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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
File 005
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 005. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2388.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 005. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2388

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 005, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2388.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript 4 The Star / Dec. 9,1983 U.S. Congress Looks at Important Gay Issues By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-Congressional panels took up a variety of issues before their winter recess that have important implications for gay people, including hearing a proposal that the Equal Rights Amendment legislation be amended to bar civil rights for gays, a review of a Reagan proposal to subject nearly four million American workers to sporadic lie detector tests about their reliability, a revamp of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, and efforts to amend Administration proposals on "acceptable" charities to which federal workers may donate. The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phyllis Schafly of the Eagle Forum asking that the proposed Equal Rights Amendment include a new provision that would block any court from extending civil rights to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which died at the state level only three states short of ratification in 1982, was reintroduced in the current congress to once again wend its way through the process. According to Schafly, the key reason for blocking civil rights for gays at this time is AIDS, and in her pitch she suggests that airline attendants who are gay be fired to insure the safety of any passengers who might accidently find the steward's blood in their food as a result of a cut during the microwave preparations. Congressional sources indicate that Rep. James Sensenbrunner will lead an effort to attach Schafly's amendment during the full Judiciary Committee proceedings. While the amendment is expected to fail, it is also expected to provide a forum for heated discussions of the "threats" gays present. In Rep. Jack Brooks' (D-TexJ government operations committee, there was a furor of activity over new Reagan Administration proposals to tighten national security by subjecting any workers with access to classified documents to random lie detector tests. According to testimony at the hearings, about four million American workers—1.5 federal workers and 2.5 workers in the private sector contracting with federal departments—would be affected by the random checks. Each federal department follows its own guidelines on what constitutes "reliable" workers, with some publicly admitting that they want to know which employees are gay. Brooks' committee took a dim view of the Reagan proposal, as have senators in a counterpart committee, and it now appears unlikely that the proposal will swing into full effect without some changes. Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) wrung changes out of a different Administration department in October. The Reagan Administration had announced earlier this year proposals to deny groups federal grants or contracts if they were doing "grass roots" lobbying with the money they received from nonfederal sources. That would have been an extension ofthe current rules, which bar the use of federal funds for any lobby purpose. The Reagan proposals were written by the Heritage Foundation, the think-tank started by Joseph Coors of Coors Brewery, and was meant to "de-fund the left." However, the broadly written proposals also angered the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, as well as several major Defense Department contractors. Among other provisions, they would have had to build a separate building and hire a separarte staff for any work they were doing to affect public opinion. Several run-throughs were tried by the Reagan Administration to satisfy its Defense Department contractors while still gouging groups like Planned Parenthood off the lists, but Frank used his oversight subcommittee to keep the issue visible. In late October, the Reagan administration finally threw in the towel, accepting a vastly watered-down version of its first proposals. In a closely related area, the Administration also had sought to cut off the list of acceptable charities any group that it claimed was doing lobbying, again broadly defined to include such things as letting the public know of proposed rules changes affecting programs. Planned Parenthood, which has faced the strongest hostility of any group during this AdminiaStration, was once again the target. The rules change was particularly objectionable in the eyes of charities, because the issue was not federal tax dollars, but merely whether federal employees would be allowed to donate to such groups during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, which is the equivalent ofthe United Way for the millions of federal workers. Lower federal court rulings prevented the Reagan Administration from striking Planned Parenthood and similar groups. and Frank's subcommittee once again kept a close watch on the situation. Frank now says he believes the charities who would like information on how to be listed as an eligible group in the Combined Federal Campaigns of the future. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission officially is dead at the age of 27, a casualty of the Reagan Administration's proposal to rid the watchdog group of its watchdogs and replace them with lapdogs. The issue was an effort to replace three commissioners with Reagan appointees, following an earlier sweep through the commission that included firing the former Eisenhower cabinet officer then serving as the Civil Rights Commission chairman- Congressional supporters of the commission, who point to the group's origins in 1957 as a key impetus for civil rights protections in the country, now are consid- Gays Expected to be Active and Visible in Primaries By Larry Bush Democratic presidential hopefuls continue a hectic schedule, .and straw polls in both Iowa and Florida drew candidates and gay activists. In Iowa, 1980 Democratic National Convention delegate Harold Wells helped launch a statewide effort to bring gays in for the Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner early in the month, showing that gays will be active and visible in the first primary. About 350 attended the Democratic Party fundraiser, and presidential hopeful Alan Cranston joined the gay group earlier in the day to talk over his candidacy. In Florida, a smaller but equally vocal group of gay Democratic Party activists also put in a day's work at the state's convention; most were divided half-and-half between Cranston and Mondale, with a smattering favoring former Florida governor Rueben Askew. Of particular note at the convention was the human rights statement, which did not echo national Democratic Party standards and instead left out support for civil rights for gays. Fred Butler, a past Key West Business Guild president and treasurer of the Monroe County Democratic Committee, rose to a point of order on the issue, but was ruled out of order. When the proposal passed, a vocal outpouring of "nays" were heard. according to Dade County Demoratic committee member Jack Campbell, a leading gay businessman. Meanwhile, South Carolina senator Ernest Hollings has added his name to the list of cosponsors of the federal gay civil rights bill. The step, which was unexpected only because Hollings had earlier indicated his support of the measure but not a willingness to cosponsor, came after Hollings told the National Organization for Women convention meeting in Washington, D.C. that he was a cosponsor. NOW lesbian rights project director Chris Riddiough and Gay Rights National Lobby field associates director Tanyan Corman talked to Hollings afterwards, told him he was not a cosponsor, and got him to move. Black civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, declaring for the presidency on Nov. 3, was the only Democratic hopeful to date to specifically mention gays among his coalition and support for civil rights that include gay people among his objectives. Among those invited to attend Jackson's announcement in Washington, D.C. was National Coalition of Black Gays director Gil Gerald and National Gay Task Force Washington representative Jeff Levi. ering measures that would take the commission away from the President entirely and make it a congressional agency. Currently the commission is charged with answering to both congress and the President, with the president appointing commissioners and congress giving approval. Civil rights protections for gays have not been part of the commission's mandate since a 1977 ruling that the commission can not go beyond the charter provided by the 1964 civil rights act, as amended. Since the act has never been amended to include gays, the commission took a hands-off policy. One possible consideration for a congressionally-mandated commission, however, might be whether language would be added expanding the charter beyond the civil rights act itself to examine discrimination wherever it occurs. TRAVCL CONSULTANTS Tl H@ Special Texas Departure January 31,1984 Call Bruce for Details Key West/Ft. Lauderdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193
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