a lot ol monPv to be made munity. Flock said. but they are not the only ones worried. .. Our straight neighbors are in a panic.·· fearing that they loo will be hit by rire­bugs. either on purpose or by accident. he says. Robert said that if the fires continue. someone is sure to die. .. The fire al Mary's Lounge was the first when the place was open." he said. .. If 11 had been one of the big clubs. every­body could not have gotten out. That's the Une poss1b1llty investigators have con­sidered is that an organized crime group from outside the city may be setting the fires in order to gel rid of some competi­tion before making a move into the city Jim Flock. a former advertising execu­tive and the other co-owner of the Silver Bullet Club. agrees that it 1s profitable to cater to gays. ··There are probably 235.000 homosex­uals in this city:· he said. "They don·t ha1·e anything to spend their money on except lhemselyes. There's millions of dollars spent in bars. "But I don·t think any or our competi· lion would consider us enough competiti­tion to do something like this. I don't think any or them are willing to commit a crime.·· Ray Hill. an activist in the Houston Gay Political Caucus. said that unlike many other cities. bars here catering lo homosexuals are not owned by any partic­ular group ··1 have iust a gut level feeling it's more to do with the radical bigot extremISt rather than organized crime." Hill sa1d of the fires. .. If the Silver Bullet had been beating out its competition. that might have been allowable: · he said. adding that this was not ~case e ~,e; ~~Roberts. was the e of •·" ~.1or hres. m October of last and on J.., 10 Both fires did minor damage. and res'"'<! m the bars fire insurance bemg cancelt. Before more insurance was purchased. t .. ,. eon Feb. 14 gulled the place. which on l[;y nights had as many_ as a 1.000 patrons '''le and on a-tear patlO. Roberu., Flock. Hill and others say i"· believe the arson squad is trying its be':. to solve the serie~ (\f fires . .. we·re unsatisfieo \\\at no one has been caught ... Flock said .. But -.,~ realize what a hell or a task we're up agam"' ·· The fires have affected the &•.• com· scary thing. That's my fea~; If it contin-ues someone will get lulled. . . R~gardless of the fires. Hill said, the homosexual community will keep its bars. addmg that two benefits have already been held to help raise money to rebuild the Silver Bullet O'Neal lo star LOS ANGELES (AP) - Ryan O'Neal will re­create his starring role from .. Love Story" in Paramount"s "Oliver's Story ... SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (UPI) - Puerto Rico's Democratic Party has turEd intn a battleground in the contest between advocates d. starehood, Jed by Franklin Delano Lopez, advocates d. Puerto Rico's present com­monwealth status, and support'ers of independence. The issue, at least as lar as the party is concerned, is headed for a unique elEction this Fall that is being bill­ed as the first of a series d. plebisCites <lll the island's eternal status question. 'Gay Rights' Law Nears SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - An ordi- sion, adding San Francisco to a list nance banning discrimination or more than 40 cities that have against homosexuals in employ- such ordinances on the books. ment. housing and public accommo- Mayor George Moscone is expect-dations needs only the mayor's sig- ed to sign the ordinance. nature before it takes efrect in this The ban is similar to a county or-citv where an estimated one in sev- dinance repealed last year in Miami en ·res1dents is a homosexual. after singer Anita Bryant led a sue· The Board of Supervisors gave fi. cessfui repeal campaign that nal approval to the ordinance Mon- brought gay rights to the nation's _d~a~yc_co_n_a~1_0_-_1_,·_0_1e~-wi_1_h_n_o~d-is_c_u_s_-~_a_1t_e_n_1_io_n_. ~~~~~~~~~~ Pqe3 Community New< NEWS AT· A GLANCE I! Sundov. April 16. 1978 Houdnn Chronicle Only minor battles remain Gays find European climate more liberal BY ROBERT MUSEL United Press International Alter all, had not the great Queen Empress herself denied their existence? LONDON - Queen Victoria was definitely not amused. In fact she refused absolutely to beheve the extraordi­nary clauns her advisers were making - that there were women in the world who loved other women rather than men It was in Victori•'s reign that one of her w1tllesl sub­jects. Oscar Wilde, went to Jail for dalliance with a young man He called it poetically "the love that dares not speak its name." As her diaries attest, the Queen's healthy interest in sex ran in only one direction, and Prmce Albert must have been the hardest-working consort in Europe. Her Imperial Majesty consequenUy did not choose to accept that there was any possible alternative. That was long ago. These days homooexual love nol only speaks its name. it often shouts 1l. Gay clubs. maga. zmes. welfare orgaruzallons and pressure groups make certain all over western Europe that everyone knows gays demand the same rights and privileges accorded heterosexuals So it was m Britain - according to the Campaign for Homosexual Equality - that relations between males were until recent years a matter for prosecution (and persecution) while lesbians were free to conduct them­selves with each other as they wished, subject only to the laws of pub he decency. And m most places they either have them or are ap· proaching the desired standard. though many minor bat­tles remain to be won In Amsterdam. once the European capital of the gay movement. a spokesman for the Culture and Relaxation Center, which has 5,000 gay members. estimated that 20 percent of landlords still reject lu)<>wn gays and 30 per Judge issues DA suspension PALESTINE. Texas (AP) - East Texas Dist Atty. Billy Ray Green has been ordered sus­pended from ofhce State Dist Court Judge Don-ald Carroll ordered the sus­l'<' ns1on Monday pendmg a trial on the merits of a petl­tton to remove Gretn TJlat • petition wos fileil hy Andl:ri<on County attorney Alex ~amer Green ts appealing both hts pubhe lewdness conv1cuon and an ensumg disbarment, but ~td he would begin removmg personal belongings from h1'- office withm the next few days. He said he thought Carroll's order ulti­mately would be overturned Green's d1str1ct mcludes Anderson, Henderson and Houston Counties. Songwritt>r di<>s SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - George C. Cory, 55, who wrote the the music for "I Left My Heart In San Francis­co," has been found dead of a drug overdose in his luxurious apart­ment. Mamie dedicates hospital Mamie Elaellffww helped dedicate an SU mllllon addition In Phoenix, Artz., to the Eisenhower Memorial Hospital named for her late husband, former President Dwlpl D. EIMUower. Built In 1971, the hospital sits on land donated by Bo• Hope and hlB wife, Dllloftll, who live here. Hope was master of cer<>­monles at the dedication. Accompanying the 81-year-old Mrs. Eisenhower was her grandson, Da'11.d ElleWwer, and his wife, Jillie, daughter ot former President ~NIDll. Guests Included Gov. FA­.... G • ..._ Ir. and Waller 4- ""'1;, former United States ambassador to Great Britain. Kansas Acting To Turn 'Wet' TOPEKA. Kan (AP) - Thr Kansas Legisla­turP took ;.n historic step toward Riving state C'ii.ize>ns a mt)a sure of liciuor by the drink Thursday night when the St•natr ron­c- ur1·rd in a Hou~r am••!ldJTl•nt to a bill al­J. owing re~taurants to st>rvc mixt>d drink'> Th;,t sent the bill to Go,· R~bert F l!Pnncll Female •fir!-tl' Col. Margar<t A. Brewer has hr~n named by Prcliiidcut Cart<'r to beromr the fJr&t woman gentral in th• M• rlne Corp•- ~he will be the Marln•s' dl­rcccor uf lnformatlon. Warning planned for pain killer ua,e1». ma,, •. lrouhle in \orth Dakota'! GRAND FORKS. ND. CAP> Covrrnors of Minnfl'so1a .tnu.,.Nortl\ Dakota are mcetin}t to discuss com­plaints that dikes built by Minneso­ca farmP1 s in thr fted River \'all(•\' are increasing fluorl rrohlem~ in th~ f'oi·th Dakota pa:·~ d thr vaJlf'\ 3rd indictment for Peron A Buenos Aires, Argentina, federal judge Thursday handed down the third Indictment to be brougllt ag•inst former president Iollel Peru, this time on charges ot abusing her presidential powers. The latest order for preventive arrest was handed down by Judge Galll­erm• Klvanola based on a decree signe<l by Peron turning over a downtown build­ing used by the Interior Ministry to her own Justiclallsta Party. Peron, who ts being held a prisoner In a house at the Azopardo Naval Base 18'.) mUes soutn of Buenos Aires, bas already been Indicted on charges of fraudulent use of stale charity funds. Commander IThitehrod di"s Commander Ed1>vd Wbltehu.d, re tired cb.1irman of Schweppes U.S.A. Ltd. woo.e familiar beard and dry Er.g:;,;h demeoncr helped sell his company's tome ·.1;:Jter to American.~. has di(VJ fn Enpj~nu, the company announCt.~d in Nr«v York Monday. He was 69. WtJte­hen1, who died Sunday in Pctersfi<•ld, Eu.;Iand, became known in the Unf!ed States through television commrrclaL' and other advertisements wh.ich m3dC him a ix>rsonlfaction of the mixrr. Stunt flier killed l'raak Tallmaa, about 59, a veteran Hollywood stunt flier who new every type of aircraft from World War I bi­planes to supersonic jets, was killed LO the crash of hlB tw!JH>ngine plane In the Santa Ana Mountains near Irvine. Calli., it was reported Sunday. Tallman was seriously injured in 1974 in the c..-ash of a World War I biplane he was flying in a scene for the movie. "The Great Waldo Pepper." He had been a ruer since the age 16. He was a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Nav-y in World Warn. WASHINGTON (AP) - The government plans to order manufactw'Crs of the most widely used prescrip­t!~ pain killer to warn physicians the drug should not be". taken with alcohol, tranquilizers or other depres­sants. A spokesman for the Food and Drug Admlnlstra­tioil said Monday the warnings will be required on package inserts accompanying Darvon and similar products cootainlng the generic drug propoxyphene. The brand name product is manufactured by Ell LUly i Co., which recenUy added the warning to Its labels, but the FDA's order also will apply to 16 firms that produce aenertc versions ot the drug. Syphilis among gays decreases AUSTIN CAP! - Thirty-seven percent of Texas men who were treated for syphihs last year reported homosexua I contacts as the source or the disease. the State Health Department said. This was 3 percent below the 1976 figure. The department attributed the 37 percent rate to tis venreal disease information campaign among homosexuals and satd the rate should not be taken as an 1nd1cat1on or the number of homosexuals in the state. cent of employers do the same The situation IS different m Soviet Russia where (for. getttng the much honored Tchaikovsky and others of his inclination> the Sexolog1cal Center of the Leningrad Health Department as recently as 1974 hsted homosex· uality as "a serious disease." TI1cre's a f1ve·year jail sentence for relations even between consenting males. though m the Soviet Union as m the west. lesbians can love "free of charg•." as a Soviet lawyer put 1t. Smee the general emancipation of gays II\ the 1960s, Amsterdam, despite its p1oneermg. has not maintained its lead The new gay capital IS Zurich. a fact that does not seem in accord with the staid stereotype of the Swiss. And other cities are qwckly catching up A study of the gay s1tuatioo m Europe produced the following summary: Any country that. like France. has so many homosex­ual greats (Andre Gide et a)) is bound to treat the sub1ect casually. and that is the case. Gay candidates campaign· ed in the recent election for the right to marry. lesbian candidates argued for what they called lesbian nghts Homosexuality as such is not punishable under French law In the Netherlands. homosexuality was legal only for consenting adults of 21 until 1971, when the law was changed to brmg it into lme with the heterosexual law permitting relallons with consenting minors of 16 and up The Swiss penal code also makes no mention of homosexuality. thou~h corruption of persons under 16 is a crune. Zurich. Basel and other Swiss German towns have many gay clubs for both sexes and Geneva has a number of gay bars and al least one lead mg lesbian hangout Although many Italians still consider them a 1oke. h<omosexuals in Italy have attamed a degr<'<' of social acceptance that would have seemed inconceivable 2fl year:-; a~o. nwre are no 5peclfic laws agail1$t homosex. uals m Italy. but police can charge them with obscene acts ma pubhc place or corruptuog m1n<>rs Austria has 41 declared meetmg places for gays - bars, restaurants. coffee houses, and sauna baths \' en na leads the nation "1th 12 of the spots Since a re>·tston of the law m 1971, homosexual relattons between 'tlen over 18 are not a crime. nor are relations between C'On· senting Juveniles. Corruption of a minor by an adult carries a one· to five.year jail term There IS no law relating to women Scandmav1an homosexuals cC1ncede the rhm:ite 1s as hberal for them as anything outside of Arr.sterd"m or Zurich. but they still feel they are sub1ect to restrictions. In Sweden. gays carmot get home loans or marry. The Swedish Parhament had a committee that mvesugaled the gay sJtuation with a view to elunmattng discrumna· hon. and. as a result of 11s report, the h<>mosexual age of consent was reduced to 15 - the same as for heterosex­uals The homosexual age of consent m Denmark IS also IS. A len¢hy study of the situation by the newspaper Extra­bladet concluded the DaniSh pubhc has become accus· tomed to homosexuals and accepts them apathetically Norway's homosexuals are also more or less acc-eptcd by the pubhc and have had their own assoc1at1ons smce 1948 to defend and extend their right,. One of the few restrictions on them 1s that they cannot marry Britain has handled homQSCxuality as ii has treated almost every other social change m 1ts history First there is the shock" horror! sen>ahon' phase featured m the more spectacular newspapers. Once that wears off. common ~DSP takes over Homosexual relations were once a crime but now are acceptable between consenting adults over 21. The gays are demandmg that the age of consent be dropped to 16. the ag• for heterosexual relations Lesbians in Britain want th<> right to marry. and to emphasize the pomt some of th<-m have borne children by art1hcrnl msemmatton. Their chances are not rated high· ly. but that's because of the social climate- not because the great-great-granddaughter of the disbelieving Victo­ria sits on the throne. EXPRESS-NEWS-Saturday, April 15, 1978 Bishops Label Gay Acts Sinful NEW YORK (AP) - Thr Standing Confer­~ nce or Orthodox Bishops says .. p~rsons who embrace homosex· ua1 hfcstyles are not qualifi<'d to teach chil­dren or act as spiritual lradcrs. ·· In a rC'solution adopt­ed at their spring meet­ing, bishops heading Eastern Orthodox churches totalling 5 million American mem­bers said secular pres­sures seek to establish homosexual lifestyles as being of t"tiual worth to marn.1t:t .. Althougn offo1ing symp<1lh.1r- <tnd pa.s1oral a.ss1stancC' to those with homosPxual <'Ondi­tions beyond th('fr con .. trol, the bishops said ScTiptu1 <' and church tradition condemn ··voluntary homosexual acts as sinful." -- -•••v•• _v...