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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 9, May 4, 1978
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South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 9, May 4, 1978 - File 001. 1978-05-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2364/show/2339.

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(1978-05-04). South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 9, May 4, 1978 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2364/show/2339

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 9, May 4, 1978 - File 001, 1978-05-04, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2364/show/2339.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title South Texas Community News, Vol. 2, No. 9, May 4, 1978
Publisher Gay Community News
Date May 4, 1978
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • San Antonio, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ~I 1111111111111111111111111111111tiIllfltl11111111111 Ill llllllll I tl111111111111111lt111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 ~ 11111 1 11111111111111111111~ t111t1lllll II Ill I I I I I I lllllll II Ill I II I II I II I I II I II II I I I I Ill I I I I I I I II ltl I I I llllll I II llll II llll I II llll II lllll II I I II II Ill II I Ill I I I I I I I I I I I llllllllll I I I lft I I I 1 l tt tr! : San Aqtonio, Texas VOLUME 2 No 9 May 4 , 1978 011t II II Ill I II Ill I I I I I I I I I I I I I It 1111111111111It1111111111111111 I I I I I I I I II I I I II II I I I I II I I I I I I II I I I I II I I 11111111111 11 1111111111111111 I f111 1 111I111111 1 11111I1 1111; • • --- 'f"""""" """""""""."1 '.I'""""""""""" """"""","," """""""""."l '.I'"""""""" """""""""~" ~ ~ ~ . FREE ~ ........... .l..,. !... ...... .. "Who Me?" Who is it that tramples through this muddy water of life everlasting? What matter of man be you that cuts my twain with such vengence? Have you no sense of love? Have you no charity for us who must be different? I must be me. Mark my words as I die. Make a case against me. Persecute me through all eternity. Do what you must for your self rightousness. You are wrong ! And you shall find no peace . For as you deny peace to others, peace s hall be denied you also . Seek your happi ness in anothers ' s sadness and you shal l never be happy . A scourge and curse be on the peacemakers for it is not peace they make . Teach me not of a god who wages war for any provocation . But tell me of a god who loves all. One who expects each of us to be ourselves , each in their own individual­ness . Let us define normal as being happy as one ' s true self and seek to encourage others in their own ways of happiness. We are an art and God is the artist. In his creativeness he c r eated us all . Joseph Phillip Davidson April 14 , 1978 Page2 Comnnmlty News Carters are "outraged' Betty alcohol addict WASHINGTON (AP) - P resident Cartor and wire ltosalynn werP drpi<-ted today as "out raged" by a newspape r re por t tha t a Se<'ret Servire ai:ent stole a t rophy and gave i t lo their daughter , Amy, a fter Shl' lost a. tra.c1< meet re lay race. LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) - t'ornwr firs t lady Hett ~· l>'ord said toda~ she is addicted to alcohol a .> well as to medieation. " l ha.ve found I am not only addicted to the medication I have been ta king for my arthritis but also to alcohol/' said Mrs. Ford in a state~ ment read by Dr. Joseph Pursch, head of the Long Beat·h Naval ttospl­t a.l'"i a lcohol and drug re-ha htlitation ce ntPr. "The rt- is a sense or outrage throughout the Whitt• lfousr, .. sa id Mary Hoyt, " hik House press se{"retary to tht• rir~ t lady. Gay rights repealed in St. Paul vote ST. PAUL (AP) - Mayor George Latimer, his own re-election overshadowed by a vote to remove homosexuals from protection under a human rights ordi­nnnrc. has beg::?ed gays not to nee the city. "Please stay in St. The Rev. Ric hard Angwin, wh o s pear­headed t he repeal as leader of Citizens Alert for Morality, said at t he church that t he vote means St. Paul homo­sexuals "will have to keep t heir sins quiet." "Our community ~till does not regard homo­sexuality as a viable al-terna tive li £estyle. We sti ll consider it immo­ral and somet hing that s hould not be flaunted before our children ... Some 2,000 gay r i g hts anti '.tis t s marched through down­town St. Paul a fter the repeal. Mar c hers tossed yellow carna­tions and daisies oh the steps of City Hall to mark wha t they called the "death .. of hu.nan rights for gays here. Cr aig Anderson , s pokesma n for St. Pa ul Cit izens fo r Human Rights, which opposed repeal, told a cheering rally held before the marctr t hat St. Pa ul gays would continue to fight for their rig hts. " This is our c ity, too, a nd we're not leaving," he said. "We a r e a ngry and hurt and - dis illu­s ioned in a system whch allows people to vote our basic r ights out of exis tence." Both s ides spent tens of thousands of dollars in t heir campaigns for and against the repeal r esolution_ "The people in this city do not realize tha t gay people a re their own children, co-work­ers and n ext door neighbors, .. said Kerry Woodward, campa ign manager for Citizens for tluman Rights. "We are not going back into the closet." Paul," Latimer urged a rally Tuesday night. .. As long as rm mayor, each of you will be .--------------------------------------------------- trcat"d as a human being, which is what you arc Th<' tu rno ut for an off-year election was high, a lmost 55 per­cent. Unofficial vote to­tals were 54,096 in fa­vor of repeali ng the Sl't't ion or the ordi­nance which prohibits discrimination in hous­ing , jobs, education and accommodation on the basis of sexual and af­f C'ctional preference. There were 31,694 votes against the repNI. At Temple Baptist Church, where 200 sup­porters or the initiative gathf."l'f."cl, s houts o r ''Halleluiah" and .. Praise the Lord!" greeted announce­ments of vote totals. [l.~;w YUHK - f'or· mPr attorney General J ohn ,.liu·lu·ll has. lei1 hosp1taJ aftl\r havmg has nght lup replaced, but >Lill dOl'sn 't have to go back to Ja il for his Watergate conv1ct1on. After leavmg Colum­bia Presbvten an Med1- ral Center Thursday. Mitchell began his fifth con,ec·ul!ve furlough. approved personally by Altomev (;pnen1l Grif­fin Bc·U - Offt<·ials explam<•<! that the only pnson medical rac1ht v avaiJa­bit' for a · disabled mrnate ~ lso hou~s psych1atnc and max1- mum-secunty prL-;oncrs regard('(} as a potential thn·at to MttcheU. Mitchell, 64. was let out of Jail last Dec. 28 after six months of 1mpn sonment. Honda sets sports car DETROIT (AP) - A new Honda spo1ts car may be rolling out of .a Columbus, Oh10, plant m 18 months. an auto mdw;try journal says. Automotive News said 111 today's edition that 1t has learned Amencan 1101.da Co. of Gardena. Calli , 1s work.mg on a notchback·style design · car sho11er and wider I than the Accord. now Honda's largest model. Gay Rights Foes Ready l(ansas, Oregon Drives l(ansas drinli law illegal? By The Asso c i a t ed P ress Encouraged by a fresh victory in St. Paul, Mi nn., the forces fighting legalized civil rights for homosexuals are preparing new of­fensives in Kansas and Oregon. Anrl the fundamental­ist pastor who led the winning side in St. Paul says he 1s looking for­ward 10 the next battle b('(·;n1:-.•' it"s in his old h1,mf>1own of Wichita, h. 1n On Tuesday, St. Paul voted, 54,096 to 31,694, to rPpeal a four-yea r­old amendment that added homosexuals to those protected from discrimination in hous­ing, employment a nd p u blic accom mod a­tions. According to homo­sexual groups, about 40 cities have some sort of homosexual rights ordi­nance. But some are clearly in trouble, oth­ers have been repealed, and many attempts to create such ordinances have been defeated: - On May 9, Wichita will vote whether to re peal its ordina nce, which has been in ef­fect since last Septem­ber. Repeal g r oups forced the vote with 26,000 s ignatures on petitions. On May 23, Eugene, Ore., will hold a s imilar vote. The c ity council passed the ordi­nance last Novembe r , but it didn't go into force because oppo­nents quickly gathered 10,000 signa t ures. - In Dade County, Fla. - pr incipally Mi­ami - last J une, voters turned out in record numbers to over t urn a s imila r ordina n ce, 202,319 to 89,562. The law had stood s ince January 1977, but en­tertainer Anita Bryant and a group called "Save Our Children .. forced a vote by col- 1 ec ting more than 50,000 signatures. The day after the vote. Flor­ida Gov. Reubin Askew signed bills barring homosexuals from mar­rying members of the same sC'x or adopting children. - In San F rancisco, there has been no orga­nized opposition to an anti-discrimination or­dinance that goes into effect next month . But throughout California, petitions are circulat­ing to force a statewide vote on whether to bar the hiring of teachers judged unfit because of public homosexuality or advocacy of homo­sexual acts. - In Seattle, two city ordinances i;rant equal job a nd housing oppor­tu nities regardless of sexual orientation. But a policeman is leading a petition drive to get a repeal referendum. - In Baltimore, the Community Relations Commission has pro­posed a non-d iscrimi­nation measure but it has not yet gone before the city council. Simi­lar state bills have been killed by Mary­land's House Judiciary Committee for the last three years. - In Massa chusetts, the House last year de­feated a statewide bill to prohibit sex-prefer­ence discrimination in many areas of public employment - even t hough it specifically excluded teachers, po­lice and firefighters. A similar bill is being consider ed this year. In Minnesota, spokes­men for homosexuals were vowi ng to fight on in the courts - or in­sisting t hat the defeats in S\. Paul and Miami only obscure larger gains they have made. But the Rev. Richard Angwin, the pastor of Temple Baptist Church who led the St. Paul repeal group, was encouraged: "I foresee doing some work in helping Wic hi­ta, a city very close to my heart," he said. TOPEKA (AP) - It may be some time before anyone can go into a restaurant in t his state and purchase an alcoholic beverage to drink with or without a meal. Altorney General Curt Schneider says he is advising the Kansas Alcoholic Beverage Control Division· director against issuing any licenses for restaurants to serve alcoholic beverages under state laws as they now stand. The 1978 Kansas Legislature passed bills in­t. ended ro legalize the sale of alcoholic liquor in es tablishments where sales of food account for at least 50 per cent of receipts. It was an attempt to say by definition that such restaurants did not come under the Kansas constitutional ban on the ··open saloon ... But the attorney general said it appears the leg- 1:-.lation is unconstitutional in its present form. GO\'. Robert F . Bennett expressed doubts about the cons titutional ity of the bills earlier when he !rt !hem become law without his signa ture. Schneider said constitutional protilems with the legisla1ion might be helped if it were amended so li4uor could be purchased in a res ta urant only in <'On nection with the purchase of food. He said issuance of a license by the Alcohofic Beverage Control director under the law as it no\\/ stands would mock the Constitution ··which he, as well as myself. is sworn to ui)hold."' Transsexual father of child Drugs Found On Spinks Worth $1.50 KLAGENFURT, Austria (AP) - Erik Schinegger, the Austrian who won a gold medal as a woman down­hill skier in the 1966 world ski championships, became the father of a baby girl 10 days ago. Schlnegger, who used the name Erika before having a sex.change opera­tion, married bis wile Renate Sept. 27, 1975. He told re­porters be was very happy that the child was a daugh­ter_ He said her name was Claire- Hangint vi~tim suspect 1n siege nearby restaurant ruscovered the body as she was leaving work. A body found banging from a tree Sunday Is that of a man police arrested earlier this month in a siege of a North Side beauty salon_ Police Lt. Dave Keene said records m the police department indicate it was the same man. Ile was identified as Terry Lee Scott, 26. of the 7100 block of Oaklawn Drive. The body was discovered about I : 30 a .m. Sunday near the intersection of Sherwood Drive and Vance Jackson Road just west of Interstate 10. Pohce reported a waitress from a Officers said a witness told them of seeing a man sitting in a parked car. Police said the car was parked nearby. Ruling due A ruling is pending with the Bexar County Medical Examiner. The North Side beauty salon incident occurred April 8 when a man entered the place, fired three shots, then bam­cadcd inside. At that time. po~ce reported the sus­pect fmaUy surrendered after 90 mmutes ms1de the beauty salon. ST. LOUIS (UPI) The tiny amounts