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Community News, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1974 - File 001. 1974-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/235/show/226.

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(1974-05). Community News, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1974 - File 001. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/235/show/226

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Community News, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1974 - File 001, 1974-05, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/235/show/226.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Community News, Vol. 1, No. 2, May 1974
Alternate Title Community News, Vol. I, No. 2, May 1974
Publisher AURA
Date May 1974
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Fort Worth, Texas
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 27910176
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript COMMUNITY NEWS A CAY gOLIOAR/1'Y -- Faet or Fit:tioJJ? paye 2 TROY PERRY page 3 VD and the Healthy Homosexual page 5 ~~[L~[KJ@~ and the [}{]@(U]@~~l:\(illfil[L page 4 SERVING THE GAY COMMUNITY 10( 1'HA1''g EN1'ER1'AINNEN1' paye 8 May 1974 - Fort Worth/Dallas Vol. I, No. 2 Fort Worth To Se Site of Texas Gay Conference The Fort \\orlh/Dallas l\klroplex Gay Council has announced that on June 21-23 they \\i ll sponsor a Te:'l.aS Gay Confrren<'<' lo be held in Fort \\orth. The Council ex­peds the thn•t• days of workshops and lt'dures will attract gay people from all over T<':'l.as and tht> South;H'SL The Confrn·n<'<' will he sly led for non-movemt>nl gays as M'll as rnov<'m<'nl gays, according lo Confrn·rH·e Chairperson Charles Gillis. "Gay Pt•oph• who are in organizations are a small minoril} compared lo non-move­nwnt gays here in Tnas. \\c want to reach both groups - to help the non-mowmenl gays h<'ltt•r understand the gay movement, and help the movement gays with the lech­ni< ·alilies of Llwir work," said Gillis. lie also pointed out that the Conference will be for the <'xpression of all viewpoints, both rnnservative and radical and in between. O nt• of the o hjel'l ivt's of the Conft•rt•m·e will lw lo form a sla te coalition of gay or­ganizations. The gay organizations of Texas an• hein11: requested to send del<·11:att•s to tlw Conference lo voice opi nions <'On<•<•rnin11: a eoalilion. During the Conference a bus­iness session of the delegates wi ll be called with the hopeful outcome of a unil<'d gay Tnas. Council Coordinator Wayne ll ibhk poin ts oul, "\\e have so much more strength in urrily. The Council was formed hy four dedieated groups in the 1\letroplex, so Lhal ''herr the Courrcil speaks, il represents hundreds of \1elroplex gays. If something like llouslon should ever happen again, we have the strength to defend oun;e(ves against the lies of Llw homophobic world. Wouldn't il be great if the entire slate '~as united in this way·~" Gillis has announeed tha t the fcalur<'d speak<'rs for the conference will be Barbara Gillings an cl Dr. Franklin Kameny. Dr. l\.arneny is an astronomer and physi<•isl, with a Ph.D. from Harvard Lnivt'rsily. lie is also the founder and presid<'nl of the \1attachine Society of Washington, D.C. Barbara Gilli11gs is the renown('d Lesbian/feminist leader who is coordinator of the /\ nwrican Library \ssocialion's Task For<'c on Gay Libt'ralion. /\ ft•w of the proposed workshops for the Corrfer<'nce include: Dealing with Public Officials, Gays and the Law, Human Lih<'ralion, F<•minism, Religion and the llomo­st':' l.ual, fl('(aliom•hips, Gay Lilt'ralure, Gay Culture and Ilislory, Fund Raising, the ''kws \ledia and many more. The Council hopes to ha\e local professionals, civil right;; leacl<'rs and public officials partiripatt• in the workshops. In order lo protect some of th(' workshop leaders, they ''ill nol IH' announced until the Conference. "Tlw gay public leaders \\ill he announced ll<'forehand, of cour:;e, but we have a <·ommilnll'nl lo protect the non-gay and gay volunt<·crs who could place themselves irr j<•opardy by aiding us," Gillis pointed out. R<•gistralion for th<' Confl'rerH'<' has h('gun, fres h<•ing I 0 per pertiOn, or L 5 per <'oupl('. Th('re art' also a limitccl numlJ<'r of scholarship registrations available lo low irworn(' p<'rsons. Free housing will he available on a firs t-come, first-serve ba~is for pn·-n·gistrants who request it. For more information, write the Council's Fort Worth address, P.O. Box 73 18 , Forl Worth, TX 761 JI; or call (817) 838-2095 in Forl Worth or (2 1 ~) 71.2-L 94 7 in Dallas. (Registration Form ebewhere in this issue.) The Fort \\or lh/Dallas \klroplex Gay Council i:; made up of the Fort Worth and Dallas Chapters of LIH' Daughlt•rs of Bilitis; Fort Worth's \ R \and Friend of .l<'sus; and Dallas' Cirel<• of Friends. RETROSPECT Gays and B lu ecoats Get It Together by John Tiffany, Chairperson, Political tction Committee of 1l R t Wedne~day, .\larch 13, ''as LIH' da)' that \\a)'nc Ribble an cl I began for ,\LR\ what could be a long and beneficial dialog with the Fort \\orlh Police Department. \s \dvi~­er;.. of AURA, and on behalf of Llw Fort Worth Gay Com­munity, we met with the Deputy Chi<·f of Police, H.F. Hopkins, and then ,,;1h the Captain of the Vice quad, C. E. Hogue. The meetings \\ert• productive, and \LR\joins with Chi('{ Hopkins in his "hope that \le ha\e opened a channel of communication between Llw police and the gays of Fort \\orlh . ., • Chief Hopkins set the tenor for the cards-on-the-table discussion by stating that he didn't know ve­ry much about gays or queers - but that he didn't have any ad­verse feelings about them. As far as he was concerned, all hu­man beings deserve respect and the equal protection of the law; futhermore, he felt that the word "queer" was used out of habit and was not an epithet. It seem­ed to both of us that Chief Hop­kins is a man secure in himself who can realistically appreciate the problems of gays as related to the law, even if he cannot under­stand homosexuality per se. In the course of the discussion the topic turned to a film at one time used by the police academy in the training of rookies and (Continued on Page 7) LPRE'.\fE COURT RULE \G\.I STOR;\G W4Slll.VGTO.\ The Supreme Court handed doY.n a decision the week of April 7-13 which up­holds the Houston "disguise or­dinance" Y.hich bans transves­tism. The court, in upholding the ruling of a lower court, agreed y,;th arguments by the State of Texas that ordinances banning transvestism helped protect the survival of the race by banning homosexual guises. {l:.iiiror's Sore. Commwrin· Nell's was giren this story ;r press time. l\'e were 1111ab/e ro check into f11rrlrcr facts co11ccm­i11g it, except to 1wify tire srvn·. In tire next iss11e we will /rare~ mor<' Jt'taileJ arriclc.) Editorial By Ken Cyr, Director of AURA The following article was written by John Tiffany, chairperson of the Political Action Committee and an AURA Adviser. I felt it was quite appropriate and had a beautiful message. It is something that we all need to think about. ONE MAN'S OPINION GAY SOLIDARITY-FACT OR FICTION? by John Tiffany What happens when you hear that there will be a costume party May 1? Maybe your reaction is anticipation of the great moment when you can dress in all your finery for the admiring eyes of the other drags. Maybe it is ho-hum, big deal. Perhaps it may be an irritation that a bunch of queens who look like Phyllis Dillers are going to be rum­maging around in the bargain basement of the Salvation Army. Much the same type of responses are evoked at the sight of an especially macho guy in levis and boots. Some may call