__ .... ..,,, ...,&&~ U-l.C.LjJ.L..L.;:tC C'Y'C'.l.:f :JC'Cl.l • They're behind ERA movement Academy Award-winning actor Richard Dreyfuss chats with Marlo Thomas, center, and Loren Bacall during an ERA fund-raising cocktail buffet at Tavern on the Green in New York's Central Park Monday night. -AP Laserphoto. Houston police deaths to he probed by D.A. HOUSTON (UPI) - Dist. Atty. Carol S. Vance said Monday his office will make an independent investigation of all slaymgs by police officers and no longer rely exclusively on the police department for case facts. "I have a lot of confidence in the Internal Affairs Division (which now investigates such cases) and we will still rely heavily on them," Vance said. But from now on, he said, "We will do our own, independent investigation as well." INSTEAD OF relying on civilian witnesses' written statements to police, a prosecutor will interview the wit· nesses personally and encourage the grand jury considering the case to hear their testimony, he said. The policy of the district attorney's office is to present directly to the grand jury all facts concerning the death of citizens at the hands of an offi-cer and let it make the determmahon about charges. IN THE PAST, the grand jury usually relied only on the written statements of civilian witnesses and heard live tes­tomony from police officers. Vance said the prosecutor will dou· ble check and supplement the pohce department investigation by making sure all the scientific evidence is col­lected immediately. Vance's decision came after recent criticism of the district attorney's off. ice for its handling of two police shoot­ings. In one case, five officers were cleared in 1975 for the fatal shooting of Billy K. Joyvies, 18. In the second, Patrolman D.R. Mays was cleared a year ago of killing Randall Webster, 17. Under the new policy, Vance said, he will personally review each case involving a police shooting of a citizen, then assign it to one of his three felony division chiefs. Reagan Might Run TOKYO (UPI) - Former California Gov, Ronald Reagan said Tuesday he hasn't ruled out the possibility of making another try for the presidency in 1980. "It's too early to tell who the candidates will be in 1980," Reagan said In an interview with the newspaper Yomiuri. "To speak irankly, I haven't closed my own door." Rites slated for Friday for Gen. Lucius D. Clay CLlY CHATHAM, Mass. (UPI) - Retired Army Gen. Lucius D. Clay, the commander of U.S. military forces in Europe after World War II, will be buried Friday at his military alma mater of West Point, N.Y. Clay, 80, died late Sunday at his Cape Cod home. As commander in chief of the U.S. European Com­mand and military governor pf the U.S. Zone In Germany under Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Clay helped foil Soviet attempts to shut off Allied access to Berlin in 1948. He directed the mas&ve airlift that sent 2.4 mil­lion tons ot food and coal into 1he war-ravaged for­mer German capital for 16 months. Former Chancellor WlllY Brandt said, "Clay was Instrumental In defeating the Berlin blockade and helping the Federal Republic of Germany develop a solid democracy." A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Friday at the U.S. Military Academy. Burial will. be'ln West Point National Cemetery. Dog lover ioins the 'other side' WARWICK. R.I. <UPI! - Two years ago Carel A. Callahan punch­ed a dog officer in the nose because she felt he was mishandling a dog. Another time. she broke into the pound and spirited away a dog she felt was being mistreated. Now she's going over to the other side. She becomes the city's new head of the Animal Control Division Mon­day. in charge of dog officers. She was appointed to the $12,000 a-year· post by Police Chief John F. Coutch­er. "No one can question her concern for animals." he said. "Even people who don't like animals would agree she's the right person." Sinatra honored Frank Sinatra was honored in Jerusa­lem for his financial backing of Hebrew University with a formal dinner given Sunday by several members o! parlia­ment. Earlier, the singer dedicated the Frank Sinatra International Student Cen­ter. His donation, he said, was par Uy to make up for his lack of schooling. The singer came to Israel Friday with 150 other U.S. donors, including actor Grego­ry Peek and Ed McMahon of the televi­sion Tonight Show. His visit included a private meeti.!'g with Prime Minister Menacbem Begin. Ex-beauty queen hunted Police Sunday scoured England for a former American beauty queen who jumped bail and disappeared to avoid trial for kidnapping a Mormon mission­ary an£1 forcing him to have sex with her. Scotland Yard said there was no trace of Jeyce McKinney, '!1, and Keith May, 24, her alleged accomplice. They are accused ot kidnapping Kell.II Ander­sen, 21, of Orem, Utah. Anderson was McKinney's lover nelore becoming a missionary in Englana. Cigarette smokers addicted, says doctor NEW YORK (AP! -Cigarette smokers are addicted to nicotine physiologically, and they smoke to prevent withdrawal symptoms. not because smoking is psychologically gratifying. says Dr. Stan­ley Schacter. a Columbia University psy­chologist. When they switch to low-nicotine brands. they smoke more cigarettes or puff them more to get the amount of mco­tine they are accustomed to. he says. Some evidence indicates heavy smokers of low-nicotine cigarettes run higher health risks than light smokers of high­nkoline cigarettes. Dr. Schacter writes m the Annals of Internal Medicine. A new hairstyle Cher Allman In a recen't pose displays her new balrstyle. Cher, who bas gone lhrough many changes recently,· t!ecllled to cbang" <her most famous trademark - bet bait. AP l.nerphoto Innocent? Richard Nixon re.pea ts hls &!ilsertlon In his forthcoming book that an Illegal act Is le­gal If a president does It, ABC News says. AP L9Mf'photo Church splits Television evangtlst Garnrr T .. d Armstrong has announced that the World-.. lde Church of God, rourtd<·d morr then 411 years a110 by his father, wll! seperate Its function from Ain­bassadnr College, Its edueatlonal wing. U.S. warned on polio shots GENEVA, Switzerland !AP) - The World Health Organization warned the Umted States to step up vacrinations against polio, saying that if the popula­tion's immunity against the disease is not sustained, "epidemics are certain to recur ... Screenwriter dies Screenwriter Michael Wilson, who won an Academy Award for "A Place in th~ Sun" but was blacklisted in Hollywood's anti-Communist !ervor, died Sunday alter suffering a hea1i attack in Beverly Hills. Wilson, 63, spent eight years in France alt.er the blacklisting, under which artists silspected o! being sympa­thetic to Communism were denied work in the movie industry in the 1950s. Newsweek editor dies Dwight Martin, a senior editor of New· sweek magazine and a former foreign cotTespondent who .overed the Korean War and the Berlin crisis, died Sur.clay In New York of a heart attack. He was 57. A uative of Washington, Martin began his journalism career at 17 as a copy boy on thP Washington Post. P&11eS Community News THE REEL THING •.•••••••••••••• Zac Sterling Well, the Academy Awards are over, and I'm still alive. I've survived another year • To those of you who screamed with joy when Peter Firth lost, thinking I would pull through with my suicide threat, I'm happy to say that when ANNIE HALL started winning the major awards, it helped to heal my wounds and discomforts about Peter. He will see his day, and his performance in EQUUS is a thousand times better and more complex than Jason Robards' in JULIA. The fact that he is not a "pc>pular fa'Ce"lso to speak,) in Hollywood, and the film he was nominated for was not as common and every day tired as JULIA, makes me understand (but not con­done; Jl1is loss. The Academy is notoriously known for giving sentiment awards over tal­ent. But this year, by giving awards to "Annie Hall," Diane Keaton and Richard Drey­fuss, they chose fresh new talents, over old and boring faces. I do feel a touch sorry for Richard Burton, who ~ at his very best in EQUUS, This was also his seventh time to be nominated. It seems they are never go­ing to actually give him an Oscar. I am extremely happy that THE TURNING POINT did not win even one award, (It's nominations were more than it's worth,) As for the Academy Award Ceremony, it­self,,, it seemed somewhat usual. The dull and silly musical numbers in the beginning were nothing but time fillers, All everyone really wants to know is who won. For a while the ceremony almost seemed like a telethon. Two documentaries about handicapped children were awarded oscars, and the first song nominee, "You Light Up My Life," was sung by Debbie Boon, while eight little deaf gir~s "sang" the song in sign language. I kept waiting for the telephone number to appear on the screen so I could send in my donation. As a matter of fact, all the "Best Song" nominees were quite a mess, Jane Powell did a senior-citizen, slowed down version of The Waltz from "The Slipper & the Rose," and Aretha Franklin took the liberty of completely changing the melody of "Nobody Does It Better." ("You Light Up My Life," by the way, was the winning song; just as I predicted,) I guess it is my turn now to step in and say what I though of Vanessa Redgrave's accept­ance speech, upon recieving her oscar for "Best Supporting Actress." I know that I must be the only one who feels this way, (or so everyone keeps telling me,) but I thought she handled it tastefully and it was beautifully worded, I was certainly embaressed for Paddy Chay­evsky, who later publicly "served" Vanessa, claiming that for Ms, Redgrave to have given a simple "thank you" would have been su­fficient. Well, as I see it, for him to have kept his ugly mouth shut would have been sufficient, Chayevsky, (winner of awards for his ludicrous screenplays of NETWORK and THE HOSPITAL,) has always been out-spoken, but he had no right to say what he did. No matter how hard I tried, I just could NOT make PETER FIRTH win for EQUUS. In case you are unfamilier with the incident, Ms. Redgrave financed and narrated a docu­mentary titled THE PALASTINIANS, For this, the Jewish Defense League, after unsuccess­fully demanding that 20th Century Fox never again hire her for a picture again, protested outside the auditorium, with 400 persons, demanding that she be stricken from the nom­inee list, She thanked the Academy members for "standing firm" on their vote. She spoke of the "witch hunt" days of the MacCarthy­Nixon period, an~ though hissed at by a few members, recieve~ rave applause at the end of her speech, For Me, Redgrave to have ig­nored the incident would have been unthink­able. Everyone knew what was happening, and she was not about to act as though they didn't. As for Chayevsky- I would have to something foul to express my feelings about him at this moment, so I will just pass the thought, As the awards soared on, I was upset to see CLOSE ENCOUNTERS only win 2, but I was happy enough every time STAR WARS beat out over JULIA and THE TURNING POINT. (Needless to say, they are n~two of my favorite movies.) RICHARD DREYFUSS wins "Best Actor of the Year" for THE GOODBYE GIRL. When Woody Allen won "Best Director" I flew to heaven and back. I never expected it. I was just certain it would be that ever grumpy Herbert Ross, I swear, that man has a chip on his shoulder that is just incredible, Of course, I predicted Spielberg, but I'm pleased with Allen. ANNIE HALL went on to win "Best Picture," .screenplay, and "Best Actress" for Diane Keaton, whom I love to death, She was incredible ~n both ANNIE HALL_and LOOK­ING FOR MR. GOODBAR. -- Richard Dreyfuss got the "Best Actor" oscar for THE GOODBYE GIRL , and though I was pulling for-Burton, Dreyfuss is definetely my second favorite. He seems to be a wonderful person, I can't believe that MADAME ROSA (practically unknown except to New Yorkers,) won "Best Foreign Film" over popular con­tenders such as A SPECIAL DAY, IPHIGINEA, and THAT OBSCURE-OBJECT OF DESIRE. Lat~ly, the Academy members have· started choosing the most obscure nominee as the winner. Everyone was shocked last year when SEVEN BEAUTIES and COUSIN, COUSINE both lost out to the (then totally unknown) BLACK AND WHITE IN COLOR. Leave it to the Academies to throw ·atleast one surprise every year. · Page6 JACKSONVILLE, FLA. dust bef9re Christmas, Dan Scarbor­ough, the senior state senator from northeast Florida, was entertaining some friends in his family's sprawl­ing ranch-style home. He was in fine fettle. In another two days, there would be a big party to cele­brate the Scarboroughs' 25th wedding anniversary. He had a close-knit family. His telephone and communications businesses were thriving. He'd gotten n percent of the vote in the last e lec­tion. Some friends thought the 45-year­old Democrat would surely make it to the governor's mansion one day-and then, maybe, even Washington. At 11 :30 p.m., he was called to the telephone. It was Sheriff Dale Carson. "Senator, I got some bad news for you," the sheriff said. "What is it, Sheriff?" Dan asked. "I've got a warrant for your son and daughter's arrest." · He was told that his daughter Lynn, 20, and son John, 24, were involved with an alleged cocaine ring. Lynn was named in four counts of conspiracy to commit a felony, John in one count. A trial is expected this spring. The alleged ring included Linda Blair, the 18-year-old actress who was pos­sessed by the devil in the film The Ex­orcist. Except for her, however, not a single person arrested fit the image usu­ally associated with the superjet, "fast­lane" set. 