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Gay Austin, September 1977
File 014
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Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 014. 1977-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-09). Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 014. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 014, 1977-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, September 1977
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date September 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript agpafagettsBgegsiraaiaciri^TrrTrTr-n-'Mria aesggg-n-ir-ff-n-io }INT: I am not saying that men's attitudes are unimportant. Even in Argentina with all it women lawyers, men often castigate women's complaints as "hysteria." The double standard exists, but since birth control, much, much less. Women were given the vote in 1947, but that does not mean that political life is automatically improved. After all, rnny, many women support that type of conservatism to the right of Ronald Reagon. The problem is more than sex, it embraces whole classes. But what you're saying ultimately is that women's rights is not really an issue in South America or Argentina. It is an issue, an important issue, but at the present moment it is not the fundamental issue. But certainly sexism plays a part in all this. It is men who say to women everytime they demand equality, that women's rights is not the fundamental issue. By saying that women must" wait until everything else is improved, women will never have equal rights. Sexism must be fought alongside other issues. I do not deny that the double standard must go. Or that attitudes must change. But remember that reality in the United States is not the same as that in South America. I ask you: if tomorrow women suddenly had equality with men, which women? The women living in vast slums worrying whether their small income will cover another weeks meals? The women who disappear and appear again in interrogation camps? Or women like me who have cultural resources and food, who support our maid and her niece far better than most maids are provided for? Women's rights may address the different methods of "interrogation" meted out to the different sexes, but it falls short of addressing to the more fundamental issues facing our society. 3«J=»a«awaawa5=s«saja53EtaEi5as=!aE^ Has your lesbianism changed your view of society? ANA: What do you mean? INT: Has the fact that you are a lesbian in a rejecting society altered your view of society? I knew I was different from other people. The name attached to it was ugly. But I knew after that experience with the older woman, that the life of pursuing men was not mine. I began to learn what I would have to do to hide the fact of my difference from others. If I did not tell the truth I was safe, and I began to acquire a reputation of not being entirely honest. Because I learned that people judge you by appearances, and you may fool them for a while, but eventuall they find out the truth. I was hardly a saint and I did make some mistakes. But those other people, who were they? They did not matter to me, except in so far as what they thought of me. I kept my life a secret from nearly every person I met. I acquired boyfriends, but I absolutely hated having to do this. In all this I had one friend who I confided to, and she never told anyone else. She knew everything about me, and she never told anyone else except her family. It was a personal preoccupation. I was not like everyone e. else, and perhaps that influenced my view of society. But under that tension, that worry, I did not involve myself with people. The last year I stopped having boyfriends. Everyone thought, especially the professors, that I was a serious student, always studying in the library. My grades improved. Oh I was such a student! But when she and I took trips to Brazil and Chile and Peru, that was my joy! The scenery was wonderful! Oh the lakes! The mountains! Oh everything was absolutely wonderful! She had a boyfriend. When we were together nothing mattered. I thought that I would love her for the rest of our life, because that was the important thing. KafoHwnHuu -U-U^U-U-B3S3S2 ■mui-iuuojiaag 13
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