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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
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The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2384.

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(1983-12-09). The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2384

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2397/show/2384.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Star, No. 3, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • Martinez, Ed
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 783846406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Fire and Brims one Heat Up Campaign Trail By Ed Martinez JACKSON Jesse Jackson brought his campaign for the Democratic nomination for president to Texas last month in a whirl• wind, five-day tour of the state. Speaking to students and religious groups, the controveraial candidate pro­voked strong emotions wherever he spoke or preached Jackson wound up his sweep with app ranees m Austin the Monday before Thanksgiving with n talk on the University of Texas campus m the afternoon and a final rally at the Ebenezer Bapti&t Church that night. His talk at UT was packed, and only last minute mt.er• vention by the candidate permitted hundreds of stu• dents kept out of the auditonum to hear Jackson's talk The talk at Ebenezer Baptist Church was attended b) hundreds of mamly black fans of Jackson After waiUng for two hours, listening to th superb choir nearly exhaust themselves filling m the wait for the speaker, the audience was treated to Jackson's arrival as he strode down the aisle of the packed build in it surrounded by Secret Service agents. Thecandidateseemed relaxed, hugpJy enjoying the crowd's adulation. The Secret Ser­viCE', on the other hand, seemed determined to keep the crowd at a safe di.stance. Jackson took the lectern, after the usual local intro­ductions, and began to woo the crowd and wpave a spell over them. His was not the usual campaign oratory. Gone were the dry statistics voters have come to expect from candidates of both parties. Totally absent were the usual pious justifications for the status quo, the whin• AUSTI~ * SAN A 0 Dec. 9, 1983 • Issue .3 o Published Every Other Friday Cartoon Book for Christmas nmg admonitions to continue to wait for a promi,ed future that has proved, repeatedly, illusory Jnckbon was speaking to his people. The whiU>S pres­ent at this service were there at their own risk, ideologi­cally ,;peaking. Jackson used Biblical referenceb, and the crowd grasped every shade, every ~mallest nuance of meaning. Jackson used repetition, hyperbole and meta­phor. He spoke of the margins ofvtctory by which Presi­dent Reagan and won in a numher of states, and then contrasted this with the number of unregistered black voters in each of those ·tates. In every single instance, black unregistered voters voting against Reagan would have defeated him. Jackson issued a call to women, Hispanics and blacks, calling it a Rainbow Coalition He emphasized the abso­lute necessity of voter registration to his candidacy He appealed for money, without which his campaign would soon grind to a premature hnlL But most!~. he offered hope, hope that he ooul(I lead nil those who have no leader with a voice loud enough to be hE'ard m the Demo­crahc party. He wheedled, begged, cajoled his audience, and, finally, ended with the slogan, 'The time has come." The T-&hirts covering the backs of young blacks repeated the same message-"The time has come." The people in the Ebenezer Baptist Church that night in Austin seemed absolutely convmced that their time has mdeed come. They demonstratl'd their conviction with money, thousands of dollars worth.Jackson's cru­sade, his Freedom Trail, as he called it, is getting up a head of steam that may just roll him right mto the highest councils of the Democratic partv Alamo HRC to Elect Officers The Alamo Human Rights C mm1ttee San Antonio's lesbian gay political action comm1tttt will elect new officers at its December meeting to heh fonda1 Dee. 12, at i OOp m at El Jardm, 106 Navarro The current chmr, Ed Buckmaster, has appomtl'd a nomina tioM comnuttee consisting of five AHRC members who Will pres. en• Ii of nine m mber i r mm d ti n to1ill theR poaltto= Election will be by place and by maJonty votes of AHRC memberfi present. Alternate Publishing, the people who bring you Drummer, the magazine for the S&M crowd, have announced they're publishing a book of cartoons by Carlo Carlucci, titled He Ain't Heavy, He's My Lover. Carlucci's works have appeared in Drummer and The Advocate, and include, among other things, a look at the social differences in gay lifeRtylee, or as he titled 1t, "The War Between the Machos and and the SiStiies." The collection is being reltased for the Christmas seawn. Following are two of the cartoons which they allowed us to reprint. ~ fET SUPPL lt, ·11,0, we don"t have a pct Tom JU,t hkc• the ,mcll of dog food on my breath• "Ho" dare )OU quc•Uon our Journal, ttc antegnt) and professional ob1cct1\1I), )OU disgumng bttlc perverted commie pinko fag.,. . . .. . . ··."!;~~- .. ~ - - --: ·.... ---~ ----- . ~ . ... _., - ~ .., .... . - 2 THE STAR / DEC. 9, 1983 ACLU Filed Freedom of Information Suit for Siminowski By Hollis Hood The American Civtc Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California filed suit in Federal District Court, Los Angeles, on October 11 for the release of documents under a Freedom of Informa• tion Act request concerning unlawful FBI surveillance of gay activists during the last 33 years. The suit, filed on behalf of Dan Sim• inowski, political columnist. lecturer and consultant, is the culmination of two years of effort to obtain FBI gay documentation. "The Freedom of Information Act case that was filed for me by ACLU of Southern California grows out ofmy initial inquiry more than a year ago," said Siminoski. "I requested the full record of FBI surveil­lance of the gay rights movement, and sev­eral facts became apparent. Many individuals and groups had been FBI targets. Documents in an unrelated court case (AFSC vs. Webster} had demon• strated a pattern of wanton destruction of documents by the FBI (including some 99 cubic feet of gay-related documents col­lected under a little-known federal Jaw called the Hoey Act) and detailed Civil Rights Bills Gain Support in Congress Anzona congressional representative Mo Udall recently became the 73rd co-sponsor of HR-2624, the national lesbian and gay civil nghts bill in the U.S. House, and Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) registered his support of 8430, making him the eighth co-sponsor of the Senate bill for employ• ment discrimination protection. Both endorsements added momentum to the national gay civil rights movement. Udall, first elected in 1961,is a reapected elder lltateeman well known for his liberal views and strong stand on environmental issueB. Because he had held off sponsor• ship for several years, Steve Endean, Gay Rights National Lobby executive director until his recent resignation, said Udall'• co-sponsorship should be considered a major breakthrough for the bill. The two recent sponsorships, the other by California representative Douglas Bosco signed in early September, renewed GRNL'a commitment for "84 by '84"-to have 84 bill sponsors by the end of Jan. 1984. Hollings, an announced candidate for the Democratic Party nomination for pres­ident, restated his support for the anti-gay employment discrimination bill' at the National Organization of Women's con­vention recently. "This is an excellent example of several organizations working together for gay civil rights," said GRNL Field Director Tanyan Corman. Endean further commented, "Stn. Hol­lings played a key role in the past by standing firm againat former anti-gay 'McDonald amendments' to Legal Servi­cea Corporation bills that passed the House and were sent to the Senate sub­committee he chaired. With his help, we were able to stop these amendments from becoming law." Just Put Your Head In the Dentist's Lap Japanese methods are in fashion from the boardroom to the assembly line, reports the Waahington Post, and now they may become standard in the dentist's office. Researchers at the University of Mary• land are experimenting with Zen denti• try. Surrounded by hushed voices, muted colors and potted plants, patients lie with their heads practically in the dentists' laps while they operate in graceful, effi• cient motions. Dr. Michael Belenky things patients wt11 feel more secure, and the added con• trol gives the dentist a lighter touch. responses from the FBI and Justice Department to the so-called "capitalgate" investigations which belied their asser­tions that contemporary gay groups were not under ongoing surveillance." The FBI acknowledged tnat 1t had some 5600 pageB of surveillance records of gay groups, which Siminowski discovered while working on his current book, Spies in the Closets: The Record of Thirty Years of Federal Surveillance of the Gay Rights Movement, scheduled for publication in 1984. "We have been struggling with the FBI since last January," he said, "to get these documents released and to qualify for the waiver of fees that the Jaw providb to researchers like myself whose work is in the public interest. But there is a farlarger record at stake in this litigation. Gay acti• vists, FOIA scholars and students of the FBI believe the Bureau has probably gathered tens or hundreds of thousands of pages of documents on the gay movement since 1950. We believe that the size of the record when fully released will demon­strate a record of federal activity against millions of gay Americans that consti­tutes a scandal of national proportions." He charges that the record will demon• strate FBI surveillance of normal activi­ties of gay persons, but believes that evolution of the case will help "policy mak• ers, educators, the media and general pub­lic to understand that lesbians and gay men are like all other Americans and deserve all the legal