'Cadillac of drugs' Called the "Cadillac of drugs," co­caine through the years has been for those who could easily spend $1SOO to $2000 for an ounce-especially celeb­rity artists, writers and performers like Louise "Mary Hartman" Lasser, rock star Gregg Allman and Tommy Rettig, who was the child star in Lassie. Vivid descriptions exist of fantastic parties where the precious stuff was set out like sugar in bowls. CommurJf! News The Houston Post APRIL 16, 1978 A promising career for Florida State Sen Dan Scarborough(/) may have been nipped One Familv's Hanle Auaiast C1eai1e by Bernard Gavzer Elite users of the past included Queen Vic­toria, Pope Leo XIII, Robert Louis Stevenson Sarah Bernhardt, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sig'. mund Freud, Douglas Fairbanks Sr., Errol Flynn. Cocaine-also called "coke," "C," "snow" and "toot"-is a white powder that when in­gested (usually by inhalation) produces a sen­sation of well-being and seems to overcome fatigue, hunger and thirst. Its most potent at­traction is its alleged power as an aphrodisiac. Frequent· inhalation can damage nose mem­branes. The National Institute of Drug Abuse estimates that 1 million Americans use co­caine at least once a month. It all begins with the coca bush, which grows on the slopes of the Andes Mountains. The leaves are picked and processed into powder, which is moved along smuggle1s' routes from South and Latin America toward the U.S. Banned here, it wholesales for as much as $4S,000 a kilo as it enters the Miami area, America's cocaine gateway. The Jacksonville case casts cocaine in a new light. The people involved are not celebrities, rich or remarkably accomplished. They are, in fact, the people of Anytown, U.S.A. Of the 33 indicted, only two were in their 30's; the rest, in their 20's and teens. They in­cluded a diver, a marine dealer, a dog han­dler, a college student, a typist, a meat cutter, a shipfitter, a laborer, a broker-trainee, a City of Jacksonville Beach employee, an electri­cian, a car salesman, a truck driver, a busboy, a carpenter, a secretary, a printer, a talent agency employee. The case demonstrates that cocaine has reached America's ordinary people, raising a possibility that many families like the Scar-t .. i""'_llllli,.._, • ~ I by the• arres~dHris qaughter Ly(ln and son John (T) ,;or part ln alleged coc~itle ring •.le boroughs may find themselves dealing with what Dan Scarborough calls a "nightmare." '·There's not a parent of teenage children in Florida today-in America today-who doesn't live in constant fear about kids smok­ing marijuana or using drugs," he said. "We all of us face the nightmare that these young adventurous people may end up being treated as hardened criminals." Non-addictive but dangerous The penalties for cocaine are very much like those for heroin. While cocaine is not addictive, the law calls it a dangerous drug. In Florida. conviction on a charge of conspir­ing to commit a felony can lead to a maxi­mum prison sentence of five years-a fright­ening prospect for any parent. For the Scarboroughs, there seemed the possibility of another penalty: damage to a promising political career. Dan Scarborough weighed that question. He tucked a_ wad of Red Man chewing to­bacco into the right side of his mouth, placed a cowboy-booted foot against a wastebasket, settled in his swivel chair and said: "It's pos­• ible I been hurt. It's possible I been bad hurt." Maybe this cocaine case would be no more threatening to his future than his support of the Equal Rights Amendment or of marijuana decriminalization. Then it became clear that he was thinking more of his son's future than of his own, since he hoped that John might follow him into public office. "Now, this is going to be a hell of a cro55 for him to bear, even though it is clear to me he is as innocent as a glass of milk and a piece of pie," Dan said. All parents' live in constant fear' of drugs 1 Page7 The night the sheriff called, there was some shock for Dan's family. But for Dan it was very much like hearing the second shoe drop. He'd already heard that Lynn and John might in some way be tangled in a drug investigation. The tip, he revealed, came from a man who told him, "There's a guy in police intel­ligence around the shop who likes to brag and said he'd seen some confiden­tial file that your son is under surveil­lance by the narcotics squad." Dan called John and Lynn into his office. "Some people told me you may be fooling around with some things you ought not to be," he said. "If you are, you better quit it. If you're not, it's good advice anyhow." "Dad, we're not;'' they said. And Dan believed them. Signs of suspicion A few weeks later, the senator's ad­ministrative assistant noticed that a photographer had been hanging around the building where Scarborough has his legislative office and his businesses. Both Lynn and John work there for their dad's companies. "I called the undersheriff, John Nel­son, and told him I'd heard my children may be under suspicion of some kind," the senator said. "I told him I was inter­ested in finding out if there was any substance to the rumor and if there was, I'd bring my kids down to the state attorney's office right then. I wasn't in­terested in squashing anything. I told him I'd rather keep my kids out of trou­ble 1han gel them out of trouble. He said he'd let me know." Nelson never did, he said. And the kids again said they were doing nothing wrong. And Dan believed them. Even after the arrest, Dan believed in th~ir innocence. Dan's wife, Virginia, also felt some­thing was wrong about the charges after she talked with Lynn. "I know this child very, very well, and I know she's innocent," Mrs. Scarbor­ough said. "I can't believe that she could look me straight in the eye and say, 'I love you' and 'not to worry' and 'I've done nothing wrong' if it wasn't the truth." But the state and federal governments say there's a strong case, that it's not just a group of young people experimenting with cocaine. , Capt. John McCormick, head of th'e Duval County sheriff's vice squad, said: "When you get into certain quantities, such as ounces, you are not talking about personal use. And when you find arrangements for picking up and trans­porting and collecting, and seize ring­leaders with three pounds of cocaine, ""nmmunlty News ~ ~~- ~ -Iii.~ Excepting film star Linda Blair, the 33 indicled were just uordinary people." you have more than a·casual deal. You have a ring." Robert Ginley, head of the Drug En­forcement Administration's Jacksonville office, said stale and federal agents dis­covered the extent of the network through court-approved telephone wiretaps. He said the central figures were George "Eddie" Mangum, 25, of Jacksonville; Garland Wade Atkinson, 28, and Andrew lnglet, 24, both of Houston, Tex. What were the roles of Lynn Scarbor­ough and Linda Blair? McCormick and Ginley were guarded about details, but Ginley said, "Lynn Scarborough has been out to Houston. She stayed with Atkinson. As for Linda Blair, she made a deal to buy three ounces of cocaine." Blair came for funeral Any connection between Lynn and Linda Blair seems to h<ive been coinci­dental. Linda Blair came to Jacksonville in late October for the funeral of Ron­nie Van Zant, lead singer of the Lynyrd Skynyrd rock group, who was killed in a plane crash. Lynn, one of the band members' girlfriend, had gone to pick up Linda as a favor. That apparently is the only contact the two ever had. Of the four Scarborough children, Lynn is the one things always seem to happen to. Vickie, 22, who is now mar­ried and has a home on the Scarbor­ough property, and Karen, 18, are de­scribed as outgoing and clownish "like their dad." John and Lynn tend to be quieter, reserved, like their mother. All four, said Mrs. Scarborough, were aver­age students at Nathan B. Forest High School. John was well-regarded as an athlete. He married young, has a 3-year­old son and supposedly is patching up his broken marriage. Despite her re­serve, Lynn was elected president of the senior girls' class. "When she was a toddler;' said Mrs. Scarborough, "she had serious eye sur­gery. Then we almost lost her when she had spinal meningitis at the age of 12. If something bad could happen, it would usually happen to Lynn." On the insistence of their lawyer, neither john nor Lynn would speak of what had happened. Neither, so far as could be determined, shows any evi­dence of sudden or unusual affluence, as might be expected of people in­volved with a ring dealing in a sub­stance that costs 10 times more than gold. John Scarborough, who works for his dad, has a base pay of $1000 a month, plus commissions. If 1978 is a good year, he may gross $15,000. Lynn gets $700 a month as a secretary in her father's busi­ness. She lives at home. "On a Wednesday before payday they'd be borrowing $4 or $5 gas money from me," said Mrs. Scarborough. Invisible profits Even one of the alleged ringleaders, Mangum, shows little evidence of money. He lives in a small ramshackle house off.a dirt road. What if evidence shows John and Lynn were criminally involved? "What do you do if you find out it's not like they told you?" Dan said. "You don't give up on them, you don't quit on them, you don't love them any less. Man, you suck it up and go do the best you can.11 He said John had worried about the impact this might have on the business, and even on Dan's political career. "That worried John because he calls on heads of companie<. I told him not to worry," Dan said. "As for my busi­ness, I've been making my income pub­lic since running for state office. My last return shows I'm worth about half a million dollars. Now, I began 20 years ago come June with $500 and three lit­tle kids. If need be, I can do it again." There were hints from some of the lawmen that Senatat Scarborough might not like to hear what's on the wiretap tapes. Did that mean there could be something damaging? No, they said. Embarrassing I Maybe. "There's nothing I can think of that would do that to me," the senator said. "No way. There is nothing that troubles me. I sleep at the foot of the cross." Virginia smiled wanly at Dan. As she looked at the embers glowing in the fireplace, she said, somewhat wistfully: "I somehow think that this isn't hap­pening, that none of this is real, that I'll wake up and find out that all of it, every little bit, has been just a bad dream:·• Slavery Charge Hits Landlady NEWARK, N.J. (AP) - A New Jersey woman was arcused ThursdRy of enslav­ing residents in her Trenton boarding home and using violence to force them to work for her and to perform sC'x acts. A federal grand ju.ry made the accusa­tions in a nine-count indictment against Jean Douglas. 40, proprietor of the Doug· las Boarding Home, which was op~ned in December 1971 and closed in May 1976 when a local bank foreclosed on the mort­gage. Mrs. Douglas was charged with invol­untary servitude. a little-used fede-ral law dating back to the post-Civil War Re­construct ion era. The grand jury said Mrs. Douglas held seven boarders pri~oner in her boarding home and forced two boarders to go to her Willingboro ho1oe to work as her pri­vate slaves. It said one resident was held in slavery from October 1972 uhtil her death in November 1975. Two of Mrs. Douglas· boarders were in­duced into slavery at a Bristol. Pa., facil­ity after the Trenton home closed, the grand jury said. The Bristol home closed in August 1976. The grand jur}' also said a female resi­dent of the Trenton home was forced to perform sexual intercourse with male boarders. Federal authorities said Mrs. Douglas used ··intimidation. violence and impris­onment" to keep residents at her home, but they would not elaborate. If convicted on all charges against her, Mrs. Douglas could he sentenced to a maximum 45 years in prison and fined . $45,000. Mrs. Douglas was a defendant in a 1975 civil suit brought by one of the residents, who said she escaped from enslavement at Mrs. Douglas· private residence. The 64-year-old resident, whose blind hus­band died at the Trenton facility, was awarded a $60,000 judgment against Mrs. Douglas. according to her attorney, Dennis Brotman. Brotman, formerly of the Trenton Le­gal Services, said his client charged in her suit that she had been beaten, forced to work and her welfare checks taken and forged. Brotman said his client, who had a heart condition, also was forced to sit in an unheated garage at the Willingboro home in the winter. · Page8 Sexchang:1 funding eyed WASHINGTON (AP) - The federal government will review whether Medicare should pay for some sex-change operations, says the secretary of health, education and welfare. Joseph A. Califano Jr. says he has ordered his health financing chief, Robert Derzon, to set up a panel of experts to review whether transsexual surgery is medically necessary in certain cases. Medicare, which picks up hospital bills for the elderly and disabled, does not now pay for sex­change operations. At issue is whether such procedures involve proven techniques. A spokeswoman for HEW's Health Care Financing Administration, Pat Schoe­ni, said the U.S. Public Health Service has consid­ered transsexual surgery to be new and experi· mental a nd that its safety and effectiveness were not proven. Medicare, run by the federal governme nt, does not pay for unproven techniques. Califano, addressing a convention of news paper editors, denied a report that Medicare had agreed to pay for a $5,600 sex-change operation for a dis· abled San Diego man, Robert Bennett, who now calls himself Bobbie Lea Bennett. Bennett, 31 and confined to a wheelchair, says he has lived like a woman for the last three years and wants to undergo the surgery. Community News DROP EVERYTHING Raid nets 80 pounds of pot Narcotics detectives paper bag,. three large said they confiscated 80 plastic bags, a cardboard pounds of manjuana box and a plastic contam­Fnday night in a raid on er. I GETTING BIGGER.!: GETTING BETTER.,11 ANNOUNCING OuR NE.w GAME & LouNGiE. an ~;ast Side home. A pistol also was con- Narcotics detective fiscated, Dawson said. Ronnie Dawson, who Held in lieu of $50.000 obtamed a search \\ar- bond, set by Night Mag­rant, went lo the resid· istrate Mike O'Quinn, was ence with four other o!fic- Armando Tijerrna. 28, of ers and said U1cy dis· the 200 block of Kipling covered the pot m brown Avenue. i _/""~'t! J..:.~=---+---"~'"ft 1----+--=E~.2~b~~-- _ _:!Wo!:.·~'l.::?.~.::>i:..---t---:--l---- -~· ~'l~-­y,/. 11~ * \ ' ~! .",~,",·' W. AREA. W1TH Pool- TAE>LE. & P1NBALL N\ACH\NES ! !!! !§§ Gay leader is sentence<l Austin Country 705 Red River Charles ~dward SpurgPon. 28. president of the Oklahoma City G:ty Task Force, today was awaiting transporta tion to the Oklahoma State Peni tenriary following his plea of guilty to <'harge~ of embez­zlement, writing bog.is chPcks anri failure to return rental property. Spurgeon was to have gone on tri­al for the four charges but befo!·e the case was called, he pleaded gmity before Special Judge Cres ton GAY SWITCHBOARD The Apartment 2828 Rio Grande Hollywood Club 304 W. 4th Private Geller 709 E. 6th Pearl St. warehouse 1720 Lavaca CLUB BATH 308 w. 16th B. Williamson. As!-; ist;int District A1 torn<'Y Ed Geary said that SpurgPon told him he had spent some of ttw money for a camp~ign aga=n~t anti-homo!'oiexu­al Jear!~r Anita BryaPt. H~ wa<; sentenced to five yca!'s in prison but three yt!ars were SllS· pended. The judge also ordered him 10 r<'· pay $6,616 a1 the rate of $111 per month. 477-6699 Mr Peepers Bookstore 2 13 E. 6th All American News 2532 Guadelupe Stallion Bookstore 706 E. 6th Page9 GYPSY'S GIBBERISH ............ from Austin 3aw ERNESTINE and HOT CHOCOLATE wrecking :LUB AUSTIN the other night before their terrific show at THE AUSTIN COUNTRY ... hi girls, your performance was really great and we appreciate you! GLENDORA, TERRY, a~d Niss Gypsy terrorized the tubs for a whole week ... we thought a few times that ~ADAM was going to evict us! Miss Gypsy was festive, festive, festive one night! She turned nine tricks that night at the tubs ... must be a one-night record! Sore for days! GENE E (STCN), what's this we hear about your teaching Philosophy here in Austin? We didn't know you had it in you ... or have you? SPLASH lJAY at Hippie Hollo~1 was a roaring success ... all those magnificent nude men. Thank you AUSTIN COUNTRY and NEW APARTMENT LOUNGE for the day! BOB KONRAD (New Apartment), you is fantastic! Welcome DAVID to the PRIVATE CELLAR .... great new blond barmaid! Gypsy is single again (ju5t for the time being MIKE--till you get your head together) .. couldn't handle that curfew shit! I met ROSEBUD the other day ... what a true love you are! You, too, TOM! JOHN R, did you really co~e to Austin with Preston as an inseparable package plan from Lubbock ... tee hee. MIKE, my love, I'm glad you're back from California ... not only were you missed (by me), but I never suspected it was you who called me from Palm Springs! BILL P (Now Apartment), I can explain at least six of those bruises ... ! should be able to .... ! picked you up off the floor at THE AUSTIH COUNTRY twice that night .. and so did several others .... you were so festive, girl! MADAft: MICHELLE, how very fickle you are. FRENCH DRESSING gave a marvelous performance the other night at THE AUST!N COUNTRY, twice. Thanks again BK! Don't you just love a queen who says she's straight while she's banging you?? How rude! He said the cabbie made a big mistake by taking him to the tubs! Some­body posted my column on the wall at the tubs with a note saying to be "CAREFUL! GYPSY MAY BE LISTENING". I really don't miss much, do I? MADAM ~ICHELLE, who do you say has silicone tits? Do you know, STEVE? CHUCK and JI~ (TWT-Houston) were terrorizing CLUB AUSTIN over the weekend and were very welcome guests .. thanks for visiting with us, guys. A few drinkie­poos with PRINCE VARK I the other day at Abel Moses, hoping a chance meeting with THE BIG F. Daylene was on her way home to dinner ~ith PRINCE LOR!, DUCHESS RAT I, and GRAND DUCHESS GAG I. Understand RAT was chef that night! Where's PRINCE PAM I these days? Really enjoyed reading ZAC STERLING's column last issue! Can't wait to see some of the movies you write abcut, ZAC! Have any of you read PLAYBO~ interview with anita bryant yet? It's a living, breathing riot .... you don't have to look at those grotesque pictures, but do read the interview. TERRY C, please don't bang on my door at the tubs when I have a trick! He was afraid you were my lover. Took me half an hour to get him settled down again! GLEN S, have you yet found a man at the baths short onoLlgh to use his shoulder as a balance beam? You scared the shit out of one guy the other night doing pirouettes in the whirlpool! I hear Miss Gypsy got really trashed the other night at THE NEW APARTMENT LOUNGE. Sitting on top of the bar, yogi position in flame red short shorts! Isn't she an absolute troll? One of my nearest, and dearest friends, GLENN, (formerly of the PRIVATE CELLAR) left last Sunday for San Francisco. He'll really be missed by us fans, as well as by WOODY (I think). BOB C, we haven't seen much of you lately at the tubs, but hear you went to Dallas to recuperate. Ladies will kindly refrain! When in San Antonio, check out my friend GENEs new tubs, all new EXECUTIVE HEALTH Community News CLUB ... should be hot! Open just in time for FIESTA. PRIVATE CELLAR'S GEORGE D., you're quite welcome, but you've done so much for us, too! Happy to hear you are going to do more ... bon apetit! Speaking of good eating .. thanks CHUCK and KENT of ZIPPY'S RAINBOW for the T-shirt, and for the fabulous food .. especially the Sunday Special (which I cannot spell)! BRANDY, do I hear wedding bells? Remember what you pulled in Monterey and San Francisco won't you girl? DAVID M of the PRIVATE CELLAR, is WONDER CLIT ... especially with his socks off! DAVID ED (Private Cellar giant) ... can't remember why we broke up, except that I'm a Size Queen! Thanks for the tab, BRIAN, but I am still trying to collect TERRY and GLEN's share so that I can pay you! ALEX, so you and MM are to try it again? Lots of luck, fellow! You got more guts than I do. Hear ROBBIE is on his way to San Francisco, but made it only as far as Houston. CHARLIE, thanks for the Peonies! Call me when Magnolias bloom, OK? BOB KONRAD (New Apartment) I hear you've been seeing the same guy for two weeks now ... THAT has to be some kind of record for you ... before now it was. at most ten days! METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH, AUSTIN, 614 East 6th Street, has services Sundays, noon and 7:30 p.m. and your attendance would be appreciated! My dear friend RAY M asked me to invite you all next Sunday. That Sunday Special at ZIPPY'S RAINBOW is called Rijsttafel .... thanks, CHUCK! RODNEY (Zippy's), did you once spread bad Ton my sister DONNIE ... barred from Hippie Hollow, indeed! Sorry about that DAVID M ... it's WONDER CLIT. .. not Super Clit! TIM (Austin Country), I love your new puppy, PRIAPUS ... how very, very apropos! JESSE (Austin Country), I want to know why your lover divorced you after Mardi Gras! Who DID you trick with in Lafayette? Are you moving to Houston soon and if so which of those two lovers are you taking in Houston? Why did MISS B&B go Miller Lite over her turntable? I would love the answer to that one. Miss Gypsy actually witnessed (no 1 ie) BRANDY and TIM bumping pussies the other night! And behind the bar at THE AUSTIN COUNTRY where the men are supposed to be men! On the subject of TIM, someone told me that he was seen rubbing his ass while he was talking about a Great Dane! Maybe great big dogs turn him on like they do FIFI .. how's Pease Park, Mike? Speaking of big dogs, hi BUTCH and DAVID. Oh, ain't she j u s t not h i n g th i s wee k? S.h e ' s go i n g to win the title of MISS SHIT DISTURBER, or she'll quit writing this tasteful column immediately! SAM (FRENCH DRESSING), how very tasteless .. . GLENDORA SHAW? Guess we all get horny on occasion! Speaking of FRENCH DRESSING, we are thrilled to hear about CLAUDE's new film role! Congrats, Claude! Hear that you looked more like Midler than Midler! Fantastic new drink in town named after me ... ask for a GYPSY next time you're at THE NEW APARTMENT or at THE PRIVATE CELLAR ... if you think you can handle it! Well, we love you anyway SAM! Speaking of Sams, hope SAM T feels better now ... we miss you! JOHN POWPOW, I really enjoyed dinner with you on Sunday at BEAN'S ... saw ROGER at the Cellar last night ... what a cutie! Had lunch with OUR MISS BROOKS at Steamboat Springs Tuesday so I could get caught up on all the late T from the Geriatric Set ... simply devine lunch, Brooks! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MONA RAY and many happy returns! Saturday, May 5 GYPSY'S FIRST ANNUAL HANGING OF THE B's! The B's, of course, are BOBBY KONRAD and BILL POCK of THE NEW APARTMENT LOUNGE ... The Hanging is in celebration of the B's birthdays ... so come to THE APARTMENT and help Gypsy hang Bobby and Bill. MIKE S, you would be so easy to love .. I'm trying not to! Love, Gypsy l 'Dildo JI 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111II111111111111111II111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ll II I II I II'"' : Page 10 Community News : : : : -: OPINIONS : EDITORIAL LEI IERS What's going on South Texas Community NeMS South Texas Community Ne"'s : :_ P. o. 8-0x 182 P. 0. 8-0x 182 _ San Antonio, TX 78291 . San Antonio, TX 78291 :.1111111111111111t11111111111111111111111111111IIII111111111111111111 I I I I I I I I I I Ill 111111111111111111111111111111111 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I If I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I: ~ 111111111111I11111111IIll111111111111111I1111111111111111111IIIII1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 rC Writer Says Anita Fears Assassination CHICAGO (AP) - Anita Bryant expects to be assassinated by homosexuals, accord­ing to a writer who in­terviewed her for Play­boy magazine. Author Ken Kelley said in observations ac­" ompanying the inter­, ·iew in the May issue that hP believes Miss Bryan rs fear · i8 realis­tic. Miss Bryant made no statement in the intei'­\" iew C'onrerning a pos­s i blC' assassination attempt, but Kelly, 26, said Monday that "We talked about it a lot, es­pecially after she got a pie in the face in Des Moines. She said. 'At least it was better than a grenade. 'Expect Anything' "I askl!d her if she expected a grenade. She said she must ex­pect anything at any time," he said. In the magazine, Kel­ly writes, "During the past 12 months, she has weathered bomb threats, snuff letters and numerous close calls with mayhem. But she has learned to take it in stride.'' Kelley, who traveled last rall with Miss Bryant and her hus­band- manager, Bob Green, said, "Bob has learned to cover his in­vestment by smother­ing his wife with securi­ty guards. But, in his own words, ·Let's face it - when some mili· tan! homosexual kills Anita, the guy will be an instant hero.'" Penalty Asked In the interview, Miss Bryant said homo­• exual behavior should be prosecuted as a felo­ny. ln some places it is not a crime and in oth· en; it is a misdemean­or. "Any lime you water down the law, it just makes it easit:?r for im­morality to become tolerated," she said. Kids show due LOS ANGELES (APJ - CBS will add a new c hildren's show called "30 Minutes" in Sep­tPmber, patterned after "60 Minutes." Restroom watcher nets two A police crackdown on suspected homosex­ual gathering places in downtown Oklahoma City public buildings continued today, as un­dercover officers ar­rested two men on lewdness complaints. Booked about 11:30 a.m. on complaints of offering to engage in an act of lewdness were Gayle Gene Clanahan, 32, of 9520 Ridgeview, booked on a complaint or offering to engage in an act of lewdness, and Glen Earl Schroll, 48, of 2120 SW 76, booked on a disorderly conduct complaint. Investigators said the suspects were ar­rested by detective Ken Smith after they al­legedly made lewd of­fers for oral sex inside a public restroom at City Hall. City Hall and the Oklahoma City County Library at NW 3 and Robinson were Tuesday targets in the crackdown. Arrested Tuesday on similar complaints were Robert Glen Dale Draper, 38, of 216 NW 13; Isias Arce Perez, 45, of 800 S Walker, and Merle Wayne Woods, 38, of 1821 NW 29. Detective Sgt. Jim Clark, sex crimes unit supervisor, promised more arrests to clear downtown suspected gathering points for homosexuals. He said the crackdown is ex­pected to move into northwest Oklahoma City parks if com­plaints continue. Eva Jo Stancil, a 22-year-old blonde chosen to represent Ala­bama in the Miss U.S.A. pageant, faces federal drug charges and is appearing in the contest in Charleston, S.C., by permission of a federal magistrate. Irregular verbs There are more than 4.000 irregular verbs in the Finnish language. B.N. Host relurninl!: The addresses are as follows: LOS ANGELES (AP) - Steve Martin returns to NBC's "Saturday Night Live" for another turn as host April 22. ABC Television Network 1330 A.venue of the Americas , N.Y.N.Y. 10019 CBS Television Network 51 W. 52nd. St. N.Y.N.Y. 10019 NBC Television Network 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N.Y.N. Y. 10020 Sound-Off The Houston Post/Sun., Ap•. 16, 1978/ Anita Bryant, orange juice, i.Ininortality Today (April'4) started beautifully with Post in hand ... Then ... with the ingestion of my daily tumbler of Florida orange juice, Anita Bryant spoiled everything. She consigned me, all of my coreligionists, and per­haps 2 billion unsuspecting adherents to various other beliefs, to HEIJ.. A one-way ticket with no intermediate stopover in purgatory. This was really the day that was. I confess that lack of future contact with Anita in the upper regions will cause me little pain, although her orange juice, then presumably cohabiting heaven with her, would come in handy in the hot place. There are compensations. In the netherworld I'll get to rub elbows with Plato and Aristotle, Confucius, Mahatma Gandhi, great artists of antiquity, and name­less architects of oriental temples and long-abandoned ancient cities. Down below there will be saltier characters, too, of both genders. Just imagine eavesdropping a conversa­tion between Attila the Hun, Cleopatra, Lucretia Bor­gia, and the Marquis de Sade! Farewell forever, Anita ..• Robt. G. Levy 651 Strey Lane, Houston, Texas 77024 • Grand inquisitor An unfortunate aspect of many people who call them­selves Christians is that they tend to react violently against people who disagree with them. When such peer pie occupy positions of power and influence, they endeavor to translate their attitudes into deeds. Such is the cause of such bloody tragedies as the Spanish Inqui­sition, the Crusades, the witch-burnings of Salem and the ... persecution of the Jews. Sadly, civilization has not passed beyond such mon­strous insanity. America has its own grand inquisitor in ... Anita Bryant. Breathing ... brimstone, this un­likely crusader has ... been venting her spleen against homosexuals. In return she has received much deserved scorn and contempt. Now ... homosexuals are not alone as objects ol her floly wrath. Jews, Moslems and indeed all who do not bow down before her peculiar God are destined for the fires of hell. The handwriting is on the wall. After the children of Sodom are slaughtered in Anita's program, the children of Israel and of Mohammed are next. Mark Whittington 4810 O'Meara, Houston, Texas 77035 • Sages, snakes ... Anita Bryant says her religious beliefs convince her that Jews, Moslems and persons o! other faiths who do not accept Jesus as their Savior will go to hell. Even in Paradise, I won't have an opportunity to talk with . . . Albert Einstein . . . or Thomas Jefferson. Miss Bryant does not say whether there will be snakes in heaven for the benefit of the snake-handling hillbilly fundamentalists in some parts of Appalachia. J. B. Leftwich '310 Taggart St., Houston, Texas 77007 •Fanaticism . . . Anita Bryant . . . considers herself another Mohandas K. Gandhi ID IMS, a photo by Margaret Bonrke-Whlte help in cutting out the goats. . .. She, unlike our Lord, can see no good in "Samaritans." Yours in Christ, and in refusal of fl).naticism. PatKochera 210 Renoir, Houston, Texas 77079 •Instead H Anita Bryant was a true Christian, instead of a hatemonger, she would welcome death, to meet her creator, instead of fearing death by assassination. Dal'ldP.Ip ... "Carrie Nation" and is pleased to give the Lord some 2705 Sunset, Houston, Texas 77005 Pqell CUllENT CINEMA ... IPHIGENIA (U) Directed by Michael Cocoyannis With the popularity of free-wheeling, non­thinking films such as "Star Wars" and "High Anxiety," which are made strictly for fun, it's nice to have a "thinking man's" picture out, even if IPHIGENIA is not a complete success. The ~illll was nominated for "Best Fore0ign Language' Fmlm" at this years Academy Awards. The film lost, however, to an un­heard of film, "Madame Rosa." Michael Cocoyannis has filmed two earlier Greek tragedies, "Electra" in 62, and "The Trojan Women" in 71. IPHIGENIA is based on the play, IPHIGENIA AT AULIS by Euripides, and quite often, the film