it cowboy drag and ask who that Auntie Tom is trying to fool. Or was he trying to pass for straight? All these snide comments point to a dichotomy of spirit which di­vides the Gay Community. Too many people advocate liberty and respect for alter­native lifestyles without really believing in these concepts. They are only chic platitudes to be mouthed in an effort to appear truly liberal. And what about the attitudes of Gay men toward our sisters? And vice versa? Sexism, intolerance and a lack of love and understanding are the barriers which hinder the formation of a sense of community and a Gay solidarity which could be a powerful force for all of us when dealing with non-gays. Think a­bout it! When was the last time that you ridiculed or other­wise denigrated a fellow Gay for not meeting your expecta­tions in some superficial area? It's not really an unsurmountable problem; all that is needed is an awareness that the problem exists and a will­ingness to put aside petty prejudices. Mistrust, misunder­standing and thoughtless derision are well enough left to ignorant "straights." We hardly need to oppress, ridicule, or hold in contempt any of our brothers or sisters what­ever their lifestyle. We can be proud, we can be beautiful, we can be together: for Gay is Good, Gay is Love. Think about it. The official views of A URA and this newspaper are ex­pressed in the editorial column above. Opinions express­ed in by lined columns, letters and cartoons, however, are those of the writers and artists and do not necessarily represent the opinions of A LBA or COHUl.'VlTY l\TEWS. Michael Walton- Charles Gi ll is· David Stevens John Ti ffa ny . Sp i ggot · · · Jay Alexander Staff .. Wayne Chairperson, Communications Committee of AURA Publication Coordinator . -Art Di rector . . -Photographer . Cultural Writer Amusements Writer Ribble, Ken Cyr , J immy Steele IT'S OFFICIAL-WE'RE NO LONGER SICK! WASHINGTON- The American Psychiatric Association has announced that a vote by mail of its membership has upheld the decision to remove homosexuality from the list of "mental disorders". The association said that 5,854, or 58 per cent, voted to back the board of trustee's redefinition; 3,810, or 37.8 per cent, voted to revert to the old listing; and 367, or 3.6 per cent ab­stained. About half the association's members took part in the nation­wide balloting. At its regular meeting, Dec . 15, the association's board ruled that homosexuality should no longer be listed as a mental disorder and urged that gay people be given the same civil rights protec­tion guaranteed other citizens. The board also replaced the homosexuality category with a new one-sexual orientation disturbance-which it said was "for indivi­duals whose sexual interests are directed primarily towards people of the same sex and who are either disturbed by, in conf l ict with, or wish to change their sex_ual orientation." "This diagnostic category is distinguished from homosexuality which, by itself, does not necessarily constitute a psych iatric disorder," the board said. The vote was prompted by a petition from about 200 dissenting psychiatrists. Publication of the name of any person, business or group in Community News should not be construed as any indication of the sexual pref erence of that person, business or group, or of their employees or members. ADVERTISING RATES are $1 per column inch. Want Ads are 5 cents per word. Community News is published monthly by AURA (Awareness, Unity and Resea rch Association), P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, TX 7611 1. SUBSCRIPTION RA TE is $3. 00 per year, mailed in plain envelope. LETTERS to the Editor of Com­munity News should be signed. However, name will be withheld upon request. All letters are sub­ject to editing to meet space re­quirements and to remove possi­bly libelous statements. Co" espondents and staff writers are needed, as well as artists, typ­ists and other workers, if Com­munity News is to thrive and be able to effectively serve the Gay Community. Won 't you help us. Write Mike Walton or Charles Gillis, P.O. Box 7318, Fort Worth, TX 76111, or call (817)838-2095. Page 2 TROY PERRY "}ou know, many times when we have our beach parties everybody cuts up u:ith me. I put 011 my bathing suit, I go run­ning out to get i11to the surf A11d they say, 'th, the pastor is going to practice walking on the water.' Well, I want to tell you some­thing. Thr l,ord literally helped me walk on the water this last week. A 11d that was the water of prejudice and the water of hate. lie didn't let me sink down. I didn't have to get down there with them! I held my head high, and I know everything is going to u•ork out. "I'm not afraid because I'm happy! I know that God's right there, and lie 's mak­ing me the happy perso11 that I am! lie 's making you happy. You've all got something to be happy about this momi11g. " - From a sermon by the Rev. Troy Perry 77ie accompanying article is edited by Ken Cyr with material from the Atlanta Barb and Rev. Perry's book, The Lord Is My Shepherd and He Knows I'm Gay. TROY PERR r is probably considered the mo~l dynamic of all gay lea<'··r~. The Re\. '.\1r. Perry \viii be in Dallas al pres,; lime, so in honor of his visit Community \ews' first monthly Profile will be about him. Rev. Troy Perry is the founder and Moderator of the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Com­munity Churches. Troy heard the call of God when he was 13; but it wasn't until 15 years later, when he heard the cry of his fel­low man, that his real ministry began. He was born July 27, 1940, in Tallahassee, Florida, to a couple that was to produce four more sons. Troy's father was a success­ful farmer, businessman and bootlegger, this last profession leading to his violent death in 1952. Mrs. Perry chose her second husband unwisely. The man drank heavily, mismanaged the family business, and beat the children, especially Troy. Troy rebelled by running off to live with relatives in South Georgia. His act gave his mother the strength to pack up the rest of the boys and start a new, inde­pendent life. It was in Georgia that Troy started preaching, inspired by his Aunt Bea. He lived with her for a lime in El Paso, Texas, and then returned home because of his mother's strong desire to keep the family together. Young Troy preached to Pentacostal, Church of God and Baptist con­gregations. It was a Baptist Church that licensed him to preach when he was I 5. To pur­sue his calling in the South, he followed the "unwritten law" and took a wife when he was I 8; they went to Chicago so he could enter Bible College. But Troy had been aware of ho­mosexual feelings within himself, even before he was old enough to understand them. Despite sever­al experiences as he was growing up, he hoped to sublimate his de­sires in marriage and his minis­try. He couldn't understand why God would have made him a ho­mosexual, yet called him to a profession where such people seemed out of place. While attending school in Chi­cago, Troy pastored a nearby Pentecostal church. But a for­mer lover, in a fit of jealousy, ex­posed him to the district over­seer; and Troy was ordered to re­turn immediately to Florida. There his work continued, and he was ordained. But Florida was conducting a "witch hunt" for homosexuals in t 961, and Rev. Perry walked under a heavy shadow. His wife had teamed a­bout him in Chicago, and stood by him; they had a son. His mo­ther also learned about his homo­sexuality, and came to accept it because she loved him. He returned to Chicago to fin­ish school. He took a day job with a plastics firm and attended Moody Bible Institute at night. The plastics company offered him a junior