of co­ca ine and ma rijuana_ which led to the arrest or heavyweight boxing champion Leon Spinks on drug charges have a street value pf about $1.50. A detective with the police de partme nt's narcotics bureau Satur­day said the one-hun­dredth or a gram of co­caine a llegedly found in Spinks' hat was worth about one dollar . The delrctive said of the 21 hundredths or a gram or marijuana also alle gedly in Spi nks' possession: .. Man, that's not much ... We don't dea l in am.punts that small. That's millesi­ma l. In an average marijuana cigarette, there's ab<l'ut one ··gram:•> \ 1 I ,! I I l Community News NEWS AT A GLANCE r Sunday, April 30, 1978 THE SAN ANTONIO LIGHT In response to the letter from three former investigators of the district attorney's office, Mssrs. Denn, et al, wherein they cast asper­sions upon District Attorney Bill White and his operation of that of· flee, I will simply say that the writers of such a letter should in­form Light readers as to why they are former investigators, instead of still working in the DA's office. Fur­ther, it would appear they they must have some personal motive (perhaps hoping to get a job from Mike Her· nandez should he be elected) for writing such a letter. As to my being among some sort of privileged few attorneys so far as Bili White's administration is con­cerned, I invite all Light readers to check with any district judge in the courthouse and they wiii find that I probably try more of my cases than most of our local attorneys and will continue to do so. Should Mike Her· nandez be elected, I will be in as good a position with him as with Bill White, so the writers of the let· ter should get their facts straight. As to their comments that Bill White probably got me to write the letter I wrote, this is not true. My letter was written not against Mike Hernandez, but for Bili White. It was my hope that Light readers might be interested in hearing from someone who is a friend of both men, from someone who knows . first-hand the superior qualifications of Bill White for district attorney. CHARLES D. BUTTS l'.o..t e Your Primary May6 It's Election Time White ) Hernandez Battle Fierce DA Campaign • Ill District Attorney Bill M. White is holding on for dear life while Mike Hernandez tries to shake, blow or blast him loose from office. White has been Bexar County's d:strict attorney since April 1, 1977. Hernandez has been running for the job since before he made official his plans on Oct. 12, 1977. Hernandez started gearing up for the campaign shortly after Gov. Dolph Briscoe's appointment went to White instead of Hernandez. So far as the Bexar Democrats are con· cerned, the issue can be decided clearly and simply, since it is an in· and·out affair, with the winner re· maining on hand to meet a Republi· can challenge in Noveml>er. White is a veteran prosecutor with about 14 years of experience in courts at all levels. He was chief of the felony section of the district attorney's office at the time of his appointment to the top job. Hernandez was peace justice in Precinct I. Place 2, for one term be· fore he made his first race against District Attorney Ted Butler in 1974. When Butler was appointed to · a district judgeship, his elective post opened up to set the stage for the current White-Hernandez con­frontation. Hernandez claims a backlog of cases exists amid inefficiency and favoritism. White has an impressive array of statistics showing a marked reduc­tion in crime, stiff penalties for wrongdoers and life sentences for those habitual losers he calls "career criminals.'' Hernandez points to his experi· ence as a trial lawyer and a iud2e in justice court. Sundav. April 23 •. 1978 THE SAN ANTONIO LIGHT THE CENTER STAGE. As Mayor Lila Cockrell sat stonefaced and rigid while being blasted by the COPS organization in front of sons (known or unknown) messing with his campaign signs was Hernandez one of this White election· year's most intrepid (and jarring) stumbles •.. while our DA's supporters were groaning, opponent Mike Hernandez and bis backers were cheering AND repeating Mr. White's quotes ••• EVERY CHANCE THEY GOT! • cam mmrf~I?::•,dl.".• ~.~ ry would just .~.~ .. ~-J... love sitting """"" in the mayor's .fW:..:.~~ seat) rocked :/''"-,.~.: back and ; • forth just-a grinning Cisneros a n d gr i n· Cockrell ning and grinning . . . sort-a like the cat which just swallowed the canary ... it feels real good watching someone else on th" hoi seat, right Henry? Page4 BEN SHAW Dies at 49. Firm Head Shaw Dies Well·known fashion coordinator Ben Shaw, who owned a success­ful modeling studio in San Antonio for more than 20 years and was a leading expert in the women's fashion field, is dead at 49. Shaw died at Hous­ton's St. Luke's Hospi­ta I Monday a fter a lengthy illnrss. Born and reared in San Antonio, Shaw had been residing in Hous­ton al the time of his death. Shaw was a Texas Military Institute and Trinity University graduate. He also at­tended Southern Meth­odist University in Dallas. He 1s survived by his mother, Mrs. Monette Shaw, of Houston, and a brother, Col. John Robert Shaw. of Max­w ell Air force Base, Ala. Funeral services a re pending w i th Por ter Loring Funeral Home. LARRY FLYNT .•. paralyzed AP LASERPHOlO Community News Carter not convinced by rebom Flynt AMII ERST. Oltt0 (AP) - If 1!11stler magazine owm•r Larry Flynt is a born-agam Christian, "h<"s n•born a lo! worse than he slarled out wll h." says Rilly Cart Pr, the president's brother. "l clon't believe an)•thing about Larry Flynt," Carter told a gathering at an auto dealership. "l'vr mrl him and I don't like him. I can't stand hrnt In fact. I was rvcn accusC'd of having him shol My slatem<•nl maclc lo columnist .lack ,\ncl<'rS<'n was 'if J had turn shot from 30 feet with n nfk. hC' \\OUldn't be paralyze-ct."'' l-'lynt n·nHtms par1ially paral:••zt."d m a Colum­hu-; hospital from gunshot wounds suff('red m a l\1an·h () amh11'-'h al Lawrl'nrcn!IP. I.a Do-It-Yourself Pot Test Formulated DALLAS (UPI) - Recent warnings by U.S. health officials that marijuana smuggled from Mexico could contain a highly toxic herbi­cide has led to the creation of a do-it-yourself kit for testing the weed. "Test 'N' Toke .. is being sold by Star Enterprises Inc. of Dallas to provide what the company calls "total peace of mind with your high"' in light of recent gnvernment warnings about the herbicide paraquat. Used in Me~ico's American-aided drug eradication program, para­quat was described in March by the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare as a possible cause of irreversable lung dam­age. Later test• showed nearly a ll the herbicide in a contaminated marijuana cigarette burned into a harmless compound when smoked. The government's arnouncement, however. worried many of the country's estimated 15 million regular marijua~;i users and prompted a lawsuit by the National Organi1ation for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. The new test kit will be placed on the market in Texas within a few days, said Troy And~rson. Star's nLu :u.~ ti11g director. The kits will be available in four other states as svvn J< a Los Angeles ba,;,,d lapora­tory can produce them. Dr. Carlton Turner , an organic cht' fl!ist who direns a government­fina11ccd 1-;tanjua.na research projt>l't at lhc Univt!rsity of Mississi ppi~ said he doubted the test or ottiers like il " " "Id work. "I just don't bel ieve a kit like that can detect paraquat in canna­bis," he said. BILLY CARTER .•• unconvinced Sentenced Former Rep. Richord T. Hanna, D· Calif., was sentenced to a prison term of six to 30 months by o judge in Washington Monday aft­er pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the Korean influ­ence scandal.. He will serve the term in an Alabama prison beginning May 8. AP Laserphoto. - AP laMroholo Raids net 60 I Quite a Life Actress Joan Fonta111e, right. takes a break with Jaclyn Smith during filmina on an AaC-TV movie. Miss Fontaine's autob1ograpt-y will be pub­lished in the fa ll. and s he promises to tell every­thing. 'I've had a hellu•1a life,' she says. tons of do 37smugg BOOTHBAY, Maine (AP) - A total of 60 tons of marijuana was confiscated and 37 people were arrested In two of t~e largest land-based marijuana seizures ever, authorities m Maine and Florida said Thursday. State police Capt. Melvm Graves said 20 tons of marijuana m 600 burlap-wrap­ped bales was sc11ed as 11 was bemg unloaded Thursda v from a cabm cruis· er at a secluded dock m Boothbay, not far from one of ~Iame's most popular coastal summer resort areas. Boothbay Harbor. In Florida, au1hon11es confiscated 40 tons of marijuana at a nor1hern Leon County warehou' e late Wcdne"lay mghl and arrest rd o.•n'n people U.S. Attorney George ~11tchcll said 31 l>C'oplc were chargt•cl in connec1ion \\ ilh Ull' seizure in l\.1am0 and all bul one \ven~ arrcstc-d Thur~day. Th0y \.\ere bnokrd al the Lincoln Count) Jarl in W1sc.a8sl•t and tht'n were taken by bus to Portland for arraignment b(-'fOre a U.S magistrate on charges of con ~pira­cy to possess maniuana :::. Suspeds Mllchell said most or those arrested said they were from Brooklyn, F\.Y .. and l he others "ere from California. Massachusetts and florida. lie declined to say whether more people would be charged. F\ me of those arrested were taken into cu•tody as they unloaded the. marijuana bales lrom the Onalay, an ~rations in Rorie/a,_ Maine 81Hoot. Bnt1sh-rcg1stered while cab.1r. I crmsrr. Gra,·cs said. The boat wa::; tted to a Ion!! woodPn dock al the end or a dirt road m an orea ma. rked for rutu•re I de,·elopmenl The nuir1Juana. \\Ith a :;tr1Jl'l \·aluc estimated at $16 million. was tcmg load<'d into three p1cl-.-up tru,·b. but I apparrntly no marijuana was rnu\·l'd out of t ile area bcf(•rc aullmnlu.. · s clo!:>et1 in, G r<:ffCS said. ~:arlicr ttus y<'ar. toe ' I arnc Lei:."la· turc increased penult1c; fur drug ,;ales and l>OSSt'ssion of large amount!'> of marijuana in an ~ffort to tom bat nr'' ly discovered marij uana t-:muggling activ­ity a long Maine's iagged. 3.500 mile-long coast. F'ederal officials have said Mame is one of the prime drug smuggling entry pomts l1l the united Slates. Graves, head of the Division or Special Inve~tigation. said the investigation that led to the raid had been active for four months. Ellington's friends, family still celebrate F\EW YOllK (Al') - Duke Ellington would have been 79 Saturday and - as when the famed composcr-bandleader was alive - the occaswn will be celebrated m big parties with friends, fans and family. Tlus year, four years after Elling­ton's death, a number of celebralions of the man and his music are planned. Grand piano His sister, Ruth, planned to give his seven-foot grand piano, painted his favorite color, blue, to the Songw1iters Ha ll of Fame. A number of jazz pia­nists, including Dave Brubeck, Mary Lou Williams and Marian McPartland, dedicated the gift earlier in the week by playing Ellington tunes on it. Ellington's son, Mercer, wrote a boOk, "Duke Ellington in Person: An Intimate Memoir," to be published the day of his father's birth by Houghton Mifflin. And on l>aLUrday nlght, the Duke Ellington Orchestra, directed by Mer c­er Ellington, was to play for a dance in Nashua, N.H. Trombonist Slide Hampton kicked off the celebration last Saturday night by directing tile 14-piece Collective Black l\rt1sts Ensemble m a conct:'rt m :\cv. York City of ~;llington compositions EWNGTQN • .• -uld be 79 Saturday 1 1 ' Tryouts The Los Angeles Rams held open tryouts for girls who would be Interested In becoming a Rams' cheerleader. Community News AUSTIN CHEAPEST CITY TO LIVE IN WASlllNGTON (AP) - Dollar for dollar, a family of four lives better in Austin than in any other metropolitan nrca, a 40-city government survey 'hows. On the other hand, New York and Boston arc about the worst places for the econom1cally minded, the Labor Department says. In its annual report on urban family budgets, the department said Wednes­day that an average urban family of four must cam $10,481 a year to main­tam a low standard or livmg, $17,106 for a middle standard of living and $25,202 to enjoy a high standard .. The mcome levels represent the cost of three hypothetical lists of goods and services, mcluding taxes. drawn up in the m1d-l!l60s to portray the three rela­tive standards of li>ing. The survey showed that a dollar goes the farthest in Austm, where a family can maintain a low standard of living on $9,286 a year, a moderate standard on $14,776 and a high standard on $21,727. But if that family moved to Boston, it would cost $20,609 to maintain a moder­ate standard. And in metropolitan New York, it would take $31,655 to keep up a high standard. Both figures arc the highest of the areas surveyed among the 48 contiguous stales. The San Francisco-Oakland area is the most expensive place for a family to maintain a low standard of livmg, requiring an annual income of $11,601 a year. Living costs in Alaska and llawail arc much higher than elsewhere m the country, but they are not comparable because of unique transportation costs that drive up the price of goods. In general, the survey reported, costs were lowest in small Southern cities and lughcst in large Northeastern cities. The figures, based on a survey con­ducted last fall, were adjusted to rcncct rising prices and changes in taxes since the 1976 survey. In 1976, the government said, 1t cost an average of $10,041 a year to maintain a low standard of living, $16,2:16 for a moderate standard and $23,759 for a high standard. By 1977, a typical family of four need­ed to cam 4.4 percent more money to maintain a low standard of living, 5 4 percent more for a moderate standard and 6.1 percent lo keep up a lugh stan· dard. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated that the median income for a family of four in 1976 was $17,315. Figures for 1977 are not yet available, but they are expected to rise. loneliness part of If singleness is power, wbat about the lonely feelings that come someti­mes when you are living alone? How can I explain those powerless moments? Actor Dead At Cushing CUSHING - Jaymes Daniel, a 32-year-old Cushing man and Holly­wood actor, was found shot to death Friday in what authorities de­scribed as a suicide. Daniel was found dead in the Cushing home of his mother, Mrs. Clara Mae Daniel, when she returned home from work about noon, police said. He had been shot once in the head with a .45-cal­iber revolver, investi­gators said. Daniel, who had been living in Hollywood for several months, had ar­rived in Cushing Thurs­day for a visit, authori­ties said. He was a stage, film and televi­sion actor in Holly­wood. w here his brother, Jay M., is a di­rector and actor, rela­tives said. Prison pressed for Isabel Peron BUENOS AIRES. Argentina (AP) - Public prosecutor Sadi Massue asked on Monday that former President Isa­bel Peron be sentenced lo six years in prison for misappropn ation oi public funds. Half a dozen charges of financial misdealings have been leveled at Mrs. Peron since the 1976 coup that toppled her government, but this is the first lime the public proseculors's office ha.s requested a specific sentence from the judge hearing one of the cases . . the deal She's a Crashing .Failure SHERMAN, Texas (UPI) - U Odessa Mae Parish ever takes anoth· er driving test, she'll probably go elsewhere to do it. The Department of Public Safety officers might r emember her in Sherman. Mrs. Parish, 72, had completed h er driving examination Tuesday and was about to receive her license as she pulled into a pa rking spot at the DPS office .. Officer Gene Hodge decided she was too close to another car and asked her t o back up and try again. He shouldn't have been so picky. Mrs. Parish reversed, shifted to a forward gear and then apparently became confused about the functions and placement of the brake and the accelerator pedals. The car jumped the curve and lunged through the plate glass window of the license of· flce, leaving 30 feet of ·sk idmarks on the waxed floor as it plowed through desks, c hairs and office materials. A clerk, Carlene Walker, 25, was hospitalized with a broken foot but there were no other Injuries. Russian royalty claim The old woman, shrunken by age, peered out from behind a dainty, gloved hand held close to her face. Just a wisp of a knowing smile hinted that she knew the question before it was asked. ls she really Anastasia Roma­nov. daughter to the dead Russian Czar Nicholas II? Did she really somehow survive the mass execu" lions of her family during the bloody Bolshevik Revolution of 1918? For more than 50 years now, Mrs. John Manahan has been answering "Yes" but saying little else to convince skeptics world­wide. At age 76, the story, the claim~ remains unwavering. MRS. JOHN MANAHAN The princess from Charlottesvtl­le, Va., by way of Romania and Germany did nothing to unra...el the mystery minutes after de-plan­ing with her husband of 10 years at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport Friday. The couple came to Texas al the invitation of local businessmen. Friday night, they attended the premiere of "Rasputin" performed by the Fort Worth Ballet Associa­tion. During a brief interview with newmen, the diminutive woman voiced her frustration with the ever-present request for "docu­ments and documents" and with "people who know more these days than the people who were there." Mrs. Manahan did not clarify how she survived what history generally says was an execution of the royal family in a cellar in Ekaterinburg (now Sverdlovsk). The claim to royalty has never been legally substantiated. How­ever, last year, a West German forensic expert said he positively ide ntified Mrs. Manahan as Anastasia by comparing a picture of her right ear lobe with a picture of Anastasia's right ear. A photo taken in 1913 shows the 12-year-old princess with a Mona Lisa smile. Beneath the bright camera lights in a bustling airport 65 years later, another smile play­ed across the lined face of an old woman. Is it the same smile? Is she real· ly Anastasia? Page6 ei.nmuntty Nen CUllENT . Cl HEMA A'! UNrnA."RRJ-O:D 1·:m1AN (R) Directed by Paul r•azursky Jill Clayburgh is a talented lady to watch for. Like Diane Keaton, she is a young ac­tress who started in silly comedies and has finally found the right picture to prove herself. I can guarantee that she will be nominated for "Best Actress" at next years Academy Awards. Clayhurgh is strictly a ****1 actr~ss, without doubt , but AN um:ARRIED •·:or' Al! is not one of the best pictures of the year, as J had anticinated . Jn its story of a breaking relati~nship it is neither as witty as Allens' ANNIE HALL or as dram<i-­tic as 13ergmans ' .:JCE~~~J FRCr.~ ~ r.:ARRJ AGi . A good sun}'lorting cast is v:ha~ is mo·.·t missing. As Clayburghs husband, J'ichael !'urnhv is only talented enough +'or tele­vision. ''"hen he breaks dovm in so h:J on the streets of New York, tellin~ :1ayhurgh that he has fallen in love with a young girl he met at ijloomingdale ' s , he is em­barrassln~ ly bad. Therefore, it makes it difficult for the audience to feel Clay­bu. rf;h,.~ "Dain , even thouf~h her exnr0~ :>;on~; in this scene arc •.··ondcrf.'ul. As her new love intrest, the tcady bear artist, nlaycd by Alan ~ates, is never totally satis~ying or even very intr~sting. He never touches her )1Crfcction . He JUSt isn't good enough for her. As.a mattcr~oF fact , tbe r11n moves at its best pace when Clayburgh shart:G scenes with her daughter and her female nsychiatrist, who are both excellent ac­tressca. Her daughter , (Jhjrley r.~acLain's non-dancing daughter in TH.~ 'r'.J;H-:JNG l Cii,!T , ) zan::: her with clever one-liners, and her n3ychiatr.i.:::t is one cf the most hlzz.are, and wonclerf'ully 1inusual ones :'." ' ve seen in "ilmr. . This is my favorite ~azursky film , (which lsn't saying a lot since I hated TJ01 .r CA'1('L .~ T::J ~' ALiCE. :n;<;? n: J.c::;' and iTA'<"ffAl''D TC•NTO,) but the fiJm lt­seJ r- has a Tot of catching 1n' to do be­" hre lt is as bril1iant aP ~ts starring 1.arly . (*"~) Nominee at this years Academy Awards +'or "Best Documentary ," THE CHILDHSN OF THTi;ATR?. 1TREET is the sensitive story­of the children who attend the Linengrad school of ballet in Russia . The children, both boys and girls , are between the ages of nine and thir­teen, and only twenty are chosen from over five thousand who audition . Those that are chosen will study not only danc­ing , which the school, of course , special­izes in, but all studies of a regular educating school . The most fascinating scenes in the film , which is narrated by Princess Grace Of ronocco , are the actual ballet scenes themselves. Brilliantly colored , and grace.fully performed, they are the very best to reach the screen. . Unlike THE TURNING POINT , which made dancerSS"eem snoopy and unlike­able , TH2AT"!'lE .'iTTlEET shows them as beautiful peo~le with pride . They are set aoart from other children; they know they are special. The film goes from the grueling begginning to the graduation night o! one year at the school . It is a very moving motion picture , full of the beauty of dance , which soars so much more in other countries . In America it seems somewhat lost , but CHILDRi~N OP Tl-l".:ATR3 >'!11nET brings it back to our hearts . ourears ' our (-"~-<:·) FCLCCA"~'r (IJ) 'Jirected by r:arvin Chomsky Generally I ~ould net review so~ething ?jke this. I really hate'tcl~vision . But ':c1,c""::A'J>T (a 'l!;· hour novel filmed for t.v. ,) i~ a great excention. It is the r-031; movin.o;, best acted , and most pain­""• 1lly true ~ovie ever !'lade for television, It is incredibly real, and for the first time that I can remember I really cried a:ter vie~ing the fir3t three hours, on the 'irst ni~ht. Yes , of course, I ' ve read ·n"lat h<nrmed to the .JeVJs in Germany , ~oland , etc., but after seeing HOLOCAlJ ~'.r I ···ill never feel the same about it . The film is !'laybe a little too hard on its audience , because it doesn 't snare even cne for~ or the torture. It ' s ~11 here, and ~e have to look at it. ~e must look at it, feel the uain, think about it , end cry about it~ .. and make sure that nothing like this ever happens again . Tha film is the story of two families . . ~ri.c and ~'arta '.Jori' are Germans, and though we synnathise wit"l them in the start , it :3 ~ot long before they become definite ene:~ies, The ·eiss family is the family ···e gro•:r ver:1 attached to, and it ' s ex­t- e~eJ y oalnful to VJatch each one of them die in one way or ano~ner. The on~y sur­vl.' 1or:; in the end a.re Rudi :."eiss, vrho at t:,·enty-three ran a··,ay from Germany to "ind another li Fe, (because of what vras hannenin~ . ) and Inga Helm, ~udi's brothers ' wire, who does everything in her power to be ":i th her husband , v.'rlO has been unjustly sent to jail for no reason. The cast is simoly incredible . They give the most believable performances of any actors in a television movie . .Joseph 1ottoms as young Rudi is the best. His wor;c is natural and convincing. Meryl ~trecp is also very wonderful as Inga. ~ven at 9~ hours, HOLOCAU3~ never idles. It moves with clearity and its audience is always caught un in its horrowing story . ~y only comnlaint is that the end-ing seems a bit quick . After all the dVIelling on the cruelty of the Germans , it would have been nice for the film to have snent more than two minutes show-ing the Americans take over . Also at the end, ~udi and Inga do not show as much unset in their lives as through the story . Things have cleared up too soon; things have already been forgotten , and put away , and that shouldn't be . Sut , every­thing about it can 't be perfect , and it damn near is. (****) Page7 ' '•!A"''.:\ U('J,') vc:.q 1.fA''.D (PG) directed by qobe-rt Zemeckes ·'her T ~irst heard about this film I ~ittered to myself '"!o way . I absolutely will not see it." And I almost didn ' t . 'hy ~id 1 decide to ? ~ell , you see 'te'len 3nielberg (whom I love,) is exec~tive producer . And if he had enough ~alth in the film to invest his money in it , then I thought "so 3hould I." And s:ire enourr,h , T "AFNA 11010 YOUR HAND io; a very hilarious movie about the re­ac~ ion the Beatles had on teenagers everywhere. J remember the day in this film pretty well . I was only seven, but J remember my mother told ~e to come and watch The ~d :ullivan show because The Beatles were i;;oing to he on it . 'ell. I didn ' t even kno•·1-".•ho the 'leatles were , but (as I saw, ) thous:mq:p of. g.i rl:> did, T ~ouldn ' t be-lieve hOY' they were all ;,~"earning and faint­ing . 1" '"ANcLt\ 'lOL') YOJT~ HAND recreates that -:l<iy "or us , through the lives of about seven teena~er~. all of which most are cr?.7.y abo11t ··ti- 'P.tles . -iy the time the ~ ul l i van sh<'" .;,ins they have each gotten ti.clo:et:> in on~' vmy or another. One of the gi~ls manage:; to get into their hotel room , but only gets a view of their feet because she ' s having to hide under the bed . Another girl h?.s gotten tickets by phoning in a correct answer to a radio station ; but she then gets stuck in an elevator . ihen she finally does reach the theatre just in time ~or ~he leatles,she promptly faints and misses the entire act! The film i'1 very original and actually a very clever idea . Regardless of what your ~i~st thoughts on it might be , there is good hw:10r here , \·Ii th a robust cast of newcommers . And th2.t ' s quite a hit . ( ->-H·) FM ''G) 3omewhat directed by ,John Alonzo ~here was ~imnly no reason for this movie to be ~ade . lt i3 simply an excuse to play ahout twenty currently ~orular rock hits . And since the hits they are playing are nretty ~uch the hits of today , I would estl~ate that this entire nroduction was consu:ned in less than two weeks ... and it s 11o·~·s ! mhe ~ilm attemnts to tell the story o~ 2. 