seems somewhat stagey. Of course a lot of the acting is (overly) melodramatic, but you must take into consideration the time and place. Cocoyannis has not made his own version, he has kept it in its nearly exact original writing, And for that he is to be commended. The story concerns the demand, by the Greek fleet, assembled to sail for Troy, that'Agamemnons' daughter be sacrificed and killed. In their belief that her death will bring wind for their ships to sail by, Iphigenia is brought to her father, by her mother, under the impression that she is to marry Achilles, a young, attra?tive ~ero. In actuality, of course, her marriage will be a wedding with death. In feeling _sor:ow for the beautif ul 13 year old, Iphigenia, one cannot help but feel that Euripide? sto:y is somewhat ludicrous, and that the films in­tentionally depressing mood i s a bit much. Irene Papas is impressive as the mother, though occas iona l l y she is forced to.deliver a rediculous line, which prompts unkind and nervous laughter from the audience. As Agamemnon, Costas Kazakos, is rough and unloving. He cares for his daugh~er, possibly, but the Greek fleet come first, and though he contemplates the deci?ion of the sacrifice, you are always certain that his final decision will result-in death for Iphigenia. . .. The most brilliant of the cast is Titiana Papamoskou as Iphigenia. Her beauty and inno~ cence is incredibly touching. Her performance is the most controlled, making her role seem the most natural. IPHIGENIA is the best screening of this type that I've seen. However, its long length and numerous boring sequences go on too ,long and keep it from being the perf~ct ~icture that it might have been. In seeing it once, one can marvel at its eagle-sharp photography and the sensitiveness of its tittle character. But to set through it another time, would be, quite frankly, a chore. (**t) "CROSSED ~" Directed by Richard Fleisher, based on Mark Twain's THE PRINCE & THE PAUPER (PG) I have to admit right out front that when I was a child, Twain's PRINCE & THE PAUPER was one of my favorite - stories, Also, when I was ten, I dis­covered a musical movie titled OLIVER! and from that point on, Mark Lester, who played Oliver Twist in the film, (he plays the prince AND the pauper in CROSSED SWORDS ,) became my idol,(or hero, whichever you prefer,) and OLIVER! will always be one of my very all time favorite movies, So, in reviewing ~:~1r=o=:5uc~n i \ My god, what has happened to Mark Lester! In his youth, his looks person­ified perfection. Perfect facial features, perfect blonde hair, perfect innocence. Now he's twenty years old and he's about six feet tall, and weighs about 60. I swear he is so skinny that he looks like a polio victum. His door knob looking knee caps simply beg to be turned. His acting performance here fluctuatess be­tween clumsy and just plain awful. Can this be that beautiful, promising little boy from OLIVER! ? The film is creatively photographed, and it captures the period wonderfully. But into this is th~own the most redic­ulous all~star cast· ever assembled. Ernest Borgnine, Rex Harrison and George C. Scott are at their all time low. Raquel Welch is the token woman, though her character isn't even remotely believe- 1~ able. Oliver Reed is the best 'of the mess, t (he played Bill Sykes in OLIVER!) but he can't begin to save it. Actually, reviewing this is hard on me- I've been anticipating its arrival for over a year - and I thought I would love it, (I wanted to.) But it is, I regret to say, the pits. (0) "RABBIT TEST" (PG) Directed by Joan Rivers Either Joan Rivers doesn't write her own j okes when I see her on television talk shows, or she didn't write this film. The credits say she did, and I just can't believe it. I have always felt that she ~B 8 the greatest female . comic in America. But her new movie, RABBIT TEST is in-concievably unfunny and nauseating. The film should have been titled RABID TEST, as I would rather suffer through rabies twice, than set all the way through this even once. Billy Crystal (of SOAP fame,) is Rivers' starring victum, and though he's charming and sensitive, his "throw-away" one-liners are far from showing any talent Rivers throws so many silly gags at her audience in every second, that I had just flat o.d.'ed after the first tnirty minutes. I saw the next thirty minutes in a disbelievable coma. All of middle class America was laughing a~ound me, but I was just amazed at their stupidity. To save my life, I just could not find any of it funny. It was just one little skit after another, no worse or better than T.V. 's "Hee Haw" and "Laugh-In. " After one hour, I could stand no more, and fled from the theatre, and as I walked out I could hear the audience laughing. And for just a moment, I im­agined them "to be laughing at me. Joan Rivers had played an ultimate joke on me: She had tricked me into se·eing her film. Too nervous to walk very far,(be- ~ cause I get upset when I think about there being movies that bad,) I snuck into the theatre next door, where a very familier favorite of mine was play­ing to a practically empty house,(even though it had won "Best Picture Of the Year" at the Academy Awards four nights earlier,) All I can say is, thank god for people like Woody Allen and Diane Keaton, and movies like ANNIE HALL. For those of us who are amune to a "television society," movies like this are all that keep us from going totaly insane. (0) Page 12 Flying finish for Liberace Bergen in love with O'Neal LOS ANGELES (AP) - Candice Bergen has been signed to star as the love interest in "Oliver's Story," the sequel to "Love Story" starring Ryan O'Neal. Edward Binns will play Phil Cavalieri, the father of Jenny, and Nicola Pagett plays a young designer who also becomes involved with O'Neal. Anthony Quinn is starring in "The Passage," now filming in Tarbes, France. Ul\IJU:\ I ilwrtu'f' and Ju-. tor· 1nt..•r 1·ti;i11ff4·ur dan:lt..•cl till' aml!Plll'l' al lht• I.on tlon l'~dla<l1um \\1th bul 11 1 lwir ptano play tnc; ~lllll tiH.'11" outflt:- \'t•gas perfurmant't•s. \\(IS drt..'SSl'd \JI a duplil'­atr or the glitkr tali:-; outr1l thal tlw Am<•nt·<rn sl~ff sportl•cl for !us part of ~1onllay 111ght's show. l'IH'C. "lie IS my proh.\g(,' and ht• t~ also lcarmng how to bt• a show-off llhe nw" Quinn plays a French shepherd who guides a sci­entist and his family through the Pyrenees Mountains after their escape from a Nazi concentration camp. \'11h.·t· l'~1nkll \tho 11s1•<I to dn\ l' I .1ht•J'att•s Huli'-1-Hoyt'l' ftlr Ills La..., "Vmu~ used to pliiy b)' l'<tr. but I taught h1111 to n~Hd muslt"." Ubt.~ra­l'C ronf1drd to the aud1- L1bt\racc rnallt• tus final l>ow 111 a wlutc O::ilnth l'io<1k, and ln slylc - flying <.llTOSS the stagt• Pt•tcr Pan faslnon SUSf)('fldtlcl frOlll WU't.'. LIBERACE ... dazzled LINDA BEATS DRUG CHARGE Donny bares lwolates ST,\:\lH);Hl. t.'nnn - Drug pos:--t.·~~1011 rhargt·~ ha\ l' IJt..•t·n drop1u.·d ag<1m.4 ~ll'fn•:-.s I iml" lllnir. ''ho h:1~ a~n·· l'd. 111 turn. to t•nn.JI 1mnt:..·d1a­h1\\ rn an an·t•ll•r:ilt•d rdiab1- l1ti11111n 1lrogn1111 !\11!-.S Blair. HI. wa:-, eha1-g..1li w11h pO:>Sl's1011 ur amplw· li-lllllll\'S. l'lliH.'f' Salli th(?\ round 1 he drug m her pur~e \\.hl'll !ht•\ arn•:-,lNI hl'r at ht>r \\'1lton. ( ·01111.. honw on a Flond<i fug1t 1' c '' a1T<.111l la~t Dt•c. :!O. M1~ Bla1r"s law\·ers obo flJ. t•d 1wt1tions agamsl thl' atlrcss' cxtradltion to Florid:.i. where she fates thargt•s of tonsptracy to bu:; or sell coeaine. lLt·:~ ~~LM\U M•11l1·fi-n>l'lt>d enter­t ~llfWI' 0111111v /\:an• will wear two dilfer· cnl hats duruig his next two visits to Cleveland. "When I come to Cleveland May 9. I'll be wearing my bas~· ball entrcpr ~ncur s hat. and when I'm here May 14, 1'11 have on my conductor's vest," Kaye said Mon.' day. Tatum is a BIG girl now 1973 She's almost grown up 1978 Actress Tatum O'Neal has matured lnlo a )Oung woman. almost at the blink or an e)'elld. The picture al lrlt sho1<s her in "Papt'r Moon," eenler in "The Bad Ne\\s Bears:· and as 15-)ear-old spending Saturday night at a ~~~}~W°J<P~]~~~s. Too Tired to Love Soap Suit Is Scrubbed A preliminary injunction suit filed against KSAT-TV for airing the con­troversial program "Soap" has been dismissed in federal court. U.S. IJistrict Judge John H. Wood Jr. dismissed the case Monday after KSAT executives announced they would not pick up the show for summer re-runs because of its poor ratings. Farrah, prince chat Actress Farrah Fawcett-Majors at· tended a royal charity show Sunday at the London Palladium and renewed a friendship with Prince Charles, whom she first met in Hollywood. "I find him 'to be very intelligent, and very charming. I think the best thing about him is that he makes you feel comfortable," F'awcett said after speaking with the prince back-. stage. The wife of actor Lee Majors later attended a party with the show's stars, comedian Bob Newhart and singer John· ny Mathis. Prince Charles also attended Ford credits 2 Rogerses Actor Glenn Ford says humorist WUI Rogers and cowboy movie star Ros Rogers helped him into the Hall of Fame of Great Western Performers. Ford, who was inducted in Oklahoma City during the Western Heritage Awards banquet of the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, said Roy Rogers taught him how to shape his hat, and the late humorist taught him how to ride a horse. Hif it hadn't been for Will Rogers and the man that made my hat, I wouldn't be here tonight," F'ord said. Roy Rogers and his wife Dale Evans, who were inducted into the hall last year, attended the banquet, at which their portrait was unveiled. Gene Aniry, outgoing president of the Cowboy Hall's board of directors, presided over unveiJ,,. ing of the portrait, painted by Eve!'P•t Raymond KinsUer. Ringo Starr said in Chicago that the BeaUes never will sing together again. "We've all gone oor separate ways," he said, "and we're too far apart, musically, ever to get together again." It's Time to Say So Long Whether you're approach­ing the end of ::i marriage, a 'en dose friendship or a love al'fair, the signs or rigor mortis are mueh the same. \\'l1Pn th\•sf' s1~ms appear. 1f ~011 n•c ·"l)..!'l!"~P ~tH•m rn 111rn•_ you ean rCl'dll<'C' till' t'i.11.~11inat t·osls ~1r .1 <l(•t(.•noratml.! n•1a~1011s!Hp. s,I\ s Wom;.m's Da~ Ir .1 :dat•o11:-.h1p J!-i doomul. 1ms'.p11n· 11:... -)H' rm1 nril~ pn•lnngs !lw ag«!l~ 1:11<!1111.. s hn 1g a ci;iri1y. a dt>fm1t1\c•1!t''" hdl m·1K1•s n,•\1i ct1n•c!lons JlOS.."'lhl1' How to tell when Ws over? Mere arc srvrral of the signs· • Whfln you'rC' bor("d most of the t 1111£". Rort"dom 1s usually th<' ftrst and most df'ad1y sign of trouble. In lovr or marnagr. it's usually rannlrnntv that brC'C'dS boredom. But In f1wn<lsh1r}, bon•dom 1s hkl·l~ to be> thf" n•sulh of d1ffrnng dt•\·c·lopm<'nl • Wht•n C•f1(' 1w:-son attac·ks ltw oth­i• r's splr 1ma}-!t'. h! .. : .. -.;aullmg md1ndual diar<i<'h.'nstit's Th,•sn. thP1:-:· s :1n• n11t JUst agamst "hat :t fll't"son <hl\'S. liul \\ h;H 1 ht• pt•r-.;1m \-.; -\?JI! thf'S(' uuh<'lmC'nh ;1n~ thffi.,,:ult to shrug off - they seem lo be based on strong evidence; they are made by a ~rson in a position to know; and they are repeated often. • When you start keeping stnct aC'rounts. In any closr relationship. keeping accounts' 1s a bad sign. "What ha\'{" you done ror fll(' lately?" IS a hostilC' question. • When you no longer fPf'l anything at all. The loss or frf'lmg 1s one of the :-;artcll'.'"il symploms or lhl"' 'l.'lld • Whc·n lh" r('lationsh1p hnngs out tht' worst m vou Each or us has 1 hr pokntial for bemg many dtfr<'f('>Ot pt.'r-sons, and the person we become depends a lot on our associations. • When you'd rather be alone or with someone else. Dreading going home, puttmg off seeing a fnend, or avoiding intimate dinners - these are all signs or the end. It's important to know when ondipg a rt'lationshtp wili solvr a probll'm and "'-h<'n 1t will not. th(' nrttrlP ron<"ludes, pomtmg out that you do not S<'parate w1ttiout pam. Rut without separation rrom an untenable situation. you cannot grow Pa_se 13 Community Newa Piono-wiz Liberace is.swept off his feet by the " Darling of the Discos," 6 -foot, 6-inch Sterling St. Jacques, at o recent disco fashion segment f ilmed for televi­sion at a Los Vegas hotel. The segment will be aired in Moy on the show "Dinah!" At right is the show's hos.fess, Dinah Shore, dancing to the latest disco beot. The Miehigan state GOP has invited Zsa Zsa Gabor to be a spe­eial guest. at a $ i ,OOO-a­plate fund raising din­ntr Thursda~· in Dear~ born. Theater Changes NEW YORK (AP) - October 1951, will bo The Fine Arts Thea ter converted into a c hap· here, which opened in PL Get-Well Calls Deluge John Wayne's Hospital BOSTON (AP ) - Government leader s a nd c e­lebrities from around the world a re bombarding Massachusetts General Hospita l with goodwill telephone calls for actor John Wayne, who is recu­perating from heart surgery. Martin Bander, hospital spokesman, said Thurs­day that Wayne's sons refused to permit identifi­cation of any of the callers. He said Wayne was not able to answer the phone and that his sons spoke to callers. Wayne, who has starred in about 200 movies, most with western or war themes, underwent sur­gery Monday for replacement of a leaky heart valve. He was in satisfactory condition under in­tensive care Thursday. Remick robbed Actress .Lee Kemick told police Thurs­day that fl, 700 in caSh was stolen from her hotel room while she was out to din­ner and shopping. Remick, who is visit­ing from her home In London, said she left the Beverly Hills Comstock Hotel, which is located In West Los Angeles, to go to dinner and later shopping Wednes­day night. When she returned, the money was missing, she said. 'Evita' roles filled Singer-actor David Essex wHI play slain Latin American revolutionary Che Gnenra and actress Elaine Paige will play Eva Peron in the musical "Evita," based on the life of Argentina's Eva Peron, it was announced Sunday in Lon­don. The musical, to be directed by Broadway's Harold Prince, wlll open June 21 at the Prince of Wales Theater. •P u .. rpholo Case defrrred A toraine possession (>harge against R<'lrt-ss Gail ~'ishrr has been deferred tor a.t least si'.\ months while sht parti­clpatrs iu a drug dlvt>r­slon program. AP L•Mrpholo Claim won Prlsellla Presi•y has won her $750,000 di­vorce claim a.galnst the estn.tt" of hrr former husband, Elvis rreslf'y, but details of the agre•­m en t were not rf'lf'ased. 