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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
File 002
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 002. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 002. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2385

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 002, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript IWaWF^WKS JrWWMTS Fire and Brimstone Heat Up Campaign Trail ^ Jackson By Ed Martinez Jesse Jackson brought his campaign for the Democratic nomination for president to Texas last month in a whirlwind, five-day tour of the state. Speaking to students and religious groups, the controversial candidate provoked strong emotions wherever he spoke or preached, Jackson wound up his sweep with appearances in Austin the Monday before Thanksgiving with a talk on the University of Texas campus in the afternoon and a final rally at the Ebenezer Baptist Church that night. His talk at UT was packed, and only last minute intervention by the candidate permitted hundreds of students kept out of the auditorium to hear Jackson's talk. The talk at Ebenezer Baptist Church was attended by hundreds of mainly black fans of Jackson. After waiting for two hours, listening to the superb choir nearly exhaust themselves filling in the wait for the speaker, the audience was treated to Jackson's arrival as he strode down the aisle of the packed building surrounded by Secret Service agents. The candidate seemed relaxed, hugely enjoying the crowd's adulation. The Secret Service, on the other hand, seemed determined to keep the crowd at a safe distance. Jackson took the lectern, after the usual local introductions, and began to woo the crowd and weave a spell over them. His was not the usual campaign oratory. Gone were the dry statistics voters have come to expect from candidates of both parties. Totally absent were the usual pious justifications for the status quo, the whin- ning admonitions to continue to wait for a promised future that has proved, repeatedly, illusory. Jackson was speaking to his people. The whites present at this service were there at their own risk, ideologically speaking. Jackson used Biblical references, and the crowd grasped every shade, every smallest nuance of meaning. Jackson used repetition, hyperbole and metaphor. He spoke ofthe margins of victory by which President Reagan and won in a number of states, and then contrasted this with the number of unregistered black voters in each of those states. In every single instance, black unregistered voters voting against Reagan would have defeated him. Jackson issued a call to women, Hispanics and blacks, calling it a Rainbow Coalition. He emphasized the absolute necessity of voter registration to his candidacy. He appealed for money, without which his campaign would soon grind to a premature halt. But mostly, he offered hope, hope that he could lead all those who have no leader with a voice loud enough to be heard in the Democratic party. He wheedled, begged, cajoled his audience, and, finally, ended with the slogan, "The time has come." The T-shirts covering the backs of young blacks repeated the same message—"The time has come." The people in the Ebenezer Baptist Church that night in Austin seemed absolutely convinced that their time has indeed come. They demonstrated their conviction with money, thousands of dollars worth. Jackson's crusade, his Freedom Trail, as he called it, is getting up a head of steam that may just roll him right into the highest councils ofthe Democratic partv THE STAR AUSTIN * SAN ANTONIO Dec. 9, 1983 a Issue .3 n Published Every Other Friday Alamo HRC to Elect Officers The Alamo Human Rights Committee, San Antonio's lesbian gay political action committee, will elect new officers at its December meeting to be held Monday, Dec. 12, at 7:00 p.m. at El Jardin, 106 Navarro. The current chair, Ed Buckmaster, has appointed a nomina tions committee consisting of five AHRC members who will pres- posttions. Election will be by place and by majority votes of AHRC members present. Cartoon Book for Christmas Alternate Publishing, the people who bring you Carlucci's works have appeared in Drummer and Drummer, the magazine for the S&M crowd, have The Advocate, and include, among other things, a look announced they're publishing a book of cartoons by at the social differences in gay lifestyles, or as he titled Carlo Carlucci, titled He Ain't Heavy, He's My Lover, it, "The War Between the Machos and and the Sissies." The collection is being released for the Christmas season. Following are two of the cartoons which they allowed us to reprint. m v=rsui°Put<; Ccut/l - "No, we don't have a pet. ' om just likes the smell of dog food on my breath." GuJk- "How dare you question our journalistic integrity and professional objectivity, you disgusting little perverted commie pinko fag?"
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