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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
File 009
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 009. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 009. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2392

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 009, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2392.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 The Star / Dec. 9, 1983 Are Gay People Chewing Up Their Leaders? A Disturbed Peace a By Brian McNaught There are too damn few gay men and women who have put themselves on the line for us to allow one ofthe better ones to leave the scene without an overdue "thank you." Steve Endean, the executive director of the Gay Rights National Lobby, has announced that he will leave the Lobby within the next few months. He does so with some bitterness, to which he is entitled. He also does so with some peace, for which I am pleased. There are numerous versions of the story which led to Endean's decision to leave GRNL, none of which concern me at this point. Nor am I presently concerned as to whether or not his departure is "good" for the community. I am more concerned that the move is good for Steve Endean and concerned that he not depart without someone publicly calling attention to his contributions to our lives. Steve Endean has given his entire adult life to lobbying for gay rights, first in Minnesota where he earned himself a reputation of professionalism and hard work, and then in the United States Congress where he brought class and respect to our presence on the Hill. In his many years of work, Steve has educated thousands of gay men and women across the country on the ins and outs of political strategizing, educated hundreds of legislators on the legitimacy of gay civil rights and been an articulate spokesperson in the press on the issues that gay men and women face on a daily basis. Endean was a primary reason why many gay men and women decided to get involved in the movement, insofar as they saw in him a maturity and sophistication they had not often seen in gay leaders. Perhaps it was time for Steve Endean to move on, as his critics insisted. If this is so, we can only hope that his next endeavor will appropriately tap his many skills, and that he will continue to share his insights with gay men and women who recognize the need for political involvement. We also can hope that Steve Endean never regrets the time and energy he gave to the community above and beyond that required by his contract, and that the community will always appreciate his commitment to us. Just as the community responded so brilliantly to Rep. Gerry Studds in his hours of anguish, I encourage you to write Steve Endean, in care of the Gay Rights National Lobby, P.O. Box 1892, Washington, D.C. 20013, and say "thank you and good luck in your next endeavor." For as long as I have been involved in the gay movement, I have heard it said that the community will chew up and spit out its leaders. We have all seen it happen over and over again. Our tendency to do so does not indicate that we are less humane or gracious than other people. It suggests to me that we are perhaps desperate for change, a little presumptuous and a wee bit homophobic. We often say "thank you" when it's too late, such as at the person's funeral or departure from town or our organizations A little encouragement can go a long, long way. People who lead our organizations or edit our newspapers or run for office as openly gay individuals are under far more stress than their salaries compensate. They often sacrifice a home life and career options because of their commitment to the community. They do so believing that it will make a difference and hoping that gay men and women will care. Yet, the mail and telephone calls they receive are often threatening messages from anonymous people. Many times these heroes of the movement lie in bed at night wondering if it's all worth the effort. Most of them know they could be making more money, have more vacation, enjoy more of a private life and have far fewer headaches if they left their movement work and stepped into the public marketplace. Getting their names in the paper or appearing on the Donahue Show was perhaps fun in the beginning, but it loses its appeal, especially knowing that every appearance is bound to gener ate a new wave of death threats. Sometimes I think people are afraid to acknowledge the sacrifices made by others, because it might make them feel guilty for not being more active themselves. Other people may fear acknowledging the accomplishment of a gay leader because they think it would diminish their power and make their relationship unequal. Some people, I suspect, don't thank or compliment a leader in the movement because they don't think a homosexual should be allowed to get a "swelled head," either because they politically oppose the idea of individual leadership, or they are simply homophobic. These fears are unrealistic. Nearly every gay man of woman I have met is the last 10 years who is working full or part time in the movement lights up when you take a moment to say "I want you to know how much I appreciate what you are doing for us all." They smile with gratitude because they rarely hear it, and in saying it, I feel no less active, powerful or secure. This holiday season, as we recall how cease fires are negotiated throughout the war-torn world in respect of religious observances, I Buggest a cease fire among warring political factions within the gay community and an extension of gratitude to all those people who give themselves to us. In addition to Steve Endean, I encourage you to write: Ginny Apuzzo, Executive Director of the National Gay Task Force, 80 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011; Larry Bush, political columnist and reporter, 410 11th Street, NE, Suite 13, Washington, D.C. 20002; David Goodstein, publisher of The Advocate, 1730 South Amphlett, Suite 225, San Mateo, Calif. 94402; Jim Kepner, director of the National Gay Archives, Box 38100, Los Angeles, Calif. 90038; Rev. Troy Perry, founder of the Metropolitcan Community Church, 5300 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 304, Los Angeles, Calif. 90029. The directors of your local political and service organizations and the editors and publishers of your local newspapers would also be delightfully surprised to hear from you, especially if you have never politically or socially seen eye to eye in the past. A simple "thank you for your efforts" will give a major boost to them and enable you to feel that you have not allowed one more dedicated person to leave the scene without acknowledging his or her commitment. &1983 by Brian McNaught, who lives in Massachusetts. 2700 ALBANY Oifriiks Cum 523-4084 A PARTY Friday, December 16 9pm til ?? DJ David Oleson-NO COVER Thursdays in December WELL DRINKS ALL CALL DRINKS TOP SHELF LIQUORS BEER 9pm til 2am O FOR 4
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