protections that are accorded to other minority groups. "The documents we seek are essential to the reconstruction of a full history of gay Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference mi GAY PRESS ASSOCIATION January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment If you are working in the gay media or are a ~ay person working in the non-gay media ( either journalism, adver­tising or administrative), plan to join your colleagues in Houston. Also. for officlals of gay organizations who are NOT in the gay media but who would like to learn hON to better influence the gay media. local and national, we'll have a special workshop. To Henry McClurg, vice president Gay Press Association 3317 Montrose #306 Houston, TX 77006 Enclosed Is my $25 registration fee (for GPA members) or S30 registration fee ( non-GPA members) for the Southern Regional Conference. (Include $10 additional if post­marked otter Jan. 13) C1 I am In the gay media. • I work for the non-gay media. c J I do not work In the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay media and other events of the conference. Name __ _ Address Phone(s) D I am a member of the Gay Press Association :::: I am NOT a member of the Gay Press Association (It arMng ,n Houston b',' plane. train or bus. let us know yOUt t1meotorrivo1 ondwew,11 pick you up al the airport Of depot) When we receive your form, we'll send you a conference schedule and a brochure on the 5<:NCN Hotel so you con make res01Vations (You do not have to stCN at The &Noy to attend the conference.) The 5<:NCN is within walking distance of several gCN clubs. Addition­ally. busses will be a.iolloble for tours of Montrose nightspots Your registration fee will include t ickets for free and discounted odmis­SIOflS to several clubs_ people in this country," Siminowski said. He further stated that infringement on personal rights was not anything unique to the experience of gay persons and "that a full record of the crimes committed against us in the last 30 years will only serve to emphasize the experience of blacks, Hispanics, women and many other ethnic and racial minorities." Gay people are the last minority, he said, to be understood as deserving of pro• tection of civil rights laws. "We come in all colors, faiths, ideologies and forms of works. We are young and old, live in every part of the nation, yet we have no legal protections at any level of authority. We demand the same protections accorded other Americana and an end to instru• siona by any governmental agents into our lives or our communities." Violence Against Gays Epidemic The National Gay Task Force reports that in the first eight months of this year, 1682 incidents of harassment, threats and attacks against gay men and women wrre reported in its Violence Project. During this same period, the gay com• munity was hit by the first wave of vio­lPnce attributed to "AIDS backlash." According to San Francisco's Community , United Against Violence {CUAV), fear and hatred associatPd with AIDS was a motivating factor in nearly 20 percent of all incidents reported this year The Dorian Group in Seattle also reports that gangs of youths seeking to beat up "plague-carrying faggots" were responsi• hie for 22 brutal attacks this summer. In Northampton, Masa., over the past year gay women were singled out for sex­ual .... ult and other phyaical atiacke. reports the NGTF newsletter. Establish• ments for gay women were vandalized, and hundreds of phone threats and other verbal harassment against these women were reported. Accordina to Kevin Berrill, Violence Project director, "These (incidents) repre8• ent only a small fraction of the total number of incidents that a ctually occurred during this period. The great majority of gay victims do not report attacks against them, and far too many still 1uffer the aftermath in eilence and isolation." THE STAR Oreulatetd '" Au111n. San Antonio ind CorSH,11 Chrled Published every other Friday 3008-A Burleson Road Austin, TX 78741 Phone Austin (512) 448-1380 MonlroN V06ce Pubh1h1ng Co CIRCULATION TN St•. •.000 cop• ~WNti:ty MontrOM Voice (Houston). 11.000 coptM ._...ty oa1• Gay News. 8.000 c:op1• ..... ty IOtal Tt11altN. 19000CcptN .... Jy, 1\IQ eo_,.,_,,.,. 3,117 uontr'OM lt.o 1301, Howlon. TX 7700I. (713) Ul-0922 Contents copyright •1983 Office hours: 1Qam-5:30pm Henry McClurg -­Ed Martinez "'•""'"" .,,_ Lyt Harna ••tcu1rve ~rl~ dlrKtOr ___M_a r_lt Orapo s,., adtte,t,1"'9 d::;;''°;;.":c'.;°;.-' -­Acel Clark art dlf.ctor Jeff Bray gr•""'" Sonny D1v11 ,ecourtflrt9 M•rnb« Gay P,., AMOCtatton N••· s.,...;rc.. fnlerN1ton11 Gay N.w• Aget'ICY, Pacific New, S-<• . Larry Bua/I /WMhinglon. 0 C ) Syndicated F••turt Se,v,cN & w,,,.,., Jeffrey W111Cn Randy­Altreel, Stone.all Featy,N 8yrtdteatt, Briao McNaugtn, Joe a ... POSlMASTt R $end eddreN co,rec:11on1 10 3317 Montrose • - Houl!On TX 7700& SuOscr'Pt0t ,111 1n US In ,..-, _,,.,.~ U9 per yea, ($2 luues), 129 po,.,, "'°""'' (29 , ...... , o, SI 25 pot - , .... 1llan 26 "-) &.ct - J2 CIO N th NatioMJ ettv.n,.mo ,.p,ffefttatiff Joe O&ba1o RJYefldet1 M•rk•t ng ee/1 Ith A-..o Now yo,;. 10011 f212> 2Q.GN3 .AI/Wrtia no dMdt,n. ~•ry other TuetdaY 5 30pm. '°' ll$Urt •-lol'°"'"9 Fridoy ... mng MCC Founder Encouraged by Church Council Dialogue Rev. Troy Perry, founder of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches, was reported by the Chicago Tribune as being pleased with the recent vote by the National Council of Churches to postpone indefinitely the membership application of the MCC. "I consider that vote to be a miracle," Perry said. "We haven 'tcome out of this as victims or loHers. The dialogue will con• tinue." Perry, who started the MCC 15 years ago, stated: "The rest of Chnstianity has been ternfied of sexuality .•.. we have to remember that the (Council) is not the enemy. They have struggled and sweated blood over us. If we applied to join the Moral Majority, we'd get an answer in less than five minutes. "We have made an impact on the (Coun• cil). We don't want to destroy them. We just want the fellowship of other Chris• tians. We need it, because sometimes it's harder to come out as a Christian in the gay community than to come out as a gay or lesbian in the straight world." NGHEF Seeks Ideas for Gay . Health Conference The National Gay Health Education Foundation 1s currently planning the first Southeastern Lesbian Gay Health Con• ference to be held in Atlanta on Apr. 21 and is asking the gay community for prop­osals for workshopR and presentations. Previous national conferences have been presented in major metropolitan areas for the past six years and have brought together gay health care provid­ers to share information and ideas, to coor• dinate networking and caucusing within their respective professional organiza• tions, and to provide a forum for profes­sional support and development. 1-'or additional information or to submit a proposal, contact Caitlin Ryan, 550 Cresthill Ave, Atlanta. GA 30306; (404) 892-2459. The deadline for submission is Feb. 10. AIDS Issue Prominent in Sodomy Statute Appeal The rationale that Texas' sodomy statute he rPt•n11c·ted lx·cnuHe of AIDS is crpating n controv .. rsy prior to an appellate court rul­ing on tht> statute which was struck down as being unrnnstitutionul last year Amarillo's Il1strict Attorney is arguing that the sodomy statute 1s neccssarv to control AIDS in an attempt to mfluencc th" US. Court of Appeals' decision, although he did not bring up the argument nt thl' trial level ''It 1s simply Improper to bnng up a new issue for the first time at the appellatl' You ·re Reading THE STARS Amerlca·s Newest Gay Community Newspaper levl'I," said Leonard Graff, National Gay Righl!! Advocate legal director. "And even 1f they could. ii is a weak argument, ht•cause nobody had even heard of AIDS at the time tht• Texas legislature enacted the sodomy statute." Jean O'Leary, executive_ director of NGRA, ~nid "The D.A 1s trymg_to exploit the public hystt•nn and to use irrational foar in an emotional attempt to persuade the court. We t'xpcct the court to disregard this shallow tactic" PLACE Monday-Pitcher-$2 Tuesday-Draft-25¢ Tuesday, Dec. 13 Benefit for Toys for Tykes, 10pm Wednesday-Beer Bust 7-11-$2 Thursday-Margaritas-75¢ and Pool Tourney Sunday-Beer Bust 8-10-$1 OPEN 2 TIL 2 N E V E R C 0 V E R 2015 SAN PEDRO 733-3365 SAN ANTONIO Can We Talk? Open 8am Daily Happy Hours 8am-2pm $}00 Bloody Marys & Screws with Quenton Martin (Austin's Round Mound of Sound) 2828 Rio Grande at 29th Austin- 4 78-8782 DEC. 9, 1983 / THE STAR 3 Pediatrics Feel Doctors Should Still Try to 'Convert' Gays According to a recently released policy of the American Academy of Pediatrics, doc tors should continue trying to "convert" adolescents who are troubled by their homosexuality. The new policy rekindled the debate as to whether homosexualb can become hete­rosexual, throult'h treatment, although the group deemed to no longer consider homosexuality a "mental disorder," according to an &sociated Press new~ story. Dr. DaVld Ke,sler, a gay ps)chintrist and professor at the Uni, ersity of Cahfor• ma at San Franci,co, questioned wh) doc­tors think they can change a per on's 'sexual orientation. He questioned tf con• verting a ga) person mto a nongay person would be any ea. ier than transforming a nongay l)('l'bon mto a gay person. ''That's exactly how easy it would be to do it the other way around," he said He quoted that there is no known casein medical history of any gay successfully converting to heterosexuality. He further questioned why young people who are troubled"' ith guilt about being gay should be "lead on a ,.,Jd goose chase to convert, when that's not po,s1hle" Director of the Adole,cent !