1;roun of d . . i . ' s at an q .1 radio station who decide to go on strike in order to keen their original format , which is to nlay no commercials . A lot of the film is nothing but concert scenes from ,Jimmy 3uffett and linda Ronstadt . And they could bore one to death , unless you really like these two . This film is so obviously cashing in on the sucess of 3ATURDAY NIGHT FJVZR , and as much as I hated that film, this one is much worse . The jokes are of the lowest ; an example being when a dark haired , red liDed , and big boobed girl comes ln to the 9 . J . booth with a skimpy little top and slacks that are so tight they look like they 've been painted on. 3he tells Swan (one of the d . . i, ' s , ) "Have you ever seen white nipples before?" ~el l, this re­viewer almost vomited , but atleast she did spare showing them to us . (0) Collllllunlty News "ONE 5ING3 THE OTHER DOE3N"r" (U) directed by Agnes Vard_a _ - This is 1977's true picture about women, and you would know that it would be the French to do it. This is their answer to American movies like THE TURNING POINT and ,TULIA , ONE SINGS, THE OTHER DOESN'T is a very nerso~d~uching drama about two female friends. They are not famous writers , radicals or ballarinas , they are just ladies. Ladies caught up in the world of life. They feel , they get emotional . They love, feel and make. They have children. And one sings, and the other does not. They are not always together through the film ; and often they are seperated by many, many miles. But their love for one another is strong, and they can always feel each others presence. ONE 3INGS, TH~ OTHER DOESN'T is a quie:r-little fi~ full of no pretentions . It is wonderfully acted and handsomely directed .Art at its highest level . (****) AP"OS 'r '3 urm2R (PG) Directed by r'artin Davidson I hate to see movies like this for one -reason: I sometimes like them. A critic is j11st not supposed to like a movie like ALl'03T SlJl'.'~'Eq! It ' s strictly a fun movie, full of absolutely nothing artistic. But can ' t movies sometimes be fun? AJ.!'OS'r s UJ'!'MER is the story of the people in and around the Pacific High ~chool campaign for student body , Jt supplies more laughs than about four recent comedies I can think of, and it's got a warm attitude about people . There are (for once,) no stereo-types . Even the bad guys are good guys , It all leads up to the senior prom, of course, but there ' s plenty fun in getting there. The c~st is just about the most sen­sitive I ' ve seen in a B movie. None of them are stars , but they've all got a future . Didi Conn (so terrible in YOU LIGHT UP MY LI~~.) is just perfect in thrs-film. 3he looks like a donkey with braces, but her character makes up for looks with a charming personality. As the boy who is running for Pr esident of the student body , John Friedrich is attractive ·and able. Really, all of them are wonderful, and I loved this movie . I ' ll probably never make another Rex Reed or Gene Shallit, though , because critics are not supposed to like fun movies with sincere little messages, But I can't heln it. ALrlOST 3lJT.'~1l':R made me just feel reai good~I like that! (***~) \ \ \ -IS IT NECESSARY THAT POWER WILL LEAD TO CORRUPTION ? For the past sever al year s we have been inundated with incidents of how power does corrupt. WATERGATE: A President of the United States was forced to resign his office, under pressure from some of th e same people who ' chose ' not to seek re-elec­tion or were thrown out of office due to thei r involvememt in the Korean rice scandal . E~en closer to home we have the possible colusion of certain local politicians with the company that supplies the fuel to light our homes and keep us warm. This will surely turn out to be another scandal, of lower key and of a local nature , but a scan~al never the less. How could a company sign a contract to supply fuel at one certain price , then a few years later raise that price with impunity. They must of had some sort of inside help. Realy •• ••• Certain organizations, who have gained power by their efforts to organize citizens groups to obtain the just due o~ ALL citizens, have now, s ince they have shown that they do have the POWER Are they now planing to dictate to the people need ? It seems .as if the voice of the peopl e has become the loud-speak er for a chosen few . Now to the latest fiasco! An appointed official, who is pledged to prosecute alledged violations of the law is saying he intends to send out HIS investigators to protect , and if necessary "SHOOT TO KILL" anyone who woul d DARE to disturb one of HIS billborad ' s around the city exorti ng peopl e to vote for him and by thei r vote , return him to power , for a full term of his own . Maybe it is not necessary that POWER in itself will corrupt but from the above ·detailed incidents it would lead the voters of this community to believe that it does , when put in the wrong ha nds . POWER DOES CORRUPT \ \ \ Community News DROP EVERYTHING . (]) 8 +> ::l 0 .0 l1l ft ..c: E-l () 0 +> z -M p'.:l (]) ..(c]:) s +> P< 'tl 0 Ii. r-1 0 (]) +> +> ·rl <+-< H 0 ~ A 0 ...:1 +> s::: :::> -M 0 r.l r-1 ::i:: Cfl I Cfl s: ..c: l1l H P.. A :::> fl) Cfl ::l CJl ?> (]) CJl ::l - r.:l bO ..(c]): :> Q H CJl .... GETTING BIGGER..!: GETTING BETTE~ l J ANNOUNCING · OuR NE.w G-AME & LouNGE AREA W1TH Pool- TAe,LE &.. P1NBALL MACHlNEs , !!! im; CLUB . (.. cr;i] . TCLUB ~BATH AUSTIN 308 w. 16/Austin/47s~79as Two-star 'billing' for NASHVILLE, Tenn. different areas in the I b h }t~b11r~ Katha;~;j" ~u:~rn~either ~~~;::,a~ 5 en s ow Maureen O'Sullivan. Uy knew of ·the other's - apparently unaware presence until Martha o! eac.h other's presence Ingram, board - showed up !or a local rhairman o! the Ten-perrormance o! a Hen- nessee Perfornung Art.s rik Ibsen play. F oundallon, made the discovery. The two, attending a performance o! "Hedda Gabler" at the Advent Theater, were seated in Seating was rearran· ged so the actresses could sit together. ~I ~' ~I ..~.,,! Austin Country 705 Red River GAY.. SWITCHBOARD 477-6699 Mr Peeper s Bookstore 213 E. 6th ; The Apartment 2828 Rio Grande Private Geller 709 E. 6th Pearl St. warehouse 1720 Lavaca CLUB BATH 308 w. 16th Hollywood Club 304 w. 4th All American News 2532 Guadelupe Stallion Bookstore 706 E. 6th M.c.c. 614 E. 6th. Page9 GYPSY'S GIBBERISH ...•••..•.•. from Austin Well, it l ooked like family night at the t ubs recently . . . WOODY, TOMMY, and GEORGE (Private Cellar) were camping it up just outside Gypsy 's d oor .. Oh, Miss Gypsy has decid e d not t o go back to THE BIG F . . too much f un being singl e ! Too , I'm wa i t i ng for just t he righ t man to come . JOHN , I hate to hear you ' re l eavi ng THE COUNTRY ! Who can ever take your place? Know that BRANDY will miss you . DONNI E , is i t true that BILL POCK took that trick away from you? How rude , BILL ! ROSS , what ' s this about dumping JOHN R. if there are Greek sailors around? I 'm tol d t hat EUGENE i s trying to be trashi er t han Mis s Gypsy .. . girl, you' l l have t o get up early t o get that t r ashy! Oh , Oh , Oh, wha t i s t his I hear a bout a sex cha nge , MIKE K? Su r e l y MADAM would not be amused, or would you, MICHELLE? Welcome t o Austin, JIM C from Philadelphia .. . one of Miss Three Letters slaves ...• how did you like the tubs? My very most sincere apologies, SAM (French Dressing), it was mistaken identity. New waiter at THE PRIVATE CELLAR •. ALAN Mand such a good waiter. Gypsy's never seen so many divorces and upcoming divorces .• too numerous to mention, but Miss Gypsy is one of them even though she's looking for a husband right now ••. she's reserved the Bridal Suite at CLUB AUSTIN, hoping to find one! Saw RABBIT TEST and am now sure I'm pregnant! AFTER HIPPIE HOLLOW HOUR at THE PRIVATE CELLAR is great! We get free beer and hotdogs •• thanks GEORGE for another winner! Don't forget Friday May 5 is GYPSY'S FIRST ANNUAL HANGING OF THE Bs (BOBBY and BILL) at THE APARTMENT LOUNGE ...• should be a night to remember! Also watch for the big announcement soon of THE FIRST ANNUAL GYPSY l'DILDO AWARDS .. could very well b e the social event of the s eason in Austin .... ! will be taking nominations for many , many awards soon .. in an upcoming i s sue of this so tasteful column. BITCH AND BEAD READING TIME! A few weeks ago, some unscrupulous, rotten thieving queen ruined a nice vacation in Austin for one of our Midland friends by stealing his wallet and a lot of money •• happened at one of our gay businesses .•• it is hard enough being gay in a society that permits the activities of creatures such as anita bryant, without being rip­ped off by another gay! SICK SICK SICK! OK get this and get it good, MADAM, if I don't get fuchsia drapes so soon in that suite of mine I'll be forced to move out of the HOMO HILTON! Good seeing you out and about in Austin POLISH PRINCESS from Houston! San Francisco is just going to have to wait •. much too busy a girl right now to leave Austin ....• business to take care of, my tasteful column, etc. Really glad to hear you've decided to stay with us BOBBY KONRAD (New Apartment Lounge) •• we would have really missed you! Oh, not easy being a tasteful columnist and it's not easy being a woman!! AUSTIN COUNTRY is really out of sight •••• always so much going on there .•• it keeps a girl so very busy keeping up! Hi to CHRISSY, BRANDY TIM, LUPE, CHRIS, JERRY, JOHN, MIKE, and BOBBY· and all you other sweeties there!! PETER, PETER, PETER! For CHUCK, I think Melissa is beautiful and sweet! Now that I have learned to say Rijsstafel, I love it even more, CHUCKIE JOE .•.. at ZIPPY'S! STEVE, why is WALTER always grabbing for your WONDER TITS? Could it be he'd like to go straight? WANDAWHALE went back to Houston after she bummed her last nickel at the tubs! CHARLIE MYMY tells me he is still in love with DAVID, whoever David isl WALTERINA SLEAZE is now into water sports ••• right JOHN, MIKE, and RANDY! I hear TROLLINDA DILLYDALLY, AMAZON WOMAN (pronounced "amazin'"), farts in her own nest! FRED G., that beeping you hear' at THE PRIVATE CELLAR is just GEORGE Ds new pacemaker! DAVID BOBO (Private Cellar) , I wonder why you tell everyone your hair is naturally blond and BOBBY PATPAT (The Commanlty Newt Austin Country) , did your brown hair dye run in the pool? RODNEY, I hear Tillie chased you away from the Eeyore Birthday Party f o r indecent exposure! Glittered jock strap and all! ANNIE is no orphan! Every t roll t h a t goes to the tubs a d opts her for the ni ght! Whe r e 's the BARONESS ROTUNDA VON LOTTA TWAT late l y? WALTERINA tell s me t he AMAZON WOMAN is l earning t o use a t ypewriter .. a c cording to Walterina you ' re a hunt and pecker! Thank you, ED for all those free burgers . • . . Oh , man , I have eaten a ton of them . .. in bed ! CHILI QUEEN ALEX, who did you go home with the other night from Pearl Street Ware. ~ JACK , I ' ll be very happy to transla , very tasteful column f or you, anytime . . my bed or yours ? SAMMY, we 're sorry to hear you ' re sick ... sure miss you! How 's tha t sweet J OHANN? My daughter RUTH is liv ing with my mother i n West Texas now! THE BI G F t ook h e r out f or me last week. After a ll, I did get custody ! MIKE DALY has such a crush on TOM ••. happy birthday to you Mikel Also, happy birthday to you FREDDIE! When are you and MAUDIE getting married? Soon I hope! AMELIA, that's a great bit of news ••. congratulationsl Do you really write poetry •.. WALTER SLEAZE? Heard you really trashed a few queens at the tubs, including Miss Gypsy •••• taste­less bitch! Who talks his tricks insane enough to go to bed with him? We know, don't we girls? Miss Gypsy almost got herself into a big mess recently, but HE struck out! Gypsy doesn't play games .•• but so many around who do play games! My sincerest regrets to RICHARD, but I knew it wouldn't work just as I knew it could never work out with me and that baseball player! Phillip(s), I hope you can put up with as many foul balls as I did, but you probably know him better than II Hi MARKI I'll meet you at the tubs s ometime and we'll make mad, passionate love! OK? It would be tastefully festive, I'm sure o f it! ZAC STERLING's last c o lumns were ver y good and very graphic! Just keep on trashing those movies, ZAC! Welcome to the family, NEIL ..• nice to have you! We will make life festive for you! Is it s o you're making house calls now, WOODY? Do love the graffiti on the laundry wall at the tubs! It reveals a lot about certain queens! We could have done without the AUSTIN SUN's article about the tubs! Oh well, let them eat crow! I'm looking for a boyfriend for you ANNE L, but I really don't know any straight guys •• sorry bout that! NOW, what is this happy horseshit about San Antonio needing shots if Gypsy comes down for a weekend? Really, now, GENE-ETTE .•. I have my shots regularly at the tubs once a month .