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Gay Austin, September 1977
File 004
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Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 004. 1977-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1977-09). Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 004. Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2291

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Gay Austin, September 1977 - File 004, 1977-09, Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/gcam/item/2306/show/2291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Gay Austin, September 1977
Publisher Gay Community Services
Date September 1977
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
Place
  • Austin, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 5962538
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM) Digital Archive
Rights No Copyright - United States
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Being gang-raped in a prison cell. . .caught in the middle of Watts as it burns. . .pummelled by a hurricane. . .stomped by a New York City street gang . . .the Ramones were playing at the Armadillo. Bastille Day, 1977, and the place was only three- quarters full. The crowd was made up partially of dedicated punk-rockers, but mostly of old-line rock fans. We stood on our feet throughout the Ramones set— they sat. The Ramones (in case you haven't heard) play LOUD, HARD, AND FAST . Ever since their debut album, Ramones, came out last year, they've been upsetting/exciting rockers all over the world. And they did it all over again, this time in Austin. Could the place which gave birth to "progressive" country and adored Bruce Springsteen accept the New York punk gospel? Apparently not. The Ramones played two short sets, and an encore, and we left the hall feeling beaten and mugged. We loved it; most the rest of the crowd didn't. The sound mix buried the vocals during the first set, so that only the punk-fans had any idea as to the content of the songs. Hell, they even repeated four songs (the new single, "Sheena Is a Punk Rocker," "California Sun," "Blitzkrieg Bop" and "Pinhead"), and most of the stoned-out hippies didn't notice. The music, with its high amplification and minimal variation, does not seduce— w x € Ramones fcg^# it rapes. None of the songs run more than three minutes; most last about two; but several are performed in a row, without any break. The sonic rape goes on without pause. The lyrics are about sex, dope, ultra-violence, sex, and death. The group's pose accents the menace of the songs—Joey, the singer, with his fish-like deadpan stare, wrapped around his microphone like a leather- jacketed praying mantis; Dee Dee, the bassist, looking like an escapee from juvenile detention, counting down songs like a drill sargeant; Johnny the guitarist, apparently in the initial stage of psychotic rage, stalking to the edge of the stage; Tommy the drummer, bashing away at a primitive kit, oblivious to the fucking audience. Look at the song titles: GIMME GIMME SHOCK TREATMENT NOW I WANNA SNIFF SOME GLUE YOU'RE GONNA KILL THAT GIRL BEAT ON THE BRAT CHAIN SAW 53rd & 3rd The last is about a psycho hustler who uses a razor blade on his client—not exactly what you hear on KNOW or those other crummy rock stations. We stumbled out the Armadillo feeling assaulted. Talking to people after the concert, every one agreed as to the one- word description—"assault." Yeah, ASSAULT. That's the key, the essence of late- seventies punk-rock: violence , aggression, and sex. Punk is only one facet of the New Wave in rock music, which is currently sweeping Great Britian and New York, but it's the violent part, the sensational part, the part you read about in Time and Newsweek. It's obvious that the "Establishment"—including the rock critics of Rolling Stone and the Austin American- Statesman—don't understand the new music. It has its own esthetic and its own objectives—it is music as catharsis. It takes the anger and alienation of life today, distills it into music, and allays it, even-if only temporarily. The Ramones (and New Wave groups generally) are attracting a large gay audience. Some bands got their start in gay S&M bars. The music articulates the rage and frustration of out-groups generally, whether they're gays or unemployed toughts, and screws it. The Ramones are often compared with the Beatles, a group which catalyzed a new way of approaching popular music. Only time will tell whether they are a passing phase or a permanent feature defacing/making our new landscape. But surely their fans in Australia will remember them: after having told they were to be banned, the Ramones stripped naked on the stage and assaulted their audience with their beating selves. The audience, needless to say, loved them.
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