executive position at a new plant they were open­ing in Torrance, California, and he accepted. In California, the Church of God of Prophecy, a denomina­tion he had been attracted to in Chicago, gave Rev. Perry a con­gregation to pastor in Santa Ana. He preached the straight and nar­row, and practiced what he preached. But he felt vaguely un­fulfilled. He was 23. Like many gay people, Rev. Perry knew nothing about homo­sexuality except from his own experiences, and the negative at­titude society had drilled into him. Now he began reading a­bout the subject, and at last ac­cepted the fact that he was, in­deed, a homosexual. Though he and his wife still loved each other, and now had two sons, Rev. Perry felt that the only honest thing they could do would be to separate. She took the boys and returned to her family. At the same time, he was forced to resign his pas­torate. He moved to Huntington Park, where his mother was living with a new husband. Rev. Perry be­came acquainted with the Los Angeles gay scene, and formed a fast friendship with Willie Smith, who was to become music direc­tor of the church Troy was to found. No one but God had any ink­ling of this in 1965, when Rev. Perry was drafted. He had an ac­tive gay sex life in the Army, both stateside and in Germany, where he spent most of his two­year hitch. Back in L.A. he moved in with his friend, Willie Smith. A friend of Willie's introduced him to Ben, the young man who was to become his hrst real lover. Rev. Perry felt head over heels in love. But his love for Ben replaced his love for God~ and when their affair ended, six months later, Troy felt completely alone. He attempted suicide. His close brush with death brought him back to God, and his mission be­gan taking shape in his mind. If he was waiting for a "si~." it came in 1968 when a friend of his, Carlos, was arrested as part of a harassment campaign by the local police. After Rev. Perry had obtamed his release, Carlos was inconsolable; he felt that no one cared about him. "God cares," Troy said almost automatically. But Carlos, who had been told by the pastor of his church that he couldn't be both a homosex­ual and a Christian, wouldn't be­lieve it. "God doesn't care about me," he said. Rev. Perry realized then how many of his fellow gays felt the same way- he himself had had doubts; and he knew what he had to do. He took out an ad in the Ad­vocate, a national gay newspaper based in Los Angeles. announc­ing that the first service of the Metropolitan Community Church would be held October 6, 1968. Rev. Perry conducted the service m his living room, wearing bor­rowed vestments; I:! people at­tended. The church continued and grew. Doctrines had to be ecu­menical enough that no one, from whatever denominational background, would feel left out. And MCC could not exclude non­gays, for that would be to prac­tice in reverse the discrimination that had been used against gays for so long. After five years, the fellowship had expanded to more than 50 congregations, all over America and in other parts of the world. Rev. Perry stepped down from the pastorate of the L.A. church to become Moderator of the Board of Elders. And despite some setbacks­the fire bombings of church build­mgs in some cities- the MCC ministry has grown continually and phenomenally. Page 3 l\1ETROPOLITA~ COl\11\1 U ITY CllURCll Rev. Richard Vincent, Pastor I OF DALLA 31l:H Ross \H'nue 826-0291 (on leave of absence) Rev. David Carden, Acting Pastor Sunday Services 11 :00 a.m. & 7 30 p.m. Thursday Services: 8:00 p.m. "A OiristiOll Oiurch for all people in 01ristian Lo1•e" Community Semce Center Crisis Line and Gay Information Center, 826-2192, Monday Saturday, 7 p.m.- 11 p.m. SILENCE AND THE HOMOSEXUAL I 1Vas never quilt• certain that the lime would ever arise. \rtuall}, I never much thought of it, or if I did, I quickly argued the thought away. Why disturb pt•opl(''~ Unfortu­natt• as it is, l\e often enjoyed helping to realize tlw absurd idt>al, of ~liddlc .\merica for those \\ho helit•H•cl in them. Pt·r-;onally, I have never been abll' to live in tilt' soothing comfort of a clrf'am, much less ont• t'ncouraged h) tht• exist­ing socit'l}. 't et in a vicarious and soml'\\ hat pen erse st•nse, I have oftt·n t•njo}ed watching otllt'r' '<'<·mmgly n•wl in their '<latt•-supported fantasy, gleefully una1Vart• of its vacu­ity. l'io doubt. many of m) compatriob 11ill violently dis­avmv mt•, hut in 'Pile of all that has happ1•nt•d, in spilt• of all that could happen, I can still find mr<·lf slyly squt•rzing mpt•lf into the ideal and often manelli11g at ho\\ well I can do it. l\e ahvays lovrd the feeling of belonging, espt'cially whrn I knew I actually didn't belong at all. This was no excep· lion. Rugs thick on the floor of a home adequalt'ly, y<'l taslelt>s.•ly, decorated, a color lf'levision brightly shining, surround1·d by boys and girls doing and being 1vhat tlwy n•,pel'livel) ',hould'. \\ho am I to 1lisrupl sud1 t•t·,tas} 11ht•n silt•nct· or, al mo,.;l, incons1•qw•ntial untruths would sa\t' a floundering dream from unsuspectt·d inundation. Yt'l I have a(,o loved belonginl!: to the gay underworld. I find it an e'l.citinl!: and wonderful experirnl't'. \nd so the qut•stion,.; of personal truth, personal integrit}. and se(f. 1•,lt·t·m inevitably arise. They, too, art• easy to dismiss. \\hy go proclaiming that you are homosnual vvht•n lwtcro­,, e ... uals do not announce thrir personal sc'l.uality. And fan­tasies rontinue! We outgrow many things. Happily, cow­arcli(' e and naivete are sometimes among them. Both were somt•1vhat diminished 1vhcn I finally rl'alizt•d that silt•11re about ont•'s ,;e,uality i~ a tacit assertion that it is sp('cific­ally lwtero,t•'l.uality. If a person be homo,e'l.ual, he there­by contributes to the de~truction of his vt•ry existe11ce. Pt•ople tt•nd to cli,.;count the importante of Lhe linguistil' n•ality in our daily li1es. I am rem111dr1l of a pa"agt· in lorw-t'o \ ab,urdist pla)', The Bald ''ioprano, \\ lwn• tlwre is a di-nr--ion about the impossihilit} of di,tingui,hing llw p1·opl1· \vith the same name when tlwy 1vt•re s1•t•n lo!!:Plher. \ 1vorcl can be t'Vt'r)' thing. Oftt'n, nothing 1•lst• "ill 1)0. • upt·rfiriall). we need look no further than th<' marriage ml\ for proof of thi,. But on an t•lusi\t•ly drepn ll'vt'I, an t''l.flt'rit•nct• ran he "ilfrd into practical no111•'1.isl('111·e if it is not v1·rbalizecl, if it is deprived of linguistic reality. This oft1·n opt'rate' consciousl) for tht' i1N111t• an1l larg<'ly un­co1N ·iousl)' for the rest of us. llo" many homost''l.Uals haw thu, bern silrnct'd into )('ss than full reality by tlwir familit•, ("\\ e kno1v he i.