••• at least that's what MADAM tells me I'm getting ••• alwa:ys somebody poking me there! Next time we check into the fabulous EXECUTIVE HEALTH CLUB in San Antonio I'll be sure to wear my health certificate around my cock! OK GENE? Indeed! And who's Judo? I enjoyed hotdogging with you, JANELL and PENNY at THE PRIVATE CELLAR last Sunday .••• we put away the hotdogs, didn't we, girls! And so much beer! Thanks, WOODY, for buying me the triple Gypsy and the Pina Colada, but I could hardly get home afterwards!! The FREE VD clinic at CLUB AUSTIN once a month on the 3rd Friday, sponsored by a group of greats, THE PRIVATE CELLAR, GAY COMMUNITY SERVICES, HEALTH DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, and CLUB AUSTIN, is a much needed service to the gay community ••• ! want to see it used more, both by men AND women! You need not be a member of CLUB AUSTIN, nor pay anything • .. in fact, YOU WINI For the women, a FREE drink from THE PRIVATE CELLAR and for the men, a FREE drink and a FREE locker pass at CLUB AUSTIN! Can ' t refuse an offer like that •••• want to see more WOMEN use this service, tool Thank all of you who provide this service. We can stamp out VD if we all cooperate. It is held from 10 p.m. till midnight. Come get your test, yawl heah? Love, Gypsy l'Dildo OPINIONS : EDITORIAL LEI -: - What's going on : IERS Soulh Texas Community News r. o. Box 182 San Antonio, TX 78291 -: -: :•••1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111~ ::. 1111111111111111111111111111 I I I I I I I II I I I II I I I I I I II 1111111• 111111111111111111111111111111111111f111111111111111111111111111111111111111IllJ11111111111111111 lllr: WHO'S GOT THE WHITE HAT ? Lately we have been hearing a lot of pro and con on just who is the best one ~o represent us (the Gays) in the race for District Attorney, and we have been pressured, coaxed, chided, romanced, and in general, pushed into a corner as to WHO we felt was the man for the job. I can not tell you who is BEST in that position, I can tell you who I persona­lly feel more comfortable with. I'm sure that most of us in gay businesses have mixed emotions on the subject and' I possibly have more than my share. In the past I have seen, and been led myself, down primrose lane by promises of 'the land of honey' treatment if we would help to elect certain persons to a desired position. Feeling that we did need a change, and that a new face had to improve our position, we voted, we delivered as requested, onlyto regret it within a very short time. As for our present District Attorney, he is an appointed official, not elected and he has been in office long enough for us to have a general idea of just where he stands. Remember this, if he intended on any spectactulars, NOW is when he would be going into his act, for as"! just pointed out, he is appointed, NOT elected and he is gohg up for his first elected position. Now is when he needs votes and needs them badly, so again I remind you, if there was ever a time in Mr White's career that we could expect legal gymnastics, it would be now. I personally feel that the San Antonio Gay has a fair and equel treatment when it comes to the legal side of life, we are not harassed when we go to bars, or other gathering places. We are not treated on a par with Los Angeles or even San Francisco wh~n we some times get carried away with our actions in the parks and on the streets. In short, we here in San Antonio enjoy a pretty much trouble free life style as far as the law enforcment agencies are concerned, and this is exactly as it should be. Now I find it hard to come up with a reason to dump Mr White, a proven and trusted, as far as I'm concerned, man who has done us no foul deeds in the past. I find no reason to feel he will do so in the future. Gene Evans B,N, The addresses are as follows: ABC Television Network 1330 Avenue of the Americas, N.Y.N.Y. 10019 CBS Television Network 51 W. 52nd. St. N.Y.N.Y. 10019 NBC Television Network 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N.Y.N.Y. 10020 SACRAMENTO, Calif. to qualify the initiative (AP) - In a rare political for the November ballot. victory for homosexuals, Al Tuesday's hearing, a state Senate committee homosexual activists, has approved a ban on job including the state's most discnrninalion based on prominent gay politician, sexual preference. were taking a more But the bill, approved 4- optimistic long-range 0 Tuesday by the Senate view. , Industrial Relations Com- "What is happening is mittce, is thought to have, - ·~ little chance or final passage in this election, year. The h<imosexual com­munity races the possibU· ity or a potentially more serious defeat later this year in a state ballot Ini­tiative aimed at removing homosexual teachers and gay-rights advocates from public schools. State Sen. John Briggs of Fullerton announced Monday that he had col­lected enough signatures the emergence of gay political power," said San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk, who says he is a homosexual. "It's no longer a taboo sub.iect..." . It would ban job discri­mination based on sexual preference in any compa· ny or agency. ____ _ Page 11 Pol. Adv. paid by M;ke Hernandez for Dist. Atty. Sylvia Salazar, Treas. 424 S. St. Mary's San Antonio, Tex. 78205 White claims right to shoot sign vandals SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS- ·Tuesday, April 18, 1978 Page 10-A Tuesday, April 18, 1978 San Antonio Express EDITORIALS W1ll1om J AedMll Editor of Ed1to,,ol Page Chortei. 0 K1lpotrid: Editor ond Publnft.er George Carmodc Assooo~ Editor Fane l Burt Managing [ d1tor Shoot boys Q. (t'rom an unidentified lady cal· ler) - Is it legal to shoot mean little boys who come on my property? Do I have to wait fer them to trample my flowers or may I shoot them when they set foot in my yard? May I use a submachine gun? My neigh· borhood has lots of little boys. DA should rethink policy on shooting Lf'avmg a h()t political elec­ti( Jn c<impaign out of it. District i\ttornl 'Y Bill White's reaction to a rh<i!lf'ng\• of his two investiga­tors' action last week is shock­ing. furthrr, he said it would be justifiable homicide should such an incidrnt lead to a slaying. 0 A. Ordinarily, Action Column doesn't recommend shooting ctti.Jdren with submachine guns. The EPA has ruled that the smoke and noise violate federal standards. In the case of defending flowers, the hassle with the feds doesn't seem "orth the effort. However, if the kidS are messing with something important like tomato plants or the District Attorney's political signs, fire away. Try not to leave any wounded. The screaming makes the noise level intolerable. The investigators drew guns on two boys who said they were f'Xatnming a trailer on which campaign signs were mounted. The investigators denied they drew guns and said they stopped the boys because other signs had nt'f'n vandalized. Confronted with that story, White said his investigators arc aulhnnzcd to shoot anyone found tampering with his cam­paign signs aft<'r dark. Pressed f ,1 1' /YU-LAP/ ~u ~/llk V~ ~em and plug ~em ~1j~- 1f lfl:•following up Ois~~i AltOJ1/l!y .,ij\U, ,Wh)te's anoouncement that hlS olffce investigators have' the power to shoot anyone found tampering with his campaign signs after dark, White was asked wheth­er that meant his investigators could sb.oot to kill in such circumstances. "That's the w~y I read the law," he said. And the person who kills someene caught tearing up a $2 yard sign, that is justifiable homicide and they would get off? "As I see it, that would be justifiable homicide," the county's chief legal officer proclaimed. No telling what happens to people who dare to vote against him. Ewn allowing for over-reac­tion during heat of the cam­paign. White comes off an over­ly- defensive public official. And the invrstigators' on-duly status as guards of the sign raises qurst ions about the use of public employees for campaign purposes. The inl'idcnt at the sign was an \ncautious one. White's response to it was even more incautious. Law officers don't have a right to shoot people without good cause and if While reads the . law. th(?. way Ile ,says he reads it. we have a sehous problem in the district attor-ney's office. Even ripping awa~ . a-' " "\.-:.\ '•1"•'P d'1- ~~·' ~"PJ1rP-n-~!· PC. ~uK,~-,· .ln ;~,J,.k a~v· ·~I 1~" c,'~" ...'. , t hardl'y ra cs a~ ·art' excuse f6r v •· · · homicide. - or even the use of guns in any manner. We hope Mr. White will recon­sider his position on the author­ity of his armed investigators to use thrir guns. Better yet, we hope his investigators will deci­de for themselves that careless display of a pistol adversely reflects upon their own skill and training. Pol. Adv. paid by Mike Hernandez for Dist. Atty. Sylvia Salazar, Treas. 424 S. St. Mary's San Antonio, Tex. 78205 'J[(.J~ tl Page12 By ROGERT Kl\Y .GR WASHI-:GrUN (C:Pl) - for many of the 26 years Maggit· B .... -• .,..i:>r l•:u bet~n a Marine. ieathPr­nf'ck re;..ruiltrs hi\-. 1..• t•mphasized they wne "look­ing for a few t;oed fllt~n." Now they've got a siogan that makrs no mention of gender. Marearet Brewer P'prcsents the change in the Marine Corps, often regarded as the most con­!-' ervativ2 of the servires and the last to admit women to tne top ranks of command. She has t--een namf'd for promotion and any day now can be "frocked" with the one-star rank of a brigadier genc~rol. 'Tm VPry much aware of the historical signifi­cance of the selection or the first woman to be a general officer in the Mdrine Corps," the trim, brown-haired colonel s~id in an interview. She is every inch a no-nons£'n ,e, career Marine, although a winning smilP dispels any drill-sergeant image. Now 17, Brewer's ir.tcrest in the Marines goes back to "World W3r 11. when I was too young to join any se-r··icc." Sh<' Pntered a reserve program at the Uniw~rsity of Michigan, but the Korean war was on when st:e graduated in 1952. She was told she'd havP tv l::tkP c!.n active duty assignment if she wanled her srcond lieutenant's bars. She had planPrd to go on to graduate school, but opted for thr c01 n.liissil)n. She liked the Ma­rin~ s so much she never did go back for an ad­vanced degree. "There WPre a vE>rv limited number of techni­ca l skills or ran~er nC1t;s open to wornen then," she says a~O!lt hrr .-;l<.irl ·1s a communications offi­cer. "We didn't fl'alizf' at the time how limited they were. il was JUSl ~~11nething we acct?pted." Women Marinec; now oper3.te bulldozers and serve as airplane mech:mics. Two female lieuten­ants rPc e11lly i:>ntea·d explosives demolition school. The total of wo1P f1n in the Marine Corps is expected to rise from 4,\00 now to around 10,000 in the next decadP. AnoLMer 3,800 jobs in :mits that form the Leeth of Marine fighting ~trrng1h are being openrd to women. That means thry also will face regular rotation to Okinawa. the grubby Pacific outpost hated by thousands of ma!e career Marines be­cause Or rcguiar year-long assignments there without families. Brewer say.;; womPn Mari11t•$ are ready to take that in stride, as Wflll as th1' risk of getting shot at in wartime. But while tlJ1•1-.