'King and I' now belongs to star Lanshury By WILLIAM GWVER ner and Constance Towers. in the gentle sarcas 1 m of Shall I Tell You NEW YORK (AP) - The King and I now belongs, radiantly though briefly, to that Broadway musical queen, Angela Lansbw-y. With lilting charm and folksy ease, Lans­bw- y is now appearing at the Uris Theater in the Rodgers-Hammerstein opus. Her appearance is the top trump in a shrewdly diplomatic ploy by the management to keep public interest high during a tbree­.!' eek vacation of the show's stars, Yul Bryn- Brynner's regular understudy, Michael What I Think Of You . Kermoyan, takes over, and stellar attention For his part, Kermoyan avoids carbon is shifted to the plot's heroine. replica of Brynner, dispiays a lusty, sonorous Lansbw-y, simply by her presence, alters baritone In Puzzlement and after some some of the realtionships between the imperi- apparent early nervousness became a co.n­ous ruler of Siam and the English schoolm- vincing oriental despot. The couple's big arm he had hired to teach bis three-score off- number, Shall we Dance? could improve with spring. a bit more practice and finer timing. Lansbury's most endearing talent is conta- Brynner and Towers return May 1, to eel.,. geous warmth, and that quality shines out brate the show's first anniversary. triumphantly in all her hall dozen songs, even AP '-"etpholo Suit filed MARLINE DIETRICH: SHE DEFIES THE INROADS OF TIME Claudine l,on11~t goes to court In Aspen, Colo., this week to Aue anoth­er resident for aiie11:<'d non·payment or a loan. The late Bill Elliott Elliott was bom Gordon Nance in Pattonsburg. Mo .. on Oct. 16. 1903. He began riding horses at the age of 5 r his father worked for the Kansas City stockyards J and participated in numerous rodeos as a teen-ager. He decided to give show business a try, enrolled in the Pasadena Community Playhouse and appeared on the screen in the late 1920s and early '30s in bit parts. In WIS he was given the lead in a serial ca/Jed " The Great Adventures of Wild Bill Hickock." Beginning in 1940. Elliott was listed amoni: the top 10 cowboy stars for 14 consecutive years, and when Don "Red" Barry relinquished the role of Red Ryder, it was Elliott who replaced him. His last film was a 1957 detective melodrama called "Footsteps in the Night." Elliott died on Nov. 26, 1965. Sophia Loren Charge Hits Sophia Loren ROME (AP) - A Rome prosrcutor is­sued an anest wa:--rant Saturday for film prn­ducer Carlo Pl11:ti and filc>d eharges ;:μain~1 llis wife. actres~ Sophi:1 L oren. in connf'ct ion with the aJIC>gcd ille~al transfPr of money out of the couno ~'· The l talian-born cou­ple arc both French cit­izens and live in Paris. F rance does not extra­< lite its ci t ilen!:> for prosecut ion in 01ht·r countries. - AP l• .. rphoto Well D a v 1 d Soul. who p lays Hutch in 'Starsky and Hutch,' has re­turned to work after back surgery '1 ) ' Page _14 Community News Grand Jury Indicts Former FBI Leader Former FBI chief indicted WA81Jl:'li(;To'lo (.\P) - 1''nrmer YBI Olre<'tor L. Patrltk Gray 111 •n<I IW•l <'th~r kty l'RI offi~ial~ l't r• indl~ted t-0day In eonneetion with bu r~dU -..iretapplo~s and brf>aki1ts. \ttorn•·y Ge-nt"ral Grifftn H. lJt>lt , annouu<"lng the- iodi('tment~ at a nt>-"'~ <·ooff'renN•, ~aid the f"bargett arnNe from l'~BI atotivities ~ar lier in tbt' ~~NHl-e wht-:t the agtHH'Y "'a"' pursnlng radical fugitives. CUBA'S NEW SEXIAWS L Patrick Grav 111 Before Fidel Castro started to communize Cuba in 1959, Havana was well-recognized as a city of sin and sex. Castro put an end to most of that. He outlawed gam­bling, prostitution, public displays of homosexuality, and the cultivation and sale of drugs. Now that he has opened up Cuba to Americans and other tourists, and 'Cubans will come into increasing contact with foreigners, Castro has established a strict penal code designed to keep his people on the straight and narrow. Cuba's new penal code says the death sentence may be meted out to those guilty of having carnal Muriel's Bill Supported By Actor WASHINGTON (AP) - Actor Eddie Albert and Se.;. Muriel Hum­phrey, D-Minn., joined forces Thursday to boost a federal nutri­tional program for in­fants and ei<pectant mothers . . Mrs. Humphrey, the grandmother of 10, said she has introduced a bill to extend the Spe­cial Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children (WJC). WJC provides low-in­come pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children under age five with supplemental foods high in iron, pro­tein, calcium and vita­mins. The bill would au­thorize $650 million for the upcoming fiscal year, compared to $440 million this year. relations with a girl under 12; committing violent ped­erasty with anyone under 16; committing rape, pi­racy, genocide, terrorism, robbery, or hijacking. A man found guilty of se­ducing a single girl under age 18 can be sentenced to nine months in jail unless he marries the girl. Public displays of homosexuality are punishable by a $400 fine and nine months in jail. Possession of mari­juana can bring an eight­year jail sentence; so, too, can the conducting of any gambling enterprise for profit . Americans who remember pre-Castro Cuba should be advised that it ain't what it used to be. What it offers is sun, · sugar, and Comnunism in the Caribbean. Page 15 GAYLY YOURS ! MOTHER LAGUNA GREETINGS FROM THE SPARKING CITY by the bay "The Boys in the Band" promises to be a sell out. It is causing quite a stir amo­ng the conservative folowers of Anita, The JOLLY JACK has expanded their hours to take advantage of the free concerts being given across the street on Saturday afternoons . The crowds dont seem to be helping the boo~-store business a lot; guess we ' re just not far enough out of our closet to be seen going into a ' dirty bookstore' in broad day light by a crowd . The move of C. C.' s only show bar into the downtown area is certainly an irjp­rovem emt both in location and facility, It puts them within walking distance of the other bars , the best crusing in to\'In and soon will be handy for a 'hot bath '. Speaking of \7hich , everyone is a - tv1itter with the news that we'll soon have a Hea 1th Cl ub here . It isnt a day to soon to suit this correspondent. I f you have a news item , party invitation problem or j oy to share , send it to GAF, P. O. Box 614, C. G. 78404 _11111111111111111111111111111 1 111111111111111111111111 1 11111 fl : -: ~illitn: ~uller1,1, (IN HISTORIC LA VILLITA) PAINTINGS . .JEWELRY, SCULPTURE : POTTERY, GRAPHICS, CHINA PAINTING, GIFTS, E TC. Bua. PH. (512) 224 -099 1 1!5C4 V IL.LITA ST. SAN ANTONIO, TX 78208 -- .- r1,,,,,,,,, ,, , ,, , , , , , , , ,, , , , , , , ,, •• • • •• • • • • • ••• • •• • ••• • • •••• •i r;;NNt~~-----'""'1 I 1£1 ~arbin i ~ ~ i 4Uli IDilylnr i irnrpus 882-0916 ~ ~~~,~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~ TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE • P. 0. Box 2036 Universal City, Texas 78148 512/655-3724 Community News DUFFY ' s uA Y HOT 11\fS Austin t.51 ~) -t~7-6699 Dalla~ (21 ll ..,.rn-G79tl East Tc,,h 111·0 84J-19H9 Fort Worth tfi 17) 335-6301 l lousron (71.l) 228-1505 16th at old 83 McALLEN Find out how to stay married -: San Antonio l5 l 2) 733-7300 ADULT BOOK STORE 413 Peoples JOLLY JACK 411 Peoples PENNY'S EL GARDIN 406 Taylor ; •• 11 1 1 111111111111111111111111· Mc ALLEN DUFFY'S TAVERN 16Ih St. al Old 83 THE EVOLUTION N. 10Ih THE OUTPOST HiWay 107 SAN ANTONIO r--Ra~i~ '1 l e.tahons 1 (\\I ) I I\\!'!" 1 IXll l\f!\\J . JI.ill Kilt I J.1111 "'on i:i.;o Kn 1n. 11111 1\1.1) \ . . 1:, Ill h i l t-: '1"!11 1\ 1\\ x . i.xo " \ I \ f 1,:111 h0'0. . Sliil h I~\ . i.'10 hl ,, \ . 1:!·111 11 O II . "110 r.1'.l'~~.l'~.l'.l'.1'~ <I \I) 1\1.1\ . . . hZ· !<HI h.Bl t IH7 :1 HEY. SISTEH 1.;1~<; MINISTER OFFICE 732-1!84 h I .I·./. ~; :I "1 11. JU I :, hi ....... . 1,11\ h \I I \1 hf/\ I "''\I K 11 \I .. 110\1. ... ,. .., IL! .41 %.I 10111 •tu .:~ HI.I 117 RES 927 W WILDWOOD NIGHT 732·1619 Advertisi~g serves by informing. t:AL\iJ·Sl'ON B.\lllg K~in Tiki 120 1Jnl/TrL·nwnt St. 7h f-9tl3 I, C.i\LVl·STON LOl1N<,t S Fruil Jar 2.:!14 ~kd1:mk Slrl'\·t 76.~-fdl9 Kon Tiki 214 23rd lr\·111on1 Si. 76.'t-90.'I Mar}\,. II 2502 ·01.-! Slrl'l'l 763-93>~ Roijcrf, Laliltc 40Q Ro .... ·nhur!! 763-i)~C~J GALVESTO'I ORGANIZATION. ' Galvestatf Ga)- Sode~~ ~. 14:;~ 1 Page 16 Bob Hayes held in cocaine raid DALLAS (CPI\ - Former Dallas Cowhoys widP l'l"<'('i\.'cr Rr.b Ha \'l'S and another man were~ :tITC'Sf­Pd C"arly Thurscia.v and charged with rhe sale or cn<'aine. HayC"s. 35. and Bob Adler, 29. \Vel'c arr0sted at a ~or·th Dallas hom" hy sub11rban Addision policP nfficrrs and investigators of the Dallas County Specialized Ci-ime Division. A spokflsman said the arrests culminated a three-month invcst:gation by a Dallas undercover officer assigm'c.J to thC" Acidision Police Depart­mPnr Hay~s. vice president of Dycon International Inr .. was charged with 1hree coimts of the sale of c-oeaine and one count of possession of a ron­trollfld substance. Adler, a Dycon salesman. \\·as charged with one ~ount of the .sale of col."aine and one count of pos· se%inn Of rocainc. Bond \\."'ls set at $10,000 for eat"h man. H:1yC'S, who playC'd colh~giatc hall ;it Florida A&Vi. ii:; tht> Cowboys· all·tim~ lC'arler in sroring. Snake bite no .jo ke! P:iOENIX. Ariz. (AP) - A mailrnnn who w,1s bit:E n t·y a rattlt>!i1nake eoilPd in a U.S. niaiil.•ox in Apa<'he Junctioii sdys rhe apparetlt Apnr!, Ft'IOl rl\.V p:·;4nL '\"fl., nr• .~okr ··Ifs a d11mh -.;;tunt for anyone to ouli,"' Rohert Little of Globe said Wedne:.;d:ly. Littlp was bit~en on rhe h:11lfl Sat4 urday an,; !;p;•nt 1wo ctays in a F'ho0nix hr•s­pita 1 for obsC'n"ltion. '"HP wac:; in there wh~n l rPachNl in to get th~ mail.'" Little said. ··He bit me and I jerked my hand back and he was still hung up h:v onP rang." Little said he "stomped" the 5nake to death, placed i! in his r.11\l! truck and t!rove to Phoenix, whC"1 e postal officials took him to the hospital. There was no way ~he snake could have got- 1en into the: mail box hy itself, Little said, be­criusf' the mailbox 1s the "letter drop·· kind. ! AP laMrphoto Spouse sues Television comedian Chevy Chase has been sued for divorce by his ·wife, actrtss Jacque­line Carlin. Edith rri/kie dies Edllb Wlllkie, the 87-year--0ld 1<idow of 1940 Republican presidential candidate Wendell WUlkle, died Sunday in Indi­anapolis, Ind., at Methodist Hospital, a nurse said. Willkie was hospitalized after falling in her home here and hreaklng her hip on Easter. but Barb Borne-r, a nurse, declined to discusi:: the exact cause of the death. Wilkie's husband died in 1944. E. Jerome Molry, one of three generations of licensed plumbers, is leaving the pipe circuit to compete os o closskol pianist in the prestigious T choikovsky International Piano competition in Moscow. H~re Molry practices for the urcoming contest ot Son Francisco "s Old first Chvrch. Commanlty News SHE WANTS TO RETURN HOME Muriel Humphrey Declines Race ST. PAUL, Minn. (/IP) - Sen. Muriel Humphrey said Satur­day she will not run for the remaining four years or her late husband's Senate term. "I want to return home to Minnesota at 1 he end of the interim period in November and resume life as a private person, with ample time for my home, family and friends," Mrs. Hum­phrey said in a speech given at a fund-raising dinner for the Minneso­ta Democratic-Farmer­Labor Party. The decision ended weeks of speculation concerning Mrs. Humphrey's political plans and opened the door for a group of Democratic hopefuls who are seeking the Senate seat Mrs. Hum­phrey took after her husband, Hubert H. Humphrey, died earlier this year. Vice President Wal­ter F. Mondale, a politi­cal protege of Hum­phrey, was a surprise guest at the dinner. Mondale kissed Mrs. Humphrey on the cheek as a crowd or Demo­c r a tic supporters roared approval. Mrs. Humphrey said that although she is quitting p ublic office, she will not be leaving public life. She said she will continue to work -NEWS-Saturday, April 15, 1978 White said wrong1• n force use The Republican candidate for district attomey ~·nday demanded District llttorney Bill White quit using his investigators as his "private police force." Marc Davidson. who is unopposed for the GOP nomination. said the use of taxpayers' money to protect White's campaign signs is illegal and an abuse of authority. White. he said. was clearly wrong in telling investigators they had the authority to shoot P".ople tnmpcring with his signs. The law. he explained, provides for the use of deadly force only where the investigator is threatened with death or serious bod­ily injury. Davidson called on White to correct his statements before the the climate he created results in tragedy. Wlute's misuse or his investigators and provocative 'tatements about shooting people caught tampering w1lh signs show bad judgment and a misunderstand­mg of the law. Davidson said. E,·cn if the investigators arc working on their own t 11nc. Davidson said. they·rc still using county eqwp­ment for White's polilical purposes. for the party and to speak out on issues that concern her. Mrs. Humphrey also mentioned her desire to work for the expansion of the Hubert H. Hum­phrey Institute of Pub­lic Affairs. A $20 mil­lion fund-raising effort is under way to build the institute at the Uni­versity of Minnesota. Mrs. Humphrey was appointed to the Senate Jan. 25 by Minnesota Gov. Rudy Perpich, 12 days after Humphrey died of cancer. Under state law, the appointment lasts until a winner is picked in a November election for t he remainder of the term. Perpich, in announc­ing the appointment last January, said that he received no commit­ment from Mrs. Hum­phrey as to whether she would run and that she was free to make her own decision. "That's a long time away. I have no idea," said Mrs. Humphrey when asked then If she would would run this fall. Her husband had served 23 years in the Senate, had been vice president and was the Democratic nominee for president in 1968. Rep. Donald Fraser, D-Minn., has been cam­paigning hard for the Humphrey Senate seat. Clayton Moore, the masked lone Konger who fovght for law and order in the television series, is suing Wrather Corp. for $30 million, charging non-payment of earnings. STYLE STUDIO EXPERT HAIRSTYLING STYLE CUTS PERM'S COLOR MEMBERS ONLY Page 18 Commonl~ News !••••······ ·················· .. ,·~ Innocent plea filed LOS ANGELES (UPIJ - Ned York, the actor who was freed after being arrested as a suspeu in the ··Hillside Strangler .. case. ple£tded inno<'cnt Wednesday to a chan~P pf marijuana possel-'sion. : s1sLe veRse J ••The'\. ~1·rt• 1't"lll <rn their \U\Y h,\ 1h1· f'u.ngrt•:.:;atiou. and tra\' t>li•d through J'hot•11i1·i.a :.nd Samari:1 ' \f '' I :1::~ : -: 1-1111111111111111111t1111111111111111111111111111111111 ti B1·olin in film LOS ANGELES (AP) - James Brolin wilt star in "Night of the Juggler." Man falls 23 stories VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) - A 24-year-old man was in stable condition today after falling 23 stories from an apartment win­dow ledge into a swimming pool, po­lice said. Police said Patrick Kouchnire was on the ledge either trying to scare or impress his girlfriend Wednesday night when he slipped and fell 208 feet into about 3 feet of water at the pool's shallow end. Po­lice said his girlfriend. who was not identi!ied, was trying to get him off the ledge when KouchiWre fell. APUMrphoto "He must have kicked against the building when he fell," a police spokesman said. "He landed in the pool, which is eight feet from the building." Debts owed .. ~ Former Georgia Gov. Singer guilty Hospital officials said Kouchnire suffered internal injuries but no broken bones. Lester Maddo¥ owes about $Ut,Ht In cam· paign debts. Friends are trying to help him raise the money. Singer Jerry Lee 1..