\ but M' don't talk about it; it's ea-ier for us all that \\a).") Tlw ti mt' mtbl come \\hrn IH' must make an is,ut• out of somPllring that people go to suth lenl!:ths not to makt• an i--ut• of. If thrre is going to be silenn•, \\e 1wuld wi,h that it ht' an lionr. t silt•ncc. But thr silenct• prevalent in many of our farnilit•s i, inherently penerse and d(',lrut'live. It is a silenre that cries out to he somt'lhing t•lst•, a frrtilr bn·1·1l­ing ground for rreudian slips. ,\t any rat<\ it is not a sil­enrt• that refrains from verhali:i:ation for fear of owrslating tht' obvious. It is a silence that "ishes tlw all too ohvious would di,appl'ar from the earth. by Timothy Habick The only acceptable type of silence would come from a person who fully realizes and accepts the possibility of a variety or continuum of se'l.ualitit·~. For such a pnson, people are approached more as sexual being" than as specif ically homosexual or lwll'rose'l.ual beings. I le rt'ali..:1•s that such fragmentation of st''l.uality places a limit on whom ont• may love or have a speeial relationship with. lie n•j1·cls tlw schizoid s<•xuality of modt'rn socit'ly as a ust'lt•ss and ndar­ious abstraction. Sexuality is thcrt•fore certainly not a11 is..ue with him. nfortunately, of course, peopl<' with ~uch an aquarian­likc t•xpanded consciousnt•ss art• hard to find. Indeed, tlw modern worltl is teeming with p1·oplt' whost• sile11c<' is op­pressive and mm.t b1• broken and destroyed. I am st•nsitive to the ideals of disc rt'lion in socit'ly. I have no innate desire to outrage my associates. Y t'l I say that they must i111lee1l lw rep1·atedly outraged. \lrrle Milin, in the afterword of his t''l.ct'llt'nt 1•ssay, "On Being Diffrrenl," arrivt'd at th1· ultimate t•xplanation of the situatio11 that tlw responsiblt• homos1·xual is in: ,\young homost''l.ual fri1·nd rt•ct•nll) saitl, "It's no serret that you, that Ollt', has such-and-such color hair, is )t'a high, \\eil!:hs thus and so. and so 011, hut whrn ) ou kt•ep ont• part of yourself secret, that be­comes the most important part of you." I have many frit'nds (even a couple of enemies, I'm happy to add). \lost art• homost•'l.ual, but quite a few have lwt­rrosexual l<'1Hlt•nc1t•s: I low them all more than they sus­pcet. But sooner or later in a perso11\ life, he muol ask a few ultimate question~. For tlw homosexual, these must in­clude a recognition of his personal sexuality, the st't'rt'livt• and therdor(' most important part of his being. Ill' must lsk wlwtlwr his friends would ht' outraged hy his sl'xualily and, if so, wlwtlwr they any longn dest•rve to be his friends. lie mw.,t he n•ady to lost• frit>1Hb and possibly makt• 1'11t·· mic>. Whom. aftt·r all, an· IH' fooling'( But most impor· lantly. ran w1• afford dis,t•mhlance in such crucial mattt•rs, matters that afft·c·t the very es.-encc of our e'l.istt•rl('('. or cour,1·, in the art'a of 1·mploym1·nt, some "discrt'lion" may ;;till lw n•quirl'cl for somt·; compassion may he in order for thosP fc\v unstablt· individuals 1vho~r mental !'>tahility could not withstand the sho<·k. But as a general rull', wt• musl remember that <'v<•ry simulation of hclcroscxuality opeaks for a condemnation of homosexuality, that rvery rvasio11 proclaims thal w1• have something about which to he ashamed, that every chance not takt•n to tlisplay our righ l lo be homo,.;t>xtial, every situation not ronfronted, is a tra­gic los~ to tht' dnelopm1·nt of a more accPptable socit'ly. We must outragr, therefore, until our S1·xuality can 110 longer occasion outrage; we must proclaim that w<' an· homosc'l.ual until M ' find our,whes heralding somt'lhing that really no long<'r matter,; we must "comt• out" with the world until th<'rt• is nothing left lo come out of. Sil­ence must at last he broken, and 1v<' must begin with our­~ ehe-. for tlw homt>-t'xtral\ l>1vn silt'nce is his worst t•11t·my. The exp1·rit•nc·<· t'Ould indel'd prov<' a frightrni11g ont• ; c·our­age will ht• at a prt'rnium. But, with \lerle \lillt'r, I kt•i·p forgetting, an cl J musn 't, the basic decency of most pt'opl<'. Page 4 Top Names Support New York Gays On Rights Bill NEW YORK- Former U.S. Attor­~~~~ yj ney General Ramsey Clark, for- 1 mer New York Mayor Robert =:<:.....x• Wagner and feminist Gloria Stei­nam were among the many nota­ble public figures who agreed to testify April 18 in support of the miiii~;il New York City Council's gay ~~~;'I rights bill, which was to come up -~-"•=• for an unprecedented fifth vote ,....,. ... "'""""- in the General Welfare Commit­DALLA D.O.B. JOINS WOMEN'S COALITION DALLAS A new member of the Dallas Women's Coalition, as of March 8, is the Dallas Chapter of the Daughters of Bili tis. The group was voted into the coalition after a statement was presented by Suzanne Wat­ers and Chris McKee on behalf of the D.O.B. explaining what the D.O.B. is, what they are doing, why they wished to join the Coalition, what they could contribute and what they hoped to achieve by joining. Other member organizations include the National Organiza· tion for Women, Women's E­quality Action League, the League of Women Voters, the Unitarian Universalist Women's Alliance, the American Associa­tion of University Women, the Dallas Women's Political Cau­cus and Women for Change. TROUBLED? FREE COUNSELING By Licensed Psychologist Who Understands Your Special Pro blems Call 4 78-5838 A Commu11ity Service of AGAPE 1.C.C. Lesbian Resource Center Opens DALLAS On Saturday, April 13, the Daughters of Bilitis held an open house for their new Les­bian Resource Center at 4612 Victor. The Center will serve as a Les­bian Information Center, will house the D.O.B. Library, and will operate a Crisis Intervention Line. For more information, write or call D.0.B. at P.O. Box 5944, Dallas, TX 75222; (214) 742-1947. tee immediately following the hearings. The bill, entitled Intro 2, would amend New York City's Omni­bus Civil Rights Act to include "sexual orientation" along with "race, color, creed, national ori­gin, ancestry, sex or physical han­dicap" as attributes which may not be used as a basis for discrim­ination in employment, housing and public accomoda tions. It was introduced into the I 974 City Council by 20 co-sponsors (22 votes are needed in the full Council for passage) as replace­ment for an identical bill, Intro 4 7 5, which was introduced in January 1971 but failed to win a committee majority. Since Intro 475 was defeated, ten U.S. cities have passed simi­lar measures into law. The cities are: San Francisco, Washington (DC), Detroit, Seattle, Berkeley, Columbus, Boulder, Minneapol­is, East Lansing (Michigan) and Ann Arbor (Michigan). Others who have agreed to tes-tify, at the invitation of the Gen· eral Welfare Committee Chair· woman Aileen Ryan and at the behest of New York's gay organ­izations are, Aryeh Neier, execu­tive director of the American Civil Liberties Union; Wilma Scott Heida, president of the National Organization for Wo­men; Florence Kennedy, Field Co-ordinator of the National Black Feminist Organization; Margaret Sloane, chairwoman of the National Black Feminist Or­ganization; Rabbi Balfour Brick­ner of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations; Dr. John Spiegal, president-elect of the A-merican Psychiatric Associa lion; Robert Morganthau, former Uni­ted States Attorney; and also five members of the New York May­or's cabinet. In addition to parents of gay citizens and gays who have been victims of discrimination, testi· mony will also be heard from spokespeople for the New York City gay community, including Dr. Howard Brown, former Health Commissioner and Chair­man of the National Gay Task Force; Father Robert E. Carter of Dignity, a national organiza· tion of gay Roman Catholics; E. Carrington Boggan of the Gay Le­gal Caucus; Jean O'Leary and Ginny Vida of Lesbian Feminist Liberation ; and Pete Fisher and Marty Robinson of the Gay Acti­vist Alliance of New York City. VD and the Healthy Homosexual If you have nol yet contracted YD, the odds are lhal you will in the future. This conclusion is based on the grnerall} promis­cuous sexual patterns of male gays, the sus­ceptibility of the human organism lo the un­usually virulent VD grrms, the failure of some lo recognize lhal they have become infected, and the delay of others in seeking lrealmenl. The most common question by gays a­bout VD are: How do you gel it? What are the symptoms? Where can you go for treatment? Whal is the general procedure al the doctor's office? Let's consider each of these in turn. Except in rare instance , the only way a person can be infected '~ilh VD is through sexual contact; il is nol spread by toilet seats, door handles, drinking fountains, or eating utensils. The germs that