·,' ilre militant women in other service hran<:Lt~.s who are demanding combat assignment:>, Brewer disagrPes. "It's my personal opinion that American soci~ ety today is not ready to require W'Jmen to serve in a direct ground combat role, as a rifleman for example." she says. · · Brewer jogs regularly to stay in shape and has just passed a regular physical filn<-ss test required of a!I female Marines, but she doesn't think most women could handle ground combat. " It requires a very high degrPe of physical strength," she says. "That would exclude the majority of women." Community News The combat orittttation ot the Marines every male leatherneck is considered a flghte'" first no matter what his 1ob - wil! conlinue to prPsent barriers to women. While other servi.::es are trai11lng female pilJts, the Marines so far are not hecause virtually ail their planes and helicop­ters are combat aircraft. llut Brewer sees room to further expand the role of women in the MJrines. She notes the serv~ ice wants to chang~ present Jaw so women Ma­rine officer<_:; can be cons1d.?red with their male counterparts for promotions. "l'M VERY MUCH aware of the historical significance of the selection of the first woman to be a general officer in the Marine Corps," Maggie Brewer says. When she began her career 26 years ago, it was war­time and she had little choice - active duty or none at all. Officer Suspended • Ill Beating of Wolllan FORT WORTH (UPI) - Fort Worth police have suspended indefinitely an officer whose al­leged beating of a city secretary April 5 required a five-day hospital stay. a Dallas newspaper re­ports. In a copyrighted story Saturday in the Dallas Morning News, the paper said Officer S.C. Sosa, 34, was suspended on charges he beat Sharilyn Lambert, 20. The suspension was tantamount to firing,· the paper reported. No criminal charges have been filed in the case, although the police department had recommended the district attornex's office file aggravated assault charges against the undercover vice squad officer. A report to the Civil Service Commission from Police Chief A.J. Brown said the incident began when Miss Lambert heard a prowler outside her apartment and called Sgt. C.A. Collins. Collins came to the apartment and while there Sosa knocked on the door twice but received no answer, Brown said. Sosa then alleg.,dly broke a window, unlocked it, raised the window and entered the apartment, the chief said. Brown said Sosa beat Miss Lambert. threw her to the floor and kicked her repeatedly. The chief's letter also said Sosa "was very intoxicated" at the time of the incident. Sosa has filed an appeal of his suspension to the commission, which has scheduled a hearing May 8. Illegal Campaign $s for Briscoe? Community J\lews ~ Meeting• are held the tirat ond third Thuroday of each 1110nth at Trinity Uni ... r•i ty' s lorthrup Hall, Room 22S , lon-t11...tlero are inYited to participate in all SAJICJW activitiu. SANOWNEWS c/ o Vi..Paia Leach 1235 E. Mulberry, #10300 San Antonio, Texas 78209 NOW Membership Form: Make checks payable to SA NOW and send to Margaret Champagne, 10903 Brocks Gap, San Antonio, 78230. ____ I am enclosing $22.00 for a year's membership in National, State. and Local NOW. Payment of local dues includes a year's subscription to this newsletter, SANOU' NEWS. ----- Non-members may subscribe to SA NOW NEWS for one year for S3.00. ---- A subscription to the state newslet1er is $3.00 yearly. Please make this check payable to San Antonio NOW. Name: Address: c/ o Pat Flores, 9110 Broadway, M·20l, San Antonio, Texas 78217 . (The local chapter will receive a SO- rebate for every subscription.) The Texas NOW Times is a bimonthly publication. City: ______________ Zip:------------ - - --- . - - --- . ~ - \ l Shirley Temple Black, who says she led 'an en­chanted childhood,' celebrates her 50th birthday today, looking back on half a century of dimples - AP L•Mrphoto On the Rocks Television executive Jack Haley Jr., left, and si~1ger-actress Liza Minnelli are apparently going their separate ways after a four-year marriage. Haley has filed a petition in Santa Monica, Calif., Superior Court for dissolution of the marriage, the Los Angeles Times reported Wednesday. They are stiown in a 1974 photo. Community News _.,.._.,.... and diplomacy. On the left, she is shown in 1933 in her role as 'Little Miss Marker.' Mrs. Black is shown on the right in her Woodside, Calif., home. Shirley Temple Turns 50 Ex-champ looks ahead Perhaps the most famous resident of the small seaside community of Light­house Point, F1a., is a former world box­ing champion with a punch known as the "Hammer of Thor." But Sweden's Inge­mar .Johansson, who likes the quiet life and keeps a low profile, doesn't dwell on the past. The walls of bis home don't have a single picture, plaque or belt from his 1%~1960 reign as world heavy­weight champ. "I don't live in the past," be said at his home. • Bowling is finally catching on back home. They'1e getting the kids out of the streets and into the alleys. • Page 15 GAYLY YOURS ! MOTHER LAGUNA Commllllity News DUFFY 16th at old McALLEN ' s 83 GAY HOT LINES Austin (5 1.'.!) 4"'!7-6699 Da ll35 (214) 748-6790 East Tc:-.as (214) 843-2989 Fort \lonh - (817) 335·6301 Houston (713) 228-1505 San -\n tonio (512) 733-7300 1111111ti111111111111111111111111 Corpus Christi TI@lliifIDl!IDl!~~~~~~~~~~~l@l@fliillj@l ~ :11ll111111111111 111111111 1 11 111: Patty Hearst's Last-Ditch Appeal Denied WASHINGTON (UPI) - Patricia Hearst lost a last-ditch appeal at the Supreme Court Monday. and almost certainly will have to serve out her prison term for helping the Sym­bionese Liberation Army rob a Cali­fornia bank in I 974. With only Justice William Bren­nan wanting to hear arguments on some aspects of her case, the court let stand wit hout comment her con­viction and seven-year sentence. Lawyers for the 24-year-old heir­ess said they may ask the high court to reconsider its rejection of the ap­peal - which is virtually never done - or ask a federal court in San Francisco to reduce her sen­tence. Once the Supreme Court's order reaches the district court in Califor­nia. authorities will be free to order Miss Hearst back to prison, where she served about two months of the sentence before her family posted $ 1.2 million bail for her release pending appeal. - ADULT BOOK STORE - 413 Peoples : : : JOLLY JACK - 411 Peoples - : PENNY'S EL GARDIN : 406 Taylor : : : -: : ;lllltllllll ll l ll l ll ltl l l l l lll 11 Mc ALLEN DUFFY'S TAVERN 16th Si. at Old 83 .One man's opinion~ She would be eligible for parole within I 4 months following her re­turn to prison. THE EVOLUTION N. 10th THE OUTPOST HiWay 107 I f 1 11 1 11tJI I J 11 1 1111111111111111111 1 11111111111111111ftIIII11 I :: : ~illita ~alfor,u, (IN HISTORIC LA VILLI TA) PAINTINGS . .JEWELRY, SCU~TURE POTTERY. GRAPHICS. CHINA PAINTING. GIFTS . ETC. au •. PH. C!512) 2 24-099t !104 V ILLITA ST. SAN ANTON IO, TX 7 8 208 : : : : r. t 11111111I11111I1111111111111111 1 11111111111 1 I111111 1 1 •I r1 1i ~~~~~~~~~~,~~~'l i JiENNl)J'& i i lEl <hrbin i 1 4Illi liraylnr i irnrpus BB2-U916 I ~~~,~~~~~~~,~~~~ TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE P.O. Box 2036 U11iuersal City, Texas 78148 512/655-3724 A guy got a job painting a yellow line down the highway. After three days, the foreman complained: "The first day you did great, you painted that yellow line three miles. The second day wasn't bad, you did two miles. But today you only painted one mile, so I'm going to have to fire you." On his way out of the foreman's office, the guy looked back and said: " It's not my fault. Each day I got farther from the paint can." Find out how to stay married ,,,,,,.,,,,,,...,,,..,,.,,,_~""".I'~ Hl<:V. H IH'J'lo:H KJ:'\(j MINISTER O F FICE; 732-ll BA RES· 927 W . WILDWOOD SAN ANTONIO -------1 Radio stations · ( U I) K \ l'E . . . . 1111-0 Kl! \\I. .. 11:.0 K iil (" 1.1(0 K("OI! 1:1:.0 Klll!Y . 1110 K~: ll.\ . 1:, IO Krn: .. 9:10 KK)\ ... tiXO K \1.\ (" ti:IO KO'iO Xlfo KTS \ . .i:.11 Kl"K.\ 12.;11 WO.\l . 12011 KZZY . . . KZ-1110 Kiii I" 10; .:, KEEZ . 9U KITE 101.:, KISS... ..... ~U l\ITY . . . . . . . . . . . ~2 .9 "K"ll"\T' ' . .. lt9l6l..1' Ksn 1 .. !HU KTF\1 .. . . . . .. 19:1 WO.\I. . . .... . , 7 GALVl·STON llATll5' Advertising serves by informing. Kon Tiki - 220 23rd/Tfl•mo 11t S1. - /ll .i-9031. GALVFSTON LOUNGFS Fruit Ja r - 2214 Mcch:tnk Stn:ct ·. 76 J-!lJ l9 Kon Tiki 2 14 .2JnJ/ Tn.•11wn1 St. 763-9031 Mary·S' II - 2502 OV! Stn.·ct - 763-9334 Robert's Lafit tt..· - 409 Ro"Cnhur!! 76.l-95G.7 GALVESTON ORGANIZATION Galvesta6 Gay Society 7624947 Pag e 16 ,, ~ Love and devotion Exemplifying the love and devotion other actors had for him, actor Will Geer gets an affectionate kiss from Richard Thomas off camera during a break in filming of 0 The Waltons." -AP :W_:J 'Grandpa Walton' dies of lung malady LOS ANGELES (AP) - Will Geer, dead at 76, was known to milhons as the spry, sage patriarch of television's "The Waltons.11 But he was also a citizen crusader who was blacklisted during the McCarthy era. The veteran stage, movie and televi­sion actor died Saturday evening of respiratory arrest at Midway Hospital. His famlly stood by his hospital bed and recited Robert ~·rost poems and sang "This Land Is Your Land." a folk music classic written by his friend and fellow labor activist Woody Guthrie. Geer. a 1975 ~;mmy winner as best supporting actor for his portrayal of Grandpa Walton, had been hospitalized secretly since March 25 for a respirato­ry aliment, said Janet Alston of CBS GC'cr'!:> former wife. actress Herta Ware. his daughters Ellen Geer and Kate Linville. and a son, Raleigh, were at his bedside when he died. Ellen con­firmC'< l his death, but said. "Ile didn't like publicity and wouldn't want talk about his body." A memorial service al a date to be announced will be held at the Theatri­cum Botanicum, the Greek-style theat­er he founded for young actors in Topanga Canyon, a rustic area about 25 miles northwest of Los Angeles, said Ms. Alston. lie had recently completed his sixth vear on CBS with "The Waltons," the story of a Depression era Virginia fam­ily based on author Earl Hamner's own life. The last show filmed was about the return of Grandma Walton, his televi­sion wife played by Ellen Corby. Miss Corby, who suffered a debltitat­ing stroke last year, said she was "very saddened" by Geer's death. Producer Andy White creclited Geer with Miss Corby's return to "The Wal­tons." Geer visited her often during her illness, encouraging her to return to the show. He urged that she be wn tten back into the series, although she remains an invalid. I Seyforth Lobotatorles, Inc. -WEIGHT REDUCT ION AND CONTROL -MUSCULAR DEVE.LOPMEf\IT -ENERGY SOURCES -SKIN ANO FACI AL FIT NE.SS IT CAN HAPPEN -, 0 YOU 11 P 0. BOX 1042.2 Donny's fiance Here it is folks. An exclush·e picture of heartthrob Donny Osmond and bis lovely new flance Debra Glenn. The two announced their engage­ment In Hawaii this week. They have been avoiding publicity • Ince they set a June wedding date but arc pictured here band-In hand on a strou along w alklkl beach. AP LASER PHOTO Rape suspect shot by citizen. TRENTON, N.J. (UPI) - A retired Army o!ficet Tuesday shot anrt killed a man who was raping a yoJng woman on a sidev.ralk, police said. PPrfE?('t Oliver, -!&, o! Pemt.erton Towru;bip said he "ent to the aid of the l!l­year-- 0ld woman to protect her from •ioience. Polire said Wayman Allen, 43, of Trenton, wa.s. shct between the eyes as he got ur from the ground and a;1proaehed Oliver. Police said (i)iver firPd hL--; .32-c;.iiber revolver because he thought the man was goi,,g to attack lum. PoliL-e S&.iJ the case would b<> presented to a ·county grand jury ID determ lre if any cnarges shou!d be lodge<i against Oliver, who recenUy re~ired after a 30-yeai Army career. SAN Af\J-1 ONIC\ TX 7fj2 IO, AC 512 532 1778 (: .. l t. t :,. '- 1 I , , I.• ( t "--· / • t ' ~ SPENCE \ • \. ,..4-1 Page 17 --, ~· EXECUTIVE HEALTH CLUB SAN ANTONIO BEEN THINKING ABOUT GETTING IN SHAPE? COMPLBTE .'/ORK- OUT FACILITIES Special wwtthly rates for regulated exercise program 1 s Si1.UN1\-.S'•-' ". , C \DIJ'.:!:TS-,'.'HIRLPOOL- SOLAR ROOM- JUICE BAR-T. V, Private rest area ' s '': '1"'LY MEMBERSHIP ·110 . 00 'remp. Membership for out of town • . '..DNISSION: Sunaay thru Friday to 6 P.M. Sunday tl::ru 'l'hursctay after 6 P .M. Saturday to 6 P.M. Friuay and Saturday after 6 P.M. 1)3 .1 5 4. 25 4.25 5 .30 STYLE STUDIO EXPERT HAIRSTYLING STYLE CUTS PERMS COLOR MEMBERS . ONLY J ~~~~~~~~~~~~ill@lffi~~@®l@!jj~~~~ ~OPEN 24 HOURS. 225-8807 BASEMENT LEVEL GUNTER HOTEL Page 18 Communitr~ ~ r....,.......,.......,.......,.......,.......,.......,.......,.......,......,,.......,......,,......,,.......,.......,...~ WI'l l'l e Ne IS on WI'I I :S Son Anton;o Texos ~ -~ Community News-Austin-Son Antonio is published every other ~ :~ Thursday. Deadline for copy and odds in Monday prior to Thursday ~ - publication. Moil all correspondence to P.O. Box 182 Son Antonio ~ ~ S :£~::~~1::PD~::;::.~~~·~~~~;5~o~0:i~~;'~~~~~;!?~~~~:~ ~ S'1ng 1ln Wh'1fe HOUSe ~~ ~~~·;u·~~.c:.~,~~"~·0~~:~n~o"n~~x~:~:·~;;c;;;;c'~;c::'.:::;·,·;~~~ ~ : ~ opinions of the Editors or staff. ~ .-~ ~..... ...............................................................................................................................l.. "'....i WASllJNGTON (AP) - "Yup," agreed Willie Nelson, with a grin that'd stop a truck. "Big beer joint." Classiest one m his 30· odd years of beer joints, he figured. The White House. Not bad for Willie Nelson. 'Big beer joint,' says S.A. singer He'll bring his guitar, a scarred-up old Martin with musicians' names etched in the wood, and he'll probably do" Amaz· mg Grace," just so the boss can catch up on 'choir practice. Jimmy Carter, known as the country bo)' who brought Vladimir Horo· Witz to the White House, is playing host to Willie Nelson, live and in con· cert, next September. Not to knock Horo­witz, the classical pia· nist, but some or the 12,000 folks who heard Nelson, the country picker, and two top Car· ter aides do "Amazing Grace" on stage Mon· day night at the capital Centre auditonum probably think Willie at the White House is a step in· the right direc· lion. The aides were Jody Powell, the president's press secretary,. and Frank Moore, Car­ter's chi~f Capitol Hill Nazi exhibit stopped lobbyist. Seems they had a beer or two. And Moore missed his 8: 15 a.m. appointment Turs­day with the president. Carter phoned, a bit unhappy, to fmd his errant aide. "It was a Bloody Mary morning," groan· ed Moore after taking Willie; his wife, Connie; sidekick Waylon Jenn· ings' wife, Jessi Colter; Jennings' son, Buddy, and a guitar player to lunch. "And you can't get LAWRENCE, Kan, (AP) - The Unh•erslty of Kansas, citing adverse reactlo.1, canceled a display of memorabllla !Mm Nazi German;v four hours before Us scheduled opening today. The e~hlbU would h&\1e come a day after coneluslon of "llolocau"t,'' a lour-night drama on prime-time national television d~plcting Nazi prosecution or the Jews. FREEPORT, Bahamas (AP) - World heavyweight boxing champion Leon Spinks cl&ims the drugs found on him In St. Louis last week were planted. In an interview before an exhibition match in Miami, Spinks -said: "Somebody is trying to set me up. Somebo­dy put those things on me." "They tried to hurt me. They tried to get me to do something then, and many people out there are doing the same thing," Spinks said. Spinks was arrested Friday after police allegedly found small quantities or marijuana and cocaine in his posses· slon. 