-e\\ois has been convict­ed In Memphis of driv­ing while under the ln­fluenee of drugs. Carter's 'No' Really Means 'Don't Know' WASHINGTON (A?) - "Do you definitely plan to run for re-election?" President Carter was asked Tuesday "The answer is no," ~.aid Carter "I don't definitely plan to run for re-election. I've not addressed that question at all." White House press secretary Jody Powell, asked later whether the p.resident was se­rious about his 1980 plans, replied "! don't know,·· then went to question Carter. "Hc just said he had not made up his mind," PowelJ reported subsequently "He just has not thought about it." Charo given Cugat divorce LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) - Latin entertainer Charo was granted a divor· ce Friday from bandleader Xavier Cugat in a brief closed-door session in District Court here. Charo, who cited incompatibility in riling for the divorce. married Cugat in Las Vegas on Aug. 7, 1966. Terms of a property settlement were not disclosed. Charo appears at the Sahara Hotel on the Las Vegas Strtp - ,.p Lanrphoto Texas Rangers' broadcaster Dick Risenhoover. 51, died of cancer Satur­day morning iust eight hours before the club's opening game against the Yankees. He was admitted to hospital in mid-March. ~r~~~~~ ..................... ~ . ~ ==~s Communoty News-Aust;n-Son Anton;o ;, pubnshed ev.,y othe' Ss Thursday. Deadline for copy and odds in Monday prior to Thursday =: s publication. Moil oll ~~rrespondence to P .0. Box 182 Son Antonio ~ Tex. 78291- Advertising rates ore $3.00 per column inch, all odds ~ :.. must be prepaid. Photo's with odds, on odditionol $2.50 each. We welcome copy but reserve the right to edit oll material submitted s - due to space or content. Opinions expressed in articles submitted to : ~ and published by Goy Community News Qie not necessarily the ~ : ~ opinions of the Editors or stoH, ~ ~~...,...... ........., .....,.....,.....,.....,.....,.......,........,.....,,.......,.....,,....,,....,..._A : •**********-+ : ... * : • Person-: : ... * : : to- * : ... * - ! Person ; - P"5onals Personak, : : •~Personal Ads" wJth tele_phqne ttnmbers and/ or addresses : : may be purchased at 10 cents per word, $2.00 minimum., : :coRPUS CHRISTI area- W/M to meet young :hung MUSCULAR guy's for fun or whatever :comes up. Phone-Photo if possible. §Tom Box 456 Sinton Tx. 78387 : BLACK MALJ;; 60 :Frenchies- F/M : Age , Race, HO barri : er- Virite Box 25111 : s .l .. 78?.0G : : : : : : : : ~~~fi~e 5i:i~~r,e;Pt!!~~,:~~~S:si~:,~~~s~ : Frank •• B~'< 7312. Waco, TX 76710 : - B/M, 34 rim- queen - di-gs blond MALES & : red-heads. Call : James 512-11.42- 0291+ MICHAEL W-EN DEAR Since you ~oved frm Mauerman Rd. I think of you-stop-Sorry for not being sinc­ere- stop-lets have fun, love B.A. Contact me thru S.T.C.N. Attractive W /M 37 med built, well endowed, sincere, would like to meet Anglo 30 to 47 who is also sincere. Picture Pref. Write: A.M. Box 1145 S.A. Tex. 78294 .w1m-s·11", us. dk hair, bl eve~. 20 vrs- 1c..~i~9lor s.incere young W/ m's, masc, gcllkg, for friendship and fun. Photo appr Carl, Box SSSI N T .• Denton. TX 76203. : ,,.iill also french F/ll - I live in Austin - tq, THIS - ., FORM TO PLACE YOUR AD Tl'rt,E! - ,___ - -- - My ao is ____ • words, at 10 cents per word, for a cost of$ ___ to appear in one Issue 1 I understand there ~ a 10% discount for four issues. I would like my ad to appear in 4 __ (check here) issues. Enclosed is$ ___ in check or money order to cover the cost. (This inform1tion is for our files and will not be printed.) NAME ADDRESS CITY STATE ZIP 't certify by my signature that I .am ower 18 HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD: Simply write your ad as you woμld like to hawe it IJ)pUI'. Print durt'{ and legibly. Count the number ot ~ds in your ad and mul~itJIY by 10 cents per word. Moil all correspondence lo P.O. Sox 182 Son Antonio Tx. 78291 fl Page 19 South Texas Communit\- "'""s P. 0. Bo, 182 . San Antonio, TX 78291 MISCELLANEOUS ;: 1erJ_,.~r ce .. l , for 2'J.":::.n:·, :;iai'"l t:i.n ·; ~!Joto . otc . nude of. fr.H-ihJ.o!l . a::;\c I P RECIOUS, - LOUNGE •Jr 'JA!...ITOS SAN Atr ON•O, TEXAS i·Jh., j,j"l'l'" ·d .\~,,,/"' 7own .. j :01~ "-:!1arlcs . I OP~N IJAJL y 2PM 2AM 7 jl~- 2\}0lr T; - 701) ') I rRI & <;AT rJl 4AM 0 f· OWNtRS ' rl.B.SANCHEZ E.E.fSPARZA L;;;;;;o;;;;;o;;;;;o;~'.•'•'~-0-·."._ ......... GAY SWITCHBOARD Community News Wanted ~·J AHJ.1 ti~ T) : young man/boy for nart time yard & odd jobs. Student O. K. cood pay, on bus , S.A. c. area Box 1021 S. A. 732% STYLIST : l/follm·1inG, nice shop , i-iedina Rd. area. 225- 8807 Gene Evans M.CC san anfonio 226·2303 METROPOLITAN CONMUNITY CHURCH of san antonio Services every Sunday, 2 :30 P.K. Join us. For mor e information please call our answerine; service and some one will get back to you shortly. Have you e'.(er wished you could help other gay people with their problems in trying to survive and suceed in a hostile society? GAY SWITCH BOARD offers an opportunity to those people who care enough to devote a few hours a week of their time. Your help can make a difference in the Jives of others. Mature and responsibile men and women who want to obtain additional information are invited to call MCC: AUSTIN -~I r" '.l, . ''TT; :~: 0urH\:ly 12 1·Toon - 7: ~.o .-.• '· '"'c: r;LJl'.JC 1 - ) f • i'~ , ·.''Ce ~<.r1a VS 7~2-4;~1 7~5-05~3 Only those 18 years of age or older are eligible. Even if you do not feel you are suited for this type of service, you may know a friend who woucr be. You would be doin9 ~ favor to all concerned by helping to direct competant wome.a. and men to this opportunit y. ; .ale , f'rofcss.i.onal ui..0t , H/3r~ ~;o /"ITrG~ ?. Yl/:-.. , ? hta . , 11, 'OJ;q._:"o. lltil . TAc1 U<'e,1 . ·'ef. ?'"'>( _t 7: 1 For a number of years now my wife and I have lived in Southern California, the land of white sand beaches and sun­kissed navels. We went to a Hollywood wedding the other day and the bride wore a veil so long it almost covered her slacks. And, you should see Beverly Hills on trash pickup day. It looks like a side­walk sale at Tiffany's. Prosecutions rose 27 percent in 1977, 1• nvest1• gators say WASHINGTON (UPI) - Cheating Uncle Sam is getting more popular, and the man who is supposed to stop it says the problem is that "n<>­body complains" when the govern­ment is ripped off. Justice Department investigators say federal fraud prosecutions in 1977 increased Tl percent over 1976, compared to a 1.6 percent increase in criminal cases generally. The fig­ures do not show how much of the increased fraud was against the government, but the investigators are sure it is on the rise. The General Accounting Office is preparing a report for next May that will show eight federal pr<r grams totaling $?.SO billion a year are losing 1 percent to 10 percent in ripoffs. Assistant GAO Director John Ols said no one knows the exact per­centage, but if 10 percent is cor­rect, that means the cost to taxpay. ers is $25 billion a year. "WE ARE TRYING get a handle on the whole thing," said Mark Richard, chief of the Justice De­partment fraud section. "The big­gest problem is that when the con· sumer is victimized, he complains. When the government is victimized, nobody complains." The department is pushing agen· cies that administer big programs to check more closely, he said. The fraud section, set up in 1955, for a dozen years had only six or seven lawyers. It now has 4-0. They are hunting for the big frauds in federal housing, Veterans Adminis­tration housing and schools, Medi· caid and job training and kickbacks in General Services Administration and Federal Highway Administra­tion construction. New types of frauds crop up all the time. Federal disaster relief has produced so many that the Justice Department is considering setting up a strike force to keep track of them. MOST CULPRITS are outsiders who get no inside help, he said. In five years there were 841 convic­tions in the FHA home mortgage program, only 110 of them govern­ment officials. Big operators falsify credit re­ports and certifications that homes are up to standard. The little guys, borne buyers, are victims along with the government. They make ideal witnesses at trial time. "I think: with computers we can reduce the ease with which people are able to commit fraud against the government," Richard said. "We are going to spot the simple crimes with computers but we are not going to catch the truly sophisti· cated operator by merely relying on computer technology." THOMAS HENDERSON, chief of the public integrity section, said official corruption may be increasing. With the help of the State Depart· ment, Henderson is going after offi­cials who commit frauds on foreign soil. "Even though it costs a lot of money, the importance is deter­rence," he said. Page 20 Community News Music Hall, Rockettes • . . given one-year reprieve NE\\' YORK (AP) - It was just after midnight 36 Rockettes had turned in their sequined ~Jippers and were preparing to move from chorus line lo unemployment line. But there were no pumpkins. "We·re in business." announced ballet captain Rosemary Novellino. "Radio City Music Hall has been saved."' - cashiers, ushers. projectionists. 1hey all pulled together.·· The trrms of the agreement provide for Rocke­fe> ller Center to manage the facility during the next year. The state has allocated $500,000 to help cover operating costs during the interim period, and another $2 miJlion in standby money. AP LIHrphoto In eleventh-hour bargaining between Rockefel­l<:> r Center Inc .. owners of the 6.000-seat show­place, and the state's Urban Development Corp., New York state agreed to foot the bill for one year of operation. The art deco palace, which had been scheduled to close after its final Easter show Wednesday night, has lost millions of dollars in recent years because of declining attendance. Rockefeller Cen­ter predicted the theater will be $3.5 million in the red this year. The state put up an additional $200.000 10 fund a non-profit UDC subsidiary, to be headed by Lt. Gov. Mary Anne Krupsak. \\lhich will study ways to provide revenue for the music ha11. One propos­aJ cal1s for a 20-story office towel' to be built over the six-story theater. The interior of the music hall includes the wortd·s largest stage. Radio City Music llall Rockctte Phyllis Wujko yeUs with delight after announcement tha.t a way had been found to keep Radio City Music Hall open. Under the agreement, Radio City Music Hall will be open today. The Easter show, featuring the high-kicking Rockettes, and the film ··crossed Swords,·· will run until a new stage show is read­ied. l{aren Quinlan alive ··It's a relief of tension,·· said Kita BourofC, a music hall singer for six years. She stood quietly weeping after the agreement was announced at a party held for the Rockettes one floor below the famed Rainbow Room in the adjacent RCA Build­ing. after 3 years i• n co1na l\fo,·ie rights bought ··we·ve been since January fighting against all odds. We stood out in the cold getting signatures on petitions. Everybody did everything together NEW YORK (AP) - CBS has paid S35 million for the rights to show the Ch·il War saga '"Gone With the Wind .. 20 times in the next 20 years, the largest fee ever paid for the television rij{hts to a movie. 'Bedpan watch' fails Larceny charged A,. LaMrphoto CHESAPEAKE. Va. (AP) - A Portsmouth man who has been unable to cough up or otherwise produce a stolen diamond ring he swallowed last week has been charged with grand larceny. A detective who had assumed that a ··bedpan watch'" would pro­duce the ring in a few days grew weary or waiting for the evjdence and served the warrant Wednes­day on David Abbott, 24. The ring was taken from a Churchland area apartment ear- Mom credited Unemployment statistics Lena Horne says It's "a matter of geneology," that al age 68 she bas been named one of America's 11 most beautiful women. "My mother was a great beauty." Latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Slalislics show that among the to largest slates in Jl<lpulalton Texas has lhe small­est percentage of unemployment. 4.7 per­cent of the total work force in March. New York had the highest unemployment rate. 8.3 percent. 'Golden Years' Grate on Bette HOLLYWOOD (AP) - "Nuts to growing old," says actress Bette Davis, who turned 70 on Wednesday. '"Don't you ever believe that life begins at 40 or that it"s wonderful to be 70. I'd give anything to be 30 again. Every so often somebody asks me if rve had my face lifted. I always tell them, 'Would I look like this II I did?'" Mis~ Davis, who has spent 47 years in films, appN•red In three films during the past year: Disney's "Return From Witch Mountain," tho tele­vision (ilm '·Harvest Home .. and thP all-st:tr Aga­tha Christie mystery "Death on the Nile," her 85th movie. ly last week. Detective Jim Widdifield said that when he approach~d Ahbott to question him last Wednesday, Abbott swallowed the $1,500 ring. X-rays taken at Chesapeake General Ho5pita1 disclosed the ring had lodged in Abbott's intes­tinal tract, Widdifield said. Ab· bott has agreed to have addi· tional X-rays made of his abdo­men, and even undergo surgery, if necessary, to remov<' the ring, Widdifield said. KAHEN ANN QUI'.'L.\:" ... still lhing ERA proponents zero in on Illinois SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) - Time is running out on the Equal Rights Amendment. With less than a year until the March 22, 1979, deadline for ratification, its supporters have zeroed in on Illinois with money, lobbyists and volunteers to try tc win over the only major North~rn holdout state - heeding signs that the proposed constitutional amend­ment to ban sex discrimination is foundering. Roh Reiner free of family LOS ANGELES (AP) - Rob Reiner. who recently left "All in the Family," stars in "Free Country," a comedy series for ABC. Remer will play a dual role, as a young 1mm1grant at the turn of the century and as the immigrant in bis 80s. As the elderly immigrant he sets the stage and concludes each episode. Mayor cancels TV appearance About hl"r everpresent cigarettes: "The only thing I worry about is dying without a cigarette in my mouth. People have suggested that I gh·e up smoking-, to which I answer, 'Whatever for~"'' Bette Davis, shown in a 1977 photo, celebrated her 70th birthday Wednesday. 'It's just another birthday. A btg one, I'll admit, but I don't believe tn birthdays,' she said. CLEVELAND, Ohio CAP) - Mayor Denms J Kucinich canceled a televised state-0f-the-city address scheduled for 'ntursday, saying he did not want to appear to be trying lo influence a recall petition drive against bun The recall drive was set off by his dismisal of Police Chief Ridlard D. Hongisto and subsequent allegations of abuse of power. The mayor has apparently gotten inw fudtur !rouble by calling the 33 City Council members "a bunch of buffoons." I ?ollov.