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Gay Austin, September 1977
File 013
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Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 013. 1977-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-09). Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 013. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 013, 1977-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, September 1977
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date September 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript ' INT: Is there a Women's Liberation movement in Argentina? Is there any kind of interaction between it and lesbians involved in the movement? ANA: You must understand. The only women I ever met whose feelings were mine was an older woman when I was 17. She had a reputation for seducing boys and girls. Depend on it, she was not a nice woman. After that one experience I needed to love her but I never saw her again. Lesbianism is not an issue in Argentina because it does not exist. It is a monstrosity that only degenerates practice. A person caught acquires a reputation that separates her from the others, except from her closest friend. Here in the United States television and the newspapers speak of it. In my country, hardly a word. Here you can find a bar. But there is no place, and if there were, the police would shut it down immediately. The progressive people speak of it as a sickness. As for the women's movement: to be liberated means something else in Argentina. Personal qualities and talent are qualities which separate some women from others. Most women still fulfill their duties, their traditional tasks inside the home, regardless of their profession outside. Men still determine the roles. Directing the house affairs is still a woman's art. INT: You mean, liberated women? ANA: To be liberated means to go to the University, to become a lawyer, a professional. There are exceptions, very few exceptions, but to be liberated is shown by your clothes, the car you personally drive. So there is no women's movement in Argentina? Not properly speaking. Argentina is the most progressive in South America. But the issue has not been defined in the way I see it defined here. Its goals are limited by a strong tradition. Women do not see themselves as a minority or oppressed group. They see themselves as individuals within a class. Do you agree with that or not? S&41^3l4WS=g3Eg3ggg5i^^ ST Whether I agree or not is unimportant. There in Argentina you see another reality than what you see here. More important, much more important, than whether you are woman or man, is what your name is and your class. The lower class, the working class, is by internal standards, relatively poor. The economic situation has improved the past two years. At one time our country was considered to be the next emerging superpower. But no more. The bottom class will, never be anything more than what it is today without a revolution. Much of the middle class can advance only so far, even with an education. My fai.iily belongs to the professional strata within the upper middle class. We are not rich nor powerful, but we are more comfortable than most. Beyond that, the cntre- peneurs, the "aristocracy." A thousand things separate classes in Argentina. The way your pronounce words indicates immediately to another person your class standing. There are other differences, numerous. But being a member of a particular class means you will be treated as such. You cannot escape from your class. You will be there for life, though in some cases, if you are talented, you can separate yourself more or jj less from the class of your birth. But even then i you will be remembered for having come from a- nother class. And it will be those above you who determine your status. But you *nu3t remember that history makes different things of different nations. The United States has a different reality because it had different circumstances. As economic conditions improve women's status within classes will be better. So the women's movement is uninportarit? No, I do not say that. But in South America, much more than Argentina, extreme disparities of wealth united with the fundamental fact of underdevelopment outweights women's rights. Poverty means something entirely different in South America. It means that you do not eat, th^t you and your children live in a one- room shack, that your children probably suffer permanent brain damage as a result of insistent malnutrition. It means absolutely no health care, since public hsalth clinics in many countries are considered socialistic. And it means, inevitably, violence, repression, and military domination of all political life. =catatse=£5ar3S= 12
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