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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
File 006
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 006. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 006. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2389

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 006, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2389.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript Atheist O'Hair Excommunicates Gay Atheists International Gey News Agency Madalyn Murray O'Hair, president of American Atheists, has expelled the oldest gay atheist groupin the United States, the Gay Atheist League, from her organization and endorsed a splinter group called American Gay Atheist, because she says the former has violated the tenets of the organization. O'Hair, who gave a keynote address at GALA's convention in 1982, sent a letter to GALA saying that because of the schism between the two gay atheist groups, it is "obvious to all what we must do." Jeffrey D. Vowles, President of GALA, said he thought it preferable to "maintain a good working relationship with all anti- religious organizations, whether they describe themselves as atheist, agnostic, free thinker, rationalist, scularist or humanist." O'Hair accused the excommunicated group of requiring O'Hair's group to accept the religion ofthe religious mates of gay atheists. Vowles said that membership in his organization is on an individual basis, and that no inquiry is made "into the religion or lack of it professed by any member's lover or companion." Air Force's Gay Probe Deemed Outrage WASHINGTON, D.C.—Gay Rights National Lobby said in a press released that it has learned that the Air Force has launched a major investigation of enlisted men in the Washington, D.C. area. At least 45 men who work at the Pentagon, Andrews AFB, Boiling AFB and other baseB were questioned about homosexuality in early November, GRNL said. The Lobby haa received reports that some of the men have been encouraged to identify gay men and women in the Air Force in order to receive better treatment, they said. GRNML reported that one man said that Air Force agents entered and searched his room without a search warrant and confiscated many personal items. "This investigation and the apparent violation of constitutional rights is an outrage," said GRNL Legislative Assistant Mike Walsh. "The investigation is based on archaic stereotypes of gay and lesbian Americans—stereotypes which ignore those women and men who are gay and who have served and are serving in the armed forced with distinction." Walsh and other GRNL staff members are in contact with some of the airmen being investigated and with senators and representatives who are members of the Armed Service Committees. The Lobby is encouraging Members of Congress to question Air Force officials about the nature of the investigation and to determine whether the rights of the enlisted men have been violated. "Again we see a clear demonstrated need for Congress to remove the regulation that homosexuality is incompatible with military service. GRNL staff members and our Field Associates must continue our efforts with the Amred Services Committees and other Members ol Congress," stated Jerry Weller, GRNI. Deputy Director. Acclaimed Art Mistaken for Junk A campus work crew at Williams College in Massachusetts recently bulldozed what they thought was a heap of junk. Trouble was, it was really an internationally acclaimed work of art, reports the Boston Globe. There was no comment from red-faced college officials, but the artist Bays she's "upset and surprised." Dec. 9,1983/The Star 7 few Hiring ;115 Gen. Krueger 340-1758!^.^^ .T >ur new community newspaper, "Best in Country Sounds" gjn expanding its Service tO the an Antonio gay communities. SPECIALS MONDAY-THURSDAY 8-10—" Monday 75$ Lonmeck:" Antomo Ed,tor Tuesday 30$ Poniese position for an experienced Wednesday $1 Margaritas & Screwdriver:ter. Submit samples. Will re- Thursday $1 Call Drinksiours a week. Pays $200 a HAPPY HOUR Monday-Friday 2-7pm December 22 Our Place Christmas Show 9pm, $2 cover CALL FOR INFO ON NEW YEAR'S PARTY MERRY CHRISTMAS! "And Remember, Our Place is Snuffy's" Austin's #1 Cruise Bar Also has Austin's Longest Hours Open 7am Daily 611 Red River—476-3611 y-io Advertisina Director Risk By Lindsey Taylor International Gay News Agency LONDON— As the number of sufferers from AIDS in Britain has slowly climbed to 24, fears among health workers have been growing that hospital precautions to prevent them from contracting the disease are inadequate. Although unions such as the Royal College of Nursing and the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staff have issued guidelines on AIDS, the Department of Health and Social Security has failed to make a statement about the possible risk to hospital staff. As a rsult, the Liverpool branch of the national Union of Public Employees (NUPE) refused to handle the body of the first British woman to suffer from AIDS when she died early in October. Colin Barrett, the Regional Secretary of NUPE, said that the ban was a protest at hospital management's failure to answer health workers' queries about potential dangers to their health. He added that he was certain that no members of his union had refused to look after living AIDS patients. The NUPE ban was lifted a week later after the Area Health Authority had issued guidelines stating that AIDS patients were to be treated in the same way as patients suffering from other infectious diseases such as Hepatitis B. The question of danger to hospital staff arose again later in the month when Professor Keith Simpson, a London pathologist, refused to conduct an autopsy on a 22-year-old Stuart Thompson-Neill, a gay drug user. Thompson-Neill had apparently died of aspiration pneumonia after injecting himself with heroin. Although the doctor treating him at Whipp's Cross Hospital stated that there was no reason to believe that the dead man had AIDS, Professor Simpson considered that the ,risks to himself and to other staff were too great to risk conducting an autopsy. Simpson told the Observer: "My attitude was that AIDS is easily communicated, and until we know more about it and how to treat it, it would he wrong to expose the staff ofthe public mortuary to He was backed by Health Minister Kenneth Clark, who said that pathologists were entitled to be cautious. However, other doctors, including the Secretary of the Association of Clinical Pathologists, disputed this view and said that appropriate safety precautions could be taken. Dr. Tony Pinching, animmunol- ogist at St. Mary's Hospital, commented that most AIDS cases would be recognized long before the patient died, so that postmortems would rarely be needed. Special isolation units are, however, being set up at London hospitals in case a similar situation should arise again.
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