cause VD die rather quickly when exposed to oxygen in the atmosphere and live for the long term only in the moist warmth of the body. However, normal hygeine will not de troy the germs; nor will il deter the lransmi ion of these germs lo another. Anyone can gel it, there i no immunity developed so you can acquire il repeatedly, and you may nev­er know you have bren exposed or infected. The lwo most common infrclion that fall into the catchall of veneral disease are gonorrhea, also known as GC or clap, and syphillis. Gonorrhea in the male i usually evinced by an uncontrollable disrhaqi;c of pus and a burning sensa tion upon urination. This presumes the site of the infection is the urethra of the penis. If the infection should occur in some other mucous mem­brane such as the inside of the eHlid, the mouth or throat, or the rrclum, 'thr y mp­lom might be itching or there might br no symptoms at all. The early ymplon of syphillis is a pain­less sore called a chancre which appear· where the germ en lered the body. The chancre usually appears within len lo ninety days after exposure and will disappear with or without lreal rnrnl. ince the sore is painle and may nol be visible if il i in the mouth or rectum, a person may pro­gress to the secondary stage of the disease and be completely oblivious of the problem. The secondary stage of the disease is u~ually marked by a rash on any part of the body, hair falling oul in tufts, a ore throat, or se­vere headaches. As in the ca e of GC, there may be no symptoms whatever. ince in Texa a minor may he treated for VD without paren tal consent, tlw que;;­tion of source of lrealnienl is best left lo the individual. If you hav(' a family doctor and are on good terms, then by all means consult wi th him. lf you don't have a par­ticu lar doctor in mind, or you had rather not discuss you sex life with him, then your best bet is the Public lleallh , en icr. There are some poin ts especially in favor of the public health approach. Fir:;l of all, the C'l.aminalion and ln•almenl are free. eeondly, you will be dealing "ith people who handle these ca.ses as part of their daily routine. They will not be :;hocked, inquisili\e, nor "ill they moralizr or at­tempt lo embarrass you. And, if you go to a prirnlc physician, he mu:;l by law re­port the case lo lhr public health people -so you will probably wind up talking to them anyway. Some people hesitate lo go lo the pub­lic health sen ice because they haveheard horror slorie:; about the treatment, about being a:;ked rude questions and being em­barra:; sed "hen they determine you are gay. \ll lhis i garbage. These people ha\e heller things lo do than embarrass you or pry in lo your pri\ale affairs be­yond the point of gelling information that \\ill help them to check lhr spread of this diseru-e, which is no\v al epidemic proportions among gay peoplr. Your per:;onal life is really none of their con­cern. The Fort Worth facility is localed al 1800 University Dri\e; and the Dallas lo­cation is 1936 melia l. , hould you elect to go lo either office. some infor­mation about the proce~s might remove any qualms you may haH': about it. First, of course, they will ask for ) our name and addre s. This is confidential and cannot be relrased lo anyone. It is used only lo contact you in the e\ent the tests indicate you need lrealmenl. (If you should le l positive, or at any other time, you still have the option of going lo a private phy~ician for treatment.) In a few minutes a technician will call you in for an e:>.amination and a short inter­view and medical hi ·tory. \ t this time, for your own good, lell lhem you are gay. The reason is lhal they will need lo run some lesb that they might not other­wise do. If these le ts are neglected, you could blill ha\ r VD and not ha\e it dis­covered "hen il is easiest lo cu re \\ilh a fe,, shob of a broad spectrum antibiotic such as penicillin or tetracycline. Remember that anyone can acquire the infection and nol be aware of it At pre­sent some authorities estimate there are at least one million persons who are in­fected and are unknowingly in feeling o­thers. For your own health':; sake and because of your resporn;ibilily lo those you lo\e, ha\e a checkup. Failure lo do o could contribute lo the already epi­demic occurrence of \ D in the gay com­munity and could, if nol treated, cause you lo de\elop arthritis, or blindne •, or even cause drath. Do } ourself and tho:;e you trick ''ilh a favor and ha\e a cht>ck­up. Plea.~<'! A Nole to gay \\Omen: Plea,e don't re­gard this as a se'l.isl \ie\\. The ,.iluation is simply that gay guy:; contribute more lo the YD problem than ''omen. Be· cause of the anatomic aspects of love­making bel\\een \\Omen, it i, most un­likely that transfer of the germ would oc­cur. llowever, lhi~ does nol give blanket insurance that you will not be infected and not Imo" it. 1n fact, women almost nner ha\e any symptoms. It':; good ~rist• lo ha\e a clwckup. It could literal­ly be \\Orth your life. Page 5 • • THAT'S ENTERTAINMENT • • • • • • • • • • • • • THE GREAT GATSBY Eastern critics panned it un­mercifully. Well, those who can get into good movies do. Those who can't write sick reviews a­bout them. The Great Gatsby is a great movie by any standard. In all probability, America is on its way to being "Gatsbyized." The movie is such a blockbuster that it may just change America's lifestyle overnight. No doubt little girls will get dolls for Christ­mas that show their thighs and drink gin. Unquestionably one of the most coveted parts for women this year, the ephemeral Daisy 1s played by Mia Farrow, who got the prize hands down after a string of lovlies had put in their bids. Ali McGraw, who first landed the Daisy role, allegedly as a wed­ding present from her husband, Bob Evans, president of Para­mount, withdrew when her mar­riage broke up. Both Barbara Streisand and Candice Bergen were candidates for the roll. Tuesday Weld turned down a re­quest to do a screen test, and Faye Dunaway is said to have taken four hours, with the aid of her own makeup men and hair­dressers, to get ready for the min­utes- long test. All failed to beat out Mia. Paramount bills the clawing and scratching for the roll oppo­site Robert Redford as "the most famous footrace among actresses for a role since the competition in 1939 for Scarlett O'Hara in Gone With the Wind. " Far on the other end of the spectrum in the varying psyches of womankind is Mame Dennis. No fainting butterfly this lady! Like Gatsby, Mame is a film of no small expense about a period of life in America when deca­dence was a way of life for many. Mame's Beekman Place town­house is a multi-floored study in Art Deco with gold-filagreed front doors on loan from the Queen Mary and a $9000 glass piano made to order. Unlike the clamoring about Daisy, Warners felt no one other than the illustrious Lucille Ball could play the fiery Mame. But the company had to wait, willing they say, until she was satisfied with the script. After she gave her final blessing, production was halted for another year while she recovered from a ski-broken leg. by Jay Alexander The all-star 20th Century Fox production of Alexander Dumas' classic, The Three Musketeers, has some notable personalities indeed. Those who have written off Raquel Welch as an actress should take another look at her as a comedienne since she is tru­ly funny in her efforts to escape the amorous attempts of her se­nile husband, to aid the queen and to properly appreciate the attentions of D'Artagnan, played by Michael York. Faye Duna­way is cast as Milady, a schem­ing courtesan enlisted by Card­inal Richelieu (Chari ton Heston) in his plot to entrap the queen in her love affair