\fedica) Cen­ter m Le\'lttown, Pa .. Dr. Kenneth Slnd­km, predicted that some 29 million youngster. between 13 and 19 are gay and have yet lo be heard from. He said the1r gonl 1s to ht>lp the practi­tioner to understand gay per,ons as "nor­ma] " Presidential Contender Glenn Charged with being Anti-Gay "I would not do anything a.s President that could be mterpreted Rb advocan or promotion ofhomo,exuality," srud De"mo­cratic Presidential conte.nderJohn Glenn, according to Virginia M Apuzzo, execu ti,e director of the National Ga, Task Force. - The • 'GTF 1s urging Glenn supporters across the nation to make their dis..atis factions kno"' n to the Ohio senator and former astronaut. In then Jatest ne"'s release, NGTF said that Glenn, m a candidate forum in • · r"' York No, 3 and m re1t<'rated remarks l\ov 9 srud he did not favor exten,non of federal ci, 11 righta protections to gay men and lesbians and described homosexual• 1ty as ''personal behn, 10r" r-;GTF nlso smd that Glenn stated "I will not sponsor or ~upport lei.islat1on to extend Title 7 of the Ch ii Rii.hts Act to indude sexual preference. Apuzzo wired Glenn "It 1, 1mpos-1blc to reconcile the fact that )OU take pnde m vour record on civil rights 1,sues "'1th\ our apparent disregard for the right,- of24 mil hon Amencnns Discrtmmat1on ba,ed on sexual onentation 1, an e,endav re.alit} m Amenca that mu t be addressed " Russians Drinking Themselves to Early Grave The avl'rage hfe expectan<'y for ::-oHet males has dropped five yen rs smce 1964, and U.S. census officials say the reason is alcohol, report,; l SA Toda> Per c.apita consumption m the Soviet Union is twice that of the l mted States and deaths from alcohol po1,onmi. are .~1, time, higher The re,ult SoVJet male, born today can expect to hve to only 62 Ie,s than nm other European country, andfarbelowthe 70 ~ ears Amencan men can look fon.'lll'd to. 4 THE STAR/ Dec. 9, 1983 U.S. Congress Looks at Important Gay Issues By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-Congressional panels took up a variety of issues before their win­ter recess that have important implica­tions for gay people, including hearing a proposal that the Equal Rights Amend­ment legislation be amended to bar civil rights for gays, a review of a Reagan prop­osal to subject nearly four million Ameri­can workers to sporadic lie detector tests about their reliability, a revamp of the U S. Civil Rights Commission, and efforts to amend Administration proposals on "acceptable" charities to which federal workers may donate. The House Judiciary Committee heard testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phyl­lis Schafly of the Eagle Forum asking that the proposed Equal Rights Amendment include a new provision that would block any court from extending civil rights to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which died at the state level only three states short of ratification in 1982, was r~ introduced in the current rongress to once again wend its way through the process. According to Schafly, the key reason for blocking civil rights for gays at this time is AIDS, and in her pitch she suggests that airline attendants who are gay be fired to insure the safety of any passengers who might accidently find the steward's blood in their food as a result of a cut during the microwave preparations. Congressional sources indicate that Rep. James Sensenbrunner will lead an effort to attach Schafly's amendment dur­ing the full Judiciary Committee proceed­ings. While the amendment is expected to fail, it is also expected to provide a forum for heated discussions of the "threats" gays present. In Rep. Jack Brooka' (D-Tex.) govern­ment operations committee, there was a furor of activity over new Reagan Admin­istration proposals to tighten national security by subjecting any workers with access to classified documents to random he detector tests. According to testimony at the hearings, about four million Ameri­can workers-1.5 federal workers and 2.6 workers in the private sector contracting with federal departments-would be affected by the random checks. Each federal department follows its own guidelines on what constitutes "reliable" wOl'kers, with some publicly admitting that they want to know which employees are gay. Brooks' committee took a dim view of the Reagan proposal, as have senators in a rounterpart committee, and it now appears unlikely that the proposal will swing into full effect without some changes. Rep. Barney Frank (D.Mass.) wrung changes out of a different Administration department in October. The Reagan Administration had announced earlier this year proposals to deny groups federal grants or contracts if they were doing "graBB roots" lobbying with the money they received from nonfederal sources. That would have been an extension of the current rules, which bar the use offederal funds for any lobby purpose. The Reagan proposals were written by the Heritage Foundation, the think-tank started by Joseph Coors of Coors Brewery, and was meant to "de-fund the left." How­ever, the broadly written proposals also angered the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, as well as several major Defense Depart• ment contractors. Among other provi­sions, they would have had to build a separate building and hire a separarte staff for any work they were doing to affect public opinion. Several run-throughs were tried by the Reagan Administration to satisfy its Defense Department contractors while still gouging groups like Planned Parent• hood off the lists, but Frank used his over­sight BUbcommittee to keep the issue visible. In late OctQber, the Reagan administration finally threw in the towel, accepting a vastly watered-down version of its first proposals. In a closely related area, the Adminis• !ration also had sought to cut off the list of acceptable charities any group that it claimed was doing lobbying, again broadly defined to include such things as letting the public know of proposed rules changes affecting programs. Planned Parenthood, which has faced the strong­est hostility of any group during this Administration, was once again the target. The rules change was particularly objec­tionable in the eyes of charities, because the issue was not federal tax dolllll'8, but merely whether federal employees would be allowed to donate to such groups during the annual Combined Federal Campaign, which is the equivalent of the United Way for the millions of federal workers. Lower federal court rulings prevented the Reagan Administration from striking Planned Parenthood and similar groupe, Gays Expected to be Active and Visible in Primaries Byl..arryS-h Democratic presidential hopefuls con• tinue a hectic achedule, and straw polls in both Iowa and Florida drew candidate. and PY activiata. In Iowa, 1980DemocraticNationalCon• vention deiefate Harold Welle helped launch a 1tatewide effort to brinr py1 in for the Jefferaon.Jackaon Day dinner early in the month, ahowing that gaya will be active and visible in the first primary. About 350 attended the Democratic Party fundraiser, and presidential hopeful Alan Cranston joined the gay group earlier in the day to talk over his candidacy. In Florida, a smaller but equally vocal group of gay Democratic Party activists also put in a day's work at the state'• con• vention; most were divided half-and-half between Cranaton and Mondale, with a smattering favoring former Florida gover• nor Rueben Askew. Of particular note at the convention was the human righta etatement, which did not echo national Democratic Party •tandarda and in1tead left out 1upport for civil righta for say1. Fred Butler, a put Key We.t Buaineu Guild in-ident and treuUNr of the Mon­roe County Democratic Committee, TON to a point of order on the i88ue, but wu ruled out of order. When the proposal pu•ed, a vocal outpourins of "nay1" were heard. according to Dade County Demora tic com• mittee member Jack Campbell, a leadinr gay buaineuman. Meanwhile, South Carolina eenator Emeat Hollinr• hu added his name to the lilt of coeponBOn of the federal say civil rishta bill. The step, which was unex­pected only becauae Holling• had earlier indicated his •upport of the measure but not a willingness to cosponsor, came after Hollinp told the National Organization for Women convention meeting in Washington, D.C. that he was a cospon­sor. NOW lesbian rights project director Chris Riddiough and Gay Right, National Lobby field associates director Tanyan Corman talked to Hollings after• wards. told him he was not a cosponsor, and got him to move. Black civil righta leader Jesse Jackson, declaring for the presidency on Nov. 3, was the only Democratic hopeful to date to epecifically mention gay1 among his coa­lition and 1upport for civil righta that include gay people among his objectiv•. Among those invited to attend Jackaon'1 announcement in Washington, D.C. wu National Coalition of Black Gays director Gil Gerald and National Gay Tuk Force Washington representative Jeff Levi. and Frank's subcommittee once again kept a close watch on the situation. Frank now says he believes the charities who would like information on how to be listed as an eligible group in the Combined Fed­eral Campaigns of the future. The U.S. Civil Rights Commission offi­cially is dead at the age of 27, a casualty of the Reagan Admimstration's proposal to rid the watchdog group of its watchdogs and replace thl'm with lapdogs. The issue was an effort to replace three rommission­ers with Reagan appointees, following an earlier b'Weep through the commiBSion that included firing the former Eisen• hower cabinet officer then serving as the Civil Rights Commission chairman .. Congressional supporters of the com­misSton, who point to the group's origins in 1957 as a key impetus for civil rights protections in the country, now are consid-enng measures that would take the com­mission away from the President entirely and make it a congressional agency. Cur• rently the commission is charged with answering to both congress and the PrCS1 dent, with the president appointing com­missioners and congress giving approval. Civil rights protections for gays have not been part of the commission's man date since a 1977 ruling that the commis• sion can not go beyond the charter provided by the 1964 civil rights eel, as amended. Since the act has never been amended to include gays, the commiBSion took a hands-off policy. One possible consideration for a congressionally-mandated