'Frameup' He called the charges a "frameup." It was his second arrest in a month in his home town. He was stopped on March 19 !or driving the wrong way on a one· way street and driving without a licen­se. "I didn't have no marijuana or cocaine on me," Spinks told reporters who met him at the Miami Internation­al Airport Friday night on his way to Freeport. The comments received a dim recep­tion in Sl Louis. George Peach, the cir­cuit attorney who issued the felony cocaine possession charge, said Spinks had blown his chances of first-offender treatment. "Based on what I read today, I'm not going to do It," said Peach, who can sus­pend prosecution a year to see if a first­offender defendant behaves himself. "He's going around saying the police are lying," Peach said. "One of the prerequisites to get into the program is to admit you erred and are willing to make restitution." Prayer for Today I REALIZE, 0 God, <hat other people's emergencies nev­er seem nearly so serious as mine. I think that when they are sick, its their imagination or morbid desire for attention; but when I am sick, I'm terri­bly ill! Replace this concentra­tion on self with a sincere sym­pathy that shares the feeling of others. Amen. 'em (Bloody Marys) at the White House mess." Jennings, who'd __ probably heard the White House is no beer +..**********'+ -tr * -tr Person- : joint at all, stayed away. "He's loose on the town," said Moore, rue- : -tr * fully. : to- : After touring the executive mansion where he'll entertain in the fall, Willie Nelson, togged in blue jeans, a red and black checked lumberjack shirt, tan boots and a canvass hat, encountered Jimmy Carter in a dark suit and matching lie. "Missed your voice at choir practice last night," said Willie. "I know 'all the words," said the presi· dent. : : ; Person i Personals Personals. "Personal Ads" wttb teleph(lne numbers and/ or addresses may be purchased at 10 cents per word, $2.00 minimum, Rosalynn: :hung MUSCULAR guy's for fun or whatever Life in ERA ~comes up. Phone-Photo if possible. aTom Box 456 Sinton Tx. 78387 :coRPUS CHRISTI area- '!J/~\ to meet young MILLEDGEVILLE, - Ga. (UPI) - First Lady : BLACK MALi;; GO Rosalynn Carter said : , , 2 , Saturday the Equal -Frenchies- F/~'. hn ,,...,. Rights Amendment will : Age , Race , ))0 barri ' M~CHA~L l'l~di:.N '-~-AR be introduced again in : er- Vlrite Box 25;11 Sincg , yo~~~C)ve.f1 f1:°m congress and resubmit- : S. f; . 78?.0G Mauerman Rd . r think ted to the states if it: of you-stop-Sorry fails to win nationwide: for not being sinc-ratification by its dead-: ere-stop-lets have line next March. : Mrs. Carter came to : fun ' 1 ov e B. A. central Georgia for a: Contact me thru meeting at Georgia Col- : S. T. C. N. lege, where her mother.: Allie Smith, was: honored as "Mother ot :; the Year." Attractive W/M 37 med built, well endowed, sincere, would like to meet Anglo 30 to 47 who is also AP LaMtphoto : : : - W/m, 21. seekspenpal<s u/35. Also int job leads : maritime Indus fry Have sea mens documents. : Frank, Bo:t 7312, Waco, TX 76710. : : B/M, 34 rim-queen : di·gs blond l'•il~LES & : red-heads. Call :·James 512-1,42-02% : 'iiill ·also french,.F/II - I live in Aust:Ln sincere. Picture Pref. Write: A.M. Box 1145 S.A. Tex. 78294 .w11n -5'11". 145, dk nair. OI eye,., 20 yrs i..,:i,..in9 for 'ioincere young W/m's '""l.lK. gdlkg for friendship and tun Pt'>CllO app1 Carl. Box 5551 NT., Denton. TX 76203 ~Tnt:. .fl f'"URM TO PLACE YOUR AD r~ - - ....--- - -_-__.__ My ad 1s ____ ,words, at 10 cents per word, for a cqst of$ ___ to appear ln one issue • I understand there i's a 10% d iScount for four issues. I would like my ad to appear in 4 __ (check here~ issues. Enclo5ed is $ ___ in check or money order to cover the CO$t. (This inform1tion is for our files and will not be printed.) NAME ADDRESS Careers melded CITY STATE ZIP l -1ity by my signotvro thot I ,am o- 18 LEON SPINKS . • . 'I've been set up' Actress Jane Fonda gestures during her key­•• te speeeb la a group •f lawyers• wives In Bever· ly Biila. Siie spake er her saeecss la melding lter paltlle and private Jives and her love of a.etlag wftll her commltmeat &o political aetlvtsm • HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD: Simply wriw your .t as you-_.td like to haM it -· Print .,_.Y ond legibly. Oount the number ot -· in your od and multiply by 10 _., per word. Moil all correspondence to P.O. Box 182 Son Antonio Tx. 78291, Page 19 Soulh Tuas Community News P. 0. &x 182 San Antonio. TX 78291 MISCELLANEOUS MALE MODEL Experienced,for drawing,painting photo. etc. nude or fashion. ask for Charles. 734-2094 734-7015 GAY SWITCHBOARD Have you ever wished you could help oth~r gay people with their problems in trying to survive and suceed in a hostile society? GAY SWITCH BOARD offers an opportunity to those people who care enough to devote a few hours a week of their time. Your help can make a difference in the lives of others. Mature and responsibile men and women who want to obtain additional information are invited to zall S.A. FREE CLINIG 1-5 P.M. weekdays 732-4661 733-0383 Only those 18 years of age or older are eligible. Even if you do not feel you are suited for this type of service, you may know-a friend.. who woocl be. You wo~.ld ~ doin'g_ a favor to al I concerned by helping to direct competant women and men to this opportunity. !PRECIOUS I cl u B I 1 ,._,I N(hALITOS SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS OPEN DAILY 2PM- 2AM I FRl&SATTIL4AM OWNERS l.B.SANCHt::Z - E.E.ESPARZA . 223-44 ll EXECUTIVE STYLE SHOP Style cuts, Perm's Color work 225-8807 Open 24 hours ROO~~-MATE \'/ANTED Male, Professional Quiet, U/35 NO DRUGS 2 B/R, 2 ba. 1145.00 Mo. Util. Included, Ref . 426-1761 Or 342-4240 l1CC: AUSTIN 611; E, 6th. SERVICES: Sunday 12 Noon-7:30 P. ri . Community News WANT ADS Wanted WANTED: young man/boy for part time yard & odd jobs. Student 0,K. good pay, on bus, S.A.C. area Box 1021 S.A. 78294 STYLIST: W/following, nice shop, Medina Rd. area. 225-8807 Gene Evans MCC san anfonio 226·2303 METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH of san antonio Services every Sunday, 2:30 P.M. · Join us. For more information please call our answering service and some one will get back to you shortly. i)dlllllllllllll'lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfl'lllllllllfllflllfllllllllflll•ll RESERVATIONS: 494-7793 Dinner and Broadway Show! EARL HOLLIMAN'S 1 ,.. .~ Cc!~ ~.ifl 1/f~ CESAR • t ,~~' • ' ROMERO 'a A '""Never Get Smart With An Angel" RUNS THRU JUNE 4 Suo. Mal $10 • Suo. he. $11 • Tues., We4., Thurs. $13 ,_F.r.i .$.1,5. ,• .S,;alI $n16t ,• ,S,p,e.c,ia,l. ,C,r.ou.,, Rates r.,,,.1 LOOP 1604 & SAN PEDRO (follow UTSA Silftol RESERVATIONS: 494-7793 Suing - AP LHerphoto A ct o r S t e v e McQueen appeared at the Tokyo District Court Monday morning to testify in a $1.6 million damage suit filed by him against four Japa­nese firms in April of 1973. McQueen alleges that still photographs of him from the movie 'Le Mans' were used wilh­out his permission by the firms to advertise their products. Jadyn's man It's pr~tty "Charlie's Angel" Jaclyn Smith with the most important man in her life, Dennis Cole. The gorgeous superstar is pictured with Dennis at West Hollywood's Palm resta urant. They've been together six months. :\i':\I YUHK - She may X ~J. b:il f.,in;:.1 r RoK~·r.~ 1~n 't n'ady to httng up her dancing .shoes. Miss Rl'ge>rs told a prC"ss gathering al a mtrrorcrl Manhattan d1s<·othPqwP on Thurs. O<:I\' Uiat shP plans 10 b"gm a N•)rth Anwncan - AP UNrphoto A wed ~1~~ ~~~~ ley, king of rock 'n roll, so awed the Beatles when they visited his Bel Air, Calif., home that they were speech­less, a friend says. ntghtdUb l<1llr IH"'\I nwnl h. ,\r..d tlits fall. a rP<.:ord a!bum ·or songs associated with my rar­f'f': · will b(' rf'iea&"'d tn l-.n~~i.ind. r::at career took fl15hl m the 1930s, and m 411 vPars shP made 73 mOVl('S - lO Of them in wluch her d.-in C'1m~ part ­nf'r was I1'red A.4attll. ' 1;1N~am ROGERS ... club tour MARY !l'ARID OFNEWllOLl LOS ANGELES - When ihc Los Angeles Times named J for,­Ty /.er ~foort• it.-:; Woman ot the Year. the presentation read: "She docs not preach the case for modern women, she dC'manstr· ates it, provrng m h~r llfe and in her work that success. togetherness and happiness can go hand in hand in hand." Mary Tyler Moore will once again demonstrate the values lhal have made her a heroine for 1hc modern woman in a special, made-for-TV mo\1e, "Ftrsl You Cry." Based on Betty Rollin's account of her mastcc· h1t1ty and its impact on hrr cn,otJono.l hfr>, the f1l1.1 is ::.il'h;•dulcd to <.llr !jOmrtu11cs m ~·lay. "ti-Iy ru·.~1 reaction when I read Belt y Rol­lm 's hook "a~ that I had an <t~hr,:!L.011 to do 1t, to be pa1 t of lt.'' :-ay~ Mary m McCall's. "But 1l real­ly scnrcs me. It's a long time since I've done an~ thing except Mary Richard' "It could perform such a sen<ice," she continues. "I hope a woman can say after watching il, 'If tlus thing should happen lo me, I'll go througl1 1l better."' Gladys seeks huge sum Court to decide $20 million lawsuit Nl·:w YOHK -·Sm-gl'f (,'/f(,~-q~ /\night say·s two recording ('Ompanws ar<' trying to k!'l'P from her the pG.<SI· b1llt v I hat one of them is gouig broke. \ltss Kmght. star of Gladys Knight and the Pips. IS asking $20 million from Buddah Records and iL'i president Arttmr Kass. and ArIS1a Rec.ords and Jts prcs1ctC>nl. t:l1ve Davis ll<>r comptamt. filed in Lht• Manhattan Supreme Court. said she signed a four-v~ar <'Ontract m i:SuC1- dah in 1976, but Buddah t"'tlCOunlered financial d1fficullles and entered into ·• a dtstnbutorslup" with Arista. She asked the coun. lo declare the original contract with Buddah void. Actress Judy Carne, the "Sock it to me" girl of TV fame, says she bas lost $50,000 In bookings because of drug charges. MARY TYLER MOORE ... with husband Grant Tinker Donny Osmond engaged Singing star Denny Osmond an­nounced bis engagement Sunday to Delara Glen, 19, a Brigham Young University freshman from Provo, Utah. A wedding bas been tentatively scbed- 111ed for June. Osmond, ~. made the an­mmncement in Honolulu, where be and llis sister Marie are filming the motion pctare Aloha Donny and Marie. Glenn, llam in Billings, Mont., is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Avery L Glena. She moved 1D Provo at the age of 12 and gtaduated fnim Provo High Scbool last year. AP LHerphoto Dreams come true Three years tJ,go Donna Summers began having frequent dreams of success. Today her success in the entertainment field is measured by records selling In the millions, a TV special with Mac Davis and head­line appearances In Las Vegas. She wlil also make a movie, "Thank Goodness It's Friday." 1914 movie classic shown RIVERSIDE, Calir. (AP) - After two cancella lions bee a use of pro­tests by black groups, D.W. Grir­fiths' 1914 classic, ""Birth of a Nation," was screened in Riverside Municipal Museum before an audi· ence of 150 persons. After the rirs t hall or Gritriths' famed movie on the South before and after the Civil War, Ron Tobey, historian of the University of Cali­fornia at Riverstt1e, lectured the au­dience on Griffiths' handling or his theme and the allegedly blatant racism freqently shown in the film. The screening was the Cirst of tour showings or the three-hour film as part of the museum's historic re­trospective program. Museum officials said the movie was included in the program so au­diences could watch Griffiths' inno­vative techniques and also because of the movie's connections with Riv­erside. Liza buys townhouse Actress-singer Iba MlnoeW, who is being divorced by her husband .Jack Haley, has purchased her first New York home, a lavish townhouse with a garden in Manhattan's historic Murray Hill sec­tion. The house was put on sale last year by costume-jewelry designer Kenneth Lane. The asking price unfurnished was $390,000 but olflclals at the Sotheby Parke Bernet really firm, which made the sale, would not disclose the sale price. The five-story house features a marble entry ball, Georgian woodwork, fireplaces in most rooms, a tented dining room connected by a solarium to a for­mal garden, and a kitchen with Por­tuguese Wes. Rock Star's Home Raided HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - Four thieves bluffed their way into rock star Stephen Stills' home in the Bel Air section and stole $500 in cash and firearms, police said Saturday. Police said the men Friday night told caretaker Me lvin ChoatB, 56, that they were sup­posed to pick up some musical in­struments. Once inside the house, one suspect pulled out a gun and tied up Choate. They then searched the house and left with $70 in cash and two guns, a .25-caliber pistol and a .357-magnum. 