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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1980
File 012
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Connections, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1980 - File 012. 1980-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2324/show/2318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1980-06). Connections, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1980 - File 012. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2324/show/2318

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Connections, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1980 - File 012, 1980-06, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2324/show/2318.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Connections, Vol. 2, No. 6, June 1980
Contributor
  • Olinger, James K.
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date June 1980
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962584
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript 'CONNECTIONS' '11 PROTEST FOLLOWS 1 "GAY POWER-GAY POLITICS" IGNA—Howls of protest, followed by the filing of official complaints with the National News Council, greeted the recent CBS television documentary "Gay Power, Gay Politics." The program, purported to examine the effect of homosexuals on the recent Mayoral election in San Francisco. It proved to be a call for heterosexuals across the nation to be on guard against gay liberation goals in their communities. The National Gay Task Force, Mayor Dianne Fein- stein and Supervisor Harry Britt of San Francisco and many others, have prepared statements that condemn the program. It is felt that CBS News failed to meet reasonable standards of accuracy and fairness for broadcast journalism. Further, the producers are being accused of misrepresentation, distortion, and sensationalism. Chief among the complaints are the use of two children as witness to "public sex" in the heavily wooded Buena Vista Park in San Francisco and the showing of S&M paraphernalia in a deceptive and shocking way, capitalizing on ignorance and fear of the subject and equating S&M with the results of gay political power. It is also claimed certain scenes were edited to make events seem to have occurred simultaneously when they did not. The juxtaposition of eccentricly dressed people (during Halloween celebrations) with discussions of serious gay grievances resulted in a manipulation of the facts which could only lead viewers to false conclusions about gay life. AUSTIN RESPONDS TO "GAY POWER, GAY POLITICS" "Gay Power, Gay Politics" was as much of a shock in Austin as it was nationally. Austin activists were quick to respond to this attack on the lesbian/gay community. The CONNECTIONS staff was finishing pasting up the May 1980 edition when the program came on. After watching it, a hasty, indignant review was written and-inserted at the last minute. The Austin Lesbian/Gay Political Caucus and Austin Lambda Cultural Center immediately initiated letter- writing campaigns against the CBS News production. Austin Lambda Cultural also showed a video tape of the program on Saturday, May 31. The Lesbian/Gay Caucus of the Travis County Democratic convention reported that repercussions of this homophobic "documentary" have already been felt. At the Travis County Democratic convention, the majority of objections to the introduction of a lesbian/gay rights plank in the party platform were based on fears generated partly by "Gay Power, Gay Politics." THANKS The Austin Country, along with the New Apartment Lounge, began advertising in GAY AUSTIN in that paper's first year, 1976. The Country, the Apartment and MCCA are the only organizations which have placed display advertisements in all seven issues of CONNECTIONS. Their faithful financial support have made Austin's own lesbian/gay news magazine possible. Without them, CONNECTIONS simply would not exist. The management and staff of the Austin Country care about the readers of our paper, and they care about our lesbian/gay community as a whole. The National Gay Task Force condemned the program as causing "damage to the cause of civil rights and human dignity for the nation's lesbian and gay citizens and a further erosion of public confidence in the media's ability to accurately and fairly report the truth." The program has brought up important questions about the way information is conveyed to the public. If the press is untrustworthy, where can a factfinding citizen turn for information? In a live panel discussion that followed the showing of the documentary (broadcast only in the San Francisco area, not nationally) some of the major participants in the program met face-to-face with producers George Crile and Grace Diekhaus. A furious debate ensued. Cleve Jones, who was the man chosen as the focus of the program, said that he felt betrayed by the producers. Armistead Maupin, author of Tales of the City, said he was surprised that producer Crile had spent so much of the show pointing out and deploring gay back-room sex when Crile himself had told Maupin that he envied the sexual freedom of gays, because he felt hemmed in by his marriage. Gwenn Craig, a black lesbian, asked why almost nothing about lesbians appeared in the program. The producers said they had decided to leave lesbians out because they couldn't find anything controversial about them.
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