· .'.llon~;, reRriond, ""!IS Ls all I ask of .you. 'f1his -:ts n peoples colutiJn. "110 i.n ;:Jan Antonio Covernrnen t c.i rcles is doin~ their job, as it is 3U~~S8 to he done ? 1'!' ·;.ss arc l;he people who <'eRerve YOU'? support at_ elec t"L?n t~m;,- .. Jf; '; ''.'.DC . i.mpo;- rtar1·1, ~~o t 1 ·~ ·1 !"~on_· 0 '1 ·1. • • _; l_.'.l LJ rJr~ tn0 u~o~-1~ ~u·1~·in·orfi~~ ·~l·~, ,r,~ ~ro~ <loin~ ·,;ihat, YOH he Lt~x-pay~; ~a;s f~r. • 0 If you. have problems with Gity, Gounty or State Government afiencies, lt could be there are others of u~ who share the same problel11s. Think about it, a t·'.ASS of voice s raise~ in protest is much more effect­ive than crying in one's beer or compla­ining to ones neighbor or friend. :mITl': Lorlay, virite your protest , let your voice be heard, let your wants be known. S!'!ERL0Cli: P.O. 'lox 182 7~~9 rntonio Tx Don't settle for anything less~~~~~~~~---. Continental BATH 6836 SAN PEDRO I SAN ANTONIO Open 24 Hours - Parking in Rear exercise room whirlpool playroom TV lounge fillllER/11 NEWS rest area sauna 6724 SAN PEDRO/ Open 10am-4am SAN ANTONIO'S HOTTEST BOOKSTORE leather goods magazines rubber goods books peeps (also visit Galleria News at 513 E. Houston and our Head Shop at 6726 San Pedro) How Texans voted Posl Washington Bureau WASHINGTON - Here is how Texans in Congress voted last week on selected major issues: SENATE 1) To approve a multi-billion dollar emergency !arm ftd bill (raising 1978 grain and cotton price supports clnd providing incentives to reduce planting) which the Carter administraticm opposed as inflationary. Ap-­proved 4~. 2) To table and thus kill an amendment to the second Panama Canal treaty that would have deleted the provision committing t.ie Ur.itecl States to build any fu. ture Central American canal through Panama. Tabled 494a. Tower R·Wlchlta ~all~ 8enben. O·Hou11<m HOUSE I) To approve a three.year extension of Small Busi­ness Administrntion loan programs, totaling $2.65 bil­lion in !isc«l years t9SO, 1981 and 1982. Approved 311). 72. 2) To pass a !llnlti·billion dollar emergency farm aid bill (raising 1978 ~ain and cotton price support• and providir1g incentives t() reduce p!anting) which the Cart­er administration opp.1Sed as inllationary. Rejected 268- 150. 3) To permit House and Senate negotiators on Presi­dent Carter's energy program to continu~ meeting be­hind closed doors undrr administration auspices instead or holdi•ig all sessions in public. The vote was a parlia· mentary maneuver to force the negotiators into the open. Defeated 371-6. 4) To authorize President Carter to nearly double the si7.e of his top personal staff from 55 to 100 at pay levels of $42,500 a year or more. The measure would also per­mit the hiring of an unlimited number of aides below that pay level, an unlimited number of consultants and an unlimited staff for the wives of the president and vice president. Passed ~134. I . Arch"r ~ ~OUilOll Bro1.•., :..-eec1umon1 y N ~ y Bur!c~on, t'-An,ori y Cottlns, R·Oa1111s N N N Ce L~ Gario D·Mluton y y E'tkh<trdt, C+louston A N y Gammagt, 0-Houston A A x Gon1ale1, 0.SIHl A11tonio y N y Hall, O·Marsh•ll y H N Hightower, 0-Vernon y N N Jer<lan, 0-~ou~lon y N y K.uen, O.L1m:clo . N y ICr.,egu, D·NP.w &r11unle1, . Mahon, 0-Lt.bb(,.;:.. v A 0 N y Mt.1ftC.(,[)..0111liu. N N y M1lfo:d, 0-Grand Prairie y N y Pickle, O·Aus11n y N y Poa~,0-Waco y y y y A:oOfl'ls,, O·McK;nney A y . Tu9ut, D-Coll~e Station H Wtiire, O·EI Pu'I A 0 A A y y H y Wflson,D-L111Ju" y N y Wrl!lftl. O·i;url Worth y N y Vcning, D·C0<pus Christi y N ' Page 22 Community News GAY SWITCHBOARD zoo 3240 N.W. Loop 410 MARY ELLEN 815 Fredericksburg SPANISH HARLEM 349 W. Josephine South Texas Communil) 'le"'s P. 0 . Box 182 San Antonio, TX 78291 FRIENDLY 622 Roosevelt New York Pub 147 E. Travis 733 ' 300 341-4302 732-7964 734.9443 San Antonio CONTINENTAL BATH 6836 San Pedro ATLANTIS 321 Navarro PRECIOUS 1107 Nogalitas SILHOUETTE 2522 Culebra SUNSET BOULEV AlW 1430 N. Main IMPALA 900 S. St. Mary's 826-9181 ".25·9468 223- 0lt13 432-9336 223-3566 CREW 223-0333 309 W. Market EL JARDIN 223-7177 106 Navarro COUNTRY 222-8273 1122 N. St. Mary's PARIS NEWS 225-9339 1929 N. New Braunfels GALLERIA 826-9057 6724 San Pedro ARMY·NAVYNEWS 674-9101 4958 S.W. Military Drive INTERNATIONAL NE'VE Bexar County 622_9227 Free Clinic 1142 W. Woodlawn Texas Gay Task Force P.O. Box 2036 Universal City, Tx 78148 The Strange Ways Of Our World The creo.t ".'.IHA'r , v;ee chi ld , cant you see an ASS \'/hen you run in to one , ·" i th YCI.;;? past track record it :::lioul<i he a cinch. I<r . " . n. c. from r.. . ::; . rr . You ' re a r::r~.'\L s. c . :' Concratulations or condolences to Jac~1e in c.c. ~iICH ever fits . To C. F . of .<> . B:. ''\ant n S~f.~C~ 1 ,. stah n.t it hone·.r? , !e:..-~t tir.e you'l.l loo~>-: ~··e;. .. Li_,_ : 1 ~8.Pl · .., <! , •••• , •••••• • • , r~o1: 1·L'1 "Gt '::;o.rl 0 J ,J·_L1 su:l.t , -;in.}~. !_· ... ,vc tlonatjons •••••• • •••••••••••••••••• '"iO;,,- · .. c l-no" l O'" ·:ou~ ·ot lds foot sto r- 1:d on , 1 ·, .;ent. Lo cl";i C:'lE':J too , CouJclnt ·;et FT the r.am pluce the or)1c1' Just goes to shov1 you 1·1hat neut Jo0:·;i1• l:>.'.1l'le?"l C:!"· ;, • '" ~ann ~elcome ~G~~ y ' ur hanc out ' a Lherc~ .. ill • o ••••••• :nJo said Oscar '.'D.fi l1 li' i1 our !l, t' r: ... T .r , ji;r;t ,:; ~ ·' .J do you think ~u idy 'oes hir; i1i1-:i11<r- , at mar·y 0llE-~:--1 Jounr·e , where else ? •··~~!!'!!•~1!1!1•••••••••1111!1•••••••••••••••• (s)o!Jm}~ et :iboornd y·':.so r(~' oannnao uet cbt 0rxo]i>n!';O ll"e !i1r1n ontis1 ca n:.; s. - (LOV,<;1) the fJo\'.'.lrs , than>;s rn1c'1) JOnt '.:orry alloutit. : r r;. r.h: i:hey ' Jl lrno.: JF tt b8lon•:s to to !::eep thej_r 1ion ~s rJ ~ r- , r_i, ~!1 I L:'. i ,. ' i· otl•0r ' r·r· ; .. ,. •J '~.::i•' ,e , J'" r "" "i _nt ,,j] : of ·~p,\'f' li l:tle n;inuvor , I irJJov; a couple of hot little oueens who B~ST be lenvin~ toNn . Of co~rse this v1ee~ t~10 1.on:{ 2+n1··~ up on ;, . ~ . f~ee11<-~. to 1 t .• , i.1.::_ ..... , .:;~ft colJ.c1c L:i..oP ~'1.1 :.I' c-: t1 l o" PL. ·?·r ' , _:;0: .. h , ·~·, runl1ctJ1 ovr.~r ··1·rs ,St11"1· ·?.'J •• Speo.~'--.i~1l of coll c t t:i.onr· , 11, ~rp pvrcly r·an1-c a,-,uturc n'oJr~ - .Jj_r:·:·C!t" or· '.'.tha_t e';or you Ytant to be calle;'.; "lterry cars , (1·;01· that 1 s the Ol:LY thine every boc:y i'l Lo':! hasnt had ) got busted for , c;et this , shop lift:Lnr; a C3.n of Vienna Sausa~;e . J\l\'/etys d i .~ thin!, she shoul" st ici~ l o lh 1 f i ve finser routine , no shots requirerl . SP~akin e of S~OTS , (well there ~ent all my readers) See you in t'·;o , .. eeks , liv :;o ' ,..,....,--:II 1:~i~-:~T tiv:e . ,'fj th Gyl)~:.y in to»'Jn over the -+c==~ ~-7""',.-::Jir'-1~6_T:C. wee.k encl , ·:1e ' ll neecl it . i'lelcome Love ••• I I Community News ~,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,""'""'""'""'""',1",I"~ 40 h 1 ~ ours 1 the FRIENDLY S td 1 d" Hank Williants I ~OU a e . '' h 0 m e s~ Th De EhTeRadO IoTf a( UgrPoIu) p -of ~ ~ union officials says the movie in works ~ 0 f t h e ~ 40-hour workweek is ~ ~ out of date and that NASHVILLE, Tenn. ~ shortening the (UP I) Warner S workweek to create Bros.Inc. Is planning a .,-: jobs would not feed movie based on the life ~ ~ inflation. of famed country music ~ ~ The group, the All singer Hank Williams ~~ R 0 u g h R ·, d e r s ~ ~~~~~Sn t~~~:~~t~ee~. SrT~~lll~fdr:::· ~~l~~~~. -{, ~/. ~ • \ ~ today hosted a meeting once called the "hlllbll· ~ in suburban Dearbocn ly Shakespeare" of S so officials from 15 country music, was the unions across the na- author of many classic ~ tion could map strate- country tunes including 1 ~ gy for the drive. "Lovesick Blues," ~ 1 ,V ~ The goal of the drive, "Jambalaya" and ~ r'"l 1"' ~ which began when the "Your Chea tin' Heart." ~ committee was formed He died of heart fail- ~ ~ las.t fall in Detroit, is to ure at the age of 29 In L ~ cut unemployment, thebackseatofawhitl' ,1,4. said Frank Runnels, Cadilhc conv~riible Hunk Williams Sr. with it. "(He was) the kind of hick that comes from so far back In the coun­try tbat you're like a damn whipped dog peo­ple kick around In this business," said William's friend, Vic McAipln, a Nashville songwrl ter. Hank Williams Jr., also a singer, said the movie will be nothing like "Your Cheatln' Heart," a 1964 film starring George Hamil· ton and Susan Oliver. ~ committee c hairman Jan. 1, 1953. Heavy ~ and president of UAW drinking com bined ~ ' b k ~ Local 22. with drugs apparently him seven standing ~ B U D DY 5 a c ~ injected for back pain ovations the first night ~ were reported to be a he performed. S ~ <:ontra('( signed contributing factor in The skinny, s im,pfe "This one wlll make that other thing look like a cartoon," Wil­liams said. He said he believes the movie will go into production this summer and said the script was being writ­ten by Paul Shrader, author of the screen· 5 3 3 5 0 4 9 ~ play for "Taxi Driver." LOS ANGELES his death. songwriter wau ~ - (AP)-Ron Howard of Because of his drink- overwhelm~d by his as- ~ S ~-i~::ctI co~:;;,~~· toh:e~ ~'::~n:~n::o%" ~h:d s~:: :~~n~~~e;u~~=~s c:::,~ S S o p e n · 3 P. M • SS ~~~0 f~~0~~c~~ w~::.c~~~ ~h~~: ~~:n:r~~~ 0:::~ -------- - - first a movie called ---------- ~ ~ "Cotton Candy." "':#',,,,,,,,,,, ,,1",l",,,,,,,,,""'"""'"'"',I""'~ Ford hikes price on 3 autos Ex-First Lady In Drug Center 'MED/CATION PROBLEM' BATTLED DETROIT (Al') Ford Motor Co. announc­ed Monday a 1.9 percent price boost on the Ford Pinto and Mustang !I and Mercury Bobcat cars. The price increase, averaging $94 per model, is the second on Ford's small cars in three months and follows the lead of Japanese and Ger· man a utomakers. The new prices take effect immediately. The action puts the slicker price of the bot· tom-line Pinto Pony above $3,000 for the first Star selected LOS ANGELES Ford Enters Drug Center (AP)-Kr isty McNlchol will star In NBC's "The Summer of My German Soldier," In which s he plays a n Ame r ican J ewish girl who hides an escaped Germ a n prisoner of war. l.01\G SEACH, Calif. (AP) - fo'ormer first la~y Betty Ford was ad· mi:tcd to Lhe alcohol an<l drug rehabilitation ccnt<'r of LC"ng Beach Naval Hospital Monday for treatment of what officials described as a "problem with medica­tion.'" sidious t hing and I mean to rid myselr of its damaging effects ... licer of the hospital. He denied that ~.!rs. Ford, 60. was in any .,.,·ay ad­dicted to drugs. ~[· ' Mrs. Ford, who has suffered for several years from arthritis, said in a prepared statement, ··rt's an in- "She has developed a dependence she is trying to overcome," said Dr. James Zimble, acting commanding of· Zimble refused to say what medication was involved or how long Mrs. Ford would be hos­p italized. "It's very premature · to discuss a nything but her state­ment," said Zimble, adding tha t her "condi­t ion is fine." Fore Hike OK'd WASHINGTON (AP) - The Civil Aerona u- 1 ics Board authorized U.S. domestic sched­uled airlines Thursday to increase their basic rares 3 percent effec­t ive May l. Nixon signs autographs Richard Nlnn, on his first visit to __ New York since his re-election campaign of 1972, signed autographs a nd chatted !I.· amiably with reporters as he left his hotel Sunday. He told the reporters they should get double-time pay for working - - on Sundays. He also said the New York Mets are the No. 1 baseball team in his book. The former president, wife Pal, daughter Tricia, and son-in-law, Edward Cox, left in a motorcade escorted by Se­cret Service agents. Reporters followed the entourage to East River Drive but were blocked by the last auto in the J--.-motorcade. Econmny 'hemorrhage' seen ----:-w ASHINGTON (UPI) - The nation ( faces an economic " hemorrhage" in 1980 - a still recession and a 10 percent or more inllation rate - unless President Carter reduces federal spending, former White House economic adviser Alan Greenspan said Sunday. Carter is expect­ed to announce an anti-inflation plan in a speech Tuesday to the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Aides have said • strategy does not include new pro­ms -Out stresses voluntary restraint. ut unless his program successfully federal spending, "We may well a real recession in 1980 a nd 1981 " · d Greenspan, chief economic ad~ rmer President Gerald Ford. Kirby p9sts bond Out of. sight After six weeks in jail in Las Vegas on a drug dealing conviction, comedian GC<lrge Kirby posted $50,000 bond and was released pending appeal. Kirby, 52, had been behind bars since he was sen­tenced Feb. 28 to 10 years in prison.alter he was convicted of selling $26,000 worth of high-grade heroin to an undercover agent. Kirby surrendered his passport and agreed to report to the U.S. Mar­shal's office once a week. U.S. District Judge Reger Foley reduced the bail from $100.000 earlier this month after Kirby's attorney, Roberl Keld, died of a heart at­tack following the trial. There are some people who just hate to say " no" to any question. and they will give a ny sort of far-fetched an· swer to avoid the word. It may have been one of these who called a local eye doctor's office the other day to make an appointment for his wife. ··Has Dr. X ever seen your wife before?" the doctor's nurse inquired. ··Uh-well, only at a distance," the man told her. Billy Carter in hospital PLA11\S. Ga. (Al') - B1llv Cartrr was admitted lo · Amrncus-Suml<'r County ilosp1tal on Mon· day. thl' hospilal admln· l i~trator. said. hut !us doc· tor r<'fusC'cl to say what was wrong\\ 1th h11n. Adm1111strator .11111 Gnmth conftnnrd that Cartl'r. the president's brother. was admitted to the hospital Sunday night. Or Paul Broun reruM'd to (·ommrnt on Carter's c:omhtion. saying a state· mrnt would be released Tu(•sday. Medicaid Pays Sex Changes TRENTON. N.J. (AP) - The New Jersey Medicaid program has paid for sex change op­erations or two men \1,•ho met requirements that arc ··fair. er1uita­ble and that protect the public dollar," says the dit·ector of the pro­gram. Dr. J.C. Elreme. medi· eal director. said the rost of 1 he two opera~ tions ""'" ~7.000. time- at $3.049. Ford said the Pony remains the cheapest car In the country. Piiot shoots crazed horse SYDNEY, Australia (AP) - An air1ine pilot shot a crazed race horse which seriously Injured itself while being flown frow New Zealand to Austra lia. Ansett Airlines said Princess Amura, a 4-year­old filly, was one of I5 horses aboard the plane. Places To go FIESTA DINNER PLAYHOUSE Dinner & a Broadway Show! RESERVATIO NS: 494-7793 Ce<!~,. ,..~ . .J CommanltJ New• Congressman Says He's 'Sorry' For Soliciting Sex From 2 Men \\".\SllI"~CT<•:\ li\P) - H1·r. ht•il. • u k Hi,·h­m1\ nd. !>-'\: Y,, l'l1nr1·ss1•1l 1'1 t11s ,nm.'i'ia'nts hut p!t'.l1h•d rnnon•nt in tl11 row·1rl>rm TJ.iursdav tn h:1\·ing: solic :t('d s<•x f•·om tv.o ~;oung mPn al his < apilal homP ,\rh'r st>ndin.c: Hrooklvn \'Otl'rs a lf'ttC'r in \\hi<'h ·J pra~·C'rfully a!'k for y;1t:r c·ompassion anrl 11nder­standin1:(" or his homO'it''.\.IJ,11 O\T•rturrs. Hirhmond stood m111C' as
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