'I'm going to He down for a couple of days and then start working on a script' NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) - The Dukr is home and feeling frisky enough to start work on a new movie. After a four-week stint in Boston Hospital tor open nean surgery John Waynp said he is ready almost immediately to make the movie "Beau John." Wayne, wearing the wide-brimmed Stetson that has been his movie trademark, trotted eagerly off a private jet at Santa Ana's Orange County Airport on Thursday and told a throng of reporters: '"It's sure good to bP home." The 70-ycar-old actor, who had surgery to replace a ruptured heart valve with a similar valve from a pig, was embraced by his two daughters, Aissa and Melinda,_ as he hustled off the jet. He was accompanied on the flight by sons Patrick and Michael and a doctor from Boston. Don't settle for anything less~~~~~~~~-- Continental BATH 6836 SAN PEDRO/ SAN ANTONIO Open 24 Hours - Parking in Rear exercise room whirlpool playroom TV lounge rest area sauna fillllER/11 NEWS 6724 SAN PEDRO I Open 10am-4am SAN ANTONIO'S HOTTEST BOOKSTORE leather goods magazines rubber goods books peeps (also visit Galleria News at 513 E. Houston and our Head Shop at 6726 San Pedro) - AP lliMrphoto Stop Jokes Texaco has asked co­median Bob Hope to stop making jokes about Anita Bryant and gay lib­eration. Hope said Texaco, which sponsors many of his television specials, had told him customers were 'tearing up their credit cards and sending them back.' BIG JOHN ARRIVES! •.. embraced by daughters MeUnda, left and .A Issa "I've got a close ram· ily, thank God," Wayne said, adding that the good wishes from his fans across the country had been so moving that "I want to cry." Frisky Duke home AP LalNt'photo Pills blam<'d Truman Capote •ays that a combination of nerves and pllls result­ed In a tirade that end· ed with him being led from lhe podium last ~·ear at Towson Unlver­• lty In Maryland. During his bospitaUzation, thou-sands of letters poured in from around the world. Even President Carter called and told MiCbael wayrie that bis lather was "a great national asset." "I'm going to go to my house, lie down for a couple of days and then start working on a script," Wayne said. He told reporters in Boston that the ~vie, entilled "'Beau John,'' was "a good story." At first, Wayne said, the operation at Mas­sachusetts General Hospital scared him. He used his given name, Marlon Monison, when be checked into the hospital March 29 under a shroud of secrecy. "I wasn't too sure, but I'm sure glad now I went back there," he said. "About two weeks ago, two guys were cut­ting around, putting a new valve in my heart, so I'm not exactly jump· ing with joy." The operation replac­ed Wayne's ruptured mitral valve, which separates the atrium from the ventricle of the heart. Page 22 Community News GAY SWITCHBOARD zoo 3240 N.W. loop 4'10 HIGH TIMES 6726 San Pedro MARY ELLEN S 15 Fredericksburg SPANISH HARLEM 349 W. Josephine South Texas Community Ne~s P. 0. Bo, 182 San Antonio. TX 78291 FRIENDLY ... , . 622 Roosevelt San Antonio 733-7300 341-4302 826- 6287 732-7964 734.9443 533-5049 SANOW NEWS 1235 E. Mulberry CONTINENTAL BATH 6B36 San Pedra 826,9181 EXECUTIVE HEALTH CLUB Gunter Bsmt. (Bsmt) 225-8807 ATLANTIS 225-9468 321 Navarro PRECIOUS 223-0413 11 07 Nogalltos SILHOUETTE 432-9336 2522 Culebra SU~SET BOULEVARD 1430 N. Main 225-6654 IMPALA 223-3566 900 S. St. Mary's Texas Gay Task Force P. 0. Box 2036 Universal City. Tx 78148 CREW 223-0333 309 W. Market El JARDIN 223-7177 106 Navarro COUNTRY 222-8273 1122 N. St. Mary's PARIS NEWS 225-9339 1929 N. New Braunfels GALLERIA 826-9057 6724 San Pedro ARMY-NAVY NEWS 674-9101 4958 S.W. Military Drive INTERNATIONAL NEWE Bexar County 622_9227 Free Clinic 1142 W. Woodlawn (.;ommunity News ... Equal Justice For All MIKE HERNANDEZ promises the public access to the District Attorney's office. The present District Attorney has proven that he is always available to the news media, but seldom to the average citizen with a complaint. The entire process of taking complaints by this office shows lack of regard for the human dignity of the complainants. Persons filing complaints are treated with arrogant indifference, sent from office to office, and many cases are complete­ly disregarded. This is not the way to treat people whom this office is supposed to serve. MIKE HERNANDEZ promises to eliminate favoritism. A close look at the record of the District Attorney shows a disturbing trend. Indictable offenses involving people of financial or political influence are thrown out, while similar offenses committed by less-advantaged people go on to trial. As an official elected by all the people, the District Attorney should be concerned with equality of justice for all the people. And he should not be susceptible to outside influence. MIKE HERNANDEZ promises help to educate the public in crime prevention. To serve the people effectively, the District Attorney must have their under· standing and support. Direct contact with the people is necessary. Speakers from this office should form liaisons with school, community, and business groups. Not just to enhance public relations, but to give citizens the facts and get them involved actively in crime prevention. WHO IS MIKE HERNANDEZ? • Justice of the Peace, 1970 - 1974 • Graduate St. Mary's University of Law B.A. Degree and Doctor of Jurispru­dence • Experienced trial attorney • Member American Bar Association, Texas and San Antonio Bar Associa­tion, and Texas Trial Lawyers • Membership in: Delta Theta Phi Legal Fraternity Knights of Columbus ·4th Degree Sembradores de Amistad International Good Neighbor Council St. Mary's Alumni Association • Respected and sought-after speaker for schools and universities, service and social groups, and professional legal organizations • Married, father of four children "It shall be the primary duty of all prosecuting attorneys, including any special prosecutors, not to convict, but to see that justice is done" Art. 2.01 Tex. Penal Code "This oath will be what I stand for" MIKE HERNANDEZ, JR. Candidate for District Attorney of Bexar County ELECT MIKE HERNANDEZ D1STRICT ATTORNEY OF BEXAR SATURDAY, MAY 6, 1978 Paid for bY Mike Hernandez tor District Attorney Sylvia Salazar, Treasurer 427 S. St. Mary's, San Antonio, Texas 78205 SoYiet wants U.S. home UNITED NATIONS (AP) - Arkady N. Shevehenko, !he Soviet diplo­mat who refused to return to M,sco'" said today he has quit his $76,000 l "nlted Nations job and wants to make a 11ew home in th1• l'.nlted Stairs. · Shevchenko said he decided to resig11 after reaching "a11 ami<'abil• mutual agreement" with t:.N. Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim. * MONTY CLIFT & LIZ TAYLOR IN "RAINTREE COUNTY" Q. Anyone who has really known Elizabeth Taylor surely knows that of all the men in her life, the one she loved most deeply was the late Montgomery Clift. Why then did she refuse to marry that remarkable actor?-L.T., Richmond, Va. A- It was the late Montgomery Clift who refused to marry her-and with good reason. Clift knew that he was bisexual, more attracted to men than women. He knew, too, that he was alcoholic, drug-addicted, spoiled, mentally ill and unstable. He preferred a sisterly relatio~ship with Elizabeth, whom he loving­ly referred lo as " Bessie Mae." As for the actress, she remained his best friend through all his trials, troubles and degradations, offered to insure his ap­pearance in films when producers found him "unin­surable." Montgomery Clift never married because he preferred a secrel sexual life with a variely of males. He was one of the most talented and bedev­iled actors in the history of motion pictures-so bedeviled that he placed himself in the hands of a homosexual psychiatrist who compounded his ills instead of curing them. My nephew Hector was home on leave from camp with his pet skunk. I asked what he did with it at camp, and he told me he kept it under his bunk. I said, "What about the odor?" He said, "The skunk had to get used to it just like I did." Pf"nalt) opposed MADRID (AP) - Sp~.in has sent Parlia~ ment a bill to abolish the death penalty. Places To go .., FIESTA DINNER PLAYHOUSE Dinner & a Broadway Show! RESERVATIONS: 494-7793 Page 24 Community News 'IHI SAN AHT-STA!=4p!I *I, 197& Martha Mitchell told truth, book says THE late Martha Mitchell, the celebrated Martha the Mouth of the Nixon Administration, is about to win a more respected place in American history. The oatspoken wife of former At­torney General John Mitchell was a far more concerned and courageous figure than the zany personality that was projected dur­ing the Nixon era, according to two recent studies of her Jife: • A new book, Martha: A Biograph:; of Martha Mitchell, by her friend and writer Winzola McLendon, will show that many of her public statements were right, particularly about the Watergate scandal. • And an upcoming NBC special called Right On, Martha, has unearthed new material which will convince many Americans that they took Martha too lighUy. The conclusions of both in­vestigations are similar to the wor­ling on a huge wreath that nysteriously appeared on her irave the day she was buried. In nine-inch letters the wreath I " . Martha Mitchell proclaimed: "Martha Was Right." McLendon, whose book on Mar­tha will be published in the fall, agrees that Martha was right about a lot of things. With the rest of America, she watched through the years when Martha drew litUe more than laughter with her public statements, midnight calls to reporters and claims that the Republicans were keeping her a virtual hostage. But Martha was the first to publicly finger President Nixon as responsible for Watergate. And Martha spent many weeks trying to convince people that the Nixon Administration would try to blame the scandal on her husband. Few listened. But McLendon, who had been a friend of Mrs. Mit­chell since she interviewed her for Look magazine in 1970, knew Mar­tha better. "I laughed when I heard Nixon's statement that Watergate was Martha's fault," she says of the ac­cusation made during the Nixon­Frosl television interviews. "A lot of what Martha has said has been proven right. She feared they were going to try to make her husband take the blame. The tapes have proved she was right." Mitchen· was convicted in January 1975, for obstruction of justice in the Watergate coverup. McLendon says the thousands of people who have visited Martha's grave in Pine Bluff, Ark., since she died of bone cancer on May 31, 1976, are a sign that many realized Martha was right. The NBC special on Martha Mit­chell will recall that in May 1973, she stood up to her husband's party The grave of Martha Mitchell In Pine Bluff, Ark. chiefs with the bravest statement of all. "Nixon has let the country down," she charged. "He should resign." Her outburst was an embarrass­ment to her husband, to the Republican Party and particularly to those involved in the Watergate burglary and coverup. "You have to understand -what a brave act that was on her part," said New York Da lly News reporter Ann Wood, who covered Watergate. "The climate was so strong against speaking out against Nixon. The saddest penalty Marti>& paid for her outbursts was the b'reakupl of her marr\He. If inflation stays same The dollar worth 100 cents in 1978 will be, if it loses 6 percent annually in buymg power, worth only 56 cents m 1988, 31 cents in 1998, 17 cents m 2008. If the loss is at the rate of 7 per­cent, that $3tne dollar will be worth only 51 cents in 1988, 26 cents in 1998, 13 cents in 2008. Next, assume that a marketbasket of goods and services bought by a typical Ne\V York City family costs ~1 in April 1978: A dollar's wotth of such goods and services in 1978 will cost, at an annual 6 percent rate of inflation, $1.79 in 1988, $3.21 in 1998, and $5.74 in 2008. If the inflationary rate is 7 percent annually, the same goods and servi­ces will cost $1.97 in 1988, $3:87 in 1998, $7-61 in 2008. m STlllJGI B09DTOU 706 I.6th Street AUSTIX. TSXAS· Only the •••I Books, Movle1, Peep1hows ** P rivate Vlewlnw Rooms *1 ;2 Price Ma9azlne Sale New HOTTEST Arcade In Texas I From Atlanta ••• to San Francisco ••• the best selectlon In adult material can be found at the Stallion Bookstore
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