commission, however, might be whether language would be added expanding the charter beyond the civil rights act itself to exam­ine discrimination wherever it occurs. TRAVEL CONSULTANTS ffi&~[l ~~~!Jl 11'~~~ ffi&~lL ~~~'lr~~ m~~[L ~~ru!'lYA~~ ffi&~ ~~ru~'lr&~~ Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 Call Bruce for Details Key West/Ft. Lauderdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 Mail to PltGAATE RECORDS 140251-nt)l-thrd""1,uc North MIMUpolos, Mlnrlf:S()g 55«1 A-ol5Clns (PA0/PC0159) 0 AUUM O CASS£m au.nt,ty----"'1c.c _..,.... _ - (611) 559-4166 (IOO) ~ >,dd'as ________ _ (,ty _ SUtc __ Zjp __ _ Atheist O'Hair Excommunicates Gay Atheists International Gay New1 Agency Madalyn Murray O'Hair, president of American Atheists, has expelled the old­est gay atheist group in the United States, the Gay Atheist League, from her organi­zation and endorsed a splinter group called American Gay Atheist, because she says the former has violated the tenets of the organization. O'Hair, who gave a keynote address at GALA's convention in 1982, sent a Jetter to GALA saying that because of the schism between the two gay atheist groups, it is "obvious to all what we must do." Jeffrey D. Vowles, President of GALA, said he thought it preferable to "maintain a good working relationship with all anti­religious organizations, whether they des­cribe themselves as atheist, agnostic, free thinker, rationalist, scularist or huma­nist." O'Hair accused the excommunicated group of requiring O'Hair's group to accept the religion of the religious mates of gay atheists. Vowles said that member­ship in his organization is on an individ­ual basis, and that no inquiry is made "into the religion or lack of it professed by any member's Jover or companion." Air Force's Gay Probe Deemed Outrage WASHINGTON, D.C.-Gay Rights National Lobby said in a press released that it has learned that the Air Force has launched a major investigation of enlisted men in the Washington, D.C. area. At least 45 men who work at the Pentagon, Andrews AFB, Bolling AFB and other bases were questioned about homosexual­ity in early November, GRNL said. The Lobby hu received report. tha t some of the men have been encouraged to identify gay men and women in the Air Force in order to receive better treatment, they said. GRNML reported that one man said tha t Air Force agents entered and sesrc-hed his room without a search war­rant and confiscated many personal items. ''This investigation and the apparent violation of constitutional rights is an out• rage," said GRNL Legislative Assistant Mike Walsh. ''The investigation is based on archaic stereotypes of gay and lesbian Americans-stereotypes which ignore those women and men who are gay and who have served and are serving in the armed forced with distinction." Walsh and other GRNL staff members are in contact with some of the airmen being investigated and with senators and representatives who are members of the Armed Service Committees. The Lobby is encouraginR Members of Congress to question Air Foroc officials about the nature of the investigation and to deter­mine whether the rights of the enlisted men have been violated. "Again we see a clear demonstrated need for Congress to remove the regula• tion that homosexuality is incompatible with military service. GRNL staff members and our Field Associates must continue our efforts with the Amred Servi­ces Committees and other Members of Congress," stated Jerry Weller, GRNl Deputy Director. Acclaimed Art Mistaken for Junk A campus work crew at Williams College in Massachusetts recently bulldozed what they thought was a heap o_f junk. ~rouble was, it was really an mtemattonally acdaimed work of art, reports the Boston Globr. Thert• was no comment from red-faced college officials, but the artist says she's ''upset and surprised." -115 Gen. Kru~er 340-1758 "Best in Country Sounds" DEC 9, 1983 / THE STAR ow Hiring ,ur new community newspaper, gin expanding its service to the 3n Antonio gay communities. SPECIALS MONDAY -THURSDAY 8-lCJ Monday ________________________ 75¢ Longneck" Antonio Editor Tuesday ------------------------------ 30¢ Ponieve position for an experienced Wednesday $1 Margaritas&. Screwdriverder. Submit samples. Will re­Thursday ---------------------- $1 Call Drinks1ours a week. Pays $200 a HAPPY HOUR :Monday-Friday 2-7pm December 22 Our Place Christmas Show 9pm, $2 cover CALL FOR INFO ON NEW YEAR'S PARTY MERRY CHRISTMASf "And Remember, Our Place is Snuffy's" nio Advertisina Director Risk By Lindsey Taylor International Gay New1 Agency LONDON-As the number of sufferers from AIDS in Britain has slowly climbed to 24, fears among health workers have been growing that ho,pital precautionb to prevent them from contracting the disease are inadequate. Although unions such as the Royal Col• lege of Nursmg and the Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staff have issued guidelines on AIDS, the Department of Health and Social Security has failed to make a statement about the possible risk to hospital staff. As a rsult, the Liverpool branch of the national r------------------------,;;;;;,;,;,;,;;;;- Union of Public Employees (NUPE) refused to handle the body of the first Brit­ish woman to suffer from AIDS when she died early in October. Austin's #1 Cruise Bar Also has Austin's Longest Hours Open 7am Daily 611 Red River- 4 76-3611 Colin Barrett, the Regional Secretary of NUPE. s8ld that the ban was a protest at hospital management'• failure to answer health workers' queries about potential dangers to their health. He added that he waa certain that no members of his union had refused to look after b~;ng AIDS patients. The NUPE ban was lifted a week later after the Area Health Authority had issued guidelines stating that AIDS patients were to be treated in the same way as patients suffering from other infec• tious diseases such as Hepatitis B. The question of danger to hospital staff aroee again later in the month when Pro­fesAor Keith Simpson. a London patholo­gist, refused to conduct an autopsy on a 22-year-old Stuart Thompson-Neill, a gay drug user. Thompson-Neill had appar• ently died of aspiration pneumonia after injecting himself with heroin. Although the doctor treating him at Whipp',; Cross Hospital stated that there wa~ no rea,on to believe that the dead man had AIDS. Professor Simpson con~ide-red that tJ,e _risks to himself and to other staff were too great to risk conducting an autopsy. Simpson told the Ob err.;er; "My atti­tude was that AIDS is easilv communi­cated, and until we know more about it and how to treat 1t, it would be "-Tong to expose the staff of the public mortuary to it." He was backed by Health Minister Ken• neth Clark, who said that pathologists were entitled to be cautious. However, other doctors, including the Secretary of the Asaociation of Clinical Pathologists, disputed this view and said that appropriate safety precautions could be taken. Dr. Tony Pinching, an immunol• ogist at St. Mary's Hospital, commented that most AIDS cases would be recognized long before the patient died, so that post mortems "'ould rarely be nE'eded. Special isolation umts are, ho-,,ever, being ,et up at London h06pitals in case a bimilar situation should arise pgain 7 4 THE STAR / Dec. 9, 1983 ~:.!·.:ongress ':.~ihe WASHINGTON-Congressional panels 1t now1/1• 1s0 took up a variety ofissues before their win- will s~ n ter recess that have important implies• changet t1ons for gay people, including hearing a Rep . . proposal that the Equal Rights Amend- changes· in years, though. She 1s a year.or ment legislation be amended to bar civil departm r than the rest of us. It wa~ quite rights for gays, a review of 8 Reagan prop- Admim~g ha ~ng fou: people in the osal to subject nearly four million Ameri- this year! fac~, 1t was quite good, because can workers to sporadic lie detector tests grants (,call} we could do a lot more about their reliability, a revamp of the "grass With three we had to cut down our U.S Civil Rights Commission, and efforts they ,.n1es. We went ~long with four for to amend Administration proposals on That le, t~en Betty, being older wanted to "acceptable" charities to which federal currel1amed, so she left the groul(. workers may donate. fund hortly after, Barbar~ M~rtin came The House Judiciary Committee heard Tr the grou,p. Her singing 1s not _that testimony from anti-ERA crusader Phy). the ,t, but she~ a 1 beau1tful w~man with a Its SchaflyoftheEagleForumaskingthat sta .it personality, We_ went with her f~r a the proposed Equal Rights Amendment and pie of years until it came time 1? sign include 8 new provision that would block en contracts a Motown. She wasn t able any court from extending civil rights to an/.gn because, her mothers wan~ her to lesbians and gay men. The ERA, which 88 ,,to coll!ge. It was then we d~ded we died at the state level only three states meJre ha~~g so mu~h trouble with four short of ratification in 1982, was r~ sio1ls, w~ d Just go with three. introduced in the current congress to once se;, 'Thats how t~e tno becam~ so popular. again wend its way through the process. st ter that, all girl groups ~ed. it. I sa~ According to Schafly, the key reason for a'~bara at a Supremes reunion in ~etro1t blockin civilri htsfor 8 tthi tun" • "t! 1976.Shecamed_owntotheshow,itwas g . g . g ysa 8 eis uce to see her again. ~IJ:?S. and R'"hne in her pitch she s uggests that ~The early 60s were pretty good days for RttPtU-IR,-,Je .,,...J) ...... O'Q,1.l-..J"cuul Ula . Disque m Amsterdam to the Olympia the Pnmettes ~a use we coul~ do a lot of Music Hall in Paris. You've also appeared r~rd hops, which are calle~ discos today. in Coca-Cola commericals and even have \\e would go there and s1~g; the kids a bread named after the group of which would dance and the whole b1~. The people you are a part. Everyone knows you by who ha~ records ~ut !"ould smg to them. sight and sound At the time, we d1dn t have any records Envious, read;rs? and we only had a guiterist. We did the What if amid this multi-million dollar hops on, weekends and school dunng the glamorous ego trip the problems became wee~. \\e becaf?,e very popular m Detroit as intense as the success? After becoming and it was fun. accustomed to the smoothness, outsiders It was difficult for Mary to pinpoint just make 1t difficult for you and your friends one fantastic moment in her career that to work together? What if the fun you topped the rest as she said, "There have started becomes laborous work that you been so many things that have happened are contracted to do? What if your record to us that were spectacular. I don't think company stopped supporting you emo- there has been any one thing greater than tionally, promotionally and financially? the other except our first record. Getting Still envious? out our first record release was the happi• This IS Hot Wax's exclusive interview est I've ever been. Of all the things that with onginal Supremes member Mary happened to us, I don't think any of them Wilson'. who lived this storybook/ soap could top that first moment hearing our opera hfe. She gave us first crack at some record on the radio. That was like 'Wow,' of the real truths to who she is today and to this is it! who many of the Supremes really were. "Our very fint record was called 'Pretty Let's start with a musical history lesson Baby' on the Lupine label. Today, there from Mary are very few copies around. 