with Lord Buck­ingham (Siman Ward). If that's not enough stars in one whack for you, other nota­bles in the film include Oliver Reed, Richard Chamberlain, Frank Finlay and Christopher Lee. Some ill feelings apparently erupted among some of the more notables in the film after they saw a screening and discovered to their dismay that a lot of scenes they shot were missing. It seems they all agreed to work for a set number of weeks at a certain fee for something called "the project," which turned out to be more than one film. Per­haps this was why the filmmak­ers were already boasting of a sequel during the closing credits of the first film. FW/D Theatre: The Boys in the Band opened April 17 for four weeks (Theatre Three, Dallas). Sunday in New York with Sal Mineo now thru May 5 (Windmill Dinner Theatre, Dallas). Butterflies Are Free, May 30 - June 8 (Scott Theatre, Fort Worth). A world premier, Jack Ruby, The All-American Boy, April 23 May 25 (Kalita Humphrey Theatre, Dallas The­atre Center). Fuse, an original script, April 9 27 (Down Cen­ter Stage, Dallas Theatre Center). Boeing, Boeing, Boeing with Van Johnson opened April 2 for six weeks (Country Dinner Play­house, Dallas). The Owl and the Pussycat with Sue Ane Langdon, April 16 thru May 19 (Granny's Dinner Playhouse , Dallas). Fid­dler on the Roof opens May 20 for two weeks (Casa Manana Mu­sicals, Fort Worth). Conference on Mental Health Oppression To Be Held ANN ARBOR- A National Con­ference on Gay People and Men­tal Health Oppression is to be held here May 4-7. The confer­ence is set to coincide with the national convention of the A­merican Psychiatric Association in Detroit. Organizers of the Ann Arbor conference express­ed the view that this should not be "just another Gay Confer­ence" but one with a specific focus (mental health oppression) and a possible target (the APA). The Conference will not be limited merely to mental health concerns, however. It will in­clude creative workshops, films, dance, music, theatre and speak­ers. There will be separate work­shops for both women and men. Workshop topics include gay people and mental health, local mental health institutions, gay media, the politics of drag, gene­tic theories of gayness, lesbians over 30, and racism among gays. For a more detailed schedule of the Gay Conference in Ann Arbor, write to Spring Confer­ence Committee, 1933 Brock Ct., Ann Arbor, Ml 48104, or call (313) 769-4186. FEEDBACK Our Readers Write Dear Folks: I was pleased to see the publi­cation of the Community News in this area and feel that it will be a great asset to the cause of civil liberties not only to the gay people of this area but to the liberation of the entire commun­ity. We need to be liberated not only from archaic, inhumane conceptions about what it means to be homo sapiens, but we need also to be liberated to an inte­grated, intelligent conceptions of what it would be like to be homo humanus. Congratulations and best wishes, Tony Lunati . . . Hi, I think your newspaper is get­ting off to a good start. Keep up the good work. J.P. Fort Worth MCC-llOUSTON OBTAINS BUILDING HOUSTON At I p.m. on March 31, 35 people gathered in a for­mer store for the candlelight dedication service of the Metro­politan Community Church of Houston's new home. Rev. Rob­ert Falls, pastor of MCC- Okla­homa City, officiated the service assisted by Rev. David Carden, acting pastor of MCC- Dallas. Also present at the service was Bob Miller, an exhorter of the Dallas church, who "has done considerable work with the Houston group in the past to help it get started," according to the Channel, publication of the MCC· Dallas. MCC Houston extends a cor­dial invitation to residents and visitors to attend one of their services in their new sanctuary at 2020 Waugl1 every Sunday at I p.m. Desperately Needed: We've been without a refrigerator since Sep­tember and summer is coming. llow about your old frig for $25. Call or write Robin, c/o .. --------... --------·AURA. PATH TO HUMANISM by Jamie Jamison "I was born a woman and nothing l wear, or do for a liv­ing, or say in terms of four letter words is going lo change lhal. I will nol allow you lo define me, because I know what I am," said Ann Davis. Ann J. Davis, American Minorities Instructor and his­torian, spoke to members and guests of the Dallas Daugh­ters of Bili tis al the Women For Change office March 15. Ms. Davis' topic wab "lluman Liberation," a revolution­ary issue which encompasses many different areas. "When we talk about human liberalion, we're talking about every­one being free lo be themselves and at the same time iden­tifying with the humanity that is in all of us." Ann pointed oul, "Just like racism was used by the pow­er slruclure to keep poor whiles and blacks apart in the South; lo keep poor whiles from identifying with black causes; the same thing is being done lo women. They're using the issue of lesbianism as an allempl lo keep us apart. Ms. Davis described lo the women how she became inter­ested in human liberation and related ome of her past experiences with ethnic and racial minority peopl e. Shar­ing her interpretation of the causation of minority oppres­sion, she said, "The basic hang-up in this country is a sex­ual one." She quoted Gene Liggcll in saying, "The word 'homosexual' shouldn't even be a noun. IL should be a verb that describes some bedroom behavior." Ann has often slated that she likes lo slay "street hon­est," meaning that she allempts lo slay in Louch and keep aware of minority happenings. "I think that for lesbian and straight women, we musl not be afraid lo reach across lines and lry lo reach each other .. .. we can learn from each other." Reprinted with permission from THE MONTHLY DOB'R, publica­tion of the Dallas Daughters of Bili tis. Don't waste it! We can use it! Your old newspapers, aluminum cans, magazines, coke bottles, etc., can help support the Gay movement in this area. For pick up, call (817) 838-2095. CHIU SUPPER-BINGO PARTY Saturday, April 27, 1974 2800 Purington (In First Unitarian Church ) 3/person SS/couple Chili/ Brans/Salad/ Brl'r Door Prizes- Bingo Prizes COME AND BRING YOUR YOUR FRIENDS! (Sponsored by Ft. Worth Daughters of Bilitis and AURA. Proceeds to go to the FW/D Metroplex Gay Council for the Texas Gay Confer· once, Juno 21 ·23, in Fort Worth.I Page 6 MCC FOLLIES: Best Show In Town Look oul Casa Manana and Slate Fair l\1usicals; you now have competition. Anyone who was al the Encore in Dallas on Saturday night, April 21, would have to agree that the besl show in the Melroplex is The J1CC Follies: Tears and Laughter performed by the Melropoli­lan Community Church of Dallas Thespians. This reviewer went expecting (although pre-show publicity staled "no drag") lo see, if nol a drag show, then al least a lot of pantomime. I had decided not even to lake notes when they began lhe pre-show music which consisted of revival-type church music. You would ex­pect church music not lo go over loo well in a bar, wouldn't you? Well, if you weren't there, believe me, the audience loved it! MCC-Dallas has a gold mine in its pianist and organi l. I leaned back as the lights dimmed (well, turned off would be more like il), reached for my drink as the chorus came in, and then almost broke my lover's leg trying to gel to my pen and paper realizing lhal this was nol going lo be jusl another "bar show." Here, before a packed audience, were 30 men and women, gay and non-gays, performing the openi11g number which was "Willkomme" from Cabaret. For a few seconds the party al my table thought the Cabaret 1\1.C. was pantomiming. IL finally hit us that it wa hi own voice, the chorus's own voices, and all 30 of them were slaying together