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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
File 007
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 007. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2390.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 007. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2390

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 007, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2390.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 4 THE STAR / Dec. 9, 1983 U.S. Congress Lc By Larry Bush WASHINGTON—Congressional panels took up a variety of issues before their winter recess that have important implications for gay people, including hearing a proposal that the Equal Rights Amendment legislation be amended to bar civil rights for gays, a review of a Reagan proposal to subject nearly four million American workers to sporadic lie detector tests about their reliability, a revamp of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, and efforts to amend Administration proposals on "acceptable" charities to which federal workers may donate. The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phyllis Schafly of the Eagle Forum asking that the proposed Equal Rights Amendment include a new provision that would block any court from extending civil rights to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which died at the state level only three states short of ratification in 1982, was reintroduced in the current congress to once again wend its way through the process. According to Schafly, the key reason for blocking civil rights for gays at this time is AIDS, and in her pitch she suggests that P'rHne flttPnHsr'jf,g w^n-oi-a (/<n;.V-aJaiM* uu Disque in Amsterdam to the Olympia Music Hall in Paris. You've also appeared in Coca-Cola commericals and even have a bread named after the group of which you are a part. Everyone knows you by sight and sound. Envious, readers? What if amid this multi-million dollar glamorous ego trip the problems became as intense as the success? After becoming accustomed to the smoothness, outsiders make it difficult for you and your friends to work together? What if the fun you started becomes laborous work that you are contracted to do? What if your record company stopped supporting you emotionally, promotionally and financially? Still envious? This is Hot Wax's exclusive interview with original Supremes member Mary Wilson, who lived this storybook/soap opera life. She gave us first crack at some ofthe real truths to who she is today and to who many of the Supremes really were. .Let's start with a musical history lesson from Mary. "There were actually two fourth members in the Primettes," Mary begins, "the first one being Betty Travis. She was in the group with Florence Ballard before Diana Ross and I had joined. "Betty is an outgoing person. I haven't Ihe senatr ^^^^^^^^^ ^uTv/ilson change* Rep. changes'in vears> though. She is a year or j rt r than the rest of us. It was quite Adminif,ng havin£ four People in the this vear1 *act' '* was 9u^e 80°d, because . jcally we could do a lot more .With three we had to cut down our thev°° nies- We went along with four for That ie' tnen Betty, DemB older wanted to ,iarried, so she left the group. t .hortly after, Barbara Martin came ■pv the group. Her singing is not that .. »t, but she's a beautiful woman with a . at personality! We went with her for a jple of years until it came time to sign contracts a Motown. She wasn't able vSign because, her mothers wanted her to „„ to college. It was then we decided we tre having so much trouble with four . is, we'd just go with three. r"That's how the trio became so popular. *ter that, all girl groups tried it. I saw y-arbara at a Supremes reunion in Detroit n 1976. She came down to the show, it was -lice to see her again. • "The early 60s were pretty good days for the Primettes because we could do a lot of record hops, which are called discos today. We would go there and sing; the kids would dance and the whole bit. The people who had records out would sing to them. At the time, we didn't have any records and we only had a guitarist. We did the hops on weekends and school during the week. We became very popular in Detroit and it was fun." It was difficult for Mary to pinpoint just one fantastic moment in her career that topped the rest as she said, "There have been so many things that have happened to us that were spectacular. I don't think there has been any one thing greater than the other except our first record. Getting out our first record release was the happiest I've ever been. Of all the things that happened to us, I don't think any of them could top that first moment hearing our record on the radio. That was like 'Wow,' this is it! "Our very first record was called 'Pretty Baby' on the Lupine label. Today, there are very few copies around. 'I Want a Guy' was our first record for Motown." That was Mary Wilson 20 years ago. What about the Mary Wilson today? "The Mary Wilson of today is basically the same Mary Wilson of the 60s and 70s except that I have matured," muses Mary. A \ The changing Mary Wilson (clockwise from upper left) in 1963, 1968, 1972 and 1983. c n souley it photo Jeff Wilson and Mary Wilson seated beneath Richard Adkins artwork at Orlando Gallery in Los Angeles "I'm just as interested in music and entertaining as I have always been. Now, I am more ready to pursue it as my number one goal. Right now, all of the ground work I have been laying for the past six years has been toward my coming out as a star, a major star. "I say, 'star' because even though the Supremes were stars and I was a part of that, my 'Mary Wilson' becoming a star is a totally different career. So, my goals are making that happen. "Touring in Europe, taking vocal lessons, acting classes and all those things were to get me ready for what is happening now. It's moving so fast. My plan of action is to get a record out. This is so the public, the people will know that I am here and I want to get my sound out there. This is my first step, to make everyone aware that I am around. "Next, is to look into how I really want to work my career, which direction. I know I would like to do some acting, but I haven't gotten to the point where it would be better than singing. Singing is my main love, so that is what I really want to do. "I've been looking for a record company. Nothing has come about, right? So, I figure like this, 'No one will record me, so I might as well record myself?' I'm going to record the record myself, which I am happy to say, I feel good about. It gives me more depth to do these things myself. "The first time with the Supremes' career was luck. The three ofthe four of us getting together, was luck. The fact that we clicked, was luck. This time I really want to know that I'm doing it and not just a fantasy, which it was the first time, I didn't feel the Supremes had any real con trol over it, even though I guess we did. It's just a different route I would like to take, "I started writing songs a couple of years ago. I havn't really recorded any of mine. I was speaking to Marvin Gaye about producing me, so we might collaborate, but nothing is definite yet." All of this news responsibility doesn't stop at the career. Mary's now a single parent with three children. So what's it like? "Wonderful," bubbles a proud, supreme mom. "It is a bit difficult because the children's interests are split and responsibilities are greater, but I enjoy having that challenge, to give as much as I can as if I were two people. "I have a wonderful relationship with my children. They know that I'm the parent, that I am the mother. They also have this feeling with me, that I am one of them. This they enjoy, because they have a certain amount of freedom. Sometimes when they are not so good, rather than scolding them, I make it a game and make sure they are aware of, say, 'bad behavior.'" Do Turkessa, 9, Pedrito, 6, and Rafael, 4, know that mom is a celebrity? "Yes they do," brags Mary jokingly, "because they traveled on the road with me from the time they were all born. Last year was the first year they have actually been home. Now that they are in school, they want to come along with me. They really weren't aware the mommy was a big star. They thought this was the way everyone lived. "They always had this excitment. Now that they are back in school, they find that mommy is something 'special.' In fact, my daughter Turkessa said, 'How come everybody at school knows you?' That was quite nice I thought."
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