'I Want a Guy' "There were actually two fourth was our fint record for Motown." members in the Primettes," Mary begins, That was Mary Wilson 20 yean ago. "the lint one bemg Betty Travis. She was \\'hat about the Mary Wilson today? in the group with Florence Ballard before "The Mary Wilson of today is basically Diana Roes and I had joined. the same Mary Wilson of the 60s and 70s "Betty is an outgoing pel'&on. I haven't except that I have matured," muses Mary. C R IIOUl£Y PHOTO Jeff W,lBon and Mary Wilson seated beneath Richard Adkins artwork at Orlando Galkry m Los Angeles The changing Mary Wilson (dockw1se from upper left) in 1963, 1968, 1972 and 1983. "I'm Just as interested in music and enter• taining as I have always been. Now, I am more ready to pursue it as my number one goal. Right now, all of the ground work I have been laying for the past six years has been toward my coming out as a star, a major star. "I say, 'star' because even though the Supremes were stars and I was a part of that, my 'Mary Wilson' becoming a star is a totally different career. So, my goals are making that happen. "Touring in Europe, taking vocal les­sons, acting claeses and all those things were to get me ready for what is happen• ing now. It's moving so fast. My plan of action is to get a record out. This is so the public, the people will know that I am here and I want to get my sound out there. This is my first step. to make everyone aware that I am around. "Next, is to look into how I really want to work my career which direction. I know I would like to do some acting, hut 1 haven't gotten to the point where it would be better than singing. Singing is my main love, so that is what I really want to do. "I've been looking for a record company. Nothing hns come ahout, right? So, I fig. ure like this 'No one will record me, so I might as weiJ record myself?' I'm going to record the record myself, which I am happy to say, I feel good about. It gives me more depth to do these thrngs myself. ''The first umc with the Supremes' career was luck The three of the four of us getting together, was luck. The fact that we clicked, was luck. This time I ri.ally want to know that I'm doing it and not Just a fantasy, which it was the first time. I didn't feel the Supremes had any real con• trol over it, even though I guess we did. It's just a different route I would like to take. "I started writing songs a couple of years ago. I havn 't ~eally record~ any of mine. I was speaking to Marvin Gaye about producing me, so we might collabo­rate, but nothing is definite yet." All of this news responsibility doesn't stop at the career. Mary's now a single parent with three children. So what's it like? "Wonderful," bubbles a proud, supreme mom. "It is a bit difficult because the children's interests are split and responsibilities are greater, but I enjoy having that challenge, to give as much as I can as if I were two people. "I have a wonderful relationship with my children. They know that I'm the par• ent, that I am the mother. They also have this feeling with me, that I am one of them. This they enJoy, because they have acer• tain amount of freedom. Sometimes when they are not so good, rather than scolding them, I make ita game and make sure they are aware of, say, 'bad behavior."' Do Turkessa. 9, Pedri to. 6, and Rafael,4, know that mom is a celebrity? "Yes they do,'' brags Mary Joking_ly, "because they traveled on the road Wlth me from the time they were all horn. Last y,•ar was the first year tht·y have actually been home. Now that they are in Achoo!, they wnnt to coml' along with me. They really weren't aware the mommy was a big star They thought this was the way everyone Ii ved "They always hsd this excitment. Now that they are back in school, they find that mommy 1s something 'special.' In fact, my dau11hwr 'I'urkessa said, 'How come ev~ rybody at a,·hool knows you?' That wns quite nice I thought." CBS-TV PHOTO In the left photo, Supreme's founder Flo Ballard with Mary Wilson m 1965. In the right photo is Flo's replacement, Cindy Birdsong, u·ith Mary Wilson. in 1972 Wilson was very open discussing the Supremes. As many of us have assumed, Florence Ballard, the founder of what became the Supremes, left the group under ,·ircumstances not familiar to everyone. Only Mary, Diana, Motown super execs and family who could be trusted or held not to break the si!Pnce may have the real answers. Much of the press and public arrived at their own conclusions and started believing these self-appointed soap operas, for lack of answers from within the Supremes or Motown. Mary's answers here might hopefully shed some light on this very private subject. Mary speaks in a somber tone, "The cloRest that I could say to anything that would clarify Florence's leaving, because it is a long story, 1'1orence did agree to leave the group on her own accord: how­ever, it was not because she wanted to. "One time we were in Europe and this was during the time Diana was becoming a solo artist and moved toward the front of the group; before Florence's leaving. We were to go to an engagement, a press recep­tion. We were told to stay upstairs in our rooms. 1'1orence and I were waiting to go to the reception unaware that Diana had already gone down, When we came down later, we realized that they had not wanted us to be involved in the reception. "Florence was very upset about that! It was around the t time Florence told me she couldn't take it any longer. And at that point I became very upset, because I real­ized al!IO what was happening, in terms of the group possibly not being together any longer. 1'1or and I sat up and cried that night, because we realized this beautiful thing was really about to split up. "I thmk that was the first thime I heard it from her lips that she would not be with the group. I have often Raid that it would be fairer to Florence and the others to tell the whole truth instead of bits and pieces. I know t~is doesn't clarify anything, it's just too in-depth to say it was due to anv one thing. · "It's all going to come out in my hook." Ncnrly nme years aftt,r Florence Bal­lard left the Supremes, she died in Feb , J 976. I lwlieve it was from heart failure as there were ns many gruesome stroics of how she died as there were about her leav­ing the Supremes. "I w8JI shocked," said Mary." But by th,• same token not as shocked as I would ha VI' been 1f it happened to someone else I knew how deeply Florence felt about th~ situa­tion with the Supremes. It was the one thing with us that made her whole life click. I know for me or Diana. no matter what happened with us, we would have found a way to find something else to do. "Diana and I have been much too close to talk about Flo's death. Perhaps we will later Later in life, to talk about it hon­estly There were so many good things about Flo On thing, whpn she laughed, hers was an infectious, Santa Claus-type laugh. You just wanted to laugh with her. She waM al~o a very sensitive woman." Did Mary ever fear that Rhe, too. would be replaced? "I never thought I could be replaced, because they weren't going to do that to me," sounds Mary m an amusingly dra• matic tone. She continue" "If they ever did put me out, I would have gone to the union (now laughing heartily). "To answer your questions, I felt I always did my Job, not that I was too important, as everybody is replaceable. I would have hbd to have been awfully bad for them to put me out." Sexual Exile Terms Brazil Paradise In response to a promi•ed campaign of extermination of Argentine homosexuals by a clandestined Nazi commando group, some 10,000 gays have fled Argentina, Chile and Uruguay for what one "sexual exile" termed a paradise in Brazil, reports the Knight.Ridder newspaper group. Sev<'nteen gay men have been strangled, stabbed or beaten to death in the past 15 months after the Nazi group burned down a Buenos Aires theater which had includNI gay sketches in a review The murders took place in one 30.block area of tht• city, reportedly a place with one of the world's lowest cnme rate•, and the poli<·e have not solved one ca. e to date. Thi• murderH come aflt•r seven years ofsys !Pmatic gay repression m Argentina, lwginning in l!li6 when a military coup shut down gay saunas, hers and hotels. Argentmci; dl'tamed for ,uspidon of hcgm gay received 30-da> ja il sentences and wt're hrandt•d in the national compu• ter file as gay Nestor Perlonghar, one of the exiles. was arrested 15 times before lenvmg the country. In Chile and Uruguay and other South em Cone dictatorshipb, repression is less violent than in Argentina. but there is no open homo ·exual activity. I i DEC 9, 1983 / THE STAR 7 Now Hiring The STAR, your new community newspaper, is ready to begin expanding its service to the Austin and San Antonio gay communities. San Antonio Editor This is a part-time position for an experienced journalist or writer. Submit samples. Will re­quire about 6 hours a week. Pays $200 a month. Austin/San Antonio Advertising Director This is a commissioned position but expect about $1000 a month-more when newspaper switches to weekly format. Mail resume. THE STAR 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 da(a terl(linal, then you sf1oulcf check ! our !he /rites( rorm a;r efetfroniq com• mHmcat~ns ,a th~ay cqmmoo,ty. _ _ Thf1 GN C Ne(Work 1 is a ,pulti-l.lSer __ ns~Jl'llOlmaUiona/ld~~llfithlocaJpho,ls~ftom ovfr 2 cities in the US. & Canada! Our respon~ hmes are last. and hourly 'S, lepal a iso a m lti·USfr ch4f fac,/ity, a d much. much more. You iointss-tt · , tthd we wiH mttil you yoo, owrt persons/ ID a::~tuntr~r.:r.;,.,mi1i.,ei,,clmflicmad.bul~lm-/}ay nu bertpa wor, (alo~w1ththel~lphonea¢cessrumliermyPUrarea) sam day e re6eive ;bur appficaVon. Or, yoJcan 'join on a special trial su scri~ion ahd recp,ve ~I the itenef1s of rf!Jular mempersh,p ~ two f1ee ho rs of'9cce!is Then ,f you w,sb. you can ~,n as i regtiar member.for only $20~. t i • 1 G" Y NEW~• INFDIIMA TIDN • ·-------~----•- -C-O_I.I_M.U_N I_C_A_T_IO__N_S_ •_ __________ _ • Regular Subscription $30 ~ Trial Subscription $15 • Send me more information, please. Name __ Address _ _ City.....