in the dance! The chorus then wcnl in lo the "Money Song" from Cabaret, and again, they were all together. A truly good number. The whole show made a mosl fan Laslie evening, especially the numbers, "Real Live Girl," "Maybe This Time," and "Sadie Sadist," done lo the lune of "Sadie, Sadie." "The Ilallclujah Chorus" spoof and the "Fal Ballet" succeeded in forcing a belly laugh from even the "bitch­iest queens." The honored guests for the evening could nol be left out of the show as they made Troy Perry, founder and Moderator of the Universal Fellowship of l\1etropolitan Community Churches, an honorary fairy by presenting him \vilh a magic wand. (What's with the honorary bit? l thought he was a dues-paying member!) Rev. Robert Falls, district coordinator of the South Central District of the UF'\1CC, was made Bishop of Fairyland, at which he remarked, "I wish you had given me the wand; mine hasn't been working loo well lately." The high light of the evening was lhe song, "We're having so much fun because we're Gay," sung Lo the lune of "Mame." Bul then a more seriou ·cord was truck toward lhe end of the show when Gay People's dreams were expressed in "Tomorrow Belongs to Me." All the people connected with the show, especially the directors, de erve the highe l amount of praise! The MCC Thespians will do a repeat performance al the Encore on April 26 and have been invited lo appear al The Bayou Landing soon. The Thespians will also appear in Oklahoma City (dale not yet set) and in Fort Worth on June 22 al the Texas Gay Conference. The proceeds of the shows go to help \ICC's mini try. -Ken Cyr Join us at the TEXAS GAY CONFERENCE JUNE 21 - 2 3, 1974 Fo rt Worth, Texas FEATURED SPEAKERS TO BE ATIONAL GAY LEADERS Ms. Barbara Gittings, coordinator of the American Library Association's Task Force on Gay Liberation Dr. Franklin Kameny, founder and president of the Mattachine Society of Washington, D.C. LECTURl.:S/WORKS/JOPS/SOCJAL ACTJVITIES/ENTERTAJNMENT/IDEA EXCHANGES _ Please send me more information about the Texas Gay Conference. Enclosed is$ _ _ check or money order for registration for the Texas Gay Conference. ($10 per person or $15 per couple make payable to Texas Gay Conference) Name ----------------- Telephone------ Mailing Address City/State/Zip Please try to find free housing for me during the Conference. __f/eose consider this my application for one of the "registration scholarships. " I am not financially able to pay the registration fee. Mail w Texas Gay Conference P.O. Box 7318 GAYS & BLUECOATS (Continued from Page1) vice officers. The film dealt with techniques of handling people in­dulging in public sex, and was considered by some to be offen­sive to the gay population in gen­eral. Although Chief Hopkins in­troduced the use of the film in his capacity as director of train­ing, he discontinued its use when the California courts ruled that these procedures amounted to entrapment. The cases which were begun using the tactics of the film were dropped and were not prosecuted. We applaud the discontinuance of this film and of those questionable handling techniques. And we further com· mend Chief Hopkins for his can­dor in admitting the error, espe­cially to us. We believe he was expressing personal as well as of­ficial policy in stating that "the management of the police de­partment will not discriminate against the gay people of Fort Worth." The door of communication may well be opening; the distinct possibility exists that a panel of responsible gays will be invited to address the police rookies, pos­sibly as early as May. This inter­change would be geared to give the police trainees a chance to see gay people as they really are, to ask probing questions, to in­terchange ideas, and in the pro­cess to dispell myths and preju­dices that may exist. The out· come could be an awareness of gay people as decent human be­ings rather than depraved rnisfi ts. (Editor's Note: Recent com· munications from A URA indi· cate that these panels will not take place. A URA has announ­ced, however, that dialog is con· tinuing and an effort is being made by the Police Department to educate their rookies about the gay people of Fort Worth.) Although it is against police policy to give written comment on the law, Chief Hopkins did say that his personal feelings were that the activities of "gays were their own business as long as they did not violate the law." Titis comment came in response to a request for a written clafifi. ca ti on of the law in regard to such non-sexual acts as holding hands, kissing, and dancing in public places. Again, though he could not officially comment, he agrees that such behavior is not illegal and indeed is protected by the law as freedom of expression. In other words, AURA feels that you need not fear holding the hand of your lover while shop­ping in Leonards, you need not stop dancing when the police come by for ID checks in the bar and you need not draw back when tempted to kiss a friend goodbye at the airport. Hold your head high and experience Gay Pride! {Editor's .Vote: We quote a Po­lice Department Inter-Office Co"espondence dated April 2 and delivered to Community News April 8: "Jn order to eliminate the pos· ibility of confusing personal opin· ion with the official department policy, the following statement is authorized to be used in the Gay Community News Publica­tion. "The Policy of the Fort Worth Police Department is and will continue to be to enforce the law as it regards Sectio11 21.06 and 21.07 of the Texas Penal Code. "Members of the department will not harass or violate the rights of any citizen. "Signed: 11.F. Hopkins Deputy Chief of Police Inspection & Intelligence Bureau" Section 21.06 refers to deviant sexual conduct, Olld Section 21. 07 refers to public lewdness.) At the conclusion of this meet­ing, Chief Hopkins suggested that we meet with the officer in charge of the vice squad, and we did so. As we were ushered in to meet with Captain Hogue, he did not seem too delighted to sec us. This was an altogether normal re­sponse from a man whose daily routine involves handling homo­sexuals and closet cases who have run afoul of the law. While he was at all times polite, he seemed to be trying excessively to be for­mal and continuously referred to copies of the penal code and lo­cal ordinances to substantiate and clarify his position. The ice was finally broken when Wayne manuevered the conversation around to a more responsive personal level, the out­come of which was an admission by Capt. Hogue that he probably would not hire an otherwise qua!