__ _________ State ___ Z,p ____ _ Type of Computer-_ ________ ________ _ Clip and Mail to: GN/C NETWORK c/o Montrose Voice Publishing 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 8 THE STAR / DEC 9. 1983 Are Gay People Chewing Up Their Leaders? A Disturbed Peace By Brian Mc:-.iaught There are too damn few gay men and women "ho have put themselves on the line for us to allow one of the better ones to leave the scene w,thout an overdue "thank you." Steve Endean, the executive director of the Gay Rights National Lobby, has announced that he will leave the Lobby within the next few months. He does so with some bitterness, to which he is entitled. He also does so with some peace, for which I am pleased. There are numerous versions of the story which led to Endean's decision to lt>ave GRN'L, none of which concern meat this point. !lior am I presently concerned as to whether or not his departure is "good" for the community. I am more con­cerned that the move is good for Steve Endean and concerned that he not depart without someone publicly calling atten­tion to h1R contributions to our liv1:5. Steve Endean has given his entire adult life to lobbying for gay rights, first in Min• nesota where he earned himself a reputa­tion of professionalism and hard work, and then in the United States CongreBS where he brought class and respect to our presence on the Hill. In his many years of work, Steve has educated thousands of gay men and women acroSB the country on the ms and outs of political stralegizing, educated hundreds of legislators on the legitimacy of gay civil rights and been an articulate spokesperson in the press on the issues that gay men and women face on a daily basis. Endean was a primary reason why many gay men and women decided to get involved in the movement, insofar as they saw in him a maturity and sophisti­cation they had not often seen in gay lead­ers. Perhaps it was time for Steve Endean to move on, as his critics insisted. If this is so, we can only hope that his next endeavor will appropriately tap his many skills, and that he will continue to share his insights with l(&y men and women who recognize the need for political mvolvemenL We also can hope that Steve Endean never regrets the time and energy he gave to the com­munity above and beyond that required by his contract, and that the community will always appreciate his commitment to us. Just as the community responded so brilliantly to Rep. Gerry Studds in his hours of anguish, I encourage you to write Steve Endean, in care of the Gay Rights !llational Lobby, P.O. Box 1892, Washing­ton, D.C. 20013, and say "thank you and itood luck in your next endeavor." For as lonit as I have been involved in the gay movement, I have heard it said that the community will chew up and spit out its leaders. We have all seen it happen over and over again. Our tendency to do so does not indicate that we are less humane or gracious than other people. It suggests to me that we are perhaps desperate for chnnite a little presumptuous and a wee hit homophobic. We often say "thank you" when it's too late such as at the person's funeral or departure from town or our oritanizabons A little encouragement can go a long, long way People who lecd our organiza­tions or edit our newspapers or run for office as openly gay individuals are under far more stres~ than their salaries com• pensate. They often sacrifice a home life and career options because of their com­mitment to the community. They do so believinit that 1t will make a difference and hoping that gay men and women will care. Yet, the mail and telephone calls they receive are often threatening mes­sages from anonymous people. Many times these heroes of the move­ment lie in bed at niitht wonderinit if it'a all worth the effort. Most of them know they could be making more money, have more vacation, enjoy more of a private life and have far fe.,,er headaches if they left their movement work and stepJ)('d into the pubhc marketplace. Getting their names m the paper or appearing on the Donahur .~how was perhaps fun in the beginning, but it lo,;es its appeal, especially knowinit that every appearance lS bound to gener-ate a new wave of death threata. Sometimes I think people are afraid to acknowledge the sacrifices made by oth­ers, because it might make them feel guilty for not being more active themselves. Other people may fear acknowledl(ing the accomplishment of a gay leader because they think it would diminish their power and make their relationship unequal. Some people, I suspect, don't thank or compliment a leader in the movement because they don't think a homosexual should be allowed to get a "swelled head," either because they politically oppose the idea of individual leadership, or they are simply homophobic. These fears are unrealistic. Nearly every gay man of woman I have met is the last 10 years who is working full or part lime in the movement liithts up when you take a moment to say "I want you to know how much I appreciate what you are doing for us all." They smile with gratitude because they rarely hear it, and m saying it, I feel no less active, powerful or secure. This holiday season, as we recall how cease fires are negotiated throughout the war-tom world in respect of religious observances, I suggest a cease fire among warring political factions within the gay community and an extension of gratitude to all those people who give themselves to us. In addition to Steve Endean, I encour­age you to write; Ginny Apuzzo, Executive Director of the National Gay Task Force, 80 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. lOOll; Larry Bush, political columnist and repor• ter, 4 JO 11th Street, NE, Suite 13, Washington, D.C. 20002; David Good­stein, publisher of The Advocate, 1730 South Amphlett, Suite 225, San Mateo, 2700 ALBANY A PARTY Calif. 94402; ,Jim Kepner, director of the National Gay Archives, Box 38100, Los Angeles, Calif. 90038; Rev. Troy Perry, founder of the Metropolitcan Community Church. 5300 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 304, Los Aniteles, Calif. 90029. The directors of your local political and service organizations and the editors and publishers of your local newspapers would also be delightfully surprised to hear from you, especially if you have never polili• cally or socially seen eye to eye in the past. A simple "thank you for your efforts" will give a major boost to them and enable you to feel that you have not allowed one more dedicated person to leave the scene with• out acknowledging his or her commit­ment. - --- 1983 by Brian McNaught, u·ho lwe• in Massachw;l'tts. 523-4084 Friday, December 16 9pm til ?? DJ David Oleson-NO COVER Thursdays in December Wll!LL DRINKS A LL CALL DRINKS 2 1 TOPSH~'te~QUORS FOR 9pm til 2am Commentary Not Quite Priest, Not Quite Nobleman By Patrick Franklin Frederick William Serafino Austin Lewis Mary Rolfe will not disappear. His flam­boyant writing and even more flamboyant character have always branded him as a "minor" prosodist, and yet after many of his more highly regarded tontemporaries have been relegated to the dusty corners of old libraries, Frederick Rolfe, "Baron Corvo," bursts forth every few years when a new group of avid readers discovers his florid soul and acid words. Rolfe was born in London on July 22, 1860, and died in Venice on Oct. 25, 1913. Betwet>n those dates, he managed to write 18 books, innumerable stories, dabble in several other arts and alienate anyone who came to him in friendship. He was a staunch Catholic who revelled in orthod­oxy and a socialist who hated conserva­tives. He indulged himself in making up new and wonderful words, while writing in an antique style that is nearly undupli­catable. He was born into a family that was at best "shabby gentille." His ancestors had founded a piano manufactury that fur­nished instruments to the royal family in George Ill's time, but had in following years come the full round to poverty once again. Rolfe never even had tl)e satisfac­tion of calling the capital his home; eco­nomics forced a move to the provinces when he was very young. Nor could he claim the distinction of a university education. He says himself that "all the education I ever had took place in third-rate schools and terminated by my fourteenth birthday." All those elements combined to create a personality that simultaneously loved and hated the advantages it had been denied. Oei;pita hi I ck of formal schooling, Rolfe found employment as a teacher in a provincial boy's school. He was regarded as eccentric even then, and his attach­ment to an obscure local saint, "Little Saint Hugh," was thought strange. So was his depiction of