· ified gay person to work closely with him. When the inequity and injustice of this position be· came apparent, Capt. Hogue was man enough to say that his was a prejudiced view and that he had never really considered the situation in that light. Since time was pressing, we had to terminate the conversa­tion at this point, but we left with the impression that Capt. Hogue was a thoroughly profes­sional officer and an honorable man who makes an honest effort to follow the law that he must enforce. The talk may have ser­ved to increase awareness and dispel apprehension of all parties. We hope so. {l.:ilitor's \'ote: This was the first meeti11g between the Police Department and A URA. Already other meetings hove occured and others are planned. Community \'ews will be keeping you infonn­ed as bulletins are released by ALRA.) Page 7 CONFERENCE TO EXAMINE GAY CULTURE OLYUPIA (Washingtvn, The Evergreen State College Gay Resource Center is organizing a laboratory/festival, "Cluldren of the Seven­ties," on Gay People and Culture. The three-~ay conference will be held at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington, May 16-18. The goal of the laboratory/festival is to provi~e Gay People on the Pacific Coast an opportunity to explore the history and develop· mental aspects of a culture in the process of self-discovery. G_ay People are more than aware that today's society has systematt~ally robbed them of personal identity, as well as knowledge of their cultural contributions. Gays have had little opportunity to define and control the development of their culture. The Conference will provide the facilities and the resources for a Laboratory that may set some directions and provide a framwork for ex ploying the artistic and educational needs of Gay People. Ga_y People are defining Gay Culture as those artistic and intellectual pursuits that Gays are developing about themselves. The Conference program will provide a variety of workshops, speake and cultural events. The featured Conference guests will include Kate Millet, author of Sexual Politics, Winston Leland, editor of Gay Sun· shine, Charlie Chiverly, editor of Fag Rag, and Jill Johnston, author of Lesbian Nation. People interested in attending the Conference, please contact: The. Gay Resource Center, CAB 305, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Waslungton 98505, (206) 866-6544. WASHINGTON-ARE YOU LISTENING? I am not an adwcate for frequent changes 111 lau·s and constilutwns. Rut lau·s and constitutions mu.~l go hand in hand uilh the progress of the human mind, as that become.~ more dereloped, more enlightened. ,h new d1.~rovrries are made, new truths discovered, and manners and opinions change u·ith lhr. change of cirwmstances, institutions must adrnnce also to heep pace with the limes. JJ e mi{!.ht as 1ull require a man to wear still the coat 1d1ich fitted him u-/1en a boy as cil"ilized society to remain er:er under thr regimen of their barbarous ancestors. -Thomas Jeffet"son CO\tE \~D JOI'\1 US! An Active and Growing Organization Dedicated to You • Publishers of Community News • Political Action meeting every Monday night • Party third Saturday of each month • Rap Sessions second and fourth Fridays • Library and Reference Materials • Working for a Gay Community Center by 1975 Dedicated to Awareness, Unity and Research the Awareness, Unitv and Research Association cordially inV1tes you to join one of the most active and fastest growing Gay organizations in Texas. S S/yr. - Associate (non-voting) SIO/yr. - Active Membership includes subscription to Community News and all other publications of AURA, including the AURA Newsletter. Not a put-on or just another fly-by-night Gay Lib Group, but an active Gay Civil Rights/ ervice Or· ganization. Call 838- 2095 for more information. AWARE E WON'T YOU HELP U ? UNITY and RE EARCH A OCIATION P.O. Box 7318 Fort Worth , Texas 76 111 (A member organlZation of the FW/D 'detroplex Gay Council) In an effort for humor, and to raise money for the forthcoming Texas Gay Conference, the Dallas Daughters of Bil it is, the Dallas chapter of a national Lesbian/feminist organization, has challeng­ed AURA, Fort Worth's gay civil rights organization, to a game of touch football. The football game is one of the many fund raising projects of the newly-created Fort Worth/Dallas Metroplex Gay Coun­cil, a coal it ion of regional gay groups. All proceeds collected at the game will be donated to the FW/D Gay Council to be used for the Texas Gay Conference to be held in Fort Worth June 21-23. Representatives from all parts of the state are expected for the weekend of workshops, lectures and general fun. The football game has humourously been named (no offense meant) the "F 1 am i ng Faggots vs. the Di ese 1 Dykes F ru i tbowl." The game will be played in Dallas on May 12 at 3:30 in the afternoon. For further information call AURA in Fort Worth at 838-2095 or in Dal­las, the Daughters of Bil it is at 742-1947. FW/D METROPLEX GAY COUNCIL ~~~ Member Organizations: Daughters of Bilitis P.O. Box 1564 Fort Worth, Texas 76101 (817) 824-8598 AURA P.O. Box 7318 Fort Worth, Texas 76111 (817) 838-2095 Daughters of Bilitis P.O. Box 5944 Dallas, Texas 75222 (214) 742-1947 Circle of Friends 3834 Ross Avenue Dallas, Texas 75204 Friends of Jesus P.O. Box 7367 Fort Worth, Texas 76111 (817) 838-9564 "Lnited in Purpose" FLASH! NOTICE! We sincerely hope that you receive this month's issue of COMMUNITY NEWS . Al­though the paper's first edi· tion last month was printed by PRINTING CENTER, 210 Jones Street (332-7931; Dal­las line, 261-7136), when the copy layout was brought in this month, manager Herb Chapman refused to accept the job saying, "We don't have to print it," and "We don't have to give you a rea· son why." Asked why it was printed last month, Mr. Chap­man replied that it was a mis­take. Brothers, Sisters and friends who do business with printers in this are. - please don't forget this incident when you next have a print· ing job. Discrimination is very hard to prove, but DOL­LARS TALK! YOU ANO THE POt/CE Compliments of The Greater Fort Worth Chapter Texas Civil Liberties Union P.O. Box 11587 Fort Worth, Texas 76109 All people have the same rights when they are stopped or a"ested by the police, whether they are guilty or innocent of a crime. IF YOU ARE STOPPED BY THE POLICE: I. You do not have to answer any questions except your name and your address. 2. If you are in your car, you should get out, close the door and move away from the car. The policeman may ask to see your driver's license. 3. The policeman may search you for weapons by patting the out­side of your clothing. 4. If the policeman asks to search your car, you may tell him you do not want him to search your car, but do not try to stop him ifhe does. 5. Under no circumstances should you argue with, fight or run away from a policeman, even if you are innocent. IF A POLICEMAN COMES TO YOUR HOUSE: I. Your home is your castle. 2. If you see a policeman coming to your house, you should step outside and shut the door and talk to him outside. Even if the po­liceman asks, you do not have to let him in your house. 3. If he has a search warrant for your house you must let him in, but tell him he does not have your permission to search your house. 4. If he does not have a warrant and comes into your house anyway, tell him that you do not give him permission to search your house, but do not try to stop him. IF YOU ARE ARRESTED: 1. As soon as you are arrested, ask for a lawyer. 2. If you are charged with a crime for which you can go to jail, you have the right to a lawyer. lfyou cannot pay for a lawyer, you have the right to a free lawyer. 3. Do not say anything or sign anything until your lawyer comes. 4. You will be taken before a judge. He will tell you your rights and what you are charged with. You can ask him for a free lawyer. He will set your bail. 5. You have the right to get out of jail by paying a bail bond. If you cannot afford bail and the crime is not serious, you may ask the judge to let you out with the promise that you will come to court for your trial. 6. Police must give you a receipt for any belongings they take from you at the jail. IF POLICE BREAK THE LAW: 1. If police hit you or call you ugly names, you can protect your rights by filing a complaint. Do not argue, fight or run away. You may be seriously hurt or even killed. 2. You can complain to the police department itself, to the Com· munity Relations Commission, to the Greater Fort Worth Civil Lib­erties Union, and in some instances to the FBI and the Jusllce De­partment. If you think your constitutional rights have been violated, you can get help in filing your complaint by calling the CiVll Liberties Union at 534-2422.
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