another boy-saint, William or Norwich, in which he painted over 100 figures that bore a rei;emblance to the child, who in turn had an uncanny similarity with hie own features. He somehow wheedled an appointment to the Scots' College in Rome, where he waa to take up holy orders. His eccentrici­ties and abraaive personality made him aa unpopular there 88 it had elsewhere and he waa aoon ejected from the school. That turned him againat hie fellow Catholics but he maintained hie deep affection fo; the church. It W88 then that he took to aigning his name "Fr. Rolfe," an ambigu- 0118 autograph that could be understood aa "Father_ Rolfe" or "Friar Rolfe," aa well aa "Fredenck." Back in England, he worked what in our own time• would be called "confidence game•." He aaaumed the title "Baron Corvo" and pretended to be a nobleman. Uains the bogus title for entree he drew funds from naive acquaintan~ for ficti­tious projects and lived by cadging meal, and lodging, from kind-hearted friends. However, aome of Rolfe', projects wer­en't bogus at.a!l; they merely sounded that way to 1u1p1e1ou1 ears. He tried to raise fund• to finance underwater photo• graphy, something thought laughable at the time. Rolfe had become fascinated with the new art and pioneered some methods of camera work and film develop­ing. The underwater scheme never came to much. His writing was better accepted, if nar­rowly published. The Yellow Book fam­ous for it1 Beardeley covere' and auociations with decadence, accepted aeveral of hie 1toriee, and of all the short pieces in thoee volumes, Rolfe'• tales 1tand up today as 1till inter-eating. He deviaed ways of telling Biblical talee u if they were pagan legends and also man­aged a turnabout that made tales of Roman• and Greelta sound 88 if they were stories of the Saints. After gulling so many important people, he found it prudent, as well as cheaper, to move to Italy. There he continued his prac­tice of taking lodging wherever possible, often from unwilling but courteous hosts. He also found an outlet for his taste in boys in the street urchins of the city; one of them he called "Toto," and he collected his stories as Tales Toto Told Me. Toto exists for us today on film. There are numerous studies of naked youths that Rolfe took in Venice and elsewhPre. He used their personalities as thinly-veiled girls in his books; The De.ire and Pursuit of the Whole, and Nicholas Crabbe. He continued his interests in painting and even built himself a boat with beautifully­painted sails so that he could travel the canals and lagoons of Venice. And he wrote. His fascination with the Borgia& resulted in an extraordinary book, The Chronicles of the House of Bor­gia, which he frankly admitted to writing as a whitewash of a family for which he felt respect. The book recounts the family history from early beginnings in Spain through its 19th century descendants. The Borgia book fascinated some, in fur• iated others. He did not limit himself to strict history, but made other comments along the way, such as his claim that the rightful ruler of England was Vittorio Emmanuele of Italy because of a tenuous connection with the deposed Stuarts. He used exotic words and spellings, insisting that the "Sistine" chapel was more prop­erly the "Xystyne," and peppered his prose with terms such as "fumicables" for tobacco, "fylfot" for swastika, and so on. Rolfe might have described his life as "contortuplicated." The sheer effort of maintaining his precarious independence and Qelf m in f of ontinued pov­erty and disdain from critics took its toll. He died at the age of only 53 and was buried in a free plot in the cemetary in Venice. If his talent had been totally expended in cadging a living, he would have soon been forgotten. But his exquisitely-written proRe still attracts readers. Its attraction is never enough to insure commercial suc• cess; The Modern Library published an edition of A History of the Borgias which remained on the list for only a few years. Alfred Knopf put out several luxurious edi­tions of his novela which couldn't quite atay in print. Sill, periodically, he becomes redisco­vered. A.J. Symonds renovated his image with "The Search for Corvo" in 1934. Broadway, in the 70., produced Hadrian vn, a dramatized veraion of his beet­known book. Biographieecameoutin 1971 and again in 1979. Toast his memory with a bottle of the Sicilian wine from which he drew hi• title. "Baron Corvo" wu a fraud and an unprincipled rogue. But he wu a writer of great talent and a etyliet of incomparable skill. Franklin, of Carmel, Calif., is the director of Stonewall Feature•. C'J983 Stonewall Featurea Syndica~. Playboy Proposes Male Bunnies When New York's Playboy Club reopens early next year, some of the scantily-clad bunniea serving drinka may be men. Company executives are considering a proposal to add the male bunnies, and some old-timers are hoppine mad about the idea. But many Playboy official• reportedly feel it', time to update the club's ima1e, reports the New York Poat. DEC. 9, 1983 / THE STAR 9 New books from A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS 0 THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $7 00. The entcnammg commg-out story of Burton Raider, who is so elegant that as a child he reads Vogue m his playpen. "The writmg 1s hesh and cnsp, the humor often hilariou•," wntes the l.A Times. "The funmes1 gav novel of the year," says Chnstopher Strut. 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One te nag~r m ten is .oy1 her , twenty-six young -people tell their stories: of coming to terms with being different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were 0 THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5 00. When Cor­dell's best friend and ex-lover 1s murdered, the only clue 1s one that the police seem 10 consider too kmky to follow up on So Cordell decides to track down the killer himself - with roults far different from what he had expected. 0 ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mose.a, $5 00 "I've known that I was gay smce I was thirteen. Does that surpnse you1 11 didn't me .. . . "So begins All-American Boys, the story of a teenage love affair that should have been simple - but wasn't. 0 CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, $5.00. A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the hill, sounds in the night, and a father-son relationship that's closer than most. D THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDmON, by Patricia Sitkm, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been imprisoned by fanaucs in the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the tnp will also involve his own coming out and the discovery of who it ts that he really loves. D DEATII TIUCX, by Richard Stevenson, $6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a private eye in the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay TO ORDER Enclosed is $ __ ~ - ple.ase send the books I've checked above (Add Si.DO postage when ordenng Just one book; 1f you order more tlan one, we'll pay postage ) D Charge my (circle one) Vis.a Mastercard acct. no.: _________ _ expuatton d.ate_· ___ _ signature: __________________ _ name address city ___________ state ___ zip ______ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 10 THE STAR/ DEC. 9, 1983 Fourteen-Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat DEC. DEC. 9 10 DEC DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC, DEC. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 18 19 20 21 22 For add 1 OM mtormat10n or phone numbers for events hsted bel0'N look tor the 1ponaonno organizahon under Organ Zit on5 n the The Stars 0 rectory Selected Event First Week -.wo.VDA l': Alamo Human Rights Committee meets, elect~ officers 7pm, Dec. 12, El Jardin, 106 Navarro. San Antomo Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: ALGPC' Winter Solstice Party, 8pm, Dec. 17, Austin • IN 1 WEEK: Winter begins at 4:31am, Dec. 22 • IN 2 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 • I.V 2 WEEKS: Austin Lesbian Gay Political Caucus meets 7:30pm Dec. 27, Commissioner's Court, Courthouse Annex • IN 6 WB.f.XS: ~OW's Lesbtan Rights C'~mference, Jan 20-22, Mih•aukee • /J\' 7 WBEKS: Gay Press Assocmllon Southern Regional Conference Jan 27-29, Houston • IN 9 WEEKS: Lincoln's birthday, Feb 12 • IS 9 WEEKS: Valentine's Dav, Feb 14 • I,\' 10 WEEKS: 5th Annual Women's Valentme Dance, Feb. 17, Umtanan Church, Austin • IN 10 WEEKS: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 •IS MARCH: ALGPC sponsors "AIDS Awareness Week," exact dates to be announced • /,'\' 12 WEF,KS: Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday, March 6 •IN 14 WEEKS: St. Patrick's Day, March 17 • IN 16 WEEKS: April Fool's Day, April I • J.•,; 19 WEEKS: National Gay Health Education Foundation 1st Southeastern Lesbian Gay Health Conference, Apr 21, Atlanta • / !V 22 WEEKS: World's Fair opens m New Orleans, May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 aJN 24 WEEKS: Gay Press Association 4th National Convention, May 25-28, Los Angeles • IN 24 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May 28 • IN 27 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anmversary of Stonewall uprising, national slogan "United & More m '84," June 15-24 • EARL}' JULY: Lesbian and Gay Bands of America concert, Los Angeles • I.V 27 WEEKS: ;:,.-ational Gay Health Education Foundation's 1st International Lesbian Gay Health Conference, "Toward Diversity," ~ew York, June 16-19 • IN 32 WEE"KS: Democratic National Convention, San Francisco. July 16-19 • IN 36 WEEKS: Castro Street Fair, Aug. 19, San FranciRco •IN 37 WEEKS: Gay World SerieR Softball Tournament opens in Houston Aug. 28, lasting to Sept 2 Store Owners Are you a STAR distribution point? If not, become one. There's no char~e and you'll find 1t will bring people into your business. To be a d1stnbut1on point we require you to place the newspaper ma lighted, easily-accessible location. end be able to distribute at least 25 copies each issue (Some locations go through 400 to 500 copies each issue) Your location will be printed in the paper each ISsue ANNOUNCEMENTS BUSINESS OWNERS We frN NCh weell tn •tus o rectory commun tv org1nuabon1 ptua businesses MtV ng H o stnt>ullon potntl for THE STAR • ndlcaln thil I at ng ... s A~ dlltnbutlOft po,nt DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES DALLAS AREA COUPLE will share home in ex.change tor same for occas,onal v1s1ts to Austin Call 21•/660- 2638 ROOMMATE WANTED San Antonio, Alamo Heights Area Separ ate bedrooms. baths turn,shed Call Skip 512/828-8481 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED STRINGERS WANTED ·The Star" aeek.s lree--lance news writers n Austin end San Antonio for assign- ;';!::~ ~~lu~mp!fheot /i':.;' w~-'X Burleson Rd, Ausl n, TX 78741 You're Reading THE STAR America ·s Newest Gay Community Newspaper Star Classified AUSTINISAN ANTONIO Prescntty working 1n a laboratory and wish ng to get mto sales? Repre,ent nationally known sc1entil1c instrument line College degree 2S-30 years. unaf­fected masculine demeanor and outgoing personality Submit resume In strict con• fldcnhahty 10 Sales Manager. Su1le 21g 26'5 Waugh Dr , Houslon, TX 77006 GAY BARS AUSTIN e Back Street Basics -811 E 7th 477-3391 • Boat House- .(07 Colorado- 47' 9667 e Chances 900 Red River ..t72-t27"J : 7 ~~ty I Apartmen 2828 Rio C.:rand&- • Pauaz-404 Colorado- ,.,, 7003 • Prwate Cel ar 709 E 61~ 477.-oJ87 e RedRrverCrourng .e,1 · RedR ver ..t76-361~ • ~unel up Saloon 705 Red R Y8f 478--8806 CORPUS CHR STI • H dden Door 1003 Morgan A¥ 182-018.J • Jof?y Jack 2 -413 Peopln e Span,shCia eon--517NChaparr11 882-05'0 • Sandbar 408 T 1ylor 88'-0277 e zoc,ac -617S6taples 883-17$3 EL PASO The Apertment 804 Myrtle Club Pigall&- 4\1 E Franlll n A" 532 9018 Diamond UI -308 S Florence -64&-9132 le M tord 207 E San Anton o !>46-9327 Noa Nt>a 6726 Alameda Av 779-9273 Old PJant.a1 on 219 S Ochoa 533--6055 Pet ShOp II 919 Pa sano Or-~9629 S.n Anton10 M ni.ng Co 800 E San Antoruo- = &01 ~ £1 Paso, 544-6969 McA.LlfN Bumpers 1 tOO Pecan Oulfy I 1702 N 10th Mail Sox 200 N 29th SAN ANGELO e Pllase 111 2226 $herwood Way 942-9188 SANANTONIO e Ab I Weaternatre 622 ROOMVelt $32-0015 e 8onham Exchange- 4~1 Bonham 271 18 1 • C.noota -t35 McCarty 3-t-t-9257 • ..,rub Atlant11 321 Navacro- 2'2!r9<l68 e C1ubHeaclsorT1 Is 2526Culebra 436-«50 • ew 309 W Market 221-0333 • El Jardin- 106 Navarro- 2~1177 • ~•c• 119 El Mo 341-4302 • vi eon 'l30 San Pedro- ns-~~ • .J 1 3~ West Av 14 -9359 • Yacam Artnur'I 607 N St Mary a ns-0678 • :::>ne N ght SIIOOn 815Fredencksburg 736- 9942 e Our Pla<:e 11 '5 Gen Krueger-340-17S8 e QawPower&LlghtCo l315SanPedro-- 714 3399 • San Pedro M,mng Co- -829 San Pedro, 223- 0243 • Snulfy I Saloon 820 San Pe(lrc,.----224-7739 • Sunset Boulevard-1430 N Main A..,-22~ • ""alk ol the T :>wn 3530 Broaoway 826--9729 e 1015 Place 2015 San Pedro--733--3365 STAR CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS ADVERTISING RATES Placing a Classified other than a Personals? Read this: • ANNOUNCEMENTS • CARS & BIKES • DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES • EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED • FOR SALE, MISC. • MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS • SERVICES • TRAVEL RATE: Up to 3 words in bold, $2 each week. Additional regular words 30¢ each per week. Minimum charge $3 per week. DEADLINE: 5:30pm Monday for Friday's newspaper. LONG TERM ADVERTISING· Run the same ad 4 issues or longer, pay the full run in advance, and make no copy changes during the full run, and you can deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13issuesor longer under the same conditions and you can deduct 25%. CHARGE YOUR AD: All classifieds must be paid ,n advance OR you can charge your classified to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill-except through your credit card-for classifieds. PHONE IN YOUR AD. Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone In classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. Placing a • PERSONALS? Read this: RATE: Up to 3 words in bold and up to 15 total words, FREE. (Add1t1onal words beyond 15 per week are 30¢ each.) FREE PERSONALS apply only to individuals. No commercial services or products for sale. HOW LONG? A Free Personal can be placed for one, two or three weeks at a time-but no longer without re-submitting the form. BLIND BOX NUMBER: If you want secrecy, we'll assign you a B lind Box Number The answers to your ad will be sent to us and we will then confidentially forward the replies to you. Rate is $3 for each issue the ad runs but replies will be forwarded as long as they come in. ANSWERING A BLIND BOX NUMBER: Address your reply to the Blind Box Number, c/o The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741. Enclose no money. Your letter will be forwarded unopened and confidentially to the advertiser. CHARGE YOUR PERSONAL TO CREDIT CARD: All charges beyond the 15-word limit or Blind Box charges must be paid in advance OR you can charge to MasterCard or Visa. We do not bill­except through your credit card-for classifieds PHONE IN YOUR AD: Only those who will be charging to MasterCard or Visa can phone in Classifieds to (512) 448-1380 Monday or Tuesday, 9am to 5:30pm. The Free offer does not apply to Personals phoned in. You will be charged the same rate as other types of Classifieds (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals) (free or ~ord) (free or 30¢ word) (30¢ word) (30C/word) (3()¢ word) {use add1t1onal paper 1f necessary) bold headline at $2 ~ --- Name words at 30¢ each Address Amount enclosed Blind Box at $3 per issue Total times .•.•.... weeks (O check o money ordor, o cash In person o VISA charge o MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card # Mail to The Star, 3008-A Burleson Rd., Austin, TX 78741 exp date ORGANIZATIONS SELECTED NAT ONAL ORGAN•ZATIONS Gey Press ASIOciation-POB 3360$. Waatungton DC 2!Xl33-f202) 317~430 Gay Rtghtl Nlbenallobby-P081192. WHh!l'lgton DC 20013--(202) $46-UIO 1 th.man R,gfrt• c~ Funct-POB 1398 Wu~ lngton., DC 20013-(20:H 54&-2025 LMnbcl• LegaJ Defenae-132 W 43rd. New York. NY 10038-(212) 8«-9'81 M•d•• Fund for Human R,ghts (Gay Prns AHOC•atlOn}-POB 33CSOS Wash1ng1on. DC 20033-(202) 3117•2430 NaliOnal AMOCtahon of Businna Councils-~Bo1t 15145, San Fr1nclaco CA 9411$-(,415) 885-6363 Nl!ltic>NII Astoe1tt1on of Gay & LMb11n Oemocrallc Ctubl 1742 MIN Av SE. Washington. DC 20003-{202) '47-3104 NallONII Oay Hatth EOUC:lhOn Found11ion-ao 8th Av 11305. N9W Yorll NY 10011-(212) ~1000 Nat,onat Gay A1ght1 Advocat•-5,4(1 Cutro. San franoxo, CA '41 l4-1•151883-3624 NatiONI 0.y r ... FOfc»-10 5th lw. ~ Yortt. NY 10011-(212) 741.5100 NGlf"a CrlS,sttne-e900) 221•7044 foutl!M ""-­YOl'll Stata) T•--• Gay1..-.bian Tap For~POB AK. Dtnton 7'&201-(817) 387-8219 AUSTIN-- Austin LHb1anl01y PoM,c,.l C1uct.11-POB 822. 78787 474--2717 meets last Tues. 7 30pm. Comm111t0ners Court. CourthOuff Annex Win­ter Solthce Party Dec 17. AIDS Aw,1ren.1 Week tn Marci, {Janet Zumbrun at 4'1-1130) CORPUS CHRISTI Gay Bar1enden A11oc1a1ion c/o Zodiac Lounve. 817 St1P4es-~77&3 ~PQi111n C0tnmuntty Churc:J\--c/o Un,tar• Ian Church, 3125 Horne Ad-851-9888 SANANTONIO- --- Alamo Human Rights COmm•ttN-664--0074 65S-~ mHC1.~off1cers. 7pm,0.C 12 El Jardin. 10& Navarro ginr'~:-i!S:-~! N'::e:,:uun~!~· ~!!atrteka 01)'-$w1lchboard- 133,-.7300 Lambda AA 1312 Wyom1ng_ __8 c:7cc4--=28"'1-=9-- LNbl"i'ni Gav"P.ople 1n Medicine-Box 290CM3. 78280 San Antonk> Gay Alliance- 8o1t 12093. 78212- 7J.3-.8315 PERSONALS BLACK AND WHITE-- Men Together createo a better lofestyIe 3317 Montrose, Suite 11•2. Houston 77006 I just realized I've never done this for the same man on two consecutive Christmas's BERNIE OVER 30? GOOD! New to Austin GWM 32, prol, 5·11· 170. bt, bt interested 1n meeting other stable persons 3trs to so·s for fraternity. physical fun. and growth Oascret1on assured and expected. All replies answered Box 3A c/o Star PRISONER SEEKS HELP Gay TDC Prison inmate requires moral and financial support to process appeal to US Supreme Court Landmark decision would prevent being gay as adm1ssable evidence to support conv,chon on totalty unrelated matter Will respond to all ~"c1~1~;«:,, ~~~ ~~~~h6~h~afJab~~s~ Jordan 352893-A. Route #4, Box 1100. Rosharon, TX 77583 --- DALLAS AREA COUPLE wlll share home m exchange tor same ,n Austin for occasIonal v,s,ts. Call (214) 660-2638 DEC. 9, 1983 / THE STAR 11 POLISH GAY MAN 31 passive black hair, hairy body, wants friendship w,th act,ve gay Would hke to immigrate to USA Will aoswer all Andrew Hoszowskl. UI Warszawska, 1 ~ 6 «~100 Gltw1ce. Poland PRIVATE GAY CLUBS AUSTIN-e Ctub Aust.in Batht-308 W l&ch-47&-7986 ByTycho SAN ANTONtO-- i Club San A"tonio- 1802N Man Av-735-1467 • Executive Huttti Clut>-723 Av 8-225-8807 SERVICES, ETC. AUSTIN The Star 448--1380 SAN ANTONt0- Amenc.an Male- (hair re;,1aCement11 -3438 N SI .... ,,.._736-9678 v~. Monte Carlo-N St M•rys-•t Mulberry 73&-ll!l98 Fortunes OON'T YOtJ JUST UN£ ~RISfMAS £VE I BfRNIE.? +-AU IS CALM,ALL /SBRJ@. # ~TING- THE. ~MAS TREE., EGG NCG, L.olEO ~. rur I co MISS lltt lAl/(lUER Cl UTTU:. ~IL~ CfBlltG 1J.18R 6fA5, [XJ,/r-ya., ~ - IM GLN) 'f'OU Ul<E KIDS,~ MY fflRfM5 WINT US lt> SIT MV UTTL£ SISTER ~ ™REE WEEKS ~ Tue( Go CN A VACATICW 12 THE STAR / DEC. 9, 1983 BACKSTREET BASICS 611 EAST 7th • AUSTIN TEXAS 78701 YEARANNV Thursday, Dec. a.· •:~~.;...., ____ . :- , .. Corky presents a . '- ~, · · •Benefit Show for .. , .. -- · the Austin .G~y AlU.~n~~~:.;.-~~ Show at 11'' m-·. --., · ::-,:;,~ ..... . • • -· ·---~•·,,..,_~._.,,-~, '!l'ill, -"""· ~~ ........ l!!!lli"'I.,.... $2 donation at the .door: ,. · Free c ·an B~er Saturday, Dec. 10 Guest DJ Jon Mott from Houston's Rich's $1 cover 50¢ Schnapps All Night After-Hours till 4am Friday, Dec. 9 Paul Parker live at 11:30pm After-Hours till 4am .sund~y, ,Dec. 11 - ~ ,~ . ,. · .. -.Nick :S.tarr-:presents a · ·Benet it Show for . Wayne Schmidt (surgery) Jason Squaza (accident) Duane Berkage (apt. fire) $3 donation at the door 